4 Burst results for "Andrew Mccrae"

"andrew mccrae" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"andrew mccrae" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"The children of lake knowing or unknown. If we're in memory we you full of mine for my finally. Our voice has been cura. I'm sharon break. Kelly and is leoni mcenroe. She is one of the children of lake alice. Who has told his story at the royal commission until abuse in care more than forty years. After the unit closed they are stories of abuse electric shock treatment and painful drugs and a warning. Some details may upset listeners. Just note my inglewood's more mo- volun-. I hated cry cry but because the math god well and he turns it back on the game and it goes on or whatever to knocked out. That's when it stops but it's just like being hit by speech amount. I say to the commission plastic charles. Brian but voltage child up just about break cubans and expecting their all. Have a normal on pump the woods. It's not gonna happen. He could see black. Zigzag is going through your heat. Same as seeking in the dude runs soon excruciating pain. He just want complaints about the treatment of more than three hundred. Young people in the child and adolescent unit of the psychiatric hospital near fung annoy emerged in the nineteen seventies when it was still open and winton for decades but no one was held to account to police was to apologize to like l. survivors for these filings. State failed them during time at lake. Callous and failing to predict the from what can only be described as torture at the hands of dr selwyn. Leaks and other like ellis stuff. If it was today there is no way. Dr lakes would be practicing. Job is to protect the public. We're not there to protect doctors today on the detail. I talked to ariz. Inside reporter andrew. Mccrae he has been at every day of the hearings every morning. There's a cut akia team karakia. Please stay for the opening prayer and song and a water. Which i think. Just.

leoni mcenroe lake alice commission plastic charles royal commission inglewood sharon Kelly dr selwyn Brian winton Dr lakes ellis ariz Mccrae andrew
"andrew mccrae" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

RNZ: The Detail

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"andrew mccrae" Discussed on RNZ: The Detail

"The children of lake knowing or unknown. If we're in memory we you full of mine for my finally. Our voice has been cura. I'm sharon break. Kelly and is leoni mcenroe. She is one of the children of lake alice. Who has told his story at the royal commission until abuse in care more than forty years. After the unit closed they are stories of abuse electric shock treatment and painful drugs and a warning. Some details may upset listeners. Just note my inglewood's more mo- volun-. I hated cry cry but because the math god well and he turns it back on the game and it goes on or whatever to knocked out. That's when it stops but it's just like being hit by speech amount. I say to the commission plastic charles. Brian but voltage child up just about break cubans and expecting their all. Have a normal on pump the woods. It's not gonna happen. He could see black. Zigzag is going through your heat. Same as seeking in the dude runs soon excruciating pain. He just want complaints about the treatment of more than three hundred. Young people in the child and adolescent unit of the psychiatric hospital near fung annoy emerged in the nineteen seventies when it was still open and winton for decades but no one was held to account to police was to apologize to like l. survivors for these filings. State failed them during time at lake. Callous and failing to predict the from what can only be described as torture at the hands of dr selwyn. Leaks and other like ellis stuff. If it was today there is no way. Dr lakes would be practicing. Job is to protect the public. We're not there to protect doctors today on the detail. I talked to ariz. Inside reporter andrew. Mccrae he has been at every day of the hearings every morning. There's a cut akia team karakia. Please stay for the opening prayer and song and a water. Which i think. Just.

leoni mcenroe lake alice commission plastic charles royal commission inglewood sharon Kelly dr selwyn Brian winton Dr lakes ellis ariz Mccrae andrew
"andrew mccrae" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mccrae" Discussed on WTVN

"In his new book, Andrew McRae visits small towns, cities and rural areas that had performed a makeover. These are places that are succeeding by creating robust economies, vibrant communities and focusing on how to build a strong next generation of residents. The book is titled Total Town Makeover. Andrew McCrae. Welcome to Our Ohio Weekly. Thank you. Glad to be with you. I looked at your bio. I noticed we have A lot of things in common. Very similar backgrounds. Both grew up on farms. We both have some experience in the broadcast world. You have five Oscars. I have zero I could go on and on. About how many things we have in common. Tell me. Tell me your background. A fill in the blanks force where you're from. How are you involved in agriculture and what? You're off farm duties? Well, I grew up in northwest Missouri. Maysville. Missouri is my address grew up on the farm and still and on the farms. So I went to university. Missouri got my degree and came back there, Which is where I live with, you know, life and two kids, but got involved in broadcasting right out of college. A TTE that time from Agriculture Network Brown Field and then the transition into TV and radio in some print with armed journal, but began a programme called American Countryside 24 years ago. And so that radio program now has heard on about 100 stations every day and then do quite a bit of speaking as well. So that takes me mostly Midwestern, but really all across the nation so kind. We're three different hats but still on the farm and actively involved in the farming operations. I gotta be honest. You'll know this. When you do a program like this. Sometimes you get people on there a little bit nervous and timid, And there's a lot of editing to do when you get done with the interview, But when you have another radio person on there with it, you're gonna make my job pretty easy this week. Now you've set a high bar you have and those types of things, but I know what you're talking about. I have to edit practically over sure. Every week and sometimes every day being a farmer and a broadcaster and an author. We'll talk about your new book and a bit. They are all very different jobs, which one is harder in your opinion. Well, you know, I guess I would say the farming from the standpoint of forming is very much a day today operation. And so if you aren't there all the time you get behind very quickly. No, I certainly so far was my dad. We've got one full time employees, other spokes help. So you know the farm goes on. But I find that that is somewhat difficult because I feel like I'm sometimes behind on things with how I do the radio. I can kind of do that when I have time certainly have deadlines. But I could maneuver around a bit with that. So that helps, But the farming it's still my passion, and there's so much going on farming. You always have to stay up with time. That's for sure. Well, I have to imagine that you know, the broadcast thing is fun. We know that firsthand. But being an author, and sometimes the topic matter that you cover on the broadcast side or when you put pen to paper, it could be pretty tough. And I think this this new book this total town makeover. Some of the things that you write about some of the things you see, you know, coming from a small town in Missouri. I come from a small town here, central Ohio. Some of those things are pretty tough to write about. In this book. Total Town makeover really kind of hits home with with a lot of people like you and me that come from small towns that have seen those small towns change in one way, shape or form over the last 20 years. Give us Ah, current status of small town, Yusa. You've travelled all over the country, and now you have this book that you wrote s. So what? What are you finding out there? It really comes down to how you want to view it, And that's not Teo. Avoid the question, But it really does. I am in small towns that are you can you can tell that And then your other small towns of the same size population wise that air tried. And I find that many times. It is just how the citizens of that town or that community decided the look of things whether they said, you know, were small, but we can do things were gonna be proactive in several areas and they've made things go and there are others that I think Perhaps a black leadership to drive the ambition. That's not that they're bad folks, but it it's a place that is not thriving. And so what? I did somewhat a bit by accident because for the American countryside program, I get all of those interviews on location. Well, for 24 years, I'm most within chronically people in places that are, you know, neat stories that you may never heard of that doing good things. And Wow, I looked back and said there's some common themes among the places that are are thriving. And so that was the motivation to write this book of Okay, So what are these people doing in one of these places doing and what can we learn from them? How has Real America changed over the years since you started really paying attention? Certainly, in some places population has declined, although that is very much relative on where you live. So that is one thing that's changed. Technology certainly has changed, and in some ways that has hurt rule American and other ways to help so We could say well with technology, young people are more likely to move away move bigger cities or places where they could do their work. But conversely, for those communities that are well connected is allowed a certain number of people to come back to those communities and be able to do jobs remotely without going into an office. And so now they can live in rural America. Those two things have certainly changed quite a bit, and I can't say if they change their lives for the better or the worse. It's very much dependent upon where you live. Obviously, you and I both know that the economy has been in a downturn since 2012. Before that. We saw a record corn and soybean prices and we saw A renaissance, I would say of rural America. We saw these young people that went off to college that normally would stay in the city Come back to the farm. They saw an opportunity there to make a living and start a family. Ah, Do you think that the last 78 years of what we've seen with commodity prices and how it all trickles down into the rural economy? Has that affected some of the towns you drive through, day in and day out. It may have some, although I think that many of those decisions are even longer term than what we saw was the uptick in the farm economy. So certainly it hasn't heard whatsoever. But what you find in a lot of these small communities that are thriving is is there is value and wealth in those AG lands and those AG operations, many of them especially the long time folks that have been there. So having some of those operators see not only the value of their farm, which they probably already do, but the ability of using some of that wealth to be able to support Local businesses or to support local entrepreneurs or even another generation of folks that want to be back on the farm, helping them that is really critical. In fact, we'd get into that in the book and the places that have really been able to do that. Well, and so in my mind Even that longer term picture has been even more important. Certainly an uptick in the farm economy. It doesn't hurt anything at all. The book that Andrew McRae is talking about is his latest called Total Town Makeover. He is also the host of American countryside Been doing that now for the past 24 years, and you mentioned Andrew that some of these towns that Our starting T make a comeback or starting to reinvent themselves. The townspeople are taken matters into their own hands. What are some of the ways that that they're causing their own renaissance, so to speak? We break it down in the book into three areas. What is what we call economic vitality. Are there ways that people can earn a living either through getting a job or being an entrepreneur? Secondly, is what we call a vibrant community. So even if I could work there is the place I want to live doesn't have amenities and will say that for a rule community, whatever that might be, Eikenberry And then doesn't have a next generation focus. Is that at least looking at that next generation and how we offer opportunities for them, So those three things become very key. I believe in a community that's that's going to drive one of the community's you feature in this new book..

Missouri Andrew McRae American Countryside America Our Ohio Weekly Andrew McCrae Total Town Agriculture Network Brown Fiel Maysville Yusa Andrew Ohio
"andrew mccrae" Discussed on Drawn To It

Drawn To It

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mccrae" Discussed on Drawn To It

"Written about this person predict. Specifically. I mean I think that's people and. We're playing. To get ahead. Taylor swift she never. Names. So and so at this address, here's the phone number. One step farther, yeah. Yeah. We were added concert one day and you. It was here actually in Saint John and you in front of a bunch of people. It's like this is a song. I wrote about my fear of commitment Oh. Yes, starts playing. But I mean a lot of people have that though it's relatable facts, I talk all the time on the podcast about. My struggles with anxiety and depression and stuff, and like even just sitting here with you guys minds ideas through the roof. And there are things in my head I. Have to do to try to work through it. You know so when you're honest with people, so much of the audience is I hate. I I do that, too. That's me or that that part of what they're going through I've been there. So I, think people really they latch onto that. So that's where so you mentioned you perform here in Saint John, you live in Valjean. Okay. Okay. It is on your page. Maybe So how how broad do you get to go with with performing? I hate that that happens every fourth or fifth podcasts. It will be done before I. Get to it so I'm just gonNA. Let go. Do you want us to wait or do you want to just keep going? This is what it is. It's all real. Physically. We haven't really gone that far like in terms of travel. We've done like just Fredericton in the surrounding area. Like Saint John, Moncton. Those places, but we're really pushing Digitally because that's how we feel, we're going to get our music out there which is gone fairly I mean well in Canada. Guys have a team that helps you without. People really know the secret of digital marketing. Actually I work at a media. Production Studio that digital marketing. Talk. Again For Yeah so the team up there has has really been. Guiding us in our producer Andrew mccrae actually works with me at that studio and he's just anytime. We have a question. He knows the answer so. The thus fantastic, I love. How well produced your song sound too like they don't. They don't have that. Recorded in. My Bedroom. A lot of people that pull it off and do quite well, but yours just sounds so I'm listening to. Why have I, not heard this on the radio. Yeah, like I. Get Mad I. WANNA call people. We. Did we did record them all in the studio with our producer and with our team and whatnot, but it's so funny. 'cause none of the songs. How it, Kinda worked out was we had written all the songs and then we Kinda just turned up like with all these people are like. Here's the song. And then they just ran with it like even we had no idea what any of these. None of the music was written. Everything was like Improv for the most part in studio with the different musicians, so so all the subtle subtle little piano things like keyboard notes such a sort of a something at the end I'm like. How do they plan all that we didn't? Yeah, it was kind of like. Every time. We add a new layer. We we get the drums. Don and it'd be okay Tom to the base here it is in the Bass player would do. His thing is so cool. It was just like a good time. The combination of everybody's like own personal flair just really worked, and we couldn't be more happy with how it turned out, but so when you guys are writing. It's like Jessica. Stick at first and. You hear the music I or the lyrics I. Kinda depends. I think usually Sam is more lyric based in I'm more music based, so it's usually a combination of those things. where it's like I'll be like this progression and I'll play it for her. She'll be like I. have this verse and I'll put music to it or something like that, but. Kind of just depends on the army think. How many? For for me, I'm just trying to relate when I'm doing a drawing I draw over same drawing many many times before I'm happy with it. Yeah, do you guys do process? Your your songwriting or is it? Is it sort of. In that, you're you're tweaking as you go and. I think. Some songs there are some songs that we have done where it's like. We leave it for a couple of weeks and come back to it. because we'll just get frustrated in. We need to take a break. Take a minute a lot of the time we'll just we'll record on our phones. We'll just like. Sit down and play the progression for a couple hours straight, and just like seeing whatever comes to mind, and then go back and listen through it. And pick. Yeah together but yeah. It's Kinda just depends I think. There there has been times where we finished song completely not only doing it for me like I. Don't know why. Go back to it, but. But combination of the two, and when you guys are writing a, don't have lurker you scatting along to the music like. What just some sort of thing to then go back to replace it or Yeah there has been times where I've been playing. And I'm like I. Don't have a line here, so I'm just going to home but I'm going to play it for you and you tell me what you think. A lot of the times we're able to come up with lines for each other songs if we have like creative block for it, but. yeah, there's been a lot of verbal Improv in songwriting, or there's a lot of times like I. have this like I'm just going to see what I'm doing while I'm playing this progression for you. I can't relate to that when it takes me so long to get into my creative sewn. Push through. The fear of the white page, the antique canvas you know that that's anxiety trigger number one, and then if there people around me, there's inside trigger number two. They're gonNA. Expect me.

producer Saint John depression Taylor Fredericton Canada Moncton Valjean Andrew mccrae army Jessica Sam Don Tom