35 Burst results for "Andrew Miller"

Bandits, Not Boko Haram, Responsible for Latest Kidnappings in Nigeria

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:07 min | 3 months ago

Bandits, Not Boko Haram, Responsible for Latest Kidnappings in Nigeria

"And welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew miller on join first of all from a by the journalist chico oduor who has followed the story of nigeria's kidnappings since the boko haram raid on jabbar festival out into this program. Is this spate of attacks on schools. There has been in the last few days in wake some lodge some small some successful some not. In the general scheme of things how common have attacks on schools like this. Become in nigeria. They've become shockingly common to be honest. it's almost at the point. where were the nigerian. Public is feeling fatigue. And that's really scary. Because dis should be front burning stories but sometimes you get people not even wanting to even know the details because we've heard this before so the attack that happened. This past monday was actually the fourth that happened since december and then last year there are several attacks and what we're seeing of course is that these attackers are no longer really affiliated with the boko haram islamist movement. It's now just bandits. Criminals are looking for money and this has become a very very lucrative business. To be honest money is being funneled to rescue these hostages. And that's what's keeping this thing going. I mean from between june. Two thousand eleven march last year at least eighteen million dollars was paid to kidnappers as ransom. So for example in kara with three hundred. Schoolboys kidnapped this past december. We learned that some of the parents started to negotiate with the kidnappers. The boys when they were abducted and taken to the forest of northern nigeria. That's cat seen a state in the northeast. So the kidnapped boys. They started to make contact with their parents. You know with their cell phones and so they're talking to their parents and they're saying bring this amount of money in order for us to be freed so the parents started trying to find ways to do that dropping bags off here and there at designated points so in that case we did see parents collecting money fundraising amongst themselves. Also we're seeing professional gauche kind of coming to the fore and this especially we see with boko haram related kidnappings. So that's how we're saying that we're seeing this in the form of the parents themselves. So it was so desperate raising money for their children and also professional shooters because this is a huge market business. That has come forth win. Stories like this. Get reported beyond nigeria. Obviously the media tends to frame them in the context of boko haram because everybody thinks back to that huge kidnapping of two hundred and seventy six goals from sheberghan in bona state. Many of whom still haven't been found again but if this is now more just you're straight up and down ransom seeking banditry. Do we know if there is any overlap between the bandit gangs and boko haram. Is there any possibility that these bandit gangs are being used as fundraising proxies if you will you know again. I think the pentagon where the kidnapping takes place. Those possibilities do exist for example. The one that happened in december with three hundred. Schoolboys boko haram responsibility. But i'm of the belief that it was not boko haram and what's happening in that part of nigeria. There's been a lot of artistic gold mining and so some people feel that that industry which is a very murky industry extraction of gold is somehow contributing to the rise and kidnappings in northeastern nigeria. Sorry northwestern nigeria which is where it happened in december but casino which is where. We saw the kidnappings in the past. Few days is not part of that. So we haven't really seen much bokram activity in kaduna. In the past few years to be honest do a has been a hotbed of just bandits. Guys who literally take up residence in the forest and for the past five years. We've been seeing these kidnappers first of all attacking motorist going from the buddha kaduna expressway. That's been their operation for the past four years. So if you're trying to go up to do now which is a two hour journey. A journey from asia. You could get kidnapped. But now they've gone and started targeting children but it's the same group of people and they have no bocom affiliation at all to be honest so they went from kidnapping motorist and they target sometimes. The huge lorries of passengers coach buses. That take people back and forth. They could also target taxes that tend to be carrying more well to do nigerians. But now they've realized that kidnapping children it's more

Nigeria Chico Oduor Andrew Miller Sheberghan Kara Boko Haram Pentagon Kaduna Asia
Nigeria kidnappings: What is Boko Haram?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Nigeria kidnappings: What is Boko Haram?

"In almost any country the armed abduction of a single child from its school would be a huge story a crime as rare as it is cruel in nigeria. In recent years the armed kidnapping of entire classrooms has become wretchedly commonplace and recent weeks have seen a further significant uptick of kidnap raids own schools by motorcycle mountain bandits. Dozens of children and several teachers have been taken. Some returned some not the tactic of large-scale school abductions was made infamous by boko haram the islamist militia. Which has spent much of this century menacing northeast. Nigeria in two thousand and fourteen boko haram generated global headlines with the kidnapping of two hundred and seventy six schoolgirls in tabuk in bona state. Many are still missing. It is not clear if any direct role boko haram has played in these most recent kidnappings. It is clear that nigeria has a serious problem. But how does nigeria solve it. Is this crime or terrorism over both and is the remedy policing or counter insurgency. This is the foreign desk. But now they've realized that kidnapping children it's more lucrative. That's literally what this is about. Just where does the money comes from. It really shows you how desperate nigerians have become just to make money the economy ever. Since buhari came into power. It's really gone. Downhill and people are taking desperate measures to make ends meet in fact in the northwest especially. Now it's extremely concerning as the groups have multiplied in terms of numbers. They've grown in terms of strength that mean the jihadist groups are trying to make inroads so we could have a more difficult situation in the northwest. But that doesn't seem to be many a sense of urgency about dealing with these. There is a certain amount of violence. That's involved here. It's it's a form of war not not peacekeeping but that violence has to be located in a broader political strategy of achieving reconciliation. And unless you have that strategy in place more violence almost always just makes things worse rather than better and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew miller on join first of all from a by the journalist chico oduor who has followed the story of nigeria's kidnappings since the boko haram raid on jabbar festival out into this program. Is this spate of attacks on schools. There has been in the last few days in wake some lodge some small some successful some not. In the general scheme of things how common have attacks on schools like this. Become in nigeria. They've become shockingly common to be honest. it's almost at the point. where were the nigerian. Public is feeling fatigue. And that's really scary. Because dis should be front burning stories but sometimes you get people not even wanting to even know the details because we've heard this before so the attack that happened. This past monday was actually the fourth that happened since december and then last year there are several attacks and what we're seeing of course is that these attackers are no longer really affiliated with the boko haram islamist movement. It's now just bandits. Criminals are looking for money and this has become a very very lucrative business. To be honest money is being funneled to rescue these hostages. And that's what's keeping this thing going. I mean from between june. Two thousand eleven march last year at least eighteen million dollars was paid to kidnappers as ransom. So for example in kara with three hundred. Schoolboys kidnapped this past december. We learned that some of the parents started to negotiate with the kidnappers. The boys when they were abducted and taken to the forest of northern nigeria. That's cat seen a state in the northeast. So the kidnapped boys. They started to make contact with their parents. You know with their cell phones and so they're talking to their parents and they're saying bring this amount of money in order for us to be freed so the parents started trying to find ways to do that dropping bags off here and there at designated points so in that case we did see parents collecting money fundraising amongst themselves. Also we're seeing professional gauche kind of coming to the fore and this especially we see with boko haram related kidnappings. So that's how we're saying that we're seeing this in the form of the parents themselves. So it was so desperate raising money for their children and also professional shooters because this is a huge market business. That has come forth

Nigeria Boko Haram Tabuk Buhari Chico Oduor Andrew Miller Kara
Is something shifting in Russia?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:48 min | 4 months ago

Is something shifting in Russia?

"It is no small thing for a russian citizen to challenge russia's government prominent critics risk of exile imprisonment own murder. Everyone else takes their chances with the tender mercies of russia's riot police but the challenges keep coming in recent weeks in particular. Large protests have been inspired by the latest persecutions of opposition figurehead alexei navalny. He's attempted assassination via poisoned underwear. He's medical evacuation to germany his return to russia and removal to a penal colony. This week navalny has been back in the dock in moscow on arcane charges of insulting a war veteran as is usually the case in such circumstances the very absurdity of the accusation is part of the lesson being taught which is that the powers that be can come for anybody for any reason this weekend. More protests are nevertheless scheduled a significant number of russians appear to have reached a perilous point for any authoritarian regime that of being passed caring about the consequences of dissent. These are not the first protests against president vladimir putin. But are they different. Are we on the verge of something seismic shifting in russia. This is the foreign desk. We have reached a point of no return and they felt that taken to the street was the only way to express their unhappiness with how things are going not just with aleksey navales jailing but also with the kremlin's foreign policy and declining living standards and declining incomes because this is not a genuine democracy. That doesn't mean that anything will change. Imminently the security forces at present a loyal the risks in coming out against the regime are just so vastly greater than anything to be gained but we are talking about the slow shabby decline rather than i would suggest at the moment. Any kind of dramatic cracking. It's only bolts the struggle between modernization and archaic way of life and put is a symbol of this archaic understanding of the universe and as we see as a socialist demonstrates that new generations are supporting navan the or not simply in the violence but he's way of understanding of the world. Hello and welcome to the foreign desk. I'm andrew miller on joint. First of all by natalya vasilyeva moscow correspondent for the daily telegraph natalia. First of all. Let's talk about this weekend. As i understand at the weather forecast is very very very much not encouraging for large-scale public protests. So what actually is planned. Hi andrew thank you for having me. Yes we're in the middle of a massive snowstorm bought. It's supposed to be over by sunday lunchtime. Which is when the protests are planned. The main opposition protests. This weekend's will be a sunday. Flash mob as the organizers called it they're asking on russians to come out of the houses and to stand yards for something as little as ten minutes and flash the torch on their phones. There's also going to be a couple of smaller. I would think rallies on sunday afternoon including a solas chain by women who want to express their support for the wife of alexey navalny. But that's pretty much all we have at the moment but you know i should also say that the two weekends of protests were also held pretty adverse weather conditions. As is you know it was cold and snowy so. I shouldn't think that the weather should be in the way on sunday. And it's not hard to discern the strategic thinking behind these decentralized protests. You can't very well send out riot. Police against people standing in their own front yards all over a city. The size of moscow wilson petersburg or any other russian city in fact. So do we have any idea how the authorities are likely to react to a protest of this sort. Well it's interesting that you ask because we did hear statements from the police and even prosecutors warning people against showing up for something that does not constitute a public assembly let alone a illegal public assembly. Obviously i don't expect right police to show up at every person's front door but if we see any source of flash mobs around town any gatherings and on central locations i think that might be a police response but i definitely don't expect anything as big violent as we saw two weeks ago. What's been your sense over. The past few weeks of where people are finding against the reserves of courage to participate in any demonstration against the russian state. Because it's not a small undertaking. Everybody who makes any kind of protesting. Russia will be aware of the risk. They are taking. What is it about this moment. That has led so many people to be able to get past that fear. It's interesting because when i interviewed people at the two rallies. I went to at the end of january. A lot of people i met were first-time protesters who had never been at any sort of political rallies. Even at the time when take into to the street didn't entail any physical or legal risks. A lot of those people told me that they have reached a point of no return and felt that take into the street was the only way to express their unhappiness with how things are

Russia Alexei Navalny Navalny President Vladimir Putin Moscow Natalya Vasilyeva Aleksey Alexey Navalny Kremlin Andrew Miller Germany Daily Telegraph Natalia Andrew Petersburg Wilson
Foreign reaction to the "disgraceful scenes" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC

Monocle 24: The Curator

05:29 min | 5 months ago

Foreign reaction to the "disgraceful scenes" at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, DC

"In washington dc transfixed. The world prompting horror interleaved with an amount of bleak humor in countries which the us are sold to lecture on the democratic proprieties. Jonah russia and turkey were among those struggling to keep straight faces as they shoot. Solemn statements hoping that due process would be observed is might be tempting even vacantly reassuring to believe that trump's last two weeks good north. The united states image abroad any worse than the previous four years already had bus. Is this in fact. A new low four states addition of the briefing andrew miller was joined by louis lucas former. Us diplomats now senior partner with seeing global advisors to take a close. Look if you've been watching yesterday's events from one of those embassies would it have felt it would have been terribly embarrassing. You know as you said we we like to go around the world and tell countries that they should strive for a more open and free democracy and democratic system of government and to see the kind of violence and destruction that we have always condemned overseas happening in the cradle of democracy in washington dc in the capitol building itself. Egged on by the president would be incredibly embarrassing awkward for a us diplomat overseas. Do you worry that this is something that is going to. Linger pass january twentieth. Will this have a lasting impact on the united states ability to project itself as a guarantor exemplar of democracy abroad. I think it'll be a long before. The united states can issue for example. A statement of condemnation because a foreign leader doesn't accept election results. Without having that country's snicker in return. I think we like to tell the rest of the world of to abide by free and fair elections and we have a president now. Who's not doing that. And i think eventually we will regain the moral high ground. But i think donald trump and the last four years and certainly the last two weeks and still two weeks to go has caused immense damage. I mean are you able to reassure yourself. At least the world does perhaps regard president trump as an aberration. It was notable yesterday in the statements from various world leaders. That even some of those who had been broadly sympathetic. Boris johnson here in the uk. Benyamin netanyahu and israel both used the wood disgraceful right. We'll donald trump's got less than two weeks left office or whether you're boris johnson. Or benjamin netanyahu or some of these republican leaders in washington dc. They're all suddenly finding backbone and sort of moral certitude condemned donald trump when. He's basically on his way out the door. I would question for all those people including the ones in washington the politicians you know. Where was that sense of morality and two years ago three years ago when donald trump was well down this path already as we were just discussing a struggle now seems imminent full the soul of the republican party between what remains i guess of its traditional stoller decor and the sort of insurgent yahoo wing which has taken over in the last four years but is going to be a concern overseas that they might be more where this came from. I mean it is not inconceivable that a republican president could be elected for years from now it might even be donald trump again. Well on yes Let's hope not but it is certainly conceivable. The republican would be elected president for years in the skull so conceivable by the way that the republicans would retake control of the house and the senate in two years so that that's not very far away so i think if you're an oversees observer if you're a diplomat in washington and want to maintain contacts with the relevant political parties in the united states. You certainly don't discount the republicans at this point and you don't discount what you called the nut wing element of the republican party. Because i think that trump base will remain there are seventy one million. Americans voted for donald trump. You know the the notion that suddenly because of yesterday mitch. Mcconnell on the leaders of the party be rediscovered by partisanship and cooperation. I think is a bit of a fantasy. They will do everything they can for the next two years to thwart joe biden's agenda and try to set themselves up for taking control in the house and the senate two years from now just quickly. If we're trying to be optimistic about this. Is that perhaps anything to the idea that there was something usefully humbling in yesterday's nonsense in the might at laced stop. Us correspondents and commentators from referring to yesterday's events as many of them did like it was something you would expect to see. In colombia or lebanon. Mark they actually be able to understand that no. This can't happen here. Indeed is maybe i'm not. I think we have a tendency to have a bit of a short memory and a sort of lack of ability to be introspective. So i think hopefully yesterday was a one off. It won't happen again. But the fact is that donald trump has stoked this sort of fear and hatred for four years now in his. He's built up a lot of resentment amongst his base against the establishment against democrats. And i think it's not going to go away overnight. Louis lucas there in conversation with an earlier this week

Donald Trump United States Louis Lucas Benjamin Netanyahu Boris Johnson Washington Dc Andrew Miller Washington Capitol Building DC Turkey Russia Republican Party Senate Israel UK Yahoo Mcconnell Mitch
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

02:43 min | 5 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"The <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <hes> <Silence> <hes> <Speech_Male> anything to promote other <Speech_Male> than what i <SpeakerChange> said at the top. <Speech_Male> Is there anything you want <Speech_Telephony_Male> to promote. Just <hes> <Speech_Telephony_Male> just <Speech_Telephony_Male> working away on my <Speech_Telephony_Male> textbook and <Speech_Telephony_Male> trying <SpeakerChange> finish <Speech_Telephony_Male> it <Speech_Male> do you. Do you want to hear <Speech_Male> me and this show <Speech_Male> or do you want me to hang <Speech_Male> up on you say <Speech_Male> goodbye. And then i'll do my <Silence> traditional <SpeakerChange> ending. <Speech_Male> I'll leave it <Speech_Telephony_Male> up to you. They <Speech_Telephony_Male> said in princess bride <Speech_Telephony_Male> as you wish the <Speech_Telephony_Male> funny one thing i will <Speech_Telephony_Male> say though is <Speech_Telephony_Male> I got to <Speech_Telephony_Male> when i started <Speech_Telephony_Male> doing this book on. hbo. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I <Speech_Telephony_Male> couldn't wait to <Speech_Telephony_Male> talk about the birth <Speech_Telephony_Male> of hbo sports <Speech_Telephony_Male> and little bit. I <Speech_Telephony_Male> know at the time. Well <Speech_Telephony_Male> i kind of had a feeling. <Speech_Telephony_Male> But now i get <Speech_Telephony_Male> the chronicle the death <Speech_Telephony_Male> of hbo sports <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> That's <Speech_Telephony_Male> <hes> <Speech_Male> still. They're still doing <Speech_Male> some stuff that you <Speech_Male> know. They got dot coming <Speech_Male> out with tiger woods and <Speech_Male> they're still doing other stuff but yes <Speech_Male> it's not. I mean compare. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Yeah <Speech_Male> compared to <Speech_Male> the heyday <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Male> boxing. <Speech_Male> But they didn't even replace <Speech_Telephony_Male> peter nelson. <Speech_Male> I mean <Speech_Music_Male> you know <SpeakerChange> put <Speech_Male> forth in it. <Speech_Male> Well good <Speech_Male> good. Good <Speech_Music_Male> luck in that <Speech_Music_Male> In that pursuit that's <Speech_Music_Male> going to be an interesting book <Speech_Music_Male> your your book on. Hbo <Speech_Male> our jim <Speech_Music_Male> miller is the. <Speech_Music_Male> He's the host of the <Speech_Music_Male> arches podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> He's the best new york <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> times bestselling author <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on many <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> books and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> he's frequent <Speech_Music_Male> guest at podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> will always appreciate his <Speech_Music_Male> jamila. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank you very much for joining <Speech_Music_Male> me today in the sports <Speech_Music_Male> media pockets. Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> so much <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all right <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> back in the studio. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> My thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> James <Speech_Music_Male> andrew miller as <Speech_Music_Male> always for his time <Speech_Music_Male> coming on <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks to obviously <Speech_Music_Male> everybody. Kate <Speech_Music_Male> is thirteen from <Speech_Music_Male> Patrick <Speech_Music_Male> show on to. <Speech_Music_Male> Chris corcoran <Speech_Music_Male> and spencer brown. <Speech_Music_Male> And john mcdermott <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Mount an easy one <Speech_Music_Male> to do today just obviously <Speech_Music_Male> given everything <Speech_Music_Male> that's going on in the states <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> stopped <Speech_Music_Male> to watch in <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> a m- always in american <Speech_Music_Male> no matter where i live <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> thinking about the people <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the united states. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You guys listening. Stay <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> safe <Speech_Music_Male> Previous episodes <Speech_Music_Male> feel <Speech_Music_Male> like this kind of conversation. <Speech_Music_Male> Rene <Speech_Music_Male> and chalise <Speech_Music_Male> manzi young. Were <Speech_Music_Male> my last <Speech_Music_Male> Podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> rene of course <Speech_Music_Male> For eight <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> years worked in. Wwe's <Speech_Music_Male> renee young. <Speech_Music_Male> She's <SpeakerChange> always awesome. <Speech_Music_Male> Talk to <Speech_Music_Male> we caught up <Speech_Music_Male> what she's doing prior <Speech_Music_Male> to that. Jimmy traina <Speech_Music_Male> posted the sports <Speech_Music_Male> illustrated media <Speech_Music_Male> podcast and gene <Speech_Music_Male> mcmanus. <Speech_Music_Male> Where <Speech_Music_Male> jimmy. I discuss <Speech_Music_Male> the state of nfl broadcasting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and some other shoes. <Speech_Music_Male> Jane and i <Speech_Music_Male> talked about <Speech_Music_Male> college. Football played <Speech_Music_Male> this year. <Speech_Music_Male> Trae winco <Speech_Music_Male> ryan <Speech_Music_Male> ruko mufid. <Speech_Music_Male> Draw head <Speech_Music_Male> down <Speech_Music_Male> The list of <Speech_Music_Male> Former <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts subjects. <Speech_Music_Male> Hopefully you will <Speech_Music_Male> find something <Speech_Music_Male> that works. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Wanna thank <Speech_Music_Male> you. Everybody's always kadish <Speech_Music_Male> thirteen for their <Speech_Music_Male> support and help <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Everybody out <Speech_Music_Male> there. <Speech_Music_Male> They say <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> be well.

hbo peter nelson Chris corcoran spencer brown andrew miller Hbo boxing john mcdermott renee young Jimmy traina Kate ruko mufid mcmanus united states nfl kadish Football
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

07:10 min | 5 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"For a lottery ticket job. It's it's it's a great. It's a great geic and you know is espn is is the moat as big around. Espn as it was five years ago. No and So but i think that a lot of the people you talk to people out there all the time. I think that they're still. They're happy to be there. They're they're proud of their work. I think that they're probably not as cocky as before i think senior executive The other day. Tell me that look. It's you know it's it's not like it used to be and it's feel smaller and it feels and you you just don't feel the power that we used to have You know and he was. He was very honest about that. But that's because the industry has changed. It's not it's not because all the sudden there's a there's a different and new sports entity that has taken the numbers away from espn And now espn is is is that you know is kind of marginalized i mean people who work at. Cbs sports nbc sports turner. I mean you know if you're working on the nba. Show turn i mean you're you feel you gotta feel really good about yourself and you and there's there's great work to be done so i i don't know i think that there's a lot of people who still i think there's a lot of people who don't take their jobs have granted that's for sure for for you. That's that's that's very that's a very start in droves because and that's a pretty smart. That's a smarter way to look. I'm not saying yeah. I wanted to pose the question to you again. I i hope. I made it very clear that it's still an incredible job. And like you said the fact that you get to wake up and work in sports in itself is a privileged incredible and then if you happen to be one of the chosen few. That's on air or you have one of these jobs where you're you're traveling to watch games is incredible but yeah you know what i think you just hit on it. I think the differences and this this has always been the case for anybody. Works for a newspaper or something like that is you. Don't take the job for granted anymore. Espn where i think. Once once upon a time you must have thought if you got there. I mean maybe it's not quote unquote lifetime job but man. It's it must have felt like it was pretty close to what you were passing everybody in the halls who had been there for twenty twenty twenty five years these people everybody. They grew up together. They moved to central connecticut. It's not like manhattan where there's ten million people there. They're all seeing each other. Drop off the kids at school. You I mean a lot of them live within a ten mile fifteen mile radius of of espn campus and so and many state. And so i think that I think that that's something that now they look at each other. We're survivors and we're lucky to be. We're lucky we're still. We're still here and we're lucky to still be here. And i think that that's something that you know gratitude. Gratitude isn't a big enough engine in In society sometimes and I think that the fact that they're thinking that i think is a good thing. Although it makes you sad about the others who have left. We'll say this it was always this. Must've been a disney thing holdover from abc or something but like so. He's interesting to me dat There would be people you know executives. Espn who always had the new york office is a bit of a either hideaway or to sort of work there for a week. So you've obviously we've seen some talent or we saw some talent there in the skippy. Your negotiate to live in manhattan or to live in new york while working for espn so that was always kind of a thought if you if you worked at espn and you had access to sort of either working in new york either full time or part time you kind of had it off because you had to work at espn. You had the brand on your resume. But you know you you get to live in new york as opposed to having to make the commitment to go to connecticut. Servers notice suspected that connects the different world not to get to deepen. Espn culture but that's sometimes worked against people to because there's a strong army of espn owners. Who felt like those people who are working in new york and who were all running off to new york and they really weren't they they. They really weren't you know they die in the world. Espn and You know you kinda get to mentality there where like I'm sure i don't think be spent a lot of time in in new york. For instance where connor shell did though right. Oh connor of course. Of course mr new york right. Yeah you're right. Yeah no. I mean i have no doubt. Norby is a creature of bristol. Connecticut and connecticut proper and Yeah i would say that the product that exists today is a direct fraction of what norby williamson wants on the air. sort of. that'll be a podcast for a for another time. Is there anything else or anything else. You wanna you wanna hit on before. I let you go no i but i think we're going to be getting some. Nfl official news. I mean there's rumors all over the place as always. But i think things with the nfl would be Sooner rather than later and it's we've been talking about for for over two years and it's going to be with us for for a long time and You know it'll be interesting to see how it would work out and as a practical matter by the way as on a as a as a practical matter with jimmy petar was asked charge to do he has done. They have a much better relationship with the leak during a great position in terms of This upcoming negotiation and they're going to be an espn they're going to be an nfl rightsholder. It's just a question of what the the rights are. So in that sense jim Petar had succeeded by the way that degree with me. Well and that's a huge huge distant from. I think if skipper had still been narrow i would have overruled. but skipper. didn't want it skipper. I agree skipper. Would've walked he. He just didn't think it was. Yeah i mean he. Let's put it this way. He might have or would have walked like. I don't know if you could say that about almost any other media executive who sort of exists today with the nfl. but yeah. you're i mean you know this world better than me. I whatever john skipper wanted. I could not see disney. Not overruling that. John skipper could not unilaterally say. Espn out of the nfl business. That i just you know. Disney's not gonna i could see disney as a corporation letting that happen no but it would have been would have been very challenging negotiation. Yeah for for disney and for espn. For look i mean it's not like skippers laurence olivier. He would have had to pull some acting chops out. It'd be sitting there across the table from them. All right jim.

espn Espn new york connecticut manhattan nbc Cbs turner connor shell nba Norby norby williamson disney nfl abc jimmy petar jim Petar
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

01:35 min | 5 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"It was a place where every single morning we the the objective of the senate and particularly the majority of the office. We're to get things done that day and it was all about you know. Remember two o'clock. In the morning. Senator baker and senator dole and senator moynihan like republicans and democrats trying to do the social security rescue act to get it saved and to get it done and everything was eventually you know operated between the forty yard lines to make sure that things got done and there was an enormous level of respect that members on both sides of the aisle had with each other and i mean i had worked for a democrat before what baker. Nobody asked me what nobody ever asked me. Senator baker never asked me what party. I belong to what i belong. Boy there was no. Oh test It was it was just an extraordinary time. And yes it obviously. It had its problems and there were mistakes time but in terms of the decorum and actually the dna of the senate as an institution. It was just I feel i feel. I feel bad for people who don't who who can't remember or go who don't know that that actually used to be like that it's well said and how about the nfl rates. We got we got some ugly. Tom's ahead of us. Hopefully there's light somewhere. You're ready to get back a yoga. So you've ordered the essentials a non-slip yoga.

Senator baker senator dole senator moynihan senate baker nfl Tom
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Espn and twenty twenty. One will look like and the importance of the nfl. Espn regarding the upcoming meteorites negotiation. But we're taping this podcast on the morning of january seventh after quite frankly one of the one of the darkest days for democracy. Certainly in my lifetime. I i would imagine almost anybody's lifetime and And truly one of the worst days that the united states has experienced some time. I'm not a historian not gonna equate it to wars or anything like that but domestic terrorism at the at its highest level in. If you're watching the images on television it was. It was awful to see a gym before we get into our espn talk. Which kind of seems mundane compared to real word. Real world issues You worked. I believe in the us capitol for a couple of years. I know you wrote. I believe you wrote a book on either working at the senate or you can sort of explain it but you know people know you for your work on sort of entertainment books but before that you you were in politics correct You the floor here. I i was yes i my first book was at the senate and i worked there for several years. It was the greatest job in my life. And what senator did you for fuck it. S i worked for howard baker winning the senate majority leader so i had the distinct honor they say in the senate of walking onto the senate floor every day several times a day and particularly in the morning when we when the boss open the senate usually at nine thirty in the morning and You know i mean it's I think it's something that people who work in that building and work on the hill. Feel it it. Sounds kind of corny. But you know it's just a really special place and it stays with you and so yesterday was fundamentally sad day to think about the the disrespect and our that was involved I mean obviously since ni- since eighteen sixteen eighteen fourteen and the war of eighteen twelve Since that no one has terrorized that building and invaded building. Like it was yesterday and this isn't a matter of politics. This isn't a matter of like you know whether you believe in this kind of policy or not. This is about democracy and respect for our democracy and our institutions are beautiful buildings and and the lives of those people who were serving at that time. And it's just shocking so want to ask you about that When you saw the images of You know broken windows and Paper strewn all over the floor people sitting in Congress people's offices and people walking through those halls with With weaponry and and stuff like that Could you put your mind in into you know you like in another universe jim thome twenty years ago. Whenever it was three thirty years ago you would have been one of those staffers. You you would have been you would have been getting the call that the capital is in lockdown. and and. here's what you are instructed to do. And like i can't even imagine being a twenty five or twenty eight year old staff or thinking. Oh my god like someone coming to kill me today right. Well i mean. I think at that moment. You're you're thinking you're probably thinking less about. I mean you're thinking about your safety but you're also just in shock that this could even happen I guess there's gonna be a almost like nine eleven level investigation here because there was. It was no secret for weeks that this was being planned. And the one thing that i came to to learn and to really appreciate about the capitol police is. They're just they're amazing people and the the level of security when i worked in the senate was was fundamentally different but the capitol police were always there and they just they they they were this wonderful group of people who really cared about the building and really cared about everybody inside the building and there was a very very thin membrane around inside the capitol to deal with those people and you saw the numbers that were you know coming up on social media and then in the mall area the day before and it's just was shocking and sad and we have to kind of trace the pedigree of what actually happened in the other way. Because i felt like a lot of those people were. They were utterly defenseless. And i think. I think there's gonna be some serious revelations about some of the things that should have happened. That didn't happen and and they're they're going to be people that are going to have to answer some very very difficult questions about why things weren't done and sometimes things are rather innocuous you know asper leaves has defense secretary and they say oh you know comes on as the new defense secretary. Nobody barely even knows his name. But when the call went to the pentagon for backup and not initially it was it was there was a no. I mean what is auto about again. this isn't about. this is literally not about politics. It's not about. It's not even about whether you're a trump supporter or not. It's about our institutions it's literally the lifeblood of our democracy and so it just we have to be very very careful right now at this time because This these are the scenes that we used to see in latin america and other parts of the world where we had made his car. It made us. It was morally repugnant. It was exactly what the united states was founded to to to be a symbol. Against and now i worry about those countries and particularly authoritative regimes looking at us now and thinking that and and using that against us. How can next time. We go on a mission to protect democracy in some countries someplace and we're trying to safeguard their elections. And what are they gonna say to us. it's just the repercussions are multi-layered. And we'll be with us for a long time. This is this is not over. Just because people are out of the capitol and outside the capitol grounds. This is this is just beginning. This is something that we're going to have to deal with for for for years and years to come and get smarter about agree You know make an awkward transition but Yeah there are some things about this. That agree with you. That are not. It's not about the politics of the moment that go beyond politics but the politics lit a lot of these fuses. Politics is radicalized. A lot of people. And i'll tell you one thing i don't mean we got y'all go ahead. I'll tell you one thing i am. I feel lucky. Is how and i was talking with a couple of friends who worked in the senate at the same time i did when i would walk on the senate floor sometimes with senator baker you you know you look over to your right and there was paul lacks out and teddy kennedy laughing together and they were. They were good friends. I mean everybody..

senate Espn capitol police howard baker united states espn jim thome nfl Congress asper pentagon latin america senator baker teddy kennedy paul
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

01:52 min | 6 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"I think jim you'd agree is leaving. Espn at least in terms of financially. Right i mean. The guy's got generational wealth now and his family set for life. I don't know if that happens if he stayed is. Espn in fact it doesn't app now. There's there's no way there's no. There is absolutely no way a various times they to sales team at espn had difficulty selling bills. Podcast yes. I know that i know that i can have changed since then so that might be a little but my only point is that there was no way even when he was the highest paid employee and espn. That's that's that's nothing compared to obviously you know what he's done since so You hope it works out for everybody all right jim. Thank you as always. Jim miller james andrew miller you know his work from from all his bestselling books and his arjun podcasts and found on twitter. If he's doing any kind of peace or story he'll be the what are you coming up promote yourself. Now i gotta do better twitter. I i just You know that. Twitter thing i haven't i just don't even have the time for. I don't know how you. I don't know how you make the time to. I'm not sure i wouldn't. I'm not sure. I'm not sure that's a bad thing. Jim i mean it. It's generally speaking. Those who voided are in a better position than those who are on like myself too much. Happy holidays she of i'm bringing you back though for For the end of for an end of the year thing that will do a maybe the last week of december Or at the very latest early first week of january. But we'll talk about this year and and and do another. Espn writ large at the end of the month as well. Thanks as always for coming on the sports media. podcast thank thank. You are back in the studio. Thanks jim miller.

Espn espn james andrew miller jim twitter Jim miller Jim jim miller
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

03:11 min | 6 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"It turned out that the way the connor decided to approach his job and connors bandwith Left a lot of room for to have a significant impact and particularly when you think about what which on michael on sportscenter six I think he was. He was obviously the fixer on that and ruthlessly so because he was very focused on what the objectives were and he got done for the company and he's been very effective. I think that the thing that people sometimes remark about norby is. He doesn't have the bedside manner and the to kind of finesse to make things seem a bit easier and a bit more humane And then others. And i think sometimes people thought that connor was too soft and nobody was too tough and there wasn't anything in the middle and you could go on and on with all these different theories to biggest problem is that nor be is very very sophisticated when it comes to the press And even when he's not quoted releases. I'm not sure how chris lip lock decides were. That probably not decided for him. They have people that are going to be out front on those things. If you notice. Connor did was not as out funt on a lot of these announcements as people who used to have his job in the past. I mean when mark shapiro had that job mark shapiro made the decisions mark which appears stood up and said. This is how i feel. He gave the quotes. And if you wanted to take a shot at him go ahead good luck. But he wasn't going to be hiding behind anything and he wanted to have ownership over. There's decisions because he was in charge. I think there's been a lot of confusion over the past couple of years about who was really in charge on certain things and that that dynamic between connor and norby was confusing to some but at the end of the day it doesn't surprise me that he was quoted in i'd release. That was something. That is under his purview and he certainly was very very involved in probably the architect of of it happening so you know. I think that we just we need to recognize that. Let's take a break for a moment in our conversation and Let's talk about Small businesses and. I think any of you no matter where you live. It's been a tough year. It's been an unprecedented year. And we all appreciate a know. Just how much energy and enthusiasm and drive and persistence and tenacity. And just pure love. It takes to run a small business particularly particularly this year. Every little bit of support from the community.

norby connor mark shapiro chris lip bandwith funt connors michael Connor confusion
President Trump Continues To Deny Election Results And President-Elect Biden Plans for His Presidency

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:25 min | 7 months ago

President Trump Continues To Deny Election Results And President-Elect Biden Plans for His Presidency

"Briefing on monocle. Twenty four and welcome to today's edition of the briefing with me. Andrew miller the white house continues to echo with the post-election tantrum of us president donald trump who spent the weekend insisting series of the kind of all capital tweets which always indicate an ordered mind at work that november thirds election was rigged which wasn't and he won which he didn't president elect joe biden however seems to have decided that he has greater priorities than worrying about any further legal challenges. Launched by rudy giuliani from garden center. Parking lots and is focusing on plans for reviving a hopefully imminently post pandemic economy on joined by suzanne lynch washington correspondent for the irish times season. Welcome as always to the briefing. We'll look at joe biden's plans shortly but first of all is donald trump's wining actually gaining any traction. Is anybody taking him seriously. And i was there at the march on saturday now wasn't a million maga- march of as he'd predicted but there were tens of thousands of americans. They're waving flags and singing hymns in some cases holding signs saying the steel and alleging that the election has been stolen so he is getting a lot of traction from supporters and on conservative media gems. Here with on fox news for example bush. Look the facts are. The joe biden has won the election and as these various states moved to sir officially certify those election results in each stage. Who's is going to be happening in the next week or so. I think that it's going to become more likely. The deriving will become clear on the wall to donald trump. That it's time to go. And unfortunately though he is digging in as you say at science no sign of him conceding jaw and of course. The question is what's doing to american democracy. We've got a lot of 'small. I want a sizable minority of this country. Who believe the dumb from did not win the election even though he did so. I think it's a sorry state of affairs here. In this country that we now have a president who is refusing to concede does president elect joe biden basically appear to be a policy of ignoring him as far as possible. Yes yes. I think you're right out of there on. It's quite a clever policy. So it's almost like a child in the coroner's having a tantrum don't give them any attention. He just get an expert system toxic of strategy been taken by joe biden. He was at questioned on this last week and he did say it was an embarrassment and it was going to damage ed donald trump legacy but he did step back from launching a full scale attack on trump at particularly there is an issue now that a federal agency here. The gsa is using to at handover resources and information. If you'd like to the incoming president like it should so joe biden would be his rights there to criticize ups in clever to be averse holding back. If you know i put the moment so that strategy described exactly what he's adopting. I think one of the reasons he's doing that is because he knows that a lot of donald trump supporters at be this way and he has said during his campaign he wants to beautify reach out to the other side. If you like so. I think he's trying to tag anais and try not to inflame further tensions at a stage trying to lower the temperature. So that's the strategy. But i do think along with this goes on. It could become more problematic for example if they really are not going to hand over these resources. Gsa people are expecting. Maybe this week they will would. If that doesn't happen with then we really could see things become more tense here and with the biden campaign that i'm saying listen hang on. We need this information on his time feud handed over. We will doubtless cross that bridge when we get to it but for the moment what do we know of what. Joe biden plans to put into action. Once he does become president on january twentieth. Well he has said that in his first few days he's going sign executive orders whereby we expect him to rejoin the paris climate accord for example. Aba expect to happen at more. Also maybe something on immigration we for example. There's been the rumbling row about daca. There are the end. The kids known as dreamers. Young people who came to america brought to america by their parents illegally and they had been given amnesty essentially under the obama administration trump reversed. It got stuck in the courts but we expect maybe by to do something on this however other plans is due to unveil economic plan of some kind or make a speech today at in delaware but a lot of that is gonna be dependent on whether he democrats have controlled and the sanish at that looks unlikely it comes to senate runoff races in georgia in early january democrats have to win vocals raises which i think very tall ask if they don't if the only way one they're not in control of the senate republicans are and that is gonna make difficult for biden to push through some of his his policy issues on tax for example even energy and he's talking about not doing in green you deal but actually quite a progressive platform in terms of energy infrastructure. So that could be stymied by the by sanish. if republicans are in control there. What do we know as well about what. President-elect biden wants to do differently in terms of handling the pandemic obviously. There is good news on the vaccine. And there's been further good news just within the last hour as a. Us vaccine is now claiming to be ninety five percent Effective or thereabouts But that's still going to take weeks and months to implement a new cases are clearing one hundred thousand today. What does he want. America to do differently until that vaccine is ready to roll when it's been quite interesting in the last few days because one of the maggie appointed a new advisory board on corona virus is one of the members of the board has been doing interviews and the words lockdown has entered the lexicon here which on a national level and a lot of people are against us at here in this country. And you know nobody has mentioned the idea that we should have national lockdown and vigers now has netted the biden campaign has pushed back on that day. No no this is. Just one of my advisers is what we're considering so that would be considered very much to nuclear option here. As joe biden has to kind of tread carefully. The issue here is at each stage has a lot of power about how they handle the krona virus. So he's going to have his highness flow trying to add. Push through suggestions to republican control states. You know the governor saif kosher for example you know is a bit in. Denial about corona virus doesn't want many restrictions like high was joe biden going to ensure a national mandate for anything. It's going to be difficult and at the moment he has been talking about mask wearing. Because there's still a lot of resistance to the us in this country. As i saw on saturday after march were few people were wearing masks. That seemed to be what he's focusing on at the moment and the other thing would be my distribution of the vaccine making that more equitable already. The governor of new york has criticized on trump's plans. That saying that you know well off people will end up getting the vaccine not poor people who are more affected by cold so we expect to see him focusing more on that more equitable distribution of acting when we get faxing point suzanne ledge. Thank you as always. That was suzanne lynch with the irish times in washington.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Suzanne Lynch Garden Center Ed Donald Andrew Miller Biden Rudy Giuliani America Irish Times Obama Administration White House Fox News GSA Sanish Washington Bush Senate
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

02:55 min | 8 months ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Positive. Me and that was that the this could mark the end of the sports talk specialist. Meaning that not necessarily like stephen a smith who Who's going to obviously be part of i take or whatever that is and not necessarily even like what. Pardon the interruption is either with kornheiser and wilbon or post. Pardon the interruption but the notion of people who are hired. Espn sort of just to be opinion because they generally speaking cost a lot of money There's a posit there that that position may may may may be endangered as well as A significant reduction in studio hosts or they thought that they could just get serve cheaper younger studio host talent especially as you sort of decided before a lot of the studios in the last ten years been paid a ton of money so on both those things. What do you think. I don't buy it because ultimately at the end of the day Espn has eight thousand. Seven hundred sixty hours to program. And i that it could be just the opposite because a lot of rights are going still through the roof even though the numbers may not justify and even though it sounds counterintuitive particularly given the economic realities of these sports businesses. And yet at the same time you can't just put a slide up there and you're going to need in fact. I think sports talk is going to maybe have a holy renaissance because at the end of the day it's far less expensive. You know how many how many how many sports is espn. Or other competitors. Really going to be able to afford now or want to spend the money on the future. And if you decide that you're not gonna bid on sport you're still gonna have to follow you know. Follow up and program that time on your network and so. I think that you're going to start to look at programming and content that is cheaper to produce and it. It may not have you know. Twelve million dollar man like stephen a smith but it will have they will there will be a need for talent will be a need for content. There will be a need for provider. He branded content. And so i think that some of those jobs are just going to be reimagined in ways that will be cheaper even cheaper to produce and may not have the the kind of cash expenditures next to them in terms of salary for these people. You know whenever anybody whenever whenever anybody says that you know that's gonna go away and that's gonna go away and that's gonna go away. He's he's not gonna turn into net flicks. They're not gonna start. You know running sports movies at ten o'clock in the morning just because they don't have it they want to spend the money..

Espn stephen stephen a smith
Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, backed by the king, moves for absolute power

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:04 min | 1 year ago

Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, backed by the king, moves for absolute power

"It is easy to forget that Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz. Al Sowed is not actually technically ruler of Saudi Arabia. That title belongs formerly to his elderly Father King Salman however since his appointment as crown prince in two thousand seventeen. It has been widely understood that. Nbs often known is the heir designate. Power behind the throne and at the age of thirty four very much the future of Saudi Arabia in this unofficial role mb has furnished considerable cause for concern he has overseen a terrible onslaught against Yemen and a blockade of Qatar. Neither of which appear to have accomplished much. He has interred dozens of his fellow royalty. For a time in a Ritz hotel and more or less kidnapped the prime minister of Lebanon perhaps most infamously. Nbs is widely supposed responsible for the murder of Washington. Post columnist. Jamal Khashoggi even by those standards. This week's palace intrigue in Riyadh is remarkable. Several members of the court appear to have been arrested at MBA's instruction including one of his uncles and one of his cousins dozens more army officers and civil servants are also reported to have been rounded up east this NBA swatting a coup. D'etat conducting one of his own. If he does manage to reach the throne when King Solomon's time comes. What does he want to do with it and is in BS? Perhaps not quite the Mariah Carey loving modernizer. He would have us believe. This is the foreign desk when you bring in Mariah Carey and all these singers and pay them views amount of money but you do not have an any universities anyplace to learn music. There is no department in any Saudi university to learn. Play ride to a drama making this these other forms that you should look for. And whether this massive youth constituency what she has to some extent manage to bring behind him is still behind him in five years time because young people need to get jobs. They need to be able to get married. They can't subsistence promises forever. So I think Basch is going to be the key determinant his credibility rather than some of the things that I looked with more interested in the book. We must remember that. Donald Trump has given unequivocal support. D'amato Vince on who is heavily implicated in the killing of the journalist. Jamal Hasha he. Trump has had his back on that one and I think as as long as trump remains in power that this relationship will continue quite strongly. You're listening to the foreign desk. I'm Andrew Miller on today show. I'm joined by Ali Al Ahmed and Laura James Ali. Ahmed is a Saudi Scala. The Institute for Gulf Affairs joins us from Washington DC. Laura James is senior Middle East analyst at the Global Advisory Firm Oxford Analytica Ali. Al Start with you and I'll start with well it's not always an easy question to answer with Saudi Arabia's concerned which is the the pretty basic one of as far as we know what has been going on this week Mohammed bin Salman the heir apparent of King. Solomon who has a lot of political ambitions obviously has members of the ruling family who are his rivals and they do not want to see him become king if they would like to see him ousted some just by talking and some by plotting so what has happened is Hamad discernment is extremely insecure about that and he took measures to stop any attempt to remove him. We have two groups here those who are talking and then the sort of speaking ill of Like his uncle Ahmad but Abdelaziz who who thinks that he has better in terms of becoming king and you have his cousin especially the younger ones who rallied around the his main rival. Hamad bin naive to try to dislodge him for power by by force even and that is why we have seen these steps of arrest and monitoring hundreds of members on family who are eyeing the throne Laura to bring you in his they one fundamental thing looking behind this extraordinary shakespeare in intrigue. Is it a reasonable assumption that MBBS is trying to nail down his future in anticipation that King Mohammed who is eighty four years old and not in good health? Con- last forever. I think he's done really since he became Crown Princeton before has been based on that assumption. It's been about shoring up his position within the family and I think if when his father succeeded nobody would have predicted that he could have done it. This effectively. He is essentially unchallenged. Do we understand. If the differences between the rival factions are actually political or is this basically a more atavistic. Instinctual family feud. I'm not sure that you can draw the distinction very clearly in Saudi Arabia between family in politics the two very much Banda with each other. I would say one difference between Mohammed bin Salman. His rivals is that he thinks that the anyway food. Saudi Arabia is essentially for one person to be in clear charging for that person to him whereas some of the people who oppose him wants to get back to a more consensual style family managed rule and Schering of resources and consensus in enslave change whereas if a political as well family reasons bin Salman says no that model work for Saudi Arabia. Dunga all these possible to be clear on rich factions of the house of sowed supporting. Nbs this point. Does he actually have the numbers? I think? So the most important in Saudi government and the ruling. Saudi Arabia is not even the ruling family anymore. It was about power previously. The model like Laura speaking about the there were centers of power at King. Abdullah had the national guard was his own militia guns so he can force his His agenda and his position and so on the delayed crown prince was also minister of defense so he had the army under his control so he can push his agenda and most importantly then the ministry of the interior with late conference knife had the interior ministry. Which has the largest number of security personnel and across the country and so he can use that to push himself to the throne in all of these people reach the throne. Some some did some died before they they got to to become king now all of these powers the Army National Guard and the Interior Ministry has been gutted and removed. Everything that's powerful about. It has been moved to something called the State Security Agency and the control of bin Salman so our bin Salman controls all the military and security apparatus in the country. So who is his real challenge? No one they can speak. They can talk about. They cannot do very much. There are members of the family who want to see him out. This is not strange to the Saudi ruling family King Faysal was shot and killed by his own nephew. King Salad was overthrown by his brothers. And also there was an assassination attempt on his life after he was deposed and expelled. This is nothing new in the history of the family so I expect to see some harsh measures against some of those younger princess like Nawaf bin Ni- F- Who was arrested and Mohammed bin? Naif who is basically the boss the boss of this of this of these people because he has the best chance in rivaling Ahmed bin Salman let us remember. It was the Obama Administration C. i. a. A and Obama who brought Hamad Knife as the future king and gave him a lot of accolades And supported him and tell trump came and push 'em B. S. INSTEAD AND MR. I'm mad but was pushed out and he still. Mr Benign has a lot of support in Washington in day democratic side. So that was the fear that MBBS had Laura how much might MB S.'s? Stature in court or credibility in the court of being damaged by his own somewhat petulant impulsive behavior over the years whether that's launching this war in Yemen his involvement? In the murder of Jamal Khashoggi would there be a concern in the rest of the court that he might be quite the loose cannon concerns among some parts of the ruling family and very strong concerns internationally. I think there are two distinct issues. One is about foreign policy mistakes. And as you've said in terms of Yemen in terms of Qatar in terms of the confrontation with Iran and particularly in Lebanon. It seemed that. His foreign policy initiatives haven't worked very well. I think within the country that's less important like the Ritz Carlton and this latest. Crackdown are actually less important than the nuts and bolts of vision twenty thirty which is his transformation plan so Mohammed bin Salman has stepped forward and said we know we need to change. The oil is going to run out. We've got to move into a new era. Diversify the economy. Be ready for this. Get Jokes Young People Change Society? I need a huge amounts woods that intensive transforming the way in which Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia Father King Salman Mohammed Bin Salman Bin Abdulaziz NBS Crown Prince Mohammed King Solomon Donald Trump Laura Washington Ali Al Ahmed Mariah Carey Yemen Jamal Khashoggi Saudi University Saudi Scala Hamad Knife Qatar King Mohammed
"andrew miller" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"There's a lot out of studies of Anti inflammatories depression. We ran review of them a couple months ago. Carla report and counted thirty six studies. The main ones they looked at were were the end said particularly silcock zip but also aspirin cytokine inhibitors statins which apparently don't just lower cholesterol but also have separate separate anti inflammatory effects. monocytes cleaned the antibiotic Piazza's zone. The Diabetes Med and that Luca quarter quits. The gist of all this data was that anti-inflammatories seemed to help depression. But what struck me was. None of these studies looked at the kind of inflammatory biomarkers. That you're talking talking about and so we really don't know in what you would expect that. Individuals with high inflammation that drug would work in an individual's with low low inflammation. The drug wouldn't work problem in the literature with the use of anti inflammatory agents to treat depression. The problem is that they treat everybody body and earlier in the interview. I told the only thirty percent of people have increased inflammation. So if you're Cox two inhibitors working for the sample as as a whole what is it actually doing. If we come up with a medication that targets inflammation and. That's not quite there yet. It is somewhat of the Holy Grail and Madison Inflammation as as you now is associated with a number of diseases so although anti-inflammatories make accents for people with inflammation. Dr Miller wasn't able to endorse them clinically. Because we just don't have the evidence but he did go on in the interview to endorse several psychiatric. Patrick Medications that work better in depression with inflammation. That's all online at the Journal. Now Dr Miller outside outside of those psychiatric medications. What kind of lifestyle? Advice what you give to someone. With inflammation the biggest offender in terms of increased inflammation snus obesity and sedentary activity so losing weight would be a very important piece of the puzzle as would be increasing physical activity so does not an exercise. The Diet that people recommend is the Mediterranean Diet as being the most anti inflammatory of the various diets. That are out there. We actually published a study showing that the closer your diet was to add a trainee and diet the lower your level of interleukin six so there. There is data out there suggesting that these diets particularly the Union Diet are associated with reduced inflammation as well as reduced depression depression. The other things that one might WanNa think about is meditation and Yoga. Some of these techniques Taichi we have been associated with increased para sympathetic tone. And we know that activation of the pair of sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system is associated. Ed with an inhibition of inflammation. Of course whether or not you're successful you can determine by going get your CRP measure after initiative. Whatever lifestyle change that you've decided to initiate so there there really is an opportunity for people to monitor their inflammatory inflammatory status and get it get down because we can treat the downstream effects of inflammation with various psychotropic agents talked talked about that targeting dopamine for example? We can do that but at the end of the day. You really want to reduce your location because it's doing other things to your to your body the Of the justice influencing neuro circuits in your brain it's also influencing your heart. Bollock there perhaps. Is the practice changing part of this podcast in my own practice. I specialize in treatment resistant depression. Russian and I have had a lot of success with some of the medications that he recommends for inflammation long before I even knew that inflammation was a cause of depression. What Dr Miller went on to say is that markers of inflammation and inflammation in the body is not gonna go down when we treat these patients patients with such psychiatric medications and get their depression better? Those markers are only known to go down through the lifestyle changes so what that means for me is two things when I see patients who have signs of inflation and got better on those kinds of medications. I now need to speak to them. That that these medicines might be making them feel better and more motivated and driven. But they're not necessarily treating the inflammation in their body and we need to do something about their lifestyle. How of course we'd I check their CRP to see if they indeed have inflammation after describing the lifestyle options to them? I'll tell the patient today. Let me know when they've started the lifestyle changes because we'll give it a couple months three to six months and check their. CRP again to see if if the inflammation is going down. This provides a unique external motivator for them to make those changes and it also gives a little incentive for them to be honest with me about whether they're doing it. Andrew Miller is the William P timmy professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Behavioral Sciences at Emory University. Where he also serves as Vice Chair of psychiatric research and Director of the Behavioral Immunology Program? His full interview view is online at the Carlisle report DOT Com. It includes two very useful charts one lists all the psychiatric treatments that have evidence to work better and inflammatory Tori. Depression bore medications three natural treatments and six lifestyle and psychotherapy approaches. The other is a list of eight signs that your depress patient it might have inflammation with directions for how to order and interpret the CRP. Our podcast listeners can get thirty dollars off their first first year subscription to that site with the Promo code podcast in all caps net helps us keep the car let report free from the influence winsome advertisers industry donors and all other sorts of entanglements..

inflammation depression Andrew Miller Vice Chair of psychiatric rese Patrick Medications aspirin Diabetes Med Carla Psychiatry and Behavioral Beha Luca Behavioral Immunology Program trainee Tori Carlisle Emory University dopamine professor William P
Carlos Beltran Out as Mets Manager After Astros' Cheating Scandal

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

08:55 min | 1 year ago

Carlos Beltran Out as Mets Manager After Astros' Cheating Scandal

"We got the news about one o'clock today that yet. Another person untied to the Houston Astros. Cheating scandal has lost his job. Carlos Beltran recently hired by the mets to be there next managers out of his job before even having having a meeting in spring training. That's because he was named in. The Commissioner's report released the other day for his role in the Astros signed stealing scandal of two thousand seventeen eighteen Beltran and the mets both indicated. Today that this was a mutual decision but I suspect that a week or two weeks ago even those with knowledge of the science dealing details from two thousand in seventeen believed that Houston. GM Jeff Luneau Astros Manager Aj. Hinch Red Sox manager Alex Cora now Carlos Beltran would still have have their jobs and they're all out and that's where we are probably Vera covers baseball for ESPN. She knows. Carlos Beltran now score very well Marley. How you doing? It's been a crazy week. I think crazy is a very good adjective buster special like no that totally can managers. Were highly touted. I don't have a job today. Unbelievable let's let's start with Carlos Beltran. That is the the most recent news. I'm going to also ask you about Alex. Corsie is we go forward but but I about Carlos. I thought that when the mets didn't put out a statement immediately on Monday evening after the Commissioner's report came out out the fact that the mets didn't come out right away and have a statement from Jeff Wilpon from Brody Bandwagon. And saying this is our guy. Carlos Beltran is our manager edger. And that's what we're going to do moving forward because what was in the report involved the Houston Astros in two thousand seventeen. The commissioners made it clear that Carlos this is not going to be disciplined for his role in that because he's the player at that time but the fact that they didn't put out that statement on Monday and then dragged out into Tuesday day and then Wednesday. You could see that the mets they were weighing their options and just as someone who covered the mets back in one thousand nine hundred seven having worked in New York market for a long. I've never seen an organization that is more affected by public opinion than the mets. And I thought Yep that he at some point. They're going to let him go. What what did you think absolutely couldn't agree more with what you said? And not only that the fact that you know one of the reasons why they hired Beltran was because it was excellent in publicity. Ns S you. And I know spending so much time covering baseball in New York. The mets have failed many times on the PR department. And this would hiring hiring Carlos Beltran. They bought themselves all this goodwill right the return of the prodigal son with everything that had happened when he had left the comments of the Wilpon when he used to be a you know. Oh a mets player. Everything gets kind of water under the bridge. There's just you know one of the most impressive press conferences that I have attended you know at city field so it was just as big. Pr Moment and then all of a sudden I agree with you. They got swayed by public opinion. And one of the things that Carlos Beltran and as you mentioned before which is important you state. The aren't family our friends of mine. So my activity here Sometimes can be a little bit swayed but the point is that can handle the media. He's been you know he was a player for twenty a years worked on a capacity assistant with the Yankees and so on and I feel that this was in my opinion. Definitely a wilpon decision muster. Oh No no question. The way this was described I think Carlos but at a statement they talked about a mutual decision. No way like this like Carlos I think absolutely was set on going forward but they say as all the conversation was taking place in New York to columnists were were taking aim at this and they are asking questions. Well what. What did the mets ask Carlos about? After the first athletic story came out about the signed stealing. And how would the mets feel about Carlos not having credibility with the media and it became a real hot topic on talk radio here and one stat ball started rolling downhill and then Aj hinch losses job and Jeff Luna lost his job and Alex. Cora lost his job. There was no way the mets leadership was going to stand in the way of that momentum and stand up and say in the past it was in the past which by the way is what Brody van wagon and said back in November. He kind of indicated like well. That's not really a mets problem. That's an astros throws problem. But their their their words their tone definitely changes week the only aspect that I can you know Ah have gone in this process. One of the things were Carlos may have had some input. Devil's advocate here. Is that one of the things that Carlos Beltran they'll turn and and you and I have covered a great deal of is the fact that he does not like off. The field distractions buster. And I think at that is the part or they'll go. You know what this is the right decision. He is one of those guys that likes to talk baseball. I remember what it was like the whole scandal with Iran in the Yankees Yankees Carlos Beltran was part of the Yankees Organization at the time as a player and he refused to engage in sort of those conversations so there is an aspect of how much he doesn't like the distraction and then that part certainly you know he could have had any input on but I I agree with you. This isn't you know the mets founded selves in an island. Having to make a decision and they got swayed by Jim Crane did and obviously you know what the Boston Red Sox decided to do. After the imposition of a penalty suspension to Alex Score. So let's breakdown go by the way. Yeah exactly breakout some other elements of this What do you think the mets miss out on? Not Having Carlos Beltran altron their manager. Carlos Beltran is an excellent leader. And I think that's one of those things that has been a little bit missing the New York Mets Organization. He drives arrives you. He's one of those guys that inspires others other players and he also galvanizes clubhouses right. He he was the player for the day when he was with the Yankees. Hanky along with Andrew Miller he always has always been so well spoken and he crosses that kind of you know barrier quote Unquote Latino players. And you know the players that are not Latino and I felt that he could galvanize that clubhouse very very well and I think that's the number one thing that the mets are going to miss out on and this is a man who obviously has left the game for a long time doesn't need the money this isn't right and it was honestly doing this job because he truly wanted to make an impact in organization that really has lost their way a little bit in the last couple of years so I think it's a huge loss. So they mess. We're GONNA do not have Carlos Beltran but I do understand the decision. In terms of the whole quote in quote distractions off the field now. I'm not as close to him as you are if I was I think and he asked me my advice in this situation. Now that he's lost the job of the mets would. I think I would tell them was Carlos you need to hold a press conference in New York have rent out a room at a hotel or restaurant invite all the reporters to come and basically say I'm here to answer all your questions about what went on with Houston with me back in two thousand seventeen eighteen. Because I think that's the only way he's going to be able to manage at some point down the road and all I heard for the last decade is this is someone who absolutely terrific manager in the future future. He has to be great at this job but I think that would allow him to and let's face he's never going to move past this. It's already cost him his job but at least to get past those questions would be to tell the writers. I'm here to answer every question you people have about what take place and I'll tell you exactly really what happened. What do you think about that? I don't know that I mean I. I would love for that to happen. Let's be very clear. I don't know that the benefit for for Carlos it's worth it If if one of the drugs and he said this in an introductory press conference specifically said I didn't want any job I don't need need a job. I wanted to stay in New York. Carl has very very young children. They're all right like very yes. Three kids are all very young during school in your this is where they reside the kids go to school will. So there's only two baseball jobs that he would apply for the New York Yankees and the New York mets and he's not gonna get either one of those jobs so I just don't think that at this point point it benefits the family anyway and I do think that Carlos will do what's best for his family especially having young children Buster and I know you know that you had young children at one time. It's the point that these kids have to see the paper tomorrow. They're going to be in school. They're old enough. You know and I feel like it would rehash a lot of topics. Is that right now. Maybe people are going to move on you know and and just gone from that now if he later on when the kids are a little bit older he wants to do something else. Maybe at that point but but at this point I just don't see the benefit.

Carlos Beltran New York Mets New York Yankees New York Houston Astros New York Mets Organization Baseball Jeff Wilpon Alex Cora Boston Red Sox Houston Commissioner Alex Espn Jeff Luneau GM Marley Corsie Brody Bandwagon Vera
An Iraqi Spring?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:36 min | 1 year ago

An Iraqi Spring?

"Some of the people who have been demonstrating across Iraq in recent weeks had not been born in two thousand and three when the United States led an invasion which was supposed is to turn the country into a beacon of liberal democracy at least four hundred of the people who have demonstrated across Iraq. In recent weeks we'll never know if such an outcome ever occurs the response of authorities has been brutal with several instances of live fire used against protesters. The protests tests began in early October. They have persisted despite the heavy handed reaction of Iraqi police and other security services last weekend. Iraq's Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi admitted defeat and announced his resignation. It is unclear who or what comes next. Iraq's new protests protests a brief venting of frustration or is it something bigger than that a delayed addition to the Arab spring or a contribution to a current global eruption of rage. And will they change anything. This is the foreign desk. A lot of these really young demonstrators. And you're like kids. were like seventeen years old going to these really dangerous places where there's live bullets and all of them will stay universally. I'm not afraid I'm ready to die for this and asked him. Why aren't you afraid? And many of them will say something like you know I've gotten used to. This isn't something that scares me anymore. which is a hard thing to hear coming from early on kids? Mel Of the question is what you're on will do or will not do. It's what the the Iraqis will do or do on mainly the Iraqi political elite who are having constitutional legal and ethical obligations awesome to insulate the country from foreign influence. I would consider what we've seen in October until now this year is probably the greatest existential essential threat to the post. Two Thousand and three Iraqi State even when Isis rose the Iraqi parties and the people were together in condemning Isis and there was a clear strategy to remove isis assist. There is not a clear strategy of what needs to be done and I think the political leaders sat in Baghdad or feeling. You're listening to the foreign desk with me. Andrew Miller my first guest today is pressure Mageed a journalist based in Baghdad who has been covering the protests since the beginning of October tober pressure. First of all. Let's talk about what's been happening this week. What point have the protests got to now so the protesters have really dug in their heels? At this point. They've we've kind of set up their own mini infrastructure within Dr Square. They have tents people are sleeping there for weeks at a time. They have blankets. They have emergency health facility. Salihi stood up for people who are injured and people are really prepared to stay there for a very long time. Well let's go back to win. This started in October as as far as it was possible to tell. was there any particular thing that sparked it off obviously underlying these demonstrations a great many eh deeply-held grievances but was there. One particular thing that seemed to bring people out into the streets so at the very beginning of October the protests I I think we're kind of like normal protests right so there were huge huge huge huge numbers at the very beginning and they were protesting after office. The fact that there was no real change. They were protesting also to a certain extent military leader. WHO's popular removal from office? But they really. I think started growing quite intensely after the the government's violent response to those protesters you know. They started using bullets at the beginning of October. And I think that's part of the reason why the protests have have grown to such an extent you know there's the endemic economic issues. There's the corruption that people are just exhausted with and then there's the fact that people are just so angry that they're seeing so many people being and killed in the streets. The authorities in Iraq went incredibly quickly from a standing start to firing live rounds at civilian protesters as anybody buddy yet understood how why that happened. It's been reported by Some of the agencies that the Iraqi government gut advice ice from costumes Sulaimaniyah the head of the Revolutionary Guard on how to respond to the protests in that might have been part of the reason why the response was so violent and Y- it seems like you know how they felt at the time was that they could not allow for any protests whatsoever that they needed to stamp it out as quickly as possible. And when you say revolution regard the you are of course talking about the Iranian Revolution regard and it has been a theme of these protests that Iranian targets have often come under fire will will quite literally. We've seen several Iranian consulates and other buildings burned down in some cases repeatedly. was that something that was already in the the era kind of resentment at Iranian influence over Iraq or did that come about because of this perceived Iranian involvement in the the massacre of at least at least four hundred that we now know of demonstrators. I think it's both I mean. People were definitely already angry at Iran for its influence over Iraq and especially it's seen as the power behind zone of some of the political parties that many protesters regardless very corrupt in as one of the main reasons that Iraq is in its current situation. And and then you know people definitely Blame Iran to a large extent for the violence. That's occurred I mean you know it's not like they don't blame government as well well but you know people definitely see that. Iran is kind of like the power behind the throne

Iraq Baghdad Iran Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahd Iraqi Government Isis United States Andrew Miller Dr Square MEL Salihi Mageed Revolutionary Guard Sulaimaniyah Seventeen Years
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Do you know of any other talent contract that had to be approved by the board. Like what group with Jon Gruden or Mike Greenberg contract of hit. Data's well yeah I think I mean I don't know what the threshold is. I don't know what the threshold is But you know look at. That doesn't surprise me. I mean it's not you know. They're not insignificant consumes scrooge. Gruden I think as last year was it six five. Maybe Greenie was it to. I mean there's like you know there's there's a serious dollars dollars if I'm a Disney board member I don't mind Hearing about that and weighing in on that. I don't think that they would be i. I don't think that they would put it down. I don't think that's in fact. I'm trying to think of a case where that's how. I don't think that's ever happened. Okay so a couple a couple of things here I want to get to. I've said this a million times You are worth whatever your company will pay you and if Steven gets fifty million dollars God bless the guy. I totally support talent getting any amount of money. Money within that context LEMASS A couple of questions one is someone bidding against ESPN on Stephen. A Smith that I'm unaware of where Stephen a Smith's camp camp would have leverage. I believe so Do you want to mention what you believe. Potential employees up potential place like zone or a Fox or do not want to go down that speculative road I can't because there was given to me off the record. Okay all right appreciate it okay. So so as as as the cliche goes all you need are two parties to create a market. And if you're telling me there's a market there that would explain why that salary dollar remember something though we remember something hold on a it with all due respect GRUDEN got six five. I don't know I I who wanted him. I don't think any of the broadcast network work would've wanted him. And sometimes you can just sometimes you know good. Representation can make the case that the property itself demands that. If you're going to be you know the I mean if Monday night. Football is the most important property that ESPN has. And if you're GONNA be the the guy in the booth You know that that's not a four million dollar job. I don't know how Gruden I this is. Nothing against Jon Gruden. But I don't know you got to six five He was the most expensive piece of talent You know at the time he he certainly outdistance. Still Simmons who was right up there and So I think that you know. Sometimes you don't even need a competing for us. I mean getting back to your original question. Look Stephen A. I remember I. I was interviewing skipper for the I think it was for the paperback version. ESPN book or maybe a follow up article or something. And I remember waiting while Stephen Stephen A. was leaving and he was leaving. The company was leaving the company. And and this was you know years ago I think a two thousand nine nine maybe two thousand. Yeah something out there. Yeah it's for the book and And you know and I saw him afterwards and you know in Stephen. I MHM way I mean he was. He wasn't morose but he believed that there were A brighter future and certainly. SPN had decided that they had they had enough and the fact that this guy I mean with the help of Rob King another was able to engineer. ESPN's AH there are not many people who leave ESPN and come back You know there have been cases. They're having cases. Suzy Kolber went to Fox Keith. Olbermann of course back and forth Other people but it to the degree that Stephen came back and then did what he's done is a you know freaking. We can moan remarkable. I I absolutely I and I think part of it is you know. Look skip. Left Jamie took Jamie Harvard's took skip to Fox and its tonnage game. I mean this guy is on all the time and he's delivering a certain kind of audience and it's it's you know every day and he makes a lot of noise for the network and he's into You know very very involved with Their properties Certainly they spend a fortune on the NBA. And he's involved there. So I mean you you. Can't you know you you can't say enough about how extraordinary whether you like it or not. From a business point of view how extraordinary this return has been for him. Well so a couple of things there that you hit on that I think are just really interesting and you. You know this better than me. Obviously given that your relationship with this guy's better tomorrow relationship but you know regarding Gruden John Skipper used to call Jon Jon Gruden Star like he would literally use that word. A silly isn't might be to the externally and when the president of a network obviously thinks you are a star then you do have leverage and you can set a market for how much a property is worth. I think Stephen a with many many management management people now at ESPN has that same thing. So in that sense that they're willing to pay for what they think is star talent correct whether you like Steven A.. Or not my last last part on this Jim and I I. I've put this out on twitter. I don't know if you've disagree with what you might have. I think you've tried to educate me on this. But I. I don't mean this to be a shot at Stephen a Smith because I really Ama- total supporter of talent. Getting as much as they can but it becomes very frustrating to me to see that what kind of dollar expenditure for. ESPN where a year and a half earlier. They're claiming that they have to cut one hundred one hundred and fifty people awesome incredibly talented journalists. Because they don't have the money for them that's what becomes frustrating for me is that. ESPN will always have money money when they WANNA have money and that feels like the the lay offs particularly that last. Layoff around the front facing people like Jane McManus and Ashley Ashley Fox. It feels like total bullshit because they work supposedly caught for cost cutting reasons but it's clear that there's money when they wanna have money for talent. Now you can educate gave me Jim. No listen. Obviously I think that's true to a certain degree I think that the thing that happened with. ESPN with layoffs was. They did a particularly bad job of of explaining meaning even though they tried so I give them credit for that. I just being. It was a bad job in terms of connecting to to people like us that a lot out of those jobs are eliminated because they were being eliminated. It wasn't to save money. It was that in the move from linear to digital. There's a whole different skill set which begs the question. Why did they spent money kind of retraining? Those people because at the same time that they were laying off people they were also hiring people and so there was a paradigm shift in the way they were doing business and what I think they decided to do. was you know if you were if you were a bricklayer. You're not given the chance to become a carpenter and if we're in so if the company didn't need bricklayers anymore then the bricklayers were let go and I think that that's something that's been difficult for people inside the company to comprehend. I don't think they ever decided that they were out of money though and they were very clear about it that they were gonNA still be hiring so you know. Look there's those particularly there's two big rounds of layoffs. We're oh you know we're really really difficult for for everybody at ESPN particularly of course for the people who are like. Oh I still think I. I'm sorry to interrupt you. I was just GonNa say I understand all that but again the whole paradigm shift is just total. Bullshit like Dana. Neil like isn't a valuable asset as in a quote unquote shift from TV to digital. She now works at the athletic and as I'm obviously biased and kicking ass Jayson Stark Ethan Strauss and just sort of don't even off the top of my head. The the people people who were Andy Katz Mark Stein. I mean there you know I i. I understand where you're coming from but but so many that's why it said they did it. Take a bad job of that. So many of those people so many of those people have post. Espn excelled in the digital space. So I I just I I think it was. I think the I and again this is their right as a company but at the end of the day you know they make the choice of who they wanna spend money on right versus. Who who they don't want to spend money on and a lot of that probably has to do with who they value or who they think has value but also probably you know like every other company? I guess relationships Epson you know. If you have the right people sort of protecting you you can. You could stay. Well I don't know because like how Schwab and scanlon and other I mean in writing. Yeah just people you thought that were just you know part of the DNA the place. How about how about Jerry Mantle? I mean talk about a guy who's part of the DNA ESPN WHO's now gone on to do private talent evaluation and it's been incredibly helpful to a lot of people in the business talk? Talk about a guy who I thought was part of the walls of ESPN. I mean that guy. You cut that guy he he he you know he bled George Bodenheimer basically listen. He he took care of Bobby Knight for the company. Well that's that's not everybody's perfect. All right he rewards work. I know another Norby Williamson Higher Ara. Let's take a break to talk about health. IQ You you out there. The.

ESPN Jon Gruden Stephen a Smith Stephen Steven A Ashley Ashley Fox Disney Jim Mike Greenberg George Bodenheimer Rob King NBA Suzy Kolber Norby Williamson Higher Ara John Skipper Football Simmons Jerry Mantle Epson twitter
"andrew miller" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

14:49 min | 1 year ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Investigators that have found very very similar. Alert results all of us going at the at the issue a little bit differently. So we know this is the these findings are relatively reproducible reproducible. Across different inflammatory stimuli and across different laboratories in what we find is that yes there are affects in the prefrontal cortex that yes. We see a decrease in activity Metabolic activity in the prefrontal CORTEX. We also see activation active ation of threat related regions in the brain including regions May Not be relevant to your audience for maybe some well. That's yes the big dilemma for sure. The hippocampus the door slammed terrier cingulate CORTEX. These are on the insular. These are all brain regions that form circuits and much of what we do in psychiatry. Now of how circuitry. What different brain in recent talking to one another leading to behavioral phenomena in that circuit that involves the mid July the insulin the campus astore slammed terriers singular cortex the anxiety circuits? So we see this activation of the anxiety circuitry. We also see Looted to this previously Ashley Effects On reward circuitry so that includes both subcortical regions The stratum and Cortisol regions Ah The venture medial prefrontal CORTEX so in those prefrontal cortex regions. What you see? is you see increased activity in the anxiety circuits markets and you see a decreased activity in the reward circuitry and the amazing thing. is you see a linear correlation between the activity activity in these circuits in the amount of inflammation in your body as measured by C reactive protein. which you can if you can go oh to your doctor right now and get measured in fact? There are three lab tests that I have recommended since the verb beginning of of writing my first book my blog post it's homocysteine AC- reactive protein in LP to and the first year because inflammation and matters and the third one is because everyone's afraid that cholesterol is going to damage their arteries and if there is damage to arteries the third one goes up. And if you just have those three numbers magically you're GONNA no no if you have inflammation if you have inflation. It's your job to figure out what it is and what to do about it now. Here's a question for you. Who are not who? What would be the best single anti-inflammatory compound you've come across that that might make people feel better? That's a tough one and I think that's the Right now that's the holy grail in Madison we. We recognize that inflammation is driving these diseases But yet strangely enough we do not not have any drug at this point That blocks inflammation in a way. That doesn't Leave one pretty vulnerable to infection. So the drugs that are used for people with autoimmune inflammatory disorders those great drugs than we actually are giving those drugs to patients with depression right now and these are drugs that block a certain inflammatory cytokines. They're very potent anti inflammatory agents. In if you have a bad inflammatory disease that's great. 'cause you'll feel much better but if you're someone someone who has middling semi high levels of inflammation without frank inflammatory disease than the the risks of having a serious infection. are greater than the benefits that you would receive from blocking inflammation. Sure so right now there is not a drug we recommend couple of so we do. We recommend obviously the lifestyle style factors that contribute to inflammation. You've alluded to some some of which you've struggled with yourself. OBESITY OBESE HANDS DOWN. The obesity is the biggest offender fat cells grow at a very rapid right and when they grow they outstripped their oxygen. Oxygen supply their blood supply and they die and anytime there's tissue damage or destruction and so wound as far as the immune system is concerned. It's not quibbling colling. Is this good bad whatever and the immune system cells enter fat tissue. They release a ton aside kind. And if you go into fat tissue you by upside you'll see a ton of these Inflammatory cells democracy will be there and they'll be activated so obesity. The city is clearly the number one offender then you start looking at stress As being a major fender especially early trauma early childhood stress. appears to really have lingering influences on how the immune system is regulated in biases towards words inflammation. Even how you're absolutely and that was my first book. Yeah if not in the the more we learn about it if there's a lot of in utero stuff that's going on as well so some of this you may not have a whole lot of control over. Although their arch. We are learning a lot about that. Changes that occur to your genome the EPA genetic changes. I don't know that that's come up in the those changes changes where the environment influences. How the genes were so even if you have a certain genetic predisposition the the the environment could influence how those genes are expressed a? We've learned about that so I think there'll be some treatments along those lines but stress can cause chronic the commission and then we talked about the The despite haussas infections obviously cause inflammation. Then of course there are a ton of things we do to people role in my world. Madison where we do surgery and Redo radiation chemotherapy. The cancer treatments people kept for cancer and whatnot in terms of medications This is a scenario that I'm actively working on right now but I'm not targeting inflammation. I'm going downstream of inflammation and targeting. The molecules inflammation is screwing up in your brain and one of the molecules that seems to be a number one target is dopamine so think about dopamine is head up dopamine. You might as well cash it in. I mean that's Parkinson's you have no dopamine. You can't move your course Parkinson's disease. He's very high rates of depression lack motivation no dopamine. That's pretty much it that's you know. And so what we do is is. This is how I treat my own patients is that if they have increased inflammation. We will work with medications that are targeting dopamine as their main mechanism of action. So that would be there. Certain antidepressants Be Appropriate and being one of them. Stimulants other drugs that directly activate dopamine receptors brownback solving one of those even giving some of Parkinson drugs to patients with increased inflammation and this kind of The loss of motivation the Nanna Tonia we call it depression fatigue here and so on so forth your sensitizing their dopamine receptors base. Where would yeah be more responsive to smaller stimuli? Yes that's mind blowing out what about nicotine. Nicotine Nicotine Patches Alzheimer's timers. Yes It's there's not a lot of work in terms of the impact of inflammation on Nicotine Other than to say that nicotine binds to nicotinic receptors in immune cells and actually shuts off inflammation summation. So how that all works and I mean obviously Acetylcholine has other effects that are probably hopefully more dramatic in the brain that you're talking about but in terms of the effects of inflammation on the brain the neurotransmitter systems there. There's not been a lot a lot of work on what's happening with What about the other natural compounds things like fish oil will Things like turmeric and I like full disclosure. I make a fish egg oil thing. My Turmeric formula includes some the Chinese herbs that I use for inflammation not all of them but some of them and there's like this long list way longer green tea extracts reservatrol. The David Sinclair has been studying. And I mean this is hundreds of compounds that you can buy at the vitamin store. Is there any any efficacy any research. Just your general thoughts on that path. I think there's a lot of interest at this point and there are studies underway. I The the The National Institute of Health is is very interested in determining which of these compounds Actually we have biologic activity and much of the interest is related to inflammation the data is. It's not entirely clear yet because there are multiple issues around dosing there multiple issues around the quality the compound. Oh Yeah and in order for us to study these various food supplements if you will that you'd this all has to be run through the FDA so in order to do these kinds of studies you have to get a supplier hire who's willing to give all of the details from the actual growing a herb for example and one contaminants might be introduced introduced in the process of growing. It's really quite quite detailed in there. Not many suppliers who are willing to give you that information or even have that information so that really blocks us as a as a As a society from getting access last two good quality supplements that may in fact have major impacts on a impact on our health. And so that that's kind of just just one of those things that we don't have a lot of control over and so you're kind of catches catch. Can when you go to the to the vitamin store. The health food food store and you This and that and the other thing we just don't know the fish oil There is better data data with fish. Oil there are some studies that suggest that it has anti inflammatory effects and potentially antidepressant effects That's an active area of investigation But they're using again highly purified you know really really high quality stuff and it has to be has to be standardized absolutely. It's the same thing people say. Oh my I hear is from functional medicine doctors a lot. I told my patients to take this specific brand of whichever this was and then they went to Simul store and they bought the six dollar color version and then they came in with pimples no positive effects and they told me they were doing what I said and unfortunately having dug in on the supply chains and stuff like that Eh a good indicator of the quality of your supplement is the cost because it costs more to make the good stuff however unethical companies can also raise their price to make it look. uh-huh how do you crack that code. I found it frustrating as well so I I'm I'm with you. There are some studies of single ingredients dance but quite often. They're out of India but we do our best and I feel like the worst. That's going to happen for most of these natural food based these things but if you try taking Broccoli extract or turmeric or whatever the thing is and you feel better and your joints don't hurt and you sleep better or whatever. Whatever happens good for you? Keep doing that and if nothing happens don't do that. It seems like the risk is relatively low so it might be worth experimenting. But I know if I had experimented I wouldn't be ram today but also I'm a corner case because I had all the bad side and and one thing that you should be aware of it and you may be aware of done. What your thoughts are on this? But there are efforts and we got into this with the with the Curcumin Molecule where you can actually the chemistry will take the curcumin and make it more bioavailable more potent and so you're taking the natural natural compounds and creating drugs that are fall intents and purposes the same thing that are now being produced. You're using chemistry to make the natural troll world even better so I know that wanders out into a little bit dangerous territory but now it's not dangerous at all. I mean the delivery systems of supplements are important that we make liposomes good liposomes. Those little balls of fat that can carry drugs passed or drugs or natural compounds. House passed the lining of the Gut and the curcumin formula we use a standardized extract called ninety five with clinical studies that show that goes up but we pair it with brain octane oil which is the Cape relic acid based not..

"andrew miller" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

13:24 min | 1 year ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"See a unique code that will get you a free copy of my new book superhuman with your purchase Happy Juvan. Today's cool factor. Today is that everything counts in large amounts. Okay that might date me because that is depeche mode reference If you don't know it depeche mode is too bad. I you have to Google it but it turns out there are twenty. Newly discovered moons in Saturn's orbit which makes it the moon king and that means there are eighty two moons and it's now ahead of Jupiter which normally before that had just seventy nine minutes there isn't this is interesting as the fact of the day is that it took astronomers at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington. DC years because because they're using data from two thousand four two thousand seven to figure this out just now more than ten years later and what's happening now there's data we've already captured that. We can now processing crunch in new ways and there's all sorts of new data coming online so when people look at you and steering the face and say this this is a fact the bottom line is there's probably another layer underneath it that we haven't figured out yet and I want you to take this little fact and just say well will you would have met someone. Five years ago that there were x number of moons and said no it's actually x number of known moons. And when someone tells you oh your body can't can't do that. There's a pretty good chance that they don't know something about your body. In fact there's very good chance that no one on earth no something so keep pushing. If there's something the thing you want your biology to do who knows it might actually be possible. Today's guest is someone I've interviewed for a while. And and someone you might not have have known He is He's an internationally recognized expert in the way the brain in immune system mm-hmm work together specifically around stress and depression. He's vice chair of research in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory School of Medicine and also the director of behavioral. Immunology there. And you're saying that is a mouthful. This is how you behave based on what your immune system does this idea that the tiny cells in your body even sub cellular things are driving large behaviors. Such as whether you want to punch someone or not is it is shocking. How real that is so the little mitochondria other little things? They are kind of in charge of things way. More than we like to admit to ourselves and Andrew Miller has researched these underlying mechanisms including how inflammation can cause depression in humans and other primates primates primates and he did the first clinical trial examining how effective immunotherapy would be in the treatment of depression. Listen more than two hundred and fifty scholarly publications numerous awards and was voted a top doctor in psychiatry for the past four years in other words a game changer. If there ever was such a thing Dr Miller welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Dave very pleased to be here. There are lots of things as you can study as a medical doctor and there are lots of things that will make your colleagues really really pissed off and and one of them is saying exactly what you said that the immune system is causing behavioral issues. In fact there are people have had their licenses has taken away for that. What made you decide to go? The high risk roots in start studying this and Publicizing it while it's actually an interesting story story And and you're right. I think most of the believes that what we think in feel is driven largely by psychological factors that are going on in our lives our relationships with other people in in things that happened to us were can in our various pursuits but the The thing that was fascinating to me and got me started in this area was Some work that was going going on in the in the area of cancer and very early on there were Some of the first immuno therapies in as I think most of your audience and you know that some of the major changes in cancer treatment have come about through our understanding the immune consistent in using different types of therapies that target the immune system to treat cancer will. These are some of the very earliest treatments that they were using immuno therapies earpiece to treat cancer what they would do. is they would Administer these drugs which are usually Molecules that are normally found in the body. So that's how he made. A therapies are working with the immune system to help it. Fight cancer in this case they were giving a molecule ultimate Cited kind which is one of the many molecules that mediate how the immune system works in the body. Immune cells release cytokines so they were Giving an a side kind that induces inflammation to patients to treat their cancers. which was it's Interferon? Alpha interfere analysis and inflammatory cytokines. Actually one of the first. If not the first immunotherapy and at that time being used to treat malignant melanoma arena arena cell carcinoma so. It became apparent very early on to the oncologist when they gave this Interferon Alfa two the patients that the patients started becoming depressed and They were quite concerned because patients were dropping out at treatment in would not continue. Continue not want to have that. That drug again felt miserable and so eventually they said we need to get psychiatry involved in so I was asked to Z.. One of these patients who was receiving Interferon Alpha and I expected going into the to the infusion center where they were fusing these molecules into into the veins of these patients. I was expecting to see people sort of covered in a blanket and shivering and looking miserable and of course the colleges don't know anything the thing about depression so you know will vote. We'll see what's really going on so I went in and there was a woman sitting there and improbably took every ounce of energy and wherewithal. She had to get prepared for her seeing the psychiatrist but shoes news nicely dressed and she sat there in quite sober. Fashion told me that she was absolutely Depressed that She had no interest in anything. She had no interest in her family. She had no interest in her husband. Her children she said she loved to cook. She was is not cooking. She left guard and she was not gardening. She said she couldn't concentrate or memory was shot. She wasn't sleeping. She was exhausted. Costed all the time and yes may be the thought had fleeting thought that maybe is this way to live your life suicidal type thing. And I looked at her and I said Oh my God this is someone who looks exactly like someone I would see it in my practice. Who had just lost a child or just had broken up relationship or had Had some other you know horrible thing happened to them in their in their lives and I said this is real depression odd. Ah This isn't something. That is a sickness or a or a fever or some type of medical reaction. This is a purely league psychological brain reaction to this to this truck to the site Chi to this inflammatory but Chedda cancer cancer I mean. Shouldn't you be depressed if you have cancer. I asked her that quick. Astor exactly that question. Good question I said well you know look you have malignant melanoma. That's not a good cancer. And she says look. I came to grips with that months ago. Okay this isn't about cancer this is about having received this yes Well she tied it to the treatment. She's got felt fine and then she had taught to the treatment and just related to that which I think is important because this comes abso- often is on our studies. Did originally focus on cancer patients. Imac that issue came up Multiple Times in presentations into whatnot. And what I could just briefly to address that is that we also gave Interferon Alfa two non-human primates Theresa's monkeys monkeys can and they too became depressed and showed all user monkeys who who weren't already depressed because they were living in a letter. Ah Well they're not. They're not happy about it but they're not I understand it. They're probably pissed off a- and a lot of people who succeeded in fighting cancer they are fighting cancer and they are full of fight right. And you're saying here's a drug that it shifts you from that fight response into absolutely classic. Depression caused by a molecule that stimulates the immune system and and stimulates inflammation and so that began this whole notion that inflammation may cause depression in some people for now one of the core tenets in in the entire body of things that I've written and taught and learned over years is that inflammation is pretty much the root of most aging by the way right now is a recording this for the first time in my career as an author. My new book superhuman about longevity evident aging is in its second week on the New York Times Bestseller List was awesome. Congratulations thank you. But a big thing is there. Hey you better turn down inflammation if you WANNA live a long time And the primary cause of inflammation is actually my cadre like because you don't get inflammation without them And if they're if they're not functioning all of the cytokines will affect your mitochondria somewhere another And in my own path of being much happier and not weighing three hundred pounds and all that turning off inflammation is a fundamental goal of almost everything. I do what I found though. Is that anxiety you not just depression. Anxiety is very much tied to biological wellness if your cells are working and I've all kinds of theories and certainly you've I've got all sorts of of laboratories there but for people listening to this okay. They don't have cancer. They're not injecting cytokines cytokines. But uh they're doing stuff that causes inflammation in where I'm going with this. Is this kind of a binary thing. Either you have enough. You're depressed or is IT A. You're a little depressed. You have less less less bounce today. You're far from depressed but you're a little bit inflamed so you're little bit less effective in your life is it. Is it linear or is it by well you know. Of course as a physician we tend to be more binary about things and we say well. Either you have depression. Are you tote when we we all know that people have a lot. There's a lot of great Gray area in between and I think it is linear. And and and what you're talking about is extremely important because the level of inflammation in your body and and we all as you as you pointed doubt that we all have sources of inflammation we can get into that information. Come from if somebody's not ejecting it into into your arm or you don't have cancer. For example. There are many sources than we go over. The you've already touched on something. I was recently in an aging conference about you know what what what are the drivers to people getting older. It's conference this was at Stanford and the conference was really It was all about inflating so that is a concert. Inflammation aging is one of the hottest topics in immunology. Right now because we recognize that much of what drives the process of of aging in the brain and much of what drives lives many of the illnesses that eventually Do People in our driven by inflammation. So we're talking about cardiovascular disease disease were talking about diabetes talking about cancer we're talking about neurodegenerative disorders really talking about. All of the diseases uses all the modern ills that we as a society are are are grappling with right now and the thing..

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"We're showcasing lots of different storytelling lots of different narratives lots of different attitudes and sometimes it's fiction times it's not but you know ABC News has opinion show opinions I mean they're they're journalistic enterprise part of the Disney family and there are there are people at ABC who can give opinions on things and I think you I think the SPN is just what they've done is they've gone way too far in the other direction and result they've made themselves unequal to the challenges of effective journalism in today's Day it's just there's just too much going on you can't you just can't keep it pulled up Jim Christley here I'd like to talk about your comments on this podcast Halo Music and I'm excited about a brand new music documentary podcast out L. called long may they run which explores iconic touring bands which have had a lasting impact on music culture the industry there I and beyond the first season focuses on the legendary band fish and is now out on apple podcasts or wherever you're listening right now stick around around because at the end of this episode will give you a sneak peek of what to expect in the series last uh the last one from me and again I realize you are not you know this is more in the world that the Austin Karpov John Lewis of Sports Media Watch sports TV ratings but you have any sense Jim do you some them and thinking about probably right about this soon do you think that China's story well of any impact on MBA viewership. I'm always one who tends to believe that people are going to watch games because they love the Games and whatever's going on sort of outside the Games they may have their opinions on but I love the warriors and they WanNa Watch the warriors they love the sixers and they wanNA watch the sixers they're going to watch but I don't know I'm not I you know I don't have all the answers and maybe there are people who are like the NBA's been incredibly disappointing here and I'm not GonNa Watch you have any sense of I think the China story I meet somebody who would think that or say that kind of whipped up in our smaller world's sports media in terms of you know I mean Look Adam Sandler Adam silver is it's a well regarded well like guy everybody likes him he's he's always been he's always accessible he's very very smart and I think that for a long time people thought you know he was just you know coated in Teflon and this is it was probably the first time in his stewardship where things got a little ruffled but you know that that happens in those jobs and I'm sure Adams Smart enough to is that they're you know they're easy they're tough days and particularly something like you know so far on the opposite end of the world I just I don't I don't see it listen I think they've actually done a lot of smart things but you know the they put out better statements I think they they're not going to serve I don't think they're going to prevent their players from talking at home once out of China so we'll see but you're right this is probably the toughest thing Adam silver's had to deal with in his commissionership and he's been arguably the greatest sports commissioner of the modern era to post two thousand so it's GonNa be it's GonNa be really interesting to watch that hey stop what you're doing on look down at your left wrist because our friends at movement watches have got exactly what you're missing movement they have you covered with tons of quality clean in an all around good looking watches and accessories that we can actually afford an order right from our couch do your wrists and your wall to favor go check out their minimalist design and that you can have with no risk because they offer free shipping and returns with over two million watches sold worldwide movement has solidified themselves elves as one of the fastest growing watch brands out there all right listen let me tell you about moving in terms of a watch that really loved avenue watch called the Nitro Blue Navy Blue Sunray dial brushed silver steel black leather angler date windows this is a series really freaking beautiful watch gonNA upset check this out nitro blue you can wear with a suit you can wear it with jeans and a t shirt at the beach take a look at you in this watch and they're going to be like art here's a dude who knows exactly what the Hell's going on Nitro Blue Movement also has tons of glasses and they offer interchangeable watch straps so you never run out of options for a new look and again this is basically the perfect gift for you you want to treat yourself to something nice or others you know we got the holidays coming up very very soon this is an absolutely fabulous gift somebody really care.

Jim Christley ABC News ABC China Disney Austin Karpov apple John Lewis
The future of diplomacy in the Twitter era

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:07 min | 1 year ago

The future of diplomacy in the Twitter era

"You're listening to the foreign desk with me. Andrew Miller on today's show I'm joined by Carolina Age and Richard Seymour Caroliina is independent diplomat cyber security and technology lead. She joins us from Milton Keynes. Richard Seymour is a journalist and author of the twittering machine. He joins joins us here in the studio. Welcome both Richard. I'll start with you and we'll start with. I think first principles we are where we are twitter and social media but twitter twitter in particular new things but the clearly not going anywhere in a hurry or something like the muse going to be something that diplomats will have to deal with breath. Is there any way at all now. You can not be on twitter if you are engaged in diplomacy. Could you just decide to rise above it now. I don't think anybody nobody in power can turned on the communicate of advantages of it but we should be clear that there's different ways of interpreting diplomacy you know if you're talking about making peace if you're talking about striking negotiations all all the rest of it twitter's nor very good platform for doing that. It's much better for showboating and sabre-rattling and grandstanding ending the kind of trump approach. If you like so I would say that really. It's not so much that you can avoid it but if you're really interested in diplomacy it might be a bit of a curse us because what's happening here is that we've got this a very elaborate system of global writing in which the rules have fundamentally changed a no one really fully understands how it's possible that war is being fundamentally rewritten but that is changing the rules and it makes it a nightmare. If you want to do what we would traditionally understand US diplomacy which would involve concessions climbed arms thinks that might be difficult for politicians things that would be difficult to maintain in in a sort of an environmental you know Phibro attention economy you know where everybody's struggling for likes and attention and so on and where a lot of the culture is driven by outrageous sentiment Caroliina are there any ways in which twitter has enabled diplomacy that it's actually made diplomacy easier or better or opened up constructive new ways in which it can be done. I think it has when we think about diplomacy in modern times really really realized in three pillars the first of these international law a complex subset of sort of the legal systems across the world and tweeter always it has very little impact on that but then manure start getting towards the second pillar of political strategy of negotiations of states wanting to achieve certain something in the the international system twitter might rate start playing some sort of a role but the third pillar which is public diplomacy of trying to get your message across I to audiences abroad. I think this is for twitter sort of potential of of just disseminating information in a way we can obviously debate whether it's not always positive information that gets resprayed around but it does have the power of getting messages across and then when we're looking at this third pillar of public diplomacy the twitter can have quite positive impact on on sort of statecraft. Richard does toy into your point. I think about how twitter is a useful tool for showboating. Thank sabre-rattling and grandstanding in fact. That's pretty much all anybody ever does with twitter but to what extent are those useful tools though to any ambassador the all or indeed state. Oh sure I mean there are absolutely vital tools their tools of war so I think it's very clear that if you look at the troll armies that it almost every major nation state has some form of troll army in other words they have paid individuals they have sock puppet spots and all the rest of it who exists to disseminate information that is likely to be destabilizing embarrassing problematic. Maybe fake it may be untrue but is going to cause problems for political industrial and other forms of opponent and even beyond states you think about a formation like the Islamic state which used the Internet to recruit the Grand Army for mobile theocracy never happened before and how did it do it. It did it by creating sewn own version of an online Omar a sort of almost like a national community from which it could draw resources recruits and using Hashtag jacking meaning and all the rest of it so obviously the standards are proving very useful but what's proven to be useful in terms of diplomacy as cyber war is often enough the the anticipated emerging properties of the system like nobody programmed the system for trolling for example that just happened to emerge out of it. Nobody programmed Graham D- Youtube to be good at so called Red pilling that just happens to be a feature of the system so actually I think a big part of our struggle now this to understand not what are the formal protocols and properties of twitter facebook all the rest of it but what are the emergent properties. What are the unintended consequences. What is if you like the unconscious of the

Twitter Richard Seymour Caroliina Richard Richard Seymour Andrew Miller Milton Keynes United States Grand Army Omar Phibro Graham Milton
Explainer 181: Brexit: will it ever end?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:23 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 181: Brexit: will it ever end?

"The british people have voted to leave the european union and the will must be respected. It was not a decision that was taken lightly. Blink not least because so many things were said by so many different organizations about the significance of this decision. If anyone is still keeping ping score it is now one thousand one hundred and sixty eight days since a narrow majority of what was then the british electorate primarily the non london in english electorate voted to take the united kingdom out of the european union as we go to where it is fifty six days until the u._k. Is due to actually leave the e._u. Having missed a couple of deadlines already there is something undeniably opposite in the current prime minister boris johnson being a former journalist. It is not too late to save pretzel boris. Johnson's government had a working majority she just about thanks to the expensive acquiescence of the democratic unionist party of northern ireland on tuesday that waifish advantage vanished when philip levy conservative member bracknell defected to the liberal democrats. I wish i wish i wish i followed later you too in the week by former labor and independent group m._p. Luciana berger. It's not impossible that by the time you listen to this jo swinson might be running the country and kyle the prime minister what advice she has for women across the country on how to deal with those men who think they could we do a better job are not prepared to do the actual work none of which it turned out made much difference to the week's crucial votes in the house of commons as we learned a number of conservative m._p.'s also oppose not deal brexit enough to vote against their own prime minister and in so doing prompt their prime minister to expel them from the conservative benches. It says everything you need to know about the polarizing effects of brexit that these rebels now outcasts were comprised of the mildest characters on the tory side of the house including former chancellors philip hammond and ken clock and cynical assumes the grandson of winston churchill. I want to make clear that i've always believed the referendum. Results must be honored and indeed. I voted for the withdrawal agreement on every occasion is is being presented to the highest which is more than can be said for my right on the front of the prime minister the leader of the highest and all the members of the cabinet who ciro disloyalty has been such an inspiration to so many any of this to speak. These punishments were followed by the resignation of m._p. Joe johnson the brother of boris johnson. If we are take boris johnson at his word and there is mountainous evidence that this is a hazardous course he still wants a withdrawal deal but wishes to keep the no deal option shen in play as a negotiating ploy this makes on the face of it since it is rarely wise to limit your options in such circumstances although the no deal brexit strategy is not so much a threat to walk out of the rug shop as a threat to shoot yourself in both feet and then sort of bleed all over the stuff while screaming but parliament seems reasonably enough to believe that i know deal brexit which is the present legal default bolt is not a risk worth running. The obvious resolution to the impasse would be a general election but the u._k. Appears now to find itself in the curious position of having a prime minister who wants a general election but says he doesn't squaring off against positionally who doesn't want to general election and says does as we wanted an action photographing is the appeal of an early election suggested date is october. Fifteenth is clear enough to johnson the plan would be to win a mandate condemn the labor party to to further disarray use a majority to pass some sort of withdrawal agreement and claim a great triumph and even if it doesn't work out quite like vast he'd still it'll be prime minister until at least two thousand twenty four. It's just as easy to see why johnson wouldn't want an election just after a new deal brexit especially if it's as bad the government's own projections predict people deprived of food and medicines unlikely to behave gratefully at the ballot box but due to the arcana no no of the u._k.'s fixed term parliament act it is not possible for johnson to simply cold and election. He requires an amount of cooperation from the opposition who do not seem inclined to give it at least not yet on wednesday night. Labor voted against johnson's motion for a general election lead jeremy corbyn corbin said that the bill blocking a no deal brexit would need to become law. I the offer the election. Today is a bit like the offer of an apple to snow white in the wicked queen because what he's offering is an apple or even election but the poison of ano- dale said an election in october still seems is likely the not the large bets on the result would be ill advised the u. K. you may have noticed is in a strange mood on the basis that the usual usual foam with brexit has been whatever is the most ridiculous theoretical outcome is probably what will actually happen. Another hung parliament causing another election within in six months seems a decent punt and or an amount of comic justice may be at hand the key underpinning of boris johnson's korea in public. Life is his hotly debatable conviction of his own destiny as some churchillian colossus it would be something if the shambles he did so much orchestrate ashes him into the footnotes and pub quizzes as britain's briefest prime minister while we're keeping score of things he's still seventy six days short <music>. I'm andrew miller <music>.

Boris Johnson Prime Minister European Union Brexit Luciana Berger Apple Jo Swinson Democratic Unionist Party Of N Andrew Miller Democrats Winston Churchill Philip Hammond Philip Levy Jeremy Corbyn Corbin Britain Korea M._P. Kyle Dale
Chinas surveillance state

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:48 min | 2 years ago

Chinas surveillance state

"One of the crucial stories of the last few decades has been China's extraordinary surge to catch up with the rest of the world in manufacturing technology. And in economic military and cultural power, one of the other crucial stories of the last few decades has been the erosion of privacy in the online era and on that front China is pulling a distance ahead. China is in the process of assembling an immense and pervasive apparatus of surveillance, which will monitor and punish and reward, the most every day of behaviors and interactions of more than a fifth of the world's people, the prophets of doom of the pre computer age. Imagine that any such system would have to be imposed by a dictatorship even George Orwell did not envisage that the population of airstrip one would voluntarily surrender personal information to the state, the communist party of China is assuredly a dictatorship. But has it also understood that a great many people below? Leave privacy to be over rated. What is the reality of China's surveillance state how might develop in future? And is it a case of today? China tomorrow, the world, this is the foreign desk. They intend the system to record every single action transaction by each Chinese citizen, whether it's economic transactions social actions are moral behavior. And then in the end create the system that ideally, in real time can sanction you and censor your or reward. You also, we've known for a long time that Goodland Facebook's business motor profit revenue has come from essentially selling our attention and that requires having a sense of what we interested in also kind of maximize the value of our time spent on decision. But I think maybe we just the fact that for all the convenience truly the enjoyment, we might get from these services. There is a price to be paid into the day some. Oh, my friends, when we want to talk about something that we think, well, public Ed attention from the police, we tried to, like, okay, let's meet offline less meeting cafe. And to have a discussion more and more. I don't want to talk about. Real issues out, like we had wayball. You're listening to the foreign desk on monocle twenty four with me, Andrew Miller on today show on joined by Caroline can and keisters matter, Caroline can is an editor a China dialogue, and the author of under red skies, memoir of growing up in China. Caroline joins us here in the studio in London and Kayce strip matter is a journalist and the author of we have been harmonized life in China's surveillance state. He joins us from Copenhagen welcome both KAI. I'll start with you. Just so we can define some terms here and make it clear. Exactly what we're talking about. China's surveillance state as referred to in the subtitle of your book is a common phrase. I suspect it's one of those, which is rather more talked about than understood. So when we talk about China's surveillance state. What is it exactly? We are talking about. Well, actually we are talking about a whole youth thing now. China was always the dictatorship. It was always a civilian state, but what heating paying. The communist party's doing now that they're basically re inventing their dictatorship with twenty-first-century information technology with artificial intelligence, and with big data and stuff. So basically we're going to see something developing their that the world has never seen that before. Caroline, what's your sense of it as somebody who lives in Beijing? Because a recurring theme of your book, certainly in the time you've been alive since one thousand nine hundred nine is one of state intrusion into people's lives, which would be regarded as extrordinary in most countries. Is it your sense that it is exceleron getting exponentially, because of the technology and the way that Kyd describes? I think when I was younger, there was a time when there was more and more freedom, and especially with the development internet. But then clearly like since the year two thousand twelve or two hundred thirteen I could feel that freedom has been shrinking. And now as kaija said, almost every street in Beijing any city. I you see the sec- TV's cameras catching any images of people whatever people are doing. I also have the fear that Wease the big data technology like people would ever they do Welby, so closely monitored. And to me, that is quite worrying, Koi, again, to return just to the basic idea of how this actually functions. We're not talking yet. Are we about one immense, centralized technological panel to knishes still a, a mishmash of overlapping dot networks? It is at the moment. Yes. Very much. So. I mean, a lot has been written, for example, about the Social Credit system, which is part of this whole effort, but it's only one piece of the puzzle, and there are many, many other different pieces of the puzzle and of course, the central government tries to sort of get a grip on all of this, and maybe especially the state security apparatus would like to have in the end one big database. But of course, the big question is like in all those used bureaucracies, will they actually be able to make it work exactly in that way? But even if they won't I would say there is enough to be worried about Carolina Social Credit system, which is something which is attracted a lot of attention in the last couple of years in particular, again, I think the some of the reporting of it may have focused perhaps overly on the lurid science fiction imagination of it, as Chinese citizen, who lives in China. How does it affect you on a day to day? Level as you go about your life. It is not like something that you see every day. Oh, you feel like getting so close to your every day. Maybe there's something that you don't have access to review your own Social Credit. Like the only thing I noticed in my life, a kind of, related to sort of crowded is, there's alipay like an app by Alibaba and there's a function of borrowing money. And if we repay back the money in time that you cried you score at rising. So that is the only thing I see so far about it about, of course, I heard stories about people who don't pay money in time, and they got the candle blocked from going to buy a train tickets or of flight tickets. And this kind of like being black list, and I don't know how was you up, like least how do you get rid of that list? So that is something that I, I think that will affect the people's live. Corey, how does that differ, though, or how might it different future from credit writing systems that you have in any developed country, really whereby an frankly, not unreasonably if it becomes the case that you are a credit risk? If you have a history of paying back, things late or not at all, then it does become increasingly hard for you to borrow money or get a mortgage. How different scale we talking about here in, in the Chinese experience. Well, the interesting thing is that actually Allah systems, probably were sort of starting point for the Chinese system, but the main difference, of course, is that it doesn't restrict itself to financial transactions the aim of the government in the end is they intend the system to record every single action in transaction by each Chinese citizen,

China Communist Party Of China Caroline Beijing George Orwell Facebook Andrew Miller Alibaba Carolina Communist Party ED Copenhagen Corey KYD Welby Kaija Editor
What does the Freedom party scandal mean for Austria?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:49 min | 2 years ago

What does the Freedom party scandal mean for Austria?

"Earlier this week, a video was released, which showed Australia's vice-chancellor conducting an unwisely amenable conversation with someone claiming to be connected to Russian money in the video shot on either in two thousand seventeen Heinz Christians rocker of the ultra-conservative Freedom Party appeared to be offering government contracts for political favors. He has now resigned and the Freedom Party has quit the government plunging Austrian politics into crisis. It is an extremely we'd scandal. Indeed verging on inexplicable, if you are a remotely sensible politician is only one rational response to any suggestion by anyone with a Russian accent, that quantity, rubles might be on offer in return for certain surreptitious services rendered that one sensible response. Is this stand up? Thank them for the drink and declared as loudly. And as clearly as possible in the direction of any lamp shades handbags that might be secrete. Eating cameras that you are. Absolutely not interested. Not now not ever. Not for the first time angry. Populists have demonstrated themselves temperamentally unsuited to actual governance. Can Austria's chancellor Sebastian Kurz survive this and seeing as how he brought these dubious far-right Yahoos into power does he deserve to this is the foreign desk? He tried to distance himself from this a little bit, and tried to portray himself as having been sort of transformed, but that infect was not completely true and could took one and a half years. Now to say that this is really enough. And he didn't do this. I mean this video just showed too much of the moon face of his coalition partners. You don't have to take very far to understand that Russian money per meets European politics in a really big way. Loads of Russian money makes its way into European parties through think tanks through various kind of campaign. Pledges. There is a huge problem post himself as somebody who suffered who week demised himself for the nation for the country. But this is sorry to say nonsense, because it was him who built this collision, it was also him who would have had so many possibilities and options to say something nobody told him to suffer. You're listening to the foreign desk with me, Andrew Miller on today's show. We'll take a detailed look at the scandal, which has both up ended and bewildered. Australian politics and ask, if there is a lesson here for voters elsewhere, in Europe, considering supporting populist outsiders, like, for example, don't but I currently of Monaco's correspondent in Vienna outlines what has become known as I beat the gate. It's hard to convey to the outside world, the extent to which the scandal has gripped the Australian imagination everyone who was talking about it in every cafe in every home up enough to guess drinking video was, he comes Alexandrian, a quarter of the population watch that historic speech by chancellor Sebastian courts last Saturday. The one where he said that enough was enough skin. Skin is and that was in the same night as Eurovision and in the spirit of vision. The scandal has given a new lease of life to this nine thousand nine hundred nine hit song by the she adults group, Bengals gets cold. We're going to be, so it's at the top of the charts in Australia. Why? Well. Because of course it was on that Spanish on that the secret video was recorded. Seriously, though, the video came as a complete bombshell, but the fact that it was the Freedom Party, the FBI mass down. So spectacularly was actually not that surprising until compared to if the social Democrats and the conservatives have long very long tradition on their values on their ideology on their programmatic basis, and this is quite different to f f is a party that opposes and not creates. And this is one answer why they always fail by themselves, did Luke was a spokesperson for the former conservative chancellor, Vulcan Schuessel, who also led a coalition government with the F the in the early two thousands. She was that, when that government collapsed would say their challenge is not being. A responsible party who governs? It's more being a party of the opposition. And this is a different role and blow up. It was their own failure. It was not the failure by others. Nobody would think about having another if a if a coalition for the next future. So I think they really knocked out themselves. Is in trouble then. So is the of a pay the conservatives, but things could go either way for them. It all depends on whether their leader chancellor courts survives the no confidence vote on Monday courses being under five using the fat his own ends, and Fulmer coalition with the F the fest place. His public statements have the past week. Have also come in for some criticism. He post himself as somebody who, who suffered two week demise himself for the nation for the country. But this is I'm sorry to say nonsense, because it was him who built this nation it was him. Baba taught is reporter working for the Viennese weekly defaulter, the only Australian publication that was given access to this talk video before it was released. She's written a biography of court since she's been watching his behavior in the public's reaction stood closely Ostrom people. They're beginning to scrutinize in to deconstruct would he's doing because. It's, it's easy now to see. I'm the anchor and I will guarantee stability, but people are beginning to ask, who's he takes responsibility for this crisis, and that's him. So it's going to be not so easy for him to have the same run during the election. Like trees Sebastian codes loses the no confidence vote on Monday. He'll remain the most popular politician in the country. But what does all this mean for the? All the all fall ride going to slip from political infamy into political obscurity. Alost word from baba told no Mike, my answer would be no. Because we believe experienced the end of the F in the beginning of two thousand to two thousand three some thought, it's the end in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s so I would be very careful to say. It's the end let's, let's remember, do not Trump during his campaign when this recording. When pop Nick, where he talked about what he does with women, and everybody was shock. Then everybody thought this is going to be the end of Donald Trump. And he was he was elected. Similar to this. I think it can even help to mobilize Motus, who will see the effects, the something.

Freedom Party Chancellor Sebastian Kurz Australia Baba Donald Trump Chancellor Sebastian Andrew Miller Vice-Chancellor Austria Europe Eurovision Vienna Motus Bengals Nick Ostrom Vulcan Schuessel Luke Monaco
Explainer 166: Was Australias shock election result really that shocking?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:13 min | 2 years ago

Explainer 166: Was Australias shock election result really that shocking?

"The results of the federal election held in a stray Lee. This past weekend was one delighted the country's bookmakers except the one betting firm regarded the thing as such a foregone conclusion that they paid out on victory by the opposition labor party before vote was counted. Believed in miracles. And tonight we've been delivered in the what. Not for the first time in recent memory, the electorate of a western democracy declining to do as pundits and posters. Had confidently predicted a stray Lia returned to office, the conservative liberal national party coalition, led by incumbent prime minister Scott Morrison, despite more than three years of polling showing a consistent lead for the labor party led by Bill shorten. I, I. And we'll wanting to hold out of the also, it's obviously not all of them. It is, perhaps, tempting four to cast Morrison's, unlikely victory as yet, another populace tantrum thrown by these spoilt, people of a wealthy and orderly nation comparable with the Brexit vote of two thousand sixteen the election of Donald Trump the same year and the handing the reins of power in several European countries and regions to sorted varieties of cowboy. But this is not that the result of the two thousand nineteen Australian federal election is instead, something of a political paradox, being both surprising and predictable. It is surprising inasmuch as nobody expected it, at least not this time, but predictable in the sense that it is the nineteenth occasions since the end of World War, Two on which ustralia has elected, the liberal party and its conservative coalition partners, far from being another furious, incoherent tipping over of the tables, this may have been a rare vote for steady as she goes business as usual looked at like that. When contemplating the global context, it might even be vaguely reassuring. Which brings us to the question of what kind of prime minister Scott Morrison will be not before Saturday question that many thought even worth asking Morrison became prime minister in a party room coup only last August, and it was widely suspected that he was destined to be remembered if at all, only by these setters of pub, quizzes seeking to start arguments among competing teams over the identity of strenuous, twenty fifth florist serving prime minister. Instead Morrison finds himself with a full three year term ahead of him and every chance of being the first Austrailia and prime minister to complete one for more than a decade. This is not just due to the against the odds victory Morrison one at the weekend. But the manner of it Morrison whose pre politics background walls in marketing substantially sidelined, the rest of his front bench and may Delek Shen all about him hoping that he's slightly labored, persona of an awkward Ernest suburban dad would connect of let a few things about the prime minister of the last couple of days of whipped up on this visit that we've both chosen well, in terms of MRs body Miranda, and gin you, and I, maybe punching a bit above are white, but nevertheless, that the tactic worked is self evident, but Morrison will not necessarily find the going easy from here, though his win on Saturday was remarkable. It was also close and on a few key issues. Morrison is comfortably in minority among his fellow Australians. He is a Pentecostal Christian and instinctive social conservative. Not a common outlook in a largely secular and increasingly small l liberal country and Morrison is if not an outright climate change skeptic, then a climate change equivocated who now finds himself leading a people who consistently list the environment among the most pressing concerns. This seems to have been one of the reasons though the list of possibilities on this front is not short. Why the voters of were ringer, a hitherto, solid liberal seat on the proverbially, prosperous, north shore of Sydney dumped their long-serving MP, and former liberal, prime minister and big weirdo, Tony Abbott. It doesn't hurt to lose, but sided I'd rather be a loser and quit. Perhaps more interesting question than how the liberal party and Scott Morrison won this election is the one asking how the labor party and Bill shorten lost the supposedly on lose -able. They may have been an answer. In the notably bipartisan national mourning prompted by the death a couple of days before polls opened of Bob Hawke, one of shortens predescessors, as leader of the labour party and prime minister of stray Leah from nineteen eighty three to nineteen ninety one this government, Mr Speaker has the resources that talent and the skill maj, this dramatic vices better, and stronger, and even more prepared to put the interest of the ordinary threat in the country. Was by any measure, a substantial prime minister, but he was also a supreme political communicator, who understood the country needs to see something potential leader of what it is, or what it wishes to become in a stray Lia the liberal party traditionally offers the status quo labor. The vision Bill shorten in the estimate of a majority of the stray Leah's voters offered, neither his successor as leader of the labour party has both need and an opportunity to think big. Monocle twenty four. I'm Andrew Miller.

Scott Morrison Prime Minister Liberal Party Labour Party National Party Coalition Bill LEE Leah Donald Trump LIA Austrailia Delek Shen Andrew Miller Bob Hawke Tony Abbott Ustralia Sydney Mrs Body Miranda
Coups detat: do they ever really work?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

04:55 min | 2 years ago

Coups detat: do they ever really work?

"Primary opposition figurehead on Guido appeared in an online video surrounded by men in uniform announcing that he intended to end the rule of President Nicolas Maduro Madero did not however respond as despots traditionally do if they military's desert them. There was no desperate skedaddle to the airport. Suitcases clanking with the contents of the national treasury a step ahead of an angry more brandishing. Pitchforks, though, Guido may well have another crack at it. The choosed a coup at least is an entry in the annals of failed overthrows, but the coup data as a means of acquiring power appears to be enjoying something of a Rene Saenz. This decade alone has seen coups attempted or accomplished in Egypt Mali, Malawi Guinea, Bissau Cote, d'ivoire, Chad, Libya, Lesotho Thailand, Gambia Burundi mcanuff also Turkey, Gabe. Bon Sudan, Montenegro and Zimbabwe, and we may have missed a couple. So what's it like to live through a coup? D'etat? What's it like to be in on one? And are they ever a good thing? This is the foreign desk. Most of the democratic transitions transitions from authoritarian governments to democratic governments have occurred with a coup being part of the process in. So the question is not our who's good or bad. But rather who is the coup against and more importantly, what comes after you needs to keep the patient on India needs to actually demand that the military is to do things the way as in bubbling expect things to be done in human rights expected the law should build tainted we have victory one. We don't have Gabby pets. We've still have the system that was best may Mugabe divide and transfer of power. He's not something that historically tends to go. Well, for anyone least of all the people at the bottom of the hape who are suffering as a consequence back governments anyway and certain Ku's second place in west Africa. They have ready if f. Any benefit people that they were supposed to be liberator. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller when the overstaying Zimbabwean tyrant Robert Mugabe walls, unloaded by Imbaba as military in November two thousand seventeen it's fair to say that any unease about the means of his removal was drowned out by celebrations of the indices rule, but is the short term gain of a coup. Even again as considerable as the end of dictatorship as ruinous as Mugabe's worth the long term damage to a country's political fabric. Grace Mutunga is a journalist in Harare and author of the memoir the power and the glory grace. Let's go back to those events in Zimbabwe before the military stepped in and removed Robert Mugabe from office was that expected or was the whole thing that complete surprise. He twice both really rule and expected in some way because people always used to say that the only way Mugabe would be moved with the bag. Me 'cause they didn't believe that the opposition hits the capacity to move over to Gabby. What happened in two thousand eight refused to stand down after Morgan's gray hit one or testimony into that. So in a way, some people expected that they would be cool. But we're not very sure that it would happen because we thought the soldiers we very in with the with Robert Mugabe. So when the the did get set in motion, what was your personally, I understanding that this was actually happening on the eve of the CU we saw military vehicles coming into town. And somehow we hit this sent that things will two k, but we're not very sure by any hours of the morning. I remember waking up head something that sounded like a bomb going off guns. Something I don't know. But we tend out later. That some ministers in the Mugabe regime hit been visited by the AMI hours of the morning, and they'll get blown off to gain access. And then by foyer 'em when you know the soldiers then came onto the national TV because I switched onto network TV, which I really watch because I thought something was really going on. And there was this woman out circulation that there was a cool and away around for him. That's when regarded more you then came on in announced that former President Mugabe was safe in December safe in the waking to remove elements around him that we miss the

President Mugabe Guido President Nicolas Maduro Mader Zimbabwe Treasury Rene Saenz Gabby Bissau Cote Grace Mutunga Bon Sudan Andrew Miller India Egypt KU Morgan Montenegro Turkey West Africa Libya
Benjamin Netanyahu set for record 5th term in Israel

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:34 min | 2 years ago

Benjamin Netanyahu set for record 5th term in Israel

"Are few countries whose elections command widespread international attention and very few such countries as small as Israel approximately the size of El Salvador with a population roughly comparable to that of Papua New Guinea, but Israel since its foundation in nineteen forty eight has become accustomed to being a story in which the whole world is invested. Israeli elections are never straightforward not once has any party won a majority on its own and government is always by coalition. And the this week's election was close. It allowed a narrow path to continuing power for Benjamin Netanyahu who now prepares to serve a fifth term as Israel's prime minister Netanyahu is by now for better and for worse. A very well known quantity. Many have interpreted his reelection as an indicator of a gathering right would drift by an increasingly uncompromising country. But and this would be a first where is. Rayle is concerned. Is it really that simple? This is the foreign desk. That he does not in buddy. Now represents all Rayleigh. He is elected prime minister. He knob in related for fister, certainly means a lot. But if you get this is what he's trying to do when we we accept that. Whether we're falling observers always Riley with thing along with him. Would completely expected. But what was not really expected, and what's is a little bit. Weary and problematic with Russ tinian. It was the right wing victory to that percentage. Israel has always been self conscious of its image around the world, and Israel has always known that it has one huge friend, which is America and San Yahoo. Who was not in great terms with the previous American president. And all of a sudden now, you have Trump is president and is released like Israel has been Netanyahu's position has been vindicated. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller on today's show on joined by Dr Dali Shenlin and show Feffer dully Shenton is a public opinion expert and strategic consultant who joins us from Tel Aviv and show Feffer is a journalist and author of BB the turbulent life and times of Benjamin Netanyahu and chill joins us from Jerusalem. Dalia? Is there a consistent reason? Do you think why the people who have voted for Netanyahu vote for him? If you were to ask his most loyal voters. What is it that appeals to about Netanyahu? What would be their response people who are stable supporters among them. Some of them are longtime traditional Likud voters Likud is one of a few parties left in Israel that has a traditional vote going back generations, certainly back to nineteen seventy seven and some of the people who vote for Likud just continue because it's part of their identity to vote Likud. But in addition to that, of course, they support Netanyahu. And I think it's a little bit of a miscarriage. Irritation. You hear frequently in this election that it's all about Netanyahu's personality people really support his policy those who have voted for him. They support the fact that he has not moved ahead on his Palestinian negotiations in a way that would lead to a Palestinian state. They believed that he is restrained when it comes to wars and escalations and doesn't always jump into wars and most of all the love his foreign policy. And the reason why new people voted for him is very similar to the reason why some of the supporters vote for him, maybe without the kind of long-term identity based reason for supporting we could before we look at Walt Benjamin Netanyahu's fifth term might entail, Israel, we should examine the likelihood of him actually getting to serve all how big a threat to his immediate political future of these corruption charges still looming against him there, quite a major threat. There was through cozy three investigations which have been. Wrapped up by the police with recommendations to indict him for bribery. The attorney general has accepted most of those recommendations and ready issued his official warning that he intends to for bribery and one case in for fraud and breach attrition to others. It's still has the right to a pre trial hearing, which will take some time Pepsi few months, but one that is over and assuming his lowest fail to convince the attorney general's every case, and we all the care has been taken into sending these I find it hard. I think it's not happening this we'll be we'll be facing charges in cold within some six twelve months. So if he's threatening the jeopardy of his victim just to fuller that up and Joel has there been any discussion at all of how he can hope to govern in any meaningful sense while actually appearing in court defending himself against what are quite serious charges. Well, there's been a great deal of discussion about that foot for quite a while. Now, that's now saying in the open that I don't believe that charges will be we'll be pressed because I will prove in the hearings that has nothing in these charges. They hasn't privately that if the charges are brought in. He intends to to stay with this kind of being prime minister despite having to pairing now, another people in Israel, including some of coalition members believe at that point. I it would it would be ridiculous permitted to remain. There's no precedent for Israeli law is does not stipulate that he has to resign. But there's there's widespread disbelief that he could hold on after that, then he'll try and who knows he's he's defiant. We had a team in other cases. Maybe it's maybe it will succeed as well. But it is really the main obstacle facing. And the biggest question Mark moving moving over his future. Dolly one difference in this election. Obviously was the emergence of a new position alliance, or at least a new opposition figurehead, which is the the the former idea chief general bennigan's, do we get a sense yet of whether Gaunt's intends to stick around as an opposition figure. And if he did whether he would be regarded. As a credible implausible one by Israeli voters. Oh, divi- divide generally tend to take the view that you had your shot and you failed and you are therefore done our bike to enter that. But I I do want to augment by. I response about why people support on Yahoo to follow up on the issue of the indictments just briefly, we should point out that I think I've heard a lot of people who were not planning on voting the cooed before. But said they changed their minds to vote Likud because they felt the indictments are either overblown exaggerated or agree with Netanyahu's own a narrative that there is some sort of a collusion or conspiracy. If you will between the forces of the left, the media, and they are pressuring the the judicial law enforcement system, and I think we need to take that into account. In addition to the issues of people who were simply supportive Netanyahu everybody who thinks that he is guilty. And then he does represent a certain form of corrupt governance and has been self serving. And we'll do anything to stay in power and represents the corruption of our institutions. Those are the people who supported Ganz and other members of the opposition. But I think that Ganz his party in relation to your second question really got the votes of a wide swath of people from the Israeli center. Many of them from the Israeli left and probably some from the Israeli right which seems to have lost three seats as a block many of them coming from other parties, but some of them clearly wanting to replaces on Yahoo by supporting Ganz now will he stay around. There's no way to know Israel. We have to remember that he is positioned himself as a centrist party and Israel. Does not have historically a great history with centrist parties, they tend to stick around for one or two cycles before kind of diminishing and then sometimes even collapsing. So I think it's not only about Gant's, but about the role for these kinds of parties that try to avoid taking a strong position on some of the most divisive issues in Israel, particularly, of course, the Israeli Palestinian conflict. And then we'll see if either he continues as a politician or whether his centrist party, which is. Strange coalition of three other party, three parties altogether. Whether they can see eye to eye on policies enough to keep them together. As a party until Bergamo McNeil who has worked I think coin to seed you asleep both in Israel and over seas to portray himself as the embodiment of the Israeli nation. And for that reason, certainly when I think is very looked at from overseas. People tend to regard Israel through the prism of Benyamin Netanyahu. We're going to talk in the second part of the show about how Netanyahu operates in the world and about how he plans to operate in the world. But when that view goes back the other way when people look at Israel and think of Benjamin Netanyahu. What are they not seeing what part of Israel that is still alive and vigorous now, he's not being represented in the government or the character of its prime minister. Well, yeah. I mean. Agrees with with this. But I think ace Pat to characterize the election as having been a referendum on the suit the busy for offense. And if you look at the numbers, this was a you're you're quoting from London where the issue of a referendum is still very much alive. Two and a half year after Brexit. This was a fifty three forty seven results. So forty seven percents of his railings, despite that's overpowering charisma, very successful campaign, and you just make ten years of successful governments in in terms of economy and relatives communist real and improving foreign relations despite everything that people thinking that's forty seven percent voted against him. Which is I think quite an impressive numbers almost half of the country. So is not represent Israel. If you look at their own party votes than he does certainly and did they could property which they needed for so long, but the view that he and buddy. This is what he's trying to do. And when we we accept that. Whether we're falling observers always Riley's where basically playing along with him

Israel Walt Benjamin Netanyahu Prime Minister Likud Riley Yahoo Rayle Rayleigh Papua New Guinea Russ Tinian El Salvador Fister Andrew Miller Bribery Dalia President Trump Tel Aviv Ganz Jerusalem
Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

13:10 min | 2 years ago

Islamic State's foreign fighters: What happens to them now?

"Syria. Islamic state is a state no longer earlier this week, the Jihadist group which at its peak controlled an area of Syria and Dirac lodge of Austria and imposed its brutal rule upon eight million. People was chased out of its last pocket of territory by goose a town on the frightens river near Syria's border with Iraq in losing its territory is Lennox state lost many of its fighters, but it didn't lose all of them. Thousands of the caliphates foot soldiers are presenting themselves and their families at refugee camps and presenting the countries from which many of them hailed with a considerable political legal and ethical pickle. Which is basically this. What is to be done with them? There have been some calls for an international tribunal. But it is surely impossible to put so many people on trial. They cannot simply be abandoned, and it would be a brave politician willing to bet their career or a society willing to bet it safety on these. Jihadists returning home as altogether reformed characters. This is the foreign desk. Hot is pre programmed to think of every defeats as a test in. There will never see anything in as permanent defeat because it has already pre-programmed into their minds mindset and into their psyche. If you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death sentence. The tendency that we have in western Europe amendment to say, it's not out problem. They left us. They took up arms against us. We want nothing to do with them is all very well by the peasant doesn't cease to exist. So I think it behoves the society which broken up to consider why has this Cussing taken on against us? And what should we be doing about that not with the individual concern? Sent only but also with society as a whole. You're listening to the foreign desk with me Andrew Miller today will be hearing from a former director of global counterterrorism at M I six and from the full member of al-qaeda to look at what can be done, and what should be done with defeated jihadis. But I for a view from the ground from Syria on joined by Jane, Arraf international correspondent with NPR. Jane, stop by asking you to set the scene forest where he speaking to us from exactly what have you been able to see over the past few days. Well, I am in a which is one of the cities in the sort of a ton of Mus Kurdish region of Syria. And this is also where some leadership the Kurdish leadership is these officials who are trying to persuade other countries that they should have an international tribunal here in this northeastern part of Syria and been able to go to a couple of the camps where they're holding foreign his wills Iraqi. And Syrian ISIS families, and I've also been able to speak to one of the foreign fighters. Those foreign fighters have been apprehended by Kurds and the US coalition the US led coalition in many cases, they've been in US detention in Syria detention centers, actually, run by the US, and now handed over back to Kurdish forces, do you have a sense of what kind of numbers we're talking about in terms of the ISIS fighters currently being held by the codes. And that's all of the Iraqi Syrian and foreign there are said to be about seven thousand of them. So that is mostly Syrian and Iraqi about a thousand of them eight hundred two thousand or said to be foreign fighters accused foreign fighters, we have to make clear that they haven't actually been tried or convicted yet, but they are suspected to be foreign fighters. So that's all the way up from eight hundred to about a thousand is the estimate you generally get from US military officials as wills occurred. In what sense you able to get a what kind of conditions that being held in? Well, compared to what they came from which was almost certain death as US air strikes in waters attacked the last bit of their territory. It's, you know, not bad the conditions of interviewing these fighters preclude either asking for getting detailed answers about how they're being held in where they're being held. But one of the ones that I interviewed he was a Canadian fighter had been held in solitary confinement for quite a while. He also said that he was having trouble getting medical care. Clearly was well enough to do an interview. But certainly medical care seems to be an issue, but having said that, you know, having covered this battle against ISIS the war against ISIS over the entire ISIS territory. It's much better than the fate that befell a lot of them which was basically being obliterated by air. Yikes. Mortars and in other cities, if we boil this entire story for the moment down to this one Canadian fighter. What sense were you able to get all of his views on gun to assume it was a he his views on now on the subject of the ideology. He joined up to fight fo did you get the sensitize east had much in the way of a rethink? Yeah. Pretty much all of them have. And this was really interesting because I found this as well. In the case of the women who were married to ISIS fighters. They have now been for several months at least in detention with either Kurds or Americans, this particular foreign fighter told me that you know, he'd had a lot of time to think, but not only that he'd had a lot of interactions with the Americans who interrogated him and with the people who are holding him and with the Kurds. He said, for instance, but one point the Americans had given him novels to read one of the women. I spoke with told me that she had. Been aware. And I'm not sure if this is true, but she said she hadn't been aware of that ISIS held slaves. You know, they took thousands of UCD's from the tiny ziti religious minority as slaves massacred, the men and took the women and girls as sex slaves. She said she'd never met one until one of them was brought to the detention center to talk to them. And she said, and that's when I realized it was true. It wasn't just rumors. What they did to these women. So yes, in many cases, certainly in the case of this Canadian fighter. I it seems to have had an impact another foreign woman who is married to ISIS fighters told me that she was happy that she wasn't sent straight back to her country. She was from the Netherlands, and she said had she been sent back. She would still have been radicalized. But as it was her views of changed a lot. She said in being held for months and months by the Kurds because the biggest question, I guess the overarching question that we're looking at in this episode is with the ideology. Of ISIS will survive the destruction of the caliphate that the whole selling point of Islam state, and there was a clue in the name was that it had conquered territory. It was building a nation. It was building a homeland. If it is seen to have filed in that central enterprise. Do you think it's still going to be able to recruit people who might be inclined towards jihad? Or is it you'll sense from talking to the people you just mentioned that they kind of starting to realize that they might have back to lose a well there are a couple of things here. One is that in terms of ISIS being able to recreate a territory the caliphate had held which ranged for seventy thousand square kilometres, roughly and encompassed major cities. No one really believes they'll be able to do that. Again. In part of the reason, it's very apparent in Iraq. For instance, the people of Mosul, which is the second biggest city in Iraq. At first, many of them will tell you. They welcomed. Isis five years ago when ISIS came in because they so hated the Iraqi government and security forces, and then they realized what ISIS actually was which was indescribably brutal. The also they will not make that mistake. Again. They know what ISIS is now they know the dangers. But having said that there is a real fear that there is another ISIS in the making because we're talking about roughly in the case of Iraq thirty thousand members of ISIS families. Now a lot of those are children. So let's leave aside the children because children are children. But if you take the adults in those families, the women, for instance, a lot of them do still believe in the ideology, there is nothing that has changed their minds since then as for the foreigners. You know, a story I hear over and over and talking particularly to these foreign women is I didn't know what I was getting into. I don't understand Syria. I married. The sky might boyfriend told me to come. So those ones seemed to have had an awakening. And those are certainly the ones that want you to know they've had an awakening the, you know, I think we also have to realize that there are lots of those people in detention in these camps who are not talking to us because they believe were infidels because they still believe in the ideology and in the coun- recently in L hall camp, which now has more than seventy thousand people in it in northeastern Syria, some of the people running the camp told me that there are new arrivals all the time. And it's those new arrivals who are the most still radicalized that they've been saying in some cases that the head of ISIS abo- becquerel daddy ordered them to come to the camp that they will stay in the camp. But then Baghdadi and ISIS will take them out of the camp. So there is no one who does not believe that ISIS is still a threat those ones who will. Speak to you. Then what do they want to happen now, especially the ones who have come from outside, Iraq and Syria have the old discovered. A sudden enthusiasm for democratic G prosise. Yes. Well. It depends where they come from. So there was a group of women. I met Dutch women they want to go back. And some of them said we understand we broke the law. We want to stand trial. But it's our children were worried about they wanted their children to be handed over to their relatives. In many cases. These are very small children toddlers, really young the others. It depends again depends entirely where they come from a I met quite a few women from eastern Europe. And there was a Chinese woman. They are all terrified of being sent back to their countries because they believe they would be executed not only that they're even afraid to contact their relatives because even by contacting their relatives their relatives would end up in jail. They say so the ones who come from western countries tend to want to be sent back there. But as you know, the problem is these countries don't want to take them. They don't want to take them mostly for two reasons. One is it's really not clear how much evidence would carry over. If they were to stand trial in their own countries. And then the other thing is they could actually pose a danger if they can't be put on trial. They can't be prosecuted for things they may have done here. Then they will have to let them go, and they will be free in their own countries. So it's a dilemma you mentioned that there is some enthusiasm among the Syrian Kurdish leadership for the idea of an international tribunal have they talked at all about what they see as the scope of that they can't realistically intend to put tens of thousands of people on trial on the they can't know and by its very nature and international tribunal would have to be set up by the international community. And there isn't a whole lot of appetite for that for one thing the Kurdish leadership here is not internationally recognised. That's a big deal. And then these things will take years and years. There has been a move to send some of these fighters in any case from countries that don't want the. Back to Iraq and Iraq can prosecute them. If they've also been in Iraq because a lot of these fighters did come from Iraq from Mosul the foreign fighters, even when they were driven out of Mosul, they came to Syria, so they could be prosecuted in Iraq. Now, the problem there is those are not transparent trials, they're not run, according to international standards, and in a lot of cases, they do end up with the death penalty. That's one thing that the Kurds keep saying if you send these people to Iraq, they will be killed. So you have this dilemma of western countries that don't want their people back. Some of them are willing to send them to Iraq to be put on trial there. But they're sending them to Iraq with a full understanding that they're going to be put on trial and going to be held in conditions, which could very well include torture and result in the death

Iraq Syria Isis United States Mosul Iraqi Syrian Europe Syria. Dirac Austria NPR Iraqi Government Al-Qaeda Jane UCD Andrew Miller Netherlands Eastern Europe L Hall
Explainer 157: Oh Brexit, where art thou?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:01 min | 2 years ago

Explainer 157: Oh Brexit, where art thou?

"Uh-huh. The beginning of this week, and such is the effect. Brexit has on our perceptions of time the beginning of this week. Now feels like something that happened before the ball war. There was a gathering consensus that didn't you want to the Brexit fiasco was at last looming. The UK's Prime Minister Theresa may now making the limbless and defiant black Knight from the one and the holy grail seem model of philosophical pragmatism was seeking to put her EU withdrawal deal to parliament full the third time uncowed by the fact that its previous to submissions had resulted in the biggest and fourth biggest defeats ever inflicted on British governments Bill the is to the right. Two hundred forty two the nose to the left three hundred ninety one. View was nevertheless forming but maize plan for another. Go was not quite as mad as it sounded that with the March twenty ninth deadline looming. All but the most crazed of Brexit ahead. Bangers would understand that maze? Root out of the EU was now the only one realistically on offer and fall in behind it, a vote cast reluctantly counts the same as any of them. They might still have been a delay. It is far from clear that parliament has time to enact all necessary legislation before much twenty nine but the two thousand and sixteen referendum result would be honored. The UK would be leaving the EU may had emphasized and correctly that any delay without defined end. Would risk this blessed event not occurs toll. And as I say there is a danger. Failure to agree. A deal that actually could end up in a situation where we have no Brexit as. On monday. However, the speaker of the house John berko in the manner perhaps of a boxing referee, taking mercy only battered barely conscious contender and calling the fight confounded may scheme. Bucko invoked a splendidly vintage president of parliamentary procedure dating back to sixteen four which precludes governments from pestilential repeat introductions of bills previously voted down. The government kennel legitimately do is to resubmit to the house the same proposition ball substantially the same proposition as of last week, which was rejected by one hundred forty nine. Thanks main seemed genuinely surprised by coz intervention, though, she should not have been mostly because berko a piece to have a legitimate point. But at least, partly because throughout the Brexit process bucco has given every indication of very much in. Enjoying the bright of the neutral spotlight has shown upon the speaker's chair. Unless substantial changes were made to Theresa May's Bill ruled berko, it would not be readmitted, given that substantial changes to not seem possible without the acquiescence of the EU who have already made it clear that they won't be any that would appear to be it. Unless inevitably this being Brexit. It isn't. As we go to a various ruses being suggested for dragging maze. Withdraw agreement back into the ring including vote to overrule. The speaker will even asking the Queen to prorogue the current session of parliament and then open a new one. Although again with barely eight damn days to go until Brexit is supposed to happen. It is debatable that there is much more time for such nonsense. If it's hard enough to make sense of what has happened making sense of what will happen is like teaching dog to play the banjo. You can try, but what would be the point. It's possible to say what the possible outcomes are the current default of a no deal Brexit, an orderly Brexit next Thursday as planned a delay to Brexit general election, a second referendum, but such has been the up ending of logic by breaks that VO one of these surely has to occur. They all seem somehow unlikely we have reached the point at which an invasion of England by Scotland wouldn't seem all that surprising on balance and mood in many respects be a relief. Meanwhile in keeping with the satirizing tradition, which has characterized Brexit from the off this past weekend. The unrig generate Brexit ultras of the leave means leave campaign commenced, an epic March from Sunderland to London to protest what they perceive as the imminent, betrayal. In miserable. Cold, pouring, rain. The few dozen would be golden souls who reported for the March to leave as it is known will lead by Nigel Farraj at least for about the first five hundred yards. Very arguably, not the first time Farraj has got a bunch of credulous saps round up about some vainglorious fully and then left them to when the going tough. As we go to where little is known of whatever survivors applauding grimly own on shed. Joel seeming they have not given up a run wild and resorted to cannibalism these full-on footsore stragglers shortly June Pontefract, they are entitled to observe. However that lonely wet and or deluded though, they may be they have a better idea of where they're going than the rest of the country. Does. Twenty four. I'm Andrew Miller.

Brexit EU Theresa May UK John Berko Bucko Nigel Farraj Prime Minister Boxing Andrew Miller Joel England President Trump Sunderland Scotland London
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Everybody. This is Richard. I'm welcome. The sports media podcast producers always Pellegrino two segments this week. But I think you really gonna find that interesting. I up this James Andrew Miller, the best selling author of books on ESPN, Saturday Night, Live and CA and someone who is chronicled ESPN for more than a decade. Now, we go pretty deep on the firing bad NAN Virk and as you'll see from from Jim. Miller's passion and fire on this podcast to say he to say that he believes this is a over punishment would be quite the understatement. So we get into that. And I think you're gonna find that really really really interesting after that is Chad fan of the Boston Globe and AJ Peres of USA today. Both of those guys cover media, and we talk about the Super Bowl viewership ninety eight point two million linear television, super super low, and we get into the reasons as to why we think that happened and all. Both of those guys also give their opinion on what went down with Adnan Virk, so Jamila for about forty minutes or so and followed by Chad Finn and AJ Peres coming up on the sports media podcast. My guess this week is a familiar one. It is bestselling author and writer James, Andrew Miller. He is the author of many books that people are familiar with on this podcast, while the oral history of Senate live CAA ESPN, of course, and he is the host of the Argentines podcast. And there is a new Arjun podcast next month. Check that out on cadence thirteen apple podcast, etc. Jamila welcome back to the podcast. Thanks for having me. All right. So we're going to be we're going to do this entire entire podcast on Adnan Virk and ESPN's decision. Earlier this week, or I guess I should say yes PS decision last week is we're taping this to fire. Adnan Virk for what they termed as as leaking as providing proprietary information to a reporter credit, Andrew Martian of the New York Post for breaking the story of the firing. And then getting the details of what happened check that story out a think fair to say, I'm Jim Nile sort of expand on it. But the the main facts in in Andrew story are certainly correct. But but of gives an brings up a lot of a lot of an interesting places to go to especially for a place that has made its bones and made its money and made its fame on sources providing information to them, and that is ESPN. Our Jim I want to start at the beginning. And that is let's just sort of go generalize. What was your reaction to and and Virk being fired? And and how do you look at that situation while it made me carsick, and I think you know, the truth is that. We all know that. There are every day. There are a lot of conversations that happened between employees of ESPN executives producers talent, otherwise on background with creatures like us. We also know that this is a guy who would work there for nine years. He bled ESPN. He's got four young boys. He's got a moral compass, despite the fact that some people now are saying, otherwise, and here's the other thing too. Which is how the fuck did that get leat? So we're talking about a situation where somebody is fired fired not suspended fired for being on background, which basically is confirming something, and we'll get into that later, and then somebody from inside ESPN leaks to the press. And so it's not even like this guy..

Adnan Virk ESPN James Andrew Miller AJ Peres Jamila Jim Nile Chad Finn Pellegrino Andrew Martian USA New York Post Senate Boston Globe writer reporter forty minutes nine years
Flags: whose is best?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

10:39 min | 2 years ago

Flags: whose is best?

"Us. Very few people whether they're happy admitting it or not are entirely indifferent to the hoisting of the country's flag. For a survey of what different flags mean to the people of different nations. We consulted the riot Asli multinational stuff here at monocle. I'm the foreign editor here at Monaco. Canada's flag the maple leaf was introduced in the sixties as way to set itself apart from the Union, Jack, which was on our previous leg since. Then it's probably most notable around the world as being spotted on backpackers backpacks as this rose in the seventies. When Canadians did not want to be mistaken for Americans during the Vietnam war when they were traveling, and that's continued on through the Iraq war and even today. I'm actually betting with Trump. There's been a bump in backpack sport in Canada flex. I'm Stephanie's Kia, and though I may not sound like it. I grew up in the United States where the flag is held in sacred esteem when we were very young we were told that it was not allowed to touch the ground and friends of mine who attended senior schools at after I left had to swear allegiance to it. It's a symbol that is everywhere in public life. You'll see it in the grocery store and at the gas station. I'm Karen Miller. And I'm the culture editor at Monaco. Now unity is not an easy thing to combine Italian politics or for that matter in its citizens national identity, but it is that precious and rare feeling that the Italian flag represents and celebrates over the years. It has naturally been used by people in all signs of the political spectrum from partisans to fascists, but somehow it has managed not to become just a preserve of far-right and theorists. It remains overall a benign and relatively neutral symbol of Italy's institutions its constitution and its young Republic, not particularly incendiary symbol. And when was the last time anything to do with the Todd politics felt fairly sedate? I'm Ben violent a producer and present at monocle twenty four. Now, I've got to say that the Estonian flag has long been a fairly contentious issue. Although overwhelmingly it is seen as a positive symbol. I would say that considering that indigenous Australians aren't necessarily represented on the flag. He can lead to a bit of misunderstanding to the types of issues that indigenous people do phase now importantly indigenous people do have their own flag. And that is why the respected among the strains as well. It's often seen at sporting events and the international events as well. So it's not as if there is no representation whatsoever. But when Austria tries to pitch it's flag as one fly, the represents all stray liens one. Does get the feeling that. Actually, there are a large number of stray into might feel as though in fact, they're not represented by that one single flag. I'm page and I'm a research app. One cool twenty full, and I am from the exotic southwest suburbs of London for me the Union Jack is actually quite an aesthetic flag, very bold colors at symmetrical and very recognizable. But it's still interesting. It's not just a Colo this sort of intricacy to the pattern. In fact, it's service Leszek that I chose the Union Jack to be on my bed sheets at my in my first year of university. And I studied in Dublin this proved slightly problematic as any later that I sort of realized that the eight hundred years or so of oppression was a factor. I should have considered before the junk on my bed sheets. And I think that's why maybe people feel a little bit uncomfortable about the Union Jack of it is so closely associated with the Royal family and colonialism, and it's got that nasty hangover sense about her. I'm your lane if affair and where I'm from. A nation is divided as Belgium split between the Flemish in the north and the loons in the south the flag has hardly anything to do with patriotism. It is almost exclusively used at sporting events. When at least we're little while the nation feels United even separatists don't mind waiting the Belgian flag and the World Cup from his will be merely seen as supporting the Red Devils. This is the foreign desk on monocle twenty four I'm joined once again by two Marshall, and we wanted to close out the program by by trying to set the oh, I'm sure not at all vexed question of whose flag of all the countries in the world ease best. I've drawn up a little list of my own come up with five that I really liked for various reasons be interested to see if they overlap with yours, we have not shared notes. Maybe if we start with what what are your top five over there? Okay. To be boring. I'll have to say that it is subjective. And if you'd say what are the best flags that work? I would give you different lists giving them even example. I like the Kenyan flag because the designs crying good. But the the the shield in the middle of it is a mess, I warrior shield now the messiah only about one point five percent of the Kenyan population. If it'd been a shield who are about twenty percent poppulation that would be a serious problem. It would be a bad fly. Leg because why do they went into the mess? I nobody's really bothered is simply something. Oh, yeah. It's symbol of our nation. So it's a good flag, Mozambique. It's on my list right for bad flags. I hope I caught like, okay. Well, I think it's a bad flack because it's got an AK forty seven on it, which isn't good. I believe but also because it's so similar to the flag of from yellow which was the organization that took on joined the independence fight full moat, Mozambique. But the problem is they represented overwhelmingly woman, particularly ethnic grouping in Mozambique. And so they pretty much said right off lag is now going be the national flag. So I think that's also that's a negative flag. Right. Good flexible flex. I. That's through the good flags. I like the Japanese flag simple, but effective, and when you know, a will the sun never sets, and you know, that behind Japan there is nothing except the sea. And then that sun, which is why I love the Macedonian flag is just mad. It's on my list. Okay. The sunburst it comes from Alexander. The great that they think was Macedonian, of course, the Greek student agree. It's just so not in the grouping of European flags each their South Korea is nice. It's not on my list. But it's in the Yang light. So over there in eastern and the little things in each corner. Actually, they mean, something to the South Koreans Brazil. Yeah. Good co- bit fussy. If you wanna talk, I let's believes but. The stars on the Brazil flag are in the position. They were on the day that independence was declared in the sky, which I like an I also liked the colors. But that's where the subjective thing in how we imbue meaning to it. I like the Brazilian football team and they play in those colors. And so it's kind of more attractive was in and of itself is just blue green Italy simply because it's such a fantastic lease simple and beautiful flag that immediately says good food. Bit again, that's the reverse engineered projection things. Actually, I also had on my list. I had Pakistan's flag, which I think is is simple and beautiful until the story of the country and has become trees. Placing the little stripe down the left hand side of the flagpole side is to include all the minorities of the indeed. So I I think it's a lovely flag. The practice may not have worked out quite like the theory. But I do like to play it's important that you have there. It's like I said the American flag doesn't always live up to its idea until the factors is if it's the thirteen stripes for the thirteen colonies, and they fought for liberty against the oppressive Brits. So in the flag is the concept of liberty. And it's important to have it there. Even if you don't always live up to its value. The ones I have mostly in aversion to flags which have the map of the country on them. So that Cyprus and Kosovo I think Cambodia's is annoying because it's just being tourist attraction in the middle of Bosnia. And Kosovo both looked like they were designed by committees. Try not to upset. Anybody and I guess understand. Also, I know the man who designed the Bosnian flag so much will pass it on to. Which might your list of disagreeable, Mozambique for reasons that we've gone into ready in the K forty-seven Greenland. It's just read in top and white at the bottom. And then the circle in the middle of it, which is white at the top. It's just boring. Uganda? Uganda's is black horizontal stripes. Black yellow red followed by black yellow red. It's like you've taken the German flag in the Belgian flagging sewn them together. And in the middle is this bird. It looks like a sort of chicken, you get an Endo's. It's actually the crane which is a national vase just it's just too fussy Nigeria. Green white green. Great country. But no such a like, and then Antarctica again the same guy that designed the Bosnian flag design how to hand in designing the talk to flag two thousand and two NET simply on a blue background for neutrality. And then the shape of enter Antarctica on it. It's just the best for like in the world. But the best flag in the world. I think we have agreed is Macedonia's. No, we have. Agreed. It's yorkshire. Is there a Yorkshire flank? We'll call is what's on light blue background with the white rose of Yorkshire Brian there in the middle, which I happen to have exactly the same thing. Tattooed on my right shoulder. So officially then the best flag in the world is Yorkshire Macedonia. Running a close second for my lecture notes on social thank you for. But he's it for this episode of the foreign desk went back next week and lookout for the foreign disc spleen available every Wednesday the foreign desk is produced by Yanni Goffin and Bill Bill so edits the program. My name's Andrew Miller. Thanks very much for listening until next time. Goodbye.

Monocle Editor Monaco Mozambique Canada Uganda Karen Miller United States Iraq Antarctica Donald Trump Jack Yorkshire Macedonia US. Italy Austria Belgium
"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Sports Media with Richard Deitsch

"Oh, Chris Corcoran and the entire Kate. Well, congratulations on your transition from SA athletic, my transition from mediocre to above average. All right. Jim Miller is a bestselling author as you know, Google Books. He's on Amazon, he's all over the place. He's the host of the Arjun podcast last big on with sex and the city, which I'm not a big sex in the city fan. But the people who listened to that told me, it was pretty awesome and super honesty from Sarah, Jessica, Parker and others. So if you're sex the fan check that out and also obviously the yard and stuff. Nick Sabin and and everything else on there. He's just good apple podcasts or Stitcher type Arjun with Jen. I don't mean to do a blatant plug. But I did do I did do a podcast on ESPN social media, and they wound up being I'm glad that it's a lot of tension because every everybody who cooperated from ESPN. It's probably I don't know probably fifteen people interviewed including skipper Djamil sage other get along. You got a lot of the players on that. It was if anybody's interested in how social media kind of evolved in devolved at ESPN, please listen, and let me know what you think. Check that out. And let's Jim Miller gets invited to the biggest podcasts in the game. The Bill Simmons's, and you know, the the people that level so for him for him to slum on this small. His fantastic. And we appreciate it. James, Andrew millage Miller. Thank you as always for your time. Thanks for having me. All right back in the studio. My thanks to James, Andrew Miller. Jamila for coming on the podcast. He's been on pretty much about as much as anybody except for John O ran, and it's always interesting discussion with him about ESPN. I appreciate his time. And he's got a a mega popular podcast origins. So make sure you check that out. The the producers at cadence thirteen doing amazing job with that podcast. That is really really labor intensive obviously Jim does great job of narrating it and putting it together and the booking, but that is that is really impressive production, quite frankly Macharia than this one. No fence to my buddy, loophole green. Oh, but that is some hard work that those guys do for Arjun the previous podcasts. If you wanna check them out, the one before this one was Chelsea genes of the Washington Post in Bruce Feldman, Chelsea as an interesting story in that. She is she's leaving the Washington nationals beat which has been on for a number of years to cover politics. She's gonna cover the twenty twenty election. One of the candidates that was. As really interesting just how that works the Washington Post in that's really cool before that a MBA roundtable with Howard Beck. Candice Buckner and shirt show. He three very prominent via writers that was a lot of fun. If you're interested in sort of in how the NBA's covered, and what happens there check that out Tom Vertucci before that Rebecca Lobo in China Robinson on women's best coverage in the states, and then Troy Aikman Kate Abdo. Rachel Nichols, Candace park Mill Hill, Renee young and many others just head to the sports media with Richard I page, please leave us a review that really really helps keep this podcast around. And obviously subscribing is is the reason it exists. One quick note before we go, and I I wanna wish everybody I will happy new year. And the best to you for twenty nineteen my family moved from New York Toronto in twenty eight team. So it was a really major year for us. But a Toronto's been incredibly welcoming candidates just an amazing nation, and so the shadow to everybody who's been so great to us where we've made this this pretty mega move in our lives. So one last note here that I just want to make note of couple of weeks ago. I sent out a tweet not not over my feed. But I responded to a couple of former colleagues of mine it's Portugal straighted, where I said to them that while I know it's not everybody's style. I was hoping I saw more people from Sports Illustrated support our old can't our old colleague Maggie gray who Maggie Griffey. Those of you know, as a WFAN sports talk host in New York City. She's on the show right before the Mike francesa show. One of the great colleagues. I've had during my career just an incredible professional so super talented..

Jim Miller ESPN Chelsea Washington Post Andrew Miller James Andrew millage Miller Chris Corcoran Nick Sabin Arjun Bill Simmons Google Portugal Maggie Griffey New York City Amazon Maggie gray Mike francesa Candice Buckner
"andrew miller" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Monocle 24: Culture with Robert Bound

"He's website. The show was produced by Holly Fischer and recorded and mixed by Alex Felix. We'll be back at the same time next week with live music by Joseph. But until then I'm Andrew Miller. Thanks for listening. You still play. No. Every day. Yes. Juiced. Me. I have this train. I. Why? No, I don't feel Channing. Right. Bye..

Andrew Miller Holly Fischer Alex Felix Channing Joseph
"andrew miller" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Yeah i think so i think there always is they have a bullpen that could be historically terrific yes as they have had for the you know since andrew miller was here you know that they have a depth at bullpen in that electric you know on type guy that later on you green became a multi inning weapon they need to to get his mechanics back look like he was beginning to do that towards the end of spring if he looks more trustworthy right.

andrew miller
"andrew miller" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"andrew miller" Discussed on Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

"With some injuries you're gonna payment arbitration bits probably gonna be a lot less than what he's worth as long as he's healthy so i give up quite a bit a i think if the as are out there looking for in andrew miller type of return which was uh to top one hundred prospect one was sort of top twenty five or thirty in clint fraser and then to other players who are not elite but but prospects in the sense that they will or expected to have bigleague value looking out there for a package like that fourplayer type of return to top end but two other guys with some value to them i think that's completely reasonable they might be able to get a little bit more but i would probably at least set my sights on settling for that say well we're not gonna take less than roughly what we think tank he's got for andrew miller because you might take a little bit less because grace had the uh injury history and a little bit of up and down in the performance probably tied to not be healthy so you're not gonna get what you get maybe for an you'll lead starter for like a a jose kintana but you should do i mean that ferry that might be greedy i think they've got the best i agree with you it's the best asset remaining on the trade market at this point um in terms of who be interested live the yankees are interested they have the prospect to put together a better package than just about anyone else who might be interested i've seen other writers have commented that the braves might be interested i just can't see them trading i starting pitcher with all the starting pitching coming in their farm system um it seems like if they were going to trade any of the pitching in the miners that they'd be doing it for a bat that just seems like it would make more sense about may not be available now it seems like it'd be a better use of their prospect assets at this point.

clint fraser andrew miller grace jose kintana yankees braves