18 Burst results for "Andrew Mason"

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

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"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"That process of incubating descript were you thinking of it like a hedge. Were you thinking of it? Like a hail. Mary were you thinking of it like some combination of the two. It sounds like there's almost like you were setting up the company with a sense of cognitive dissonance. But you had a sense that that was the only way to actually do this. It was a little bit of a hedge. It was a little bit of. We can do both these things. And it was a little bit of just self-indulgent. I'm personally really interested in this both because I'm interested in audio and media production but also because I just love building tools and so yeah. I think it was all those things you've worked in a recording studio and whenever I see those recording studios they have all this gear inside of them. Are you a believer? That we need analog gear. Do you think everything can be turned into software in the audio production process the recording studio I worked at was electrical audio studios in Chicago? Which is famously analog recording studio so everything at the time was done on on two inch tape and I personally it depends on what you're doing. I guess I I really appreciate the constraints that that puts on the on the creative process. And I'm a firm believer like in all aspects of things that you know making things easier doesn't necessarily make them better but that's really like about one's creative process beyond that in terms of like the sonic qualities of it. The reason I never became a recording engineer and didn't stick with that is because I have terrible taste and that sort of thing and and so I wouldn't be a good person to ask. I think you know people spend way too. Much time fixated on on gear as a way of procrastinating on their actual craft as a musician. Is there a part of you that wants to quit this whole business thing and just write music all the time and not at all? I mean I'm an amateur musician. I'm not very good. I love to play music but I don't. I don't really have any desire to write music. How big is the PODCAST tooling market? We'll find out. There's a lot of podcasts out. There and it's it's growing quickly. It's big enough for us and a bunch of other people and a bunch of investors to be excited about it. You know we think of ourselves. As part of a larger new media space than podcasting specifically in the new media world content tends to blur the boundaries between podcasting or audio text and in video you're distributing across all three for any given piece of content. And when you think of it that way when you think of how the size of video than it really starts to get quite exciting. Is there a way to make podcasts? More social I don't even know what you there's this common theme around the fact that podcast can't be shared. Maybe you just don't you don't you don't even like explore the world podcast marketing at all. You're just more in the PODCAST. Tooling space. Like people will say that. There's a problem being able to share a podcast is the idea because they're all in this fractured RSS's go system and you know. There's not a one canonical way to listen to a podcast. Like a Youtube Video I'm sure that could be better yet. Don't have that. I don't have any fair enough. Do you have a sense for why the podcast advertising market is so underdeveloped? No it's very hard to get podcasters to change their workflows. So I watched the descript commercial that you have and you have this old guy who looks like somebody with old dusty podcast recording tools. How do you get somebody like that to change their workflow? I think it's hard to get people to switch from pro tools to audition or one time line editor to another timeline editor. Because all of these tools are so mature they've all aped each other's features and at this point if you talk to someone and you ask them what they're using if they're using pro tools logic or audition. It's almost definitely because the reason they're using it is because it's what they learned on because all the tools are equally good. Descript is really the first editing tool since editing tools. Made the jump to the computer. That's a complete reimagining of the Interaction Paradigm. Where you're editing documents instead of editing. Purely as a time line and you know it's one of the changes that is happening because the technology exists for it to happen. You know like when Youtube came around. It wasn't just that it was a brilliant idea. It's that technology. Only at that moment had reached a point where it's such a platform was even achievable and words are just a better abstraction of narrative audio narrative media than way forms. They're more expressive there. Faster and easier to work with so once people start using it. It's just such an obvious improvement that in terms of speed and simplicity and the fact that you can remain in your editorial brain and not need to continuously switch back into your technical or engineering brain as you're making these kind of way form edits to your timeline that those are the reasons that we tend to see people switch on top of that you know podcasting is going through. Golden Age and most people are podcasting now are not that crusty old audio engineer their print journalists or just whoever that don't know time line editors from Adam Right. They're they're they're new to it and they might be outsourcing their editing. If they're doing any editing at all because of the technical complexity and learning curve and descript is now making editing possible for them when it just simply wasn't within reach within reach before for people who have not worked in a digital audio workstation or who have not edited a podcast can you hone in on that distinction between the document based editing style versus the timeline based editing style. What are you describing there? Yeah the when I say time line style. I'm you're imagining like garage band or I'm movie. Where you have on the Y axis you have tracks of your different media and the excesses time and so you're just seeing your tracks are different speakers or music or effects when it gets into video titles or or be role that you might be overlaying on top of your main video track and then the documents is is exactly what it sounds like when I say in. Descript your editing scripture editing something. That looks like you're working in Google docs. But when you're editing the the words you're also editing the underlying media when you're thinking about the market size for podcast editing or video editing. Is there a specific company or set of products that you benchmark against to know or even just to reverse engineer? How much you need to charge for this. When you're trying to calculate like what is the market. How much do I need to charge in order to have like a good business here? Are there analogues or like? I'm just wondering how you're thinking about the market sizing. There's a little bit of that but there's a lot of looking at the Zeitgeist and just seeing that we're in a world where there's really no difference anymore between the the consumer and the Creator and the Pro Sumer. Everyone is a content creator and the tools that are out. There are difficult to use so if you believe that you can build something that can be a solution for the creators out there. Then it's a process of combining existing markets creating ones that don't exist into into something new and that's happening all the time with startups that were creating new spaces. Are there any machine learning applications that you really wish you could have in descript but the models are just not quite good enough yet? Don't know yet there's kind of a backlog of things that were excited to start exploring but haven't yet and we'll see when we get there. Are there any particular business adjacency that you're considering exploring hosting or the recording process itself right now? We're focused on building a great editing tool. That's really the main thing as we get to the to the end of the conversation. Just give me a description. For how the management of the is structured like. How do you organize the proteins than testing process and the overall management of the company? It's still a small team. Were maybe twenty two twenty three people. I have a VP of engineering and the engineering and research teams reporting to him and still don't have any other product managers other than me. Although that'll change soon we have a couple of designers who report into me. The team here is senior but by comparison to some of the teams. I've I've worked on in the past and the engineering team is high has high consumer judgment and high business judgment. And that's why we haven't had the need for dedicated product managers so far we just have a lot of very creative high judgment engineers who were able to work directly with design to take you know a fairly high level goal and work things out and I think the team here is has really enjoyed that a lot of the team has been together for you know going on five years since the detour days. It's all the same team and at this point. Were growing where we're hiring now after we did our series A. But it has a strong core. That's really figured out how to work well together. If you weren't building descript. What company would you be working on? I don't know that I would be doing a company. I I have a couple. You know kind of random side projects that I'd love to work on at some point but yet I'm not sure. Can you share anything? I just want to know what the next reckless decisions going to be. Oh No it's too self indulgent. I'll I'll share it some other time fair enough Andrew. Thanks for coming on the show. Great talking to you my pleasure. Thanks for having me. As a company grows. The software infrastructure becomes a large complex distributed system without standardized applications or security policies. It can become difficult. To oversee all the vulnerabilities that might exist across.

descript engineer Youtube Mary Descript Chicago content creator VP of engineering Andrew overlaying editor Adam Right
"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I'm building a new product G two. I is the company that I call on to help me find a developer who can build the first version of my product G two. I is a hiring platform. Run by engineers that matches you with react. React Native Graph Q. L. and mobile engineers who you can trust whether you are a new company building. Your first product like me or an established company that wants additional engineering. Help G two. I has the talent that you need to accomplish your goals go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about what g two I has to offer. We've also done several shows with the people who run G to I gave Greenberg and the rest of his team. These are engineers who know about the react ecosystem about the mobile ecosystem about graph. Curiel react native. They know their stuff. And they run a great organization in my personal experience g two. I has linked me up with experienced engineers that can fit my budget and the G. Two I staff are friendly and easy to work with. They know how product-development works they can help you find the perfect engineer for your stack. And you can go to software engineering daily DOT COM SLASH G to I to learn more about G to I thank you to G two. I for being a great supporter of Software Engineering Daily both as listeners and also as people who have contributed code that have helped me out in my projects. So if you want to get some additional help for your engineering.

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Like you know your whole thing with with the point and then that transitioning into groupon and then with detour in that transitioning into descript. I think there's probably some nugget of wisdom or nuggets of wisdom that you can offer about how to evolve an idea that is not working perfectly into something that is more honed and has a better market. Do you have any lessons that that you can share with the audience? In both cases I've been through kind of two sets of companies that had a pivot in them. The first was the point. Which was this collective action platform that pivoted into groupon and groupon was a very narrow application of the broader technology. Or the the broader idea. Which was this idea of collective action tipping point get a critical mass of people to agree to do something and only once it's achieve does go into action group on that applied to group purchasing so in the early days groupon was. You would only get the deal if twenty people joined or something like that and that was a situation where our backs were up against the wall at risk of losing our funding and we had to come up with something and we were just kind of frantically experimenting with all the different use cases that we had we had imagined with detour. It was this audio tour platform and when we started like from the moment we started thinking about about script I was immediately thinking of as the potential for a separate business and we treat it as such internally where it had. Its own team honestly. It's like I probably wouldn't recommend doing something like that in a normal startup especially if it's your first startup. It's like this whole other thing to manage. I don't know it's like it's this weird combination of being stubbornly persistent about about sticking with your idea but also keeping your ears open and looking for opportunities being open to the idea that the the thing is not the thing that you thought it. Was this other thing over here. But it's it's really a wonderful part of the process is his is kind of working through the wreckage of your idea to find some gem. That's in there and it's often said that the obvious ideas are taken so you kind of have to get yourself into a little bit of a mess and look at what your assets are to have those constraints to figure something out. So the one thing I've done is consistently just recklessly jumped into and and and got myself into a mess that I have to work my way out of so if you're thinking about doing a startup like just do a startup in and get started and don't don't over think it and and may just be open to the idea that maybe things will come out differently than than you expected although not badly when..

groupon
"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

16:04 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Data doc in two thousand eighteen. You acquired lyre bird which has this technology that allows you to train an audio model and create new audio and I remember when Larry Bird I launched with their demos and it was scary but also exciting is incredibly useful potentially but it's also potentially dangerous. Why did lyre bird decide to sell their product instead of trying to product? Is it themselves so the library team is a team of researchers that worked in Yasha NGOs lab up In the University of Montreal who are just incredibly smart. Phd Researchers and are doing. I think the the best work I've seen anyone out there in making a easy to reproduce voice model of yourself. We had our eyes on that space really since the beginning of descript. But you know the stuff that we know how to do is build product and product engineering. Build a business and we don't know anything really about the kind of deep learning stuff that those guys were doing so when we started talking to each other we realized that we had a similar vision and skill set that really complimented each other and so we decided to join forces. And it's really been you know of all the acquisitions I've done in my career. Perhaps the most hand in glove fit between two teams describe how the library technologies used in descript increasingly. It'll just be scattered throughout. We have a few things that Larry Bird. His belt that are in production. Now like a speaker detection that's just automatically labeling speakers a mono file that you transcribe the big thing that will be. Launching is overdubbed and that'll be launching soon. It's in Beta right now. That'll let you load about ten minutes of your voice and from that we can give you a text to speech model that you can use to generate audio so the text speech application. This is one of these ideas that could be potentially dangerous. But I know you have a limitation on it where you can only use it on your own voice. How do you enforce that? It's pretty simple. And Lyre Bird used a similar mechanism when they were an independent company and successfully trained three or four hundred thousand voices without any cases of fraud. All you do. Is You give people a script that they have to read. And then you validate the transcript of what they read against the original script and so unless you can fool someone into reading a ten minute scripts. You can't really fake. It describe some of the other subtle uses of machine learning descript so one of the other ones that were rolling out now is disfluencies detection already in the apper. Um and detection so if you say Amer We have a kind of one click button. You can use to zap all of those. We're doing something similar now with. That'll catch contextual filler. Words like like or you know it will also catch stutters and false starts so that you can easily clean up your your audio and were looking to offer more tools around like that around mixing and and leveling your audio noise reduction and room tone detection. There's really an endless list of the types of things that we could. We could be adding. It's ripe for for tools that are enabled by machine learning something like a powered compressor or E. Q. People have subjective opinions on the what a compressor Q. Should be on a podcast. Like if you listen to Joe Rogan. It's going to be mixed a little bit differently than NPR. Is that important does it? You know is it hard to find the right granularity of which to give people? Is it something like instagram? Filters where you just want to give people some sane defaults that make things sound nice that they can sample. Yeah the cool thing. About de script I mean we have compressor effects and Eq- effects just built into the APP so when we think about applying machine learning it's not a destructive process it's really just tweaking parameters that are that are in the APP and then while it's true that there's some subjectivity and taste involved in house of one might mic. Something I think that's true for the vast majority of people just want something that sounds professional and good and you know the subtleties of different. Compressors are really of interest to them so we can do something that gets to a general place that things sound good and then the user can continue to tweet from there. We think that's a pretty good option. How does it domain video editing? Compare to that of audio editing. That's a interesting question. My experiences mostly in audio. I went to school in music technology. I worked in recording studio for a couple of years. And then a detour. We were working very closely with radio producers and got a firsthand view at their at their workflow and what worked well about it and what didn't like most people. I've done some video editing but before joining descript but it really had to get myself up to speed with the workflows and the way people work. I think when you look at the video editing tools in the audio editing tools. There's a lot of similarities but there are some differences. Some of those differences are like for example. The way that you said the in and out point for a range selection appeared largely be path dependency and just convention one will start at one way and another different way and everybody got used to it. That's in that field. Others are legitimately different so for video editors tend to apply effects on the clip level primarily while our editors tend to apply them on the track level. And that's for like legitimate use case reasons in the nature of what kinds of effects. You're putting on video versus audio. So we've been kind of looking at that and working through the differences and trying to come up with something that works for both. I will say that I think the primary dividing point between for media editing tools should be whether it's narrative or music that to me seems like a more natural division than audio or video the fact that they're divided that way is more. You know just circumstances of history but if you were building something from scratch today I think you would probably divide things more along the lines of music versus narrative given that you studied music production music technology and now. You're working on audio editing tool I did show with splice and one with company though similar to splice these online music collaboration platforms. I've always found it curious. That music there has not really been a get hub experience for music. There has not been mass collaboration on music. Do you have any perspective for why that is having people tried to do it? I thought like splice in Gaza or exactly so they tried to splice tried to do it and they basically pivoted to being a cloud sample library which they're having a lot of success with but people just didn't want to collaborate if that's the problem the problem is that it was. I never tried to use it so I'm seriously just speculating here. But the other way to think of it is that it was kind of bolted. Auden non-first class feature for the software platforms. And I mean if you just just to take an example like if you look at the way. Adobe has added collaborative tooling to their suite of products. It feels like illustrator if you compare the way. It works with illustrator to the way that it works like a tool like sigma has treated collaboration. You Know Fig Has reimagined everything from the ground up with collaboration collaborative workflows. First Class citizen. And it's worked wonders for them and and really giving them a major superpower and I think a lot of these music editing tools. Whether it's pro tools are able to live or logic or any of them have not made the decision to rethink what they're doing as a collaborative tool and all of these time. Line editors are so feature rich like they've all been around for ten or twenty years just adding feature upon feature upon feature. And if you're making music if you're in a creative workflow you want to have access to that stuff a lot of the time. So so the idea of switching to a startup that's building a collaborative time line editor. It's a big tradeoff right. It's going to take a long time before somebody starting from scratch on a music. Production tool can reach the kind of minimum feature set. That is going to allow someone to say. Yeah I'll use this instead of able to live and I don't feel in any way restricted in terms of what I can do creatively. Collaboration is a first class citizen in descript. What are the implications of that so I think about the complexities of Google? Docs YOU HAVE TWO PEOPLE. Editing concurrently you can have these kinds of merge conflicts that occur when somebody goes off line for a little bit and somebody else has edited the same piece of text that they have been editing. Offline you have emerged conflict. Do those kinds of issues emerge in the collaboration experience with descript? Yeah they sure do. And and there's some types of those conflicts that there's not really a good single solution to and we'll just let the user know that it's happened and save both in their version history and make it easy for them to pull it back so we've had to work through that same set of issues that the other collaborative editing tools live collaborative editing tools of had to work through. And he's just enough of an edge case. That very rarely happens in in causes a an annoyance. Yeah I think that's right. It's like a near-term annoyance and the main thing you know for us is making sure there's never a situation with data loss and because we have full version history and the way everything and because descript off line were saving everything to your hard drive before we even try to push it to the cloud so the chances of anything happening. There are very slim when I think about the business of podcasting. We have five shows per week. We have four ads per show and I record them all as host read ads. Which is what most of the market wants these days. You want the host to read the ad so it's sort of like influence or marketing and one application that people talk about sometimes is like. Oh if you wanted to get dynamically inserted ads where you know you could have this real time bidding. Where some kind of advertiser like bids on like. Let's say I'm a listener. I've suddenly tuned into an episode about Java script. You know an advertiser bids on that listen in real time with a Java script error monitoring tool ad but I have not recorded that ad so you could have this real time process. Where all of a sudden the advertiser has purchased that ad and they dynamically create an ad based off of voice model. That has been trained from my voice. That's a potential application. I don't know if it's something that people will want but it seems like something that's almost an inevitability do you have any perspective on that potential application? Not really agree with you Hon. That it will be possible in agree with you that I'm not sure if it's something people want right do you think you as a consumer thinking like a consumer who is probably consumed a lot of podcasts. Would you know the difference? I think we'll reach a point where people will not no difference so if you just assume that people won't know a difference and then think about what world looks like where this is happening and whether it changes the value of these host red podcasts. I mean you can't look at that. In isolation of all the other ways in which synthetic voice will be appearing in culture. And how that will change people's perception of voice. So there's just too many kinds of variables in play to even like be able to speculate right for me. Yeah because in that I guess in that world you can have like a ghost entirely ghost. Written podcast episode. Somebody could totally script an entire episode of me talking to somebody else and like maybe. That's something people want. We just have no idea at this point too far from that. I mean there's probably you know visionary people out there that will answer your question more -firmative Lee but I certainly don't feel like I have any idea in terms of synthetic voice technology though. Like how good is it today if I tried to write an entire ghost? Written podcast episode. Would it sound like me? The use case we've been focused on for now is pick ups and editorial corrections in part because we think it's more interesting says something. That's augmenting organic audio rather than being complete substitute for it if we can allow you to correct a couple of words in something that you've recorded and give you the same kind of editorial flexibility that you have when you add text that seems like an incredibly useful thing. It's also I think the longer a string of text to speech is the more likely you are going to notice a glitch in the matrix so there are use cases for longer form text to speech in its current form like it is useful for stuff and I think we`ll. We'll start seeing that once once we come out of Beta but I don't think in the next year you're going to be listening to you know audio books of your favorite celebrities. Synthesis synthetic voice or something like that. What's the hardest engineering problem? You've encountered building these scripts. So far I would have to defer to the engineers on that one. I'm thinking about trying to answer. And just a and then thinking about my engineers listening to be trying to answer that and then just like wanting to punch me well. So let's take a different angle so you know. I've listened to a lot of podcast interviews with you and you're one of these people who I think. Is You serve a pretty valuable touch point of inspiration in the same way that these other founders who have beaten their head against the wall with like product that might not have a perfect market..

descript Larry Bird University of Montreal Phd Researchers Joe Rogan fraud Gaza Adobe Google NPR Auden Lee
"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

11:06 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For more than fifteen years. Describe the state of PODCAST tooling. Well you have to go a little bit further back because the truth is that podcast. Tooling is mostly just music production tooling so back in the nineties. You started to see tools like pro tools. Taking non linear audio editing. Off of tape machines and onto the computer and nothing has changed too much since then. Everything's gotten better. There's many different options. If you're making podcast you're using time. Line based editors with way forms an abstraction such as pro tools or adobe audition or maybe garage band or audacity and there's a high learning curve powerful flexible tools but not really within reach of of the normal person so the way. D- script came along. Is that we were working on a audio tour platform called detour. And we're basically making these long-form podcasts and just saw what a tedious workflow was for these audio producers so this is at about the same time that speech to text was reaching an inflection point where it was actually accurate enough to be usable and we thought wouldn't it be cool if you could just automatically transcribe audio and then build a audio editing tool or podcast. Editing tool that was really designed with narrative based content in mind and not. Just trying to repurpose these tools that were designed with music in mind and allow people to edit audio by editing text. The same way they wouldn't word processor. So that's what we're doing with descript. I can think of a few main types of podcasts. You have the to person interview format which we're engaged in right now. You also have the this American life style podcast with some emotional narrative that is going concurrently with music. What are the other important podcast or use cases that you want to accommodate in building podcast editing tool well? The main thing that we are trying to accommodate is the editing process. So if you're just doing something that's totally unscripted where you're just let the tape roll for two hours. And you don't feel the need to edit any of that you wanted to come out exactly as it is than the tools that are already out there. Do that sort of thing pretty well. I mean you can just use tools that ship on your computer for that but if you want to craft your content in any way if you if you want the ability to edit and make things sound better that's the space that we're playing in and like you said that that applies to both unscripted content like this conversation that we're having as well as scripted content like at this American life episode or so all of the above. So as you said descript contain audio files and then transcribe them and then allow you to edit them as text document and this requires at least two technologies that I can think of to machine learning technologies. You've got speech to text. And you also have the audio text alignment. How good is the quality of those algorithms today very good? So if we were to transcribe this conversation that we're having right now there'd be very few errors. The word rate might be two percent or definitely less than five percent. In fact you would probably be more distracted by punctuation errors than the actual word accuracy as the quality of the recording starts to diverge from this broadcast quality or people with heavy accents than the quality can still word era can still be as highest thirty percent but increasingly you know if for just your general podcast. The transcription is incredibly accurate. The forest alignment process. That we use is doing. A kind of phonetic mapping of the text to the audio and giving us timestamps at the beginning and end of every phone team. And that's incredibly accurate. Is Well accurate enough? That like further improving the accuracy of those word boundaries hasn't really been a major area of focus for us. You do also have this facet of the system that if I want to transcription that has a higher degree reliability. I can keyed off to a white glove human editor. So what are the circumstances where I would want to do that? What are the circumstances? Where a human editor is going to catch things or edit things that are more fine grain than what the automatic transcription can. I think there's two categories one is like I said when the when you have a strong accent. Ter- win the audio quality is lower. So if you just have an iphone that you have on a table on a crowded restaurant and you recording conversation the transcription. Accuracy gets low enough. That somebody's going to need to go through and clean it up for it to really be useful. The other situation is just like you work at the organization that has a budget for human transcription and even two percent air rate is something that you don't need to bother with so you'd rather have it transcribed we see both of those. Descript is a desktop application. Can you give me the brief overview of the stack of technologies? That go into it. Sure so back in maybe two thousand fifteen or so when we started working on the script in we're INC incubating inside if detour this audio tour company that I mentioned it was a native Mac application and written I an objective c and then in swift and then once we spun it out to a to be a standalone company and launched a surprise surprise. Some of the first feedback we got was from users requesting a windows version of the APP. This is I think two thousand eighteen and in that brief period of time it felt like the landscape had really changed and we were kind of on the cusp of the point. Where we're building this in a full web. Technology Stack was viable. We've obviously seen this transition happened to different categories of tools starting with crm and documents and spreadsheets and and now you know designed tools like sigma but we are very cautious about doing it for an audio video. Production tool because of the requirements of processor intensive audio video editing the size of the files that we're dealing with. They're just a lot of things about it. That made us nervous. But at that point we looked at what was out there and we felt like the benefits of using a web technology stack outweighed the costs so descriptors built in react and the desktop application runs in electron and then we have like parts of our media. Engine that are native and it runs off line so just being able to run an electron has allowed us to make this possible in a way that that we couldn't have in in purely a browser at least not yet. There are some elements of the machine learning stack. That can be in the cloud. There are some elements that can be or that need to be local. What are the the models or the machine learning systems that you need to keep locally and what are the ones that are fine to be in the cloud? We don't have our own transcription engine. That just seemed like the kind of thing that there's a bunch of really big companies with really smart people where it's a core strategic focus to be good at speech to text and so rather than try to compete with them as a small startup. We would just continuously survey the field of options out there and use whatever we thought was the most accurate and the best experience for our customers. So that as a result is all in the cloud. We have our own alignment process. And we do that. Both in the cloud and locally depending so in addition to the initial alignment when we've transcribed to file. Whenever you're correcting a transcript will realign the seconds around that correction to make sure that the audio and text remains aligned and it's important for us to have that work offline so that as much of the experience can work off line as possible. So we do that locally. A lot of the new overdubbed text to speech stuff. That we're doing is in the cloud. Are there any particularly annoying? Bugs that come to mind that you've solved that might illustrate the difficulties of working with audio. I think part of it is we have a design paradigm. The document that encourages people to use the tool creatively and and push its limits so as soon as we we saw people you know creating these documents that were that are you know timelines that are five or ten hours long with incredibly large assets and thousands of edits and cross fades and and so on so it just got pushed to its limits very quickly and it took us some time to just catch up with the way in which people were using it and make sure that that all worked with with audio and video. There's a long list of things like that and was such an open ended application. What's your process for testing it? So we do a lot of internal testing and then we have some manual. Qa we have automated Qa as well but we haven't found that to be quite as useful as just the automated Qa that we do because the manual Qa because it is so open ended and and often our customers are using it in ways that are difficult to replicate with automatic test cases. We also have a a pretty active. Beta user community who get early access to early versions of the APP and are really good about logging reproducible bug reports for us today.

editor adobe Descript
"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Ocean makes infrastructure. Simple I continue to use digital ocean because of the low friction and attention to user experience digital ocean has kept the experience simple and can spin up a server in less than a minute and get high quality performance for a low price for an application that needs to scale digital ocean has CPU optimized droplets memory optimized droplets manage databases managed Cooper. Nettie and many more products digital ocean has the flexibility to choose the right instance for the right workload and you can mix and match different configurations of CPU Ram if you get stuck digital ocean has thousands of high quality tutorials responsive QNA forums and a customer team who treats customers respectfully Digital Ocean. Lets developers focus on what they are building? Visit do dot co slash s daily and receive one hundred dollars in credit over sixty days. That one hundred dollars can be put towards hosting or infrastructure and that includes managed. Databases a managed. Coober Nettie Service and more. If you want to get started with Cooper Netease digital ocean is a great place to go. You can use your hundred dollars to start building your distributed system and you can get that hundred dollars in credit for free at do dot co slash s daily. Thank you to digital ocean for being sponsor of Software Engineering daily Andrew Mason. Welcome software engineer daily. Thanks for having me glad to be here. It's twenty twenty. We've had podcasts..

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Api text to speech speech to text and other domain specific machine learning applications. Some of the most popular podcasts and Youtube Channels Use D. script as their editing tool because it provides a set of features that is not found in other editing tools. Such as Adobe Premiere or a digital audio workstation descript is an example of the downstream impact of machine learning tools becoming more accessible even though descript only has a small team of machine learning engineers. These engineers are extremely productive due to the combination of API is cloud computing and frameworks like tensor flow. Descrip- was founded by Andrew Mason who also founded groupon and detour. Andrew joins the show to describe the technology behind descript as well as the story for how it was built. It's a remarkable story. Actually and there's some creative entrepreneurship there's numerous takeaways for both engineers business founders and honestly my favorite part is the fact that groupon which is Andrus. I extremely successful company was born out of a product that was not working and the same thing kind of happened with descript. Andrew had been working on a company called detour and for many years. He was trying to make it work and eventually through having his back against the wall with the product not working as well and is popularly as he planned he found a Jason problems and that turned into descript which is an amazing product. So I really liked the story as an example of how innovation actually works in practice because it can be very very messy digital.

Andrew Mason groupon Youtube Adobe Descrip Andrus Jason
"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Api text to speech speech to text and other domain specific machine learning applications. Some of the most popular podcasts and Youtube Channels Use D. script as their editing tool because it provides a set of features that is not found in other editing tools. Such as Adobe Premiere or a digital audio workstation descript is an example of the downstream impact of machine learning tools becoming more accessible even though script only has a small team of machine learning engineers. These engineers are extremely productive due to the combination of API is cloud computing and frameworks like tensor flow. Descrip- was founded by Andrew Mason who also founded groupon and detour. Andrew joins the show to describe the technology behind descript as well as the story for how it was built. It's a remarkable story. Actually and there's some creative entrepreneurship there's numerous takeaways for both engineers and business founders and honestly my favorite part is the fact that groupon which is Andrus. I extremely successful company was born out of a product that was not working and the same thing happened with descript. Andrew had been working on a company called Detour and for many years. He was trying to make it work and eventually through having his back against the wall with the product not working as well and is popularly as he planned he found a Jason problems and that turned into descript which is an amazing product. So I really liked the story as an example of how innovation actually works in practice because it can be very very messy digital.

Andrew Mason groupon Youtube Adobe Descrip Andrus Jason
"andrew mason" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

12:26 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Amazing. I mean pretty. Cool that you had it ready now given the proliferation of podcast. And all that. That's so cool. So let's talk a bit about the amazing Sifi powers that Lyre Bird now brings to D- scripts suite of features. It was pretty cool to see all the different takes on this. I think it was like a wired article that was like you can fake your own voice. Now how library I get onto descript teams radar. Was it because you were already trying to think of the most. Seamless seamless way for folks to edit audio in post production. And then you kind of thought wait like what if someone actually needed to correct something that was mistaken taken and they don't have the original file or that can't speak to that guest anymore and then you're thinking of all the different ways to do it in house and then you're like wait. Someone already doing it there. I'm kind of curious about how that turned out pretty much from the first time. We Demo D- D- script to somebody and showed them how you can delete a word from the from the document and it until the from the audio people would ask us what happens when you type a word. Does it generate audio in so it was kind of the the self evident other side of the coin and so when we saw we saw labored launch. We were immediately excited. Not just about the the product and the quality of what they were doing but also the ethical approach that the team was taking to these issues and they had invested in putting some protections in place to make sure that you could only train your own voice and so you know we just kept a watch on what they were doing and at some point had an opportunity to talk to them and the more we talk the more it started to feel like there had always been. I'm a liar bird shaped hole in descript where they were building this incredible technology and we were building the receptacle for that Technology Ed. And what we're doing with this over TUB overdubbed product is is the first thing but we are excited to introduce a new class of hey. I enabled tools that make it easier for people to practice their craft. That's amazing I think also the fact that it becomes much easier for makers and creators to do the work that they do is amazing and really the people who benefit are folks like us Nina folks listening audience right because we have incredible oh quality authentically delivered in exactly the way the creators intended. So I I know I've won a super duper excited. Another thing I wanted to chat to you about is there. There's such thing as a typical day at descript for you. A lot of the people who are listening our founders themselves leaders themselves And I was. I'm just curious. I guess you're probably entering a new stage for the company. Now things with growing you'll be building out the product roadmap. I just wondered yet does a typical day. Okay for Andrew Exist and if not where your main responsibilities that you just make sure you get done. I don't know what a typical typical day is. But we're definitely eh going through a stage right now where the team including Lyre Bird is twenty five people and having just completed our series A. and launch this product. We're seeing a lot have growth and we're starting to to scale out the team and If you take the the library team is still based in Montreal in San Francisco. It's been me a designer office manager doing all the back office and a bunch of engineers. So I've been kind of the the person that does the other stuff from marketing to customer support and and and so on and now post launched. That's just not not scaling so we're trying to find ways to carve pieces of me off and create different rolls around them. And I've I've I've been through this once before before. It's it's one of the harder transitions for for founder. At least the first time I hope it'll go smoother this time. Where when you're when you're small and the a lot of what's made you successful his your ability to do things and as you start to scale you have to learn to not do things and let other people do do things at hire people to do those things and give them the space to do those things so that's kind of what we're what we're starting to do now? We just hired somebody to to run engineering for us. We didn't we didn't have any other engineering management in the company before that and now we're hiring we have somebody that's doing customer support and and I think the stuff that will stick with me for a while is hopefully talking to customers and in some of the product management stuff around the editor product. Wow Oh yeah. That's pretty cool. It's funny what you said about Beijing that stage where you're scaling and then having to really just let go and like delegate some of the things you as a founder used to control that seems to be a common theme that I see happening in a lot of the interviews that I do. And then you talk about this challenge of finding the right talent talent right like you need someone to run engineering for you. I just wonder now that you're a few companies in to being founder. Does sourcing great talent talent. Get any easier. Do you feel you've been able to either identify any strategies tactics or shortcuts. Anything really that you you feel might make you better at picking the right folks now than let's say ten years ago. Yeah I mean I sure hope so for for one thing I know what I'm what I'm looking for. Especially when it comes to hiring people in management in a lot of companies though the way that people get into management management is they'll be individual contributors who have great ideas and nobody wants to listen to their ideas because it's the people in management that gets to have those conversations so they say okay. I guess I'll become a manager. And then they become a manager for the wrong reasons not because they care about people or unlocking unlocking the the the best possible incarnation of their teams. But because they care about getting their ideas to be listened to so it's it's actually quite hard to find people who who who have got into management for the right reasons But you know when you you when you talk to them you can. You can tell pretty easily. It's just it's just a question of knowing what you're looking for after having made a bunch of mistakes made those mistakes in the past and and looking to avoid them so that's one thing but I mean we still are. I still make mistakes with hiring and it's it's just that one of the hardest things to do. Yeah that's true. I often think of it just from the perspective of the human condition it. We are so hard to read even at the best of times and sometimes even what we think we want. I'm thinking of this as like someone. Applying for a job isn't necessarily what you want because you don't know until you're doing I and I feel like that's why there's always a constant complexity around hiring and like finding the right person because there are so many unknowns until you're actually in the trenches you don't know how you respond or how you'll deliver but yeah I appreciate you sharing that. I think that's really cool. Another thing that I wanted to ask you about so in in product and the makers community in particular we start new discussions all the time and something that seems to come up a lot. Is this idea of like personal development particularly as as a leader or as a founder a lot of people want to invest in continuous learning. A lot of people want to ensure that they're doing everything in their power for to be the best leader that can be support the people that they're collaborating with. I just wondered like maybe what your regime looks like. Or what are the things that you do to invest in yourself in in case second inspire some of the folks who are listening to try them out will I perfected myself back in two thousand fourteen or so just stock to them the peak Andreessen no What do I do I mean? I'm I'm actually going to do a like intensive weekend leadership kind of seminary thing that a friend of mine recommended. It was one of those like backhanded recommendations. It's like yeah you should. You should really do this is i. Guess means there's something deeply wrong with me so I try. I try to do stuff like that. I try to read whatever whatever whatever People recommend I try to create an atmosphere in the company where it's easy for people to give me feedback and at that. How does feedback work at D- script by the way this? This is another conversation we were having recently like people were wondering how often should they catch up with their teams and what different channels should be available for folks in teams to chime into stuff. So I'd love to get a bit of insight into how that works descript at product for the record we've all got Weekly Khatib's relied manager. We use slack for everything. We don't have dedicated We don't have any like dedicated internal emails to each other or anything like that and then every Monday we have a team call which happens on Zoom 'cause we're distributed team and that's where we recap of metrics all the KPI's then folks who might be leading on a specific project project that have updates to share like feature a building or whatever. Get a chance to talk to the team about that. So that's kind of us not show curious how how you manage feedback at descript and maybe how you connect as a team hybrid so we have a similarly. We have a weekly all hands meeting where someone will give an update on a project. They're working on. We'll talk about metrics the only unusual thing we or one of the unusual things we do is we have a we have an internal podcast and every week excellent shot at that so we rotate. We have a theme and so it's an opportunity to dog food the APP but it's also an opportunity to learn about someone to coffee that. Yeah no I think I think more and more companies will do stuff like that is completely. He's setting aside my my bias in the issue. It just it just it just makes a Lotta sense other than that I look we. We don't have this figured out at our scale and it's something thing that as we're starting to scale now just now talking about what we're going to do around standardizing compensation and performance reviews news and how those things are interlinked. So we're we're actually as we started talking to firms to help us through that process. They're telling us that we're we're doing doing an earlier than a lot of companies do but I think it's good to get that foundation in place because otherwise it's too late so I do you know one on ones ends with people probably about about once a month which is which is not very much because at this point most everybody reports into me And I'm still mostly justly an individual contributor with a bunch of senior largely autonomous people on the team that's mostly worked out and and that's an opportunity to to give feedback but I think like we don't have any like software set set up or anything like that and we'll have to figure out a better way you to do all this stuff as we start to scale. Yeah that's awesome. I think it says a lot about the status quo that speaking to experts in culture and people policy telling you that you just raised series a. You're actually coming in quite early. But I hope that we will shift that status quo. I hope more our founders like yourself will reach that milestone and thank now is the time to invest in people in culture. Because of course that's what matters and that's what's key so very very Positive to hear that from you right. I know I've only got like a minute more of your time and you've just told me about all the busy things you have to do So before I let you go oh Every product on radio episode. I ask our guest to share the products that they love. They could be the APPs on your home screen. Might be some cool new device. Is You just got at home. But you know what product.

descript Lyre Bird Beijing Montreal Andrew Andreessen San Francisco Khatib
"andrew mason" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

12:41 min | 1 year ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"So under thank you. So much for being our guest on product Radio today very grateful to have you here by pleasure. Thanks for having me groupon funnel always hold a very special place in my heart. I have to say because it's the very first company that I worked for in the tech industry so this was all the way back in twenty eleven in the London office and that is also where I met one of my best friends. Emily who is head of operations at product. We've got real group-group on Crew going but of course I am here to have you on the show today. Talking about your current venture descript. This actually came about really like all the way back in September with the really exciting news about your you're a fundraising round fifteen million dollars. You'd raised and also the acquisition of Lyre Bird. podcasts are just booming and as soon as that story broke Ryan and the rest of the team were Mike Cabinet Andrew on the podcast talking about what he's got planned for descript so finally we have you here. Thank you so much. I thought it might be fun just to kind of start off by having. Can you describe descript to folks in the audience. Who aren't familiar with it or haven't had a chance to use it yet? Sure so descript is a tool for making podcasts. You can record edit mix collaborate would makes it. Unusual is instead of editing way forms every all the editing. It looks like you're just working in a word processor so we automatically convert all of the audio into text. And then you can edit just by editing text we also have some New Science Fiction Action Features Doing via the acquisition of library feature called overdubbed that actually lets you type words and it will generate audio in your own invoice and blended into both sides. That's that's currently in closed Beta with the plan to do a public launch soon incredible. Yeah thank you so much for giving us that. Rundown of what D- script does what I find so cool about de script and like the origin story is the fact that we're in a time now where everyone's talking about podcast. Paul has industries booming. Saying you know we had spotify making acquisitions of anchor and Gimblett and in many ways one might assume that you just looked ahead two dozen kinda thought okay. This is as a space. That's growing. I'm going to build an incredible platform to let people at podcast and video at Cetera. But actually if I'm not mistaken indeed script started while you're working on your other venture detour am I right. I love to know more about the origin story and how it actually came about while. You're at detour. Yeah No I. I wish that we could claim that we had that much vision but it was a happy accident So detour was a was a mobile audio tour apple away that you could walk around the city city and you would have these location aware stories. Going in your ear and half of the company was building the technology the other half was building the contents and it was through the process Asif process of building this content which was basically location based podcasts that we got an appreciation for how or the tool chain was and how neglected narrative media creators have have been in terms of the tools that are available to them This was right. Around the time that there it was incredible progress happening automatic transcription so we thought. Wouldn't it be cool. If someone just built a audio editor that worked like a word processor and we found someone who is working on exactly that idea at Berkeley. We hadn't built a prototype. We started showing it to some people and it just seemed like a immediate media. Product Market Fit. Something people have been asking for for a long time. The technology just hadn't existed so we sold detoured Spin out descript and that was about two years ago that we started the company. That's incredible if anyone's listening and has not yet watched the video on Youtube that you dropped a couple of months ago I really encourage into. It's it's incredible and exactly as you describe. It makes editing audio as simple as editing document. I really love all the collaborative it features in as well in some ways. It kind of reminds me of things like notion or Google. Docs in that. You can work on things as a team while editing in real life and I just think that's so cool I. I know that you mentioned how you wanted to see. If the technology was available something that could let you edit audio so simply on you mentioned that. Ah you found someone who was working on this at Berkeley. Like how exactly did that come about. Do you think there must be someone working on this problem. Let me find out who it is I think we we googled around and we we found a PhD student and engineer. Just an incredible guy named Steve Ruben had published some papers along these lines and he was still finishing his paper and or he's still finishing his PhD But we started working together in building prototypes and and it. Just it just worked out. It was just a week. We're really lucky. That's incredible and you're doing all this while you are still also running. Hr I'm alright business before the acquisition happened. This was kind of something that we had in our back pocket in in detour. Because we we we were over investing investing in it. If all you would be doing if all you were thinking about was baking detour successful but we knew that there is a potential business here and we're treating it like something something like a kind of a backup plan as as one does when you're pre prop product market fit as we were in detour. You're just you're staying open to different paths us. That's awesome. I love how honest you are about the different decisions. A founder has to make as they go through the journey and all the different. The things you have to consider like you just said detour was not product market fit yet. So you and your team were staying open minded to the other things that you could work on as as you know prototype community full of makers millions of makers all around the world all various stages of the journey summer students. So repeats droppings were indy makers there's some like you are going on that venture route and I just wonder what does it feel like. And how do you sort of navigate that difficult decision Asian making process. Where do you assign resources when you find yourself as you were a few years ago indeed for trying to make Detroit a successful But then also exploring his other You have that could also be successful. Is there any advice. You can share for founders. Who might also be at a similar kind of crossroads where they're trying to? I guess way up the the variables of success. That's a tricky one. I've I've been through it twice. I went through PRUITT. When we pivoted the point to group on the point was kind of a the original idea for what became group on And in that case it was just I our backs were up against the wall. We were running out of money. The idea just wasn't going anywhere in the case of detour the way that we approached it was we had add protected resources that were fully assigned to work on descript so people who were hired specifically to work on that product and so there wasn't as much of a resource. Robbing Peter to pay Paul kind of situation. Then it came down to you know when do you. When do you cut bait on detour detour and arguably I waited too long on that I we? We tried every last possible approach that we could think of And eventually it was just like it's not supposed to be this hard. You know I mean having having been through this before I know it feels like when stuff is working and it felt like we were doing the most elaborate things in order to market the product and reach customers and and at some point just clicked that. It's not supposed to be this hard and we should move on. That's amazing. Thank you so much for sharing that so I don't know if you're familiar with Gimblett the media's podcast startup they've always just sort of like wound that down to the last few episodes and what I loved with their take on what it's like to be acquired wired so they're very honest about what it was like spotify reaching out to them all the conversations. That happened what I found really interesting when I was doing research for this interview. was that exactly the as you said you know. You had a company that was acquired but there was also something that was developed. While you're at the company that you kinda like spun out and catch and that you're still working on now for the makers who are listening. How hard is it to pull that off? Like how hard is it to kind of go. We're going to keep. This can have the rest of that. I don't know if it's easier hard. It's just a question of whether the acquirer firer is interested in what you have to sell them and not the other stuff and who are. Our acquisition was unusual in the in the sense that none of the team went along with with it. All of the teams stayed with me and continued working on on D- script so he just sold the technology to bows and it happened. Fit really nicely with the augmented reality. -ality stuff that they were they were starting to spin up. Oh okay cool. Wow that's awesome. That makes a lot of sense so talk to us about the sort of first half of up twenty one thousand nine hundred and how you sort of built up to raising this round and acquiring firebird. was that sort of looking at the product Red Map and realizing that there were certain things that you you had to be able to do with descript in order to serve users. I'm curious to just get a bit more insight about the thought process astrum you and the rest of leadership that sort of like lead up to that so I'll I'll go back a little bit. Further to two years ago when we launched the the first version of these scripts. So we've been we've been incubating descript within detour for a few years by the point that that we've launched it and it was a makeup because has the technology stack at the time that felt like the best thing to do however in in in this short number of years things change very quickly web technologies had reached a point where we felt like it might be possible to build a fully featured audio video workstation. The station using web technologies give them all the advantages of web technologies being cloud. I and live collaboration. Is You pointed out earlier. There's been this trend of every category of tool making the jump to the cloud and and becoming collaborative and and disrupting the space in the process. kind of starting with crm making its way to docks now application and database development and. It hasn't happened with audio and video radio because of the largely because of the constraints around dealing with these massive on compressed files so we saw that there was an opportunity to do that and we did something very unconventional channel which is right after launching pretty much stopping to to rebuild everything in a web technology stack and we spent a year doing that and then we spent the next year. Roughly speaking getting to what we really see as our one point. Release Ace that we just launched a and that's our our audio production suite so we we. We decided to do that. Because the signals goals around product market fit. Were strong enough and and we just felt like if we didn't do this now it was going to become increasingly difficult to do it later And there was so much potential to unlock by making by just tools have to be collaborative to compete in this day. So so That that's the most unusual thing that we did and And Yeah and now we have this this release out more pretty happy with it. That's incredible. That's yeah that's interesting in in many ways than reduce say that inner two years ago it wouldn't have been possible to build the web APP. You have today it just because of the complexity of the product. I think five years ago when we started thinking about detour. I don't think it would. I don't think web technologies were quite their air transcription. Accuracy was on the cusp and transcription is is foundational. To our product it's accurate accurate. Cheap transcription and the kind of stuff that we're doing now like basically offering transcription for free to anyone with a subscription is stuff that we couldn't have done on five years ago just because it would have been cost prohibitive to offer the kind of accuracy that we offer. Wow that's amazing. I mean pretty. Cool that you had it ready now given the proliferation of podcast..

spotify Berkeley Paul groupon London Emily Lyre Bird. Youtube Google Mike Cabinet Ryan Detroit Asif Gimblett apple
"andrew mason" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"With Andrew Mason live from Los Angeles, California, as we get you ready for the Broncos at the chargers this morning. Well, we talked about the bad news. The Broncos lose their starting left guard. Dell max Garcia who was filling in for Ron Larry who they lost a couple of weeks ago to a torn achilles. But the bye week allows you to get a few guys back. So Mace the Broncos get Royce Freeman back, they get Darian Stewart back and they get Bradley Roby back. So three key players in this Broncos offense and defense right now. Yes. Especially going against the chargers that will see Phil Riverstone the ball doing array of targets suppose coming out of the backfield end the wide receiver and tight end. So having Stewart back will certainly help Bradley Roby will give the Broncos other full complement of corners. Once again in VoiceStream allows the Broncos to get back to the rotation. They had it running back four with Lindsay, invoice freedom to carry the, of course, it's awesome. Good things from devante Booker wings, filling in for Morgan Freeman also saw fumble against Houston that led to eight Texas touchdown that proved decisive in the game you figure they'll probably go back to the priority list that they had before Freeman was injured, which is still Lindsey voice Freeman putting the carries. Then devante Booker seeing a handful of reps over the course of the game. But maybe devante Booker in. There is earned a little more. And it could be something of a three way split rather than gets to waste. And then also the Broncos get a little bit more of a look at crave. Evans who played in his first game against the Houston. Texans. What were the reviews on Craven's play against in his first game back in almost a year and a half generally positive considering the layoffs that he had had not played the end of the twenty sixth. With washington. I imagine they'll try to make more use out of him today. The chargers, they're not what they have been what they expected to be tight end. Of course, without a hundred Henry who's on the shelf because of a torn ACL, but at the same time you do need to cover them an insult rivers will look to Antonio gates who plume back varying late in the preseason. And of course, Virgil green old friend from the Broncos for the last several years who signed with them in free agency. But I think with craven maybe in this game the thing that you want him doing is perhaps watching the running backs a little bit, particularly the moment Gorbunov clerk can be very explosive when he gets into space, and maybe that could be his role today is serving as kind of a check into winning coverage. And maybe that'll help offset the loss of Brandon Marshall. He's still struggling with a knee injury. He's out. What do you expect him to be out? Another maybe. Be weaker. So at this point, we'll see I mean, those bruises they're kind of tricky. And I guess it was something similar with your ability or was young took him a while to get back. So no, not certainly not positive that the bye week was enough to get Brandon Marshall back, but with Josie Joel in there who they like an awful lot. The Broncos can afford to be cautious and take their time with Marshall. So during the bye week. What did the Broncos learn about themselves? A lot of times teams get a chance during this off week to introspectively self scout self scout themselves. What are strengths what our weaknesses? What did they learn about themselves that they can figure to improve upon and do better or find some weaknesses that they need to clean up? Honestly, I don't know. That's not something I asked players specifically about I mean, certainly, they seem to come back in the locker room energize. I don't know what they learned. I think. If they did learn anything it will be on display today. But it's probably too early to answer that question with the info or lack thereof. I have on that particular topic. Yeah. Fair enough. And maybe that's something that the Broncos wanna play a little bit close to their vest. Give away all the answers for the second half of the season. But just as a as a general vibe since you touched on it. Do you feel like that they're gonna come back with with an edge because remember last year, although the bye week was very early in the regular season was after week four almost too early. The Broncos were three and one they win on that eight game losing skid. So coming off the bye week, which is a little better located in the season about the midway point. Do you feel like the Broncos can come back energize that edge? And even though they're three and six makeup push and try to become a winning football team again here in the second half of the season, or you hope so it seems like they were saying all the right things this week now actually saying all the right things and then going out there and showing it on the field. These are two completely different things. So while I think they've. Had the right message had the generally the right mindset. What does it mean? If you go out there on Sunday and ended up struggling into laying an egg. I think what's interesting though. It's hearing over and over talk about a fast start fast start that start. And yet the Broncos have been a pretty good starting team. They're they're in the top six in the league in first quarter scoring Martian. The issue for them has been the mid game. They're twenty six in the league in scoring margin in the second and third quarters combined. So you know, it's while they're saying fast start fast start. I think the key for them is to get a fast start as they have. Sometimes they played reasonably well in the first quarter. And then sustain it. And I think that will answer the question of whether things are different after the buyer for it's going to be the same team that lurched in struggled and gasped in wheezed into the by losing six or seven. Yeah. I agree with you. I thought they've been okay. On on the start side. I'm surprised there was such an emphasis about a fast start. I thought they did pretty good in that respect. It was more or less sustaining that start is. The second and third quarters where they kind of went to sleep to some degree, and they weren't very good on third down efficiency. They weren't very good in the red zone. And that's where you got to be a lot better. If you wanna win football games, especially against this is against this team. This team will will capital will pounce on its opportunities. They don't capitalize. And also the chargers they're right up there with the Rams in chiefs in terms of yards per play. And those three teams have three of the four best average yards per play figures in the Super Bowl era. So you've gotta have things figured out because the chargers will make you pay if you're struggling. Yeah. And the chargers just continue to find ways to win. They're they're doing things I want to get into it in our next segment a little bit more. But it kind of is a prelude. The chargers they've been able to win the close games that the Broncos haven't been able to win. Yeah. And that may.

Broncos chargers Darian Stewart Brandon Marshall Bradley Roby devante Booker Royce Freeman football Houston Morgan Freeman Dell Los Angeles Phil Riverstone California Andrew Mason max Garcia Ron Larry Craven Lindsey voice Freeman
"andrew mason" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"And as always we like to do it. But we're going to do it from the road. This time Andrew Mason's. Not in studio with me, he's out in sunny, California, we wake up to ice and frost and chilly weather, but we got sunshine now. So that's all going to burn off health things going out there for you. Andrew. Mason. Well, it's funny. You're talking about getting locked Angeles in San Diego us. I can tell you. I won't be getting confused because the chargers were still in San Diego be waking up in San Diego instead wake up in Long Beach, which is an industrial port city, a very different feel. San diego. No fun last night for Mason yet. Nowhere to go, but industrial warehouses. I ain't having a nice meal that having a sushi meal and having an after dinner drink, but certainly when you walk around beach. You know, you're not in. Still one of the travesties in the NFL, and quite frankly. Barris meant to the NFL that the chargers are playing in a soccer stadium, a thirty thousand seat soccer stadium. And I suspect even based on last year, and based on what I've seen from other opposing teams that come in the Broncos have sixty to seventy percent of the fans there today will be almost like a home field advantage for the Broncos. Yeah. And that's where it's been for almost every game. The upset her. You and a lot of people say oh playing soccer stadium. If all of a sudden, the Broncos were playing pool on the road, and they're putting in say Wembley stadium. And what did no problem? That's a legitimate venues. One. Chargers were obviously going for something different when they moved to stop. It was temporary. But they were still in kind of oh, we're gonna in candidate hotel feels more capacity. No bad seat in the house that sort of thing. But it is it is further shown the degree to which the LA market consider the chargers irrelevant and unnecessary because the chargers. Almost every game. They can't even get more than twelve thousand fans of their own supporting them into their home stadium. And just looks like a whole new. I don't think it's going to get much better when they get to the new stadium where they're basically just going to be into the Los Angeles. Rams, right. Right. And that's even worse because I don't know how a team and the way teams survive and operate nowadays they need that stadium revenue. They need that in house revenue in order to compete in free agency and have some of their own money. Reverend totally rely on on another team as a tenant. So is the NFL second guessing their decision to allow the chargers to move to LA. Is there any talk any thoughts any discussion that maybe one day they'll go back to San Diego? I'm sure nation just in casual conversation, but the structure of the deal and the structure of the lease that they have it basically locks them in to the new stadium going up in Inglewood for a couple of decades. So there's not a lot that can be done at this point. It's pretty well set. It is frustrating. It stinks. Not having San Diego in the NFL. And you kind of look back on it. When you had the Rams and the chargers and the raiders all talk about relocation a few years ago and St Louis had a pretty viable stadium offer coming together, and it and had a viable stadium. I mean, it may it didn't have a lot of charm, obviously, the dome in Saint Louis, but it was a viable stadium. With the only thing they really need to fix was the area beyond the you're on the turf where guys would sometimes slip besides that. It was a viable stadium. And so sometimes I think to myself, you know, the ideal thing would have been to find a way to keep a team in Saint Louis and say, it's the chargers. Could make deal in San Diego have them be here as long as the only team, but didn't work out that way. And now you've got a team like the chargers playing in a sub-standard facility. Andrew Mason is joining us from Los Angeles, California is the Broncos get ready to take on the chargers today in Carson California in the stubhub center at two oh five. All right. The big news of the week is that more casualties along the offensive line for the Broncos on Thursday in practice, as it turns out max Garcia blew out his name torn ACL gone for the year. What happened in practice? It's hard to understand especially an offensive lineman blowing out his knee in practice. When in today's NFL you're only allowed to have fourteen practices in pads during a seventeen week season. So what happened Mace? You can have. Practice. Even though you had limited practice time. Just look at Ryan cloudy a few years ago. He blew out his Nina, not a no pads. No not too much in the way of contact. So it's these things still sometimes happen in football. Even with the change in practice schedule. The interesting thing about Garcia was according to Vance Joseph who made it through the practice. He was hobbling a little bit as certain point. But he made it through and then after the practice, I had the ACO hair diagnosed now the thing with ACL tears is you don't always see guys immediately pull up and get treated sometimes they'll continue to play. Sometimes they they can get by with it. And we've seen plenty of guys walk off the field over the course of years after tearing the ACLU so it kind of falls into that category. But still a tough blow for the Broncos down being down, Ron Leary and Matt Paradis next Garcia to that three interior linemen. And you're facing a situation where you have Billy Turner at left guard for the first time the you woke us and making his first career start at right guard. And oh, by the way, it looks like you're gonna be seeing Joey Bosa. On the other side of the line scrimmage. Exactly. So I was gonna ask you to go ahead and put that offensive line for us together. Now, so Connor mcgovern's gonna stay at center Elijah Wilkinson a play right guard. And then you're gonna move Billy Turner over to left guard who played in some filled in thought he did a pretty good job at right tackle when Jared Ville dear was down for a few weeks. So that's the interior line. Any talk on fell deer and bowl. Switching sides bell deer playing left tackle ball's moving to right tackle. No not right now. Like both remain left tackle, Jerry Bill. You're right that if you were gonna make a change of that caliber wouldn't a bye week had been in an appropriate time to try to make a change that significant. But. While Jerry del deer going from right? Tackle to left. Tackle is perfectly logical because he's been left tackle in the past scare bowl. He hasn't been a right tackle, he's played on the left side. So I'm not sure if the switch that is that viable at this time, not from the bold and from the bowl developed ear and at at on the right side. Okay. So then elaborate a little bit on the interior. We know Connemara governor a little bit. He's been playing right guard you got alleged Wilkinson play right guard now, and then Billy Turner left guard. What's that makeup? Look like just kind of based on experience at the interior part of the line. Well, Billy Turner altered experience is on the right side. He played right guard over in Miami for a bit. And of course, has been a right tack with the Broncos and his role until this week. Until until injury struck in the last few weeks what they right side backup. Right. Tackle right guard. He was pretty he was pretty well down the list as far options at left guard, unfortunately because the Garcia injury. The Broncos have been forced exercise that option. Wilkinson broke into the league last year as a tackle he played tackle UMass. And they've been working on him. As more of a swing guy. He started working at guard earlier this year OTA's and in a training camp. And so now the Broncos at fort had been forced to turn to him there at at right guard. So we'll see how it goes. He did play reasonably well at times against Houston a couple of weeks ago, but he's still learning and again like I mentioned with Joey Bosa. Those interior linemen are going to have a significant channel is because the chargers can generate a pretty good pass rush from the interior when both is in there. So it'd be a rough day at times. We'll see. Yeah. That's the other breaking news this morning. You hit on a Joey Bosa hasn't played a snap yet. This season some sort of foot sprain. He had going on during the training camp. I believe is when it happened or possibly even the first preseason game. But this will be his first regular season snaps of the season. I'm sure he'll be on some sort of pitch count. They won't want to rush him back too much, but very disruptive guy when healthy. And the question is though how healthy is he is he back to anything approximating his old self those foot springs can be pretty tricky. And the chargers they had been looking for him to come back earlier this month, and I know a few weeks ago they were talking about the Seattle game a couple of weeks ago. At a target for that guy. Push back a little bit. There was a lot of mystery. And. Shrouded nature certainly as far as how he was coming along. Leaking out of the chargers campus result of of that? So we'll see I mean, we don't really know how that he's going to be in your, right? You probably will be on a fish count. But even when he has those snaps is he going to be as old self or is going to be easing his way back in that being said, even Joey Bosa at say sixty five percent. Came caused problems for interior of the offensive line is really patchwork at best until we see them come together over the next few weeks. So a lot of questions. He's Andrew Mason from Denver Broncos dot com in orange and blue seven sixty you can hear him weekdays from ten AM to one PM on orange and blue seven sixty with Ryan Edwards and ring of Famer Steve atwater each and every day when we come back. We're going to get into what the Broncos learned about themselves during the bye week what sort of improvements should we look for the second half of the season as your Denver Broncos, try to rebound and go on some sort of winning streak this three and six is not acceptable around here. They gotta find some wins in the back half of the season. Broncos game day continues on KOA NewsRadio eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM. Win a pair of.

chargers Broncos NFL Andrew Mason San Diego Joey Bosa Billy Turner Los Angeles max Garcia Denver Broncos California Wembley stadium Rams Elijah Wilkinson Ryan Edwards soccer stadium Saint Louis soccer ACLU
"andrew mason" Discussed on The Pitch

The Pitch

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on The Pitch

"Welcome back to without fail. And my interview with Andrew Mason in two thousand ten Andrew found himself at the helm of this huge company. And he says he didn't know how to be a CEO of a company like that. So he look for some advice. You just start like reading these bullshit business books like good degrade. I mean, it was a great book. But. Then you get you get this idea. Yeah. Sure. I mean, I was reading everything I couldn't figure out what the fuck was happening to me. And at some point. Would you think a good degree? I haven't read good to great. I read the hard thing about hard things. It's great. I'm I've read art of war. I will not God my witness. No, it's time to hang it up. When you read art of war. Okay. So you're reading these business books, and you're trying to be well, I think there is this thing where all of a sudden, you're CEO, and it starts starts a joke. Like, ha I'm a CEO. I would say it. Ironically, a lot. And then all of a sudden, I'm like, no, I am. Yeah. And it's like I can't just joke about it anymore because like everybody now is working for me. And it's like a bad look to totally self deprecate. As CEO people. I also had a really hard time accepting that I mean, I remember Forbes wrote an article putting us on the cover for calling us, the fastest growing company of all time, and I hung it up in the lobby of our of our office, and I surrounded it with cover articles about like web than in all base. Yeah. That we're all like the hottest company ever all these companies that had that had gone under. And it was this kind of like morbid joke that. That just came from my discomfort with the insanity of everything that was happening. Right. But. It sounds like there was like there was a lot of internal conflict for you about your role. Is that true? The the the conflict was was just like. Like people would ask people would ask me where did you come up with the idea for groupon? And I would respond with something insulting like well. I was just out flying. A kite one day got a little cloudy started to rain and low lightning struck the kite the lightning bolt flew down the string into my hands. And I thought what if there was a way on the internet to get fifty percent off local businesses. It's an asshole response. No. But it's such a it's. Like like the idea. There was a lot of on the right up. There was a lot of stuff in the press of trying to kind of deify and turn the turn the CEO into this hero or this genius. Or something that like I felt like those things but not with groupon. I didn't want group onto be the like the dumb coupon company like that just felt like a an active desperation in order to not have our funding taken away. And it's just funny how these ideas happen to people. You know, like me today. I never would have gotten myself in a situation where the conditions for group on could have happened. It took having an incredibly naive idea, which was the point and messing that up. Right. And then figuring out what I could make out of this rubble in order to be in the conditions. That would Li. Lead me to start group on like, I wouldn't have just woken up out of bed. One day and say, I have this idea for a way to offer deals for local businesses fifty percent off Renton gonna go drop out of college. And and start that company. Next episode part two of my conversation with Andrew Mason groupon. Meteoric ride continues until it all comes crashing down for Andrew. It was just this crazy rocket ship that never really let up until you know, later. I'm sitting on my couch fired imagining how I could just sit here and order pizza, not move the rest of my life. That's next episode of without fail without fail is hosted by me and produced by Sarah Platt, it's edited by Devin Taylor Nazanin refs, and Johnny me special. Thanks to Ben Bergman this episode was mixed by Peter. Leonard are amazing amazing the music that I love so much is by Bobby Lord. If you enjoyed the show, and you want to hear more subscribe on apple podcasts.

CEO Andrew Mason groupon Forbes Devin Taylor Bobby Lord Ben Bergman Sarah Platt Leonard apple Johnny Renton Peter fifty percent One day one day
"andrew mason" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"Welcome back to without fail and my conversation with Andrew Mason, the founder of groupon when we left off, groupon was beginning to grow and looking to expand into other cities. Group on was six months old. We only existed in Chicago, we'd had really limited press, but it was going well in Chicago well enough that we decided to get into another city in to Boston. And we sent a couple of our people in our team out there to go door to door and try to sign up some businesses, and we went into a, we went into a business and they said, yeah, you guys don't be so pushy. You know, you were here. You were here a week ago and we told you we'd get back to you and we were like, that's not true. We weren't here week ago. What are you talking about? And they're like, yeah, you were, you left your, you left us flyer with us, and they gave us the flyer and it was this. It was. I don't remember what they were called at the time, but it was the first. Groupon clone and they had like literally copied a bunch of the writing on our website and and from our sales materials. And it was just completely shocking like I was new to business, right? I always thought I was going to be a musician. And in that world, we would call this plagiarism. But in business apparently I was learning. It's just called competition for, but man, it was shocking to see that and and if that wasn't shocking enough, like then over there were at some point, literally thousands of groupon clones, everyone from Google to Facebook to Amazon, had launched the exact same the exact same model, and we were going up against all of these people and. I hated them like I hated them not just as businesses or as competitors, but I hated the people like I would. I would find out who the people were were in direct beams of hate to them in their lives and hope that nothing but bad things happen to them for the rest of their lives. It just seemed like the worst kind of person to me that would that would just shamelessly copy what you're doing and in order to make a quick buck. So what offended you so much about that. Wouldn't that wouldn't offend you? Is that hard to understand why that would be offensive? I'm asking questions on behalf of the listener. I mean, you know, at at that point, I I, it was kind of like, you know, my idea was my thing and, and at that point, my life, I took a lot of. That was where I got a lot of my satisfaction from having that. And that's the form of impact that I'm having and an and it took a lot of hard work to get there. Right. I mean, one of the heating yet felt like cheating, totally felt like cheating. Yeah..

groupon Chicago Andrew Mason Boston founder Google Facebook Amazon six months
"andrew mason" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

StartUp Podcast

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on StartUp Podcast

"Tightening groupon provides discounts on everything from dinner today, spas all at a click of a mouse Mason started group on ten years ago when he was in his mid twenties, and every element that you can imagine in a typical startup story, groupon did it bigger Mason was the first time founder who before starting the company had been a grad student in public policy. And yet within two years of lunch and the company, it was earning hundreds of millions of dollars a month in revenue and was valued at several billion dollars. It was called the fastest growing company in history. It grew faster than apple faster than Facebook, faster than Google, and then just as rapidly and just as dramatically its fortunes changed this dream rise and nightmare fall all in this incredibly short time span. It's almost like the comic book version of a startup story larger than life a startup fable, but it wasn't a fable. It actually happened to a real guy. I met Andrew Mason in two thousand thirteen in. In the aftermath of all this. He was starting a new company involving audio, and I and my co-founder, we're starting Gimblett. So we were both involved in audio and we got to know each other a bit and eventually enter became an investor in Kim on. But we had never really talked about his experience at groupon. Never. That is until a couple of months ago when I sat down with him in a studio in San Francisco and used this very podcast as an excuse to get him to tell me his whole story. This is like for me very exciting because I've always wanted to ask all the questions that I'm about to ask you, which is like sort of like you've had this crazy experience with group on. It happened at a very like a time that I can't even imagine it my life..

Andrew Mason groupon Kim founder apple San Francisco Facebook co-founder Google billion dollars ten years two years
Andrew Mason and the start of Groupon

Without Fail

06:34 min | 2 years ago

Andrew Mason and the start of Groupon

"andrew mason" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"andrew mason" Discussed on Recode Decode

"I also want to tell you about to embarrass to ask my other podcasts which echoes of lauren good from the verge this is lauren's replicant every friday we answer your questions about conceived because they make a clump plug you that would be fantastic every bribe answer questions about consumer tech lauren what did we talk about this week we sort of or sort of saying what we talked about we talked about robotics we talked about this topic with rich mahoney he is the ceo of seismic he's a former director of robotics at sri he's built from oxford darpa before rich what was your favorite part of this week's podcast i'd like the questions i'd like hearing what people are really thinking about robots and being able to help just add to that conversation are we too afraid of robots way way too afraid well well henry freight is something so yeah robots are can have an opportunity to have really increase the quality of life for a lot of people so i think life can be better for many people in the world and robots can help to that yeah thank you robot guy for saying that fantastic if you were freed of that back slipping robot before requires all la assuaged weir's release that's a good let's wait thank you it was a great discussion we hope you'll go listen to it you can find too embarrassed ask on apple podcast school play music wherever you listen to podcasts that's too embarrassed asked to see you there were here on recode decode with the obstreperous andrew mason who is difficult as usually despite the fact that i'm trying to hawk his new company descript we were just talking about it we're here with kc newton from the virtuous my cohost over several episode so having a great to having a great time so we i want to get back to this concept of where audio is going because it has bloomed in terms of podcasts me in terms of you were into a doing detour your last company.

lauren ceo director oxford darpa weir kc newton apple andrew mason