35 Burst results for "Andrew Johnson"

Boston police officer charged with drug possession

WBZ Morning News

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Boston police officer charged with drug possession

"A Boston police officer, is now in custody on drug charges. Master police arrested 51 year old Andrew Johnson of Cheston Hill yesterday in West Roxbury. Prosecutors say Johnson was found with methamphetamine and other drugs back in January, up in Woodstock, New Hampshire. Following his arrest, Johnson was released to turn himself into New Hampshire authorities. Andrew Johnson has been a Boston police officer sends 2002, Meanwhile, former commissioner of Boston Police Department really grass placed him on administrative leave. On January 27th when the Boston Police Department became aware of the ongoing

Cheston Hill Andrew Johnson West Roxbury Boston Johnson New Hampshire Woodstock Boston Police Department
Boston Police Officer Andrew Johnson Arrested On Drug Charges

WBZ Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

Boston Police Officer Andrew Johnson Arrested On Drug Charges

"Police officer has been arrested in Massachusetts on drug charges he faces in New Hampshire State police arrested Andrew Johnson of Chestnut Hill yesterday in West Roxbury. Prosecutors say Johnson was found with meth and other drugs in Woodstock, New Hampshire Back in January after his arrest, Johnson was released so that he could turn himself into New Hampshire authorities.

New Hampshire State Police Andrew Johnson Chestnut Hill West Roxbury Massachusetts Johnson Woodstock New Hampshire
Boston Police Officer Andrew Johnson Arrested On Drug Charges

WBZ Midday News

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Boston Police Officer Andrew Johnson Arrested On Drug Charges

"Drug charges. Mast A police arrested 19 year veteran Andrew Johnson of Chestnut Hill yesterday in West Roxbury. Prosecutors say Johnson was found with meth and other drugs back in January in Woodstock, New Hampshire. Following his arrest, Johnson was released to turn himself into New Hampshire authorities then police Commissioner William Gross Place Johnson on administrative leave on January 27th when the department became aware of the investigation. Abide administration has hit its

Andrew Johnson West Roxbury Chestnut Hill Johnson New Hampshire Commissioner William Gross Pla Woodstock
Boston Police Officer Arrested On Drug Charges

WBZ Midday News

00:24 sec | 3 months ago

Boston Police Officer Arrested On Drug Charges

"Arrested in West Roxbury today on drug charges Officer Andrew Johnson of Chestnut Hill was arrested in connection with an incident In January and Woodstock, New Hampshire, New Hampshire, authorities say In that incident, the officer was found to be in possession of methamphetamine and amphetamine. Johnson was arrested by Massachusetts State Police then released to turn himself in. To police in New Hampshire across the country. It is

Officer Andrew Johnson West Roxbury New Hampshire Chestnut Hill Woodstock Massachusetts State Police Johnson
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

01:36 min | 4 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Post Reports

"Dirty <Speech_Female> of <SpeakerChange> to <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was michelle. Kroll <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of the library <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of congress speaking <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> with the posts lean <Speech_Music_Female> cunningham. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> She is the host <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of a bunch of history. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> including presidential <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> which you can find on <Speech_Music_Female> your podcast up or <Speech_Music_Female> at washingtonpost <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> dot com slash <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> presidential. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> That's it proposed <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> reports. Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for listening. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> If you <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> are hearing this episode <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> on february <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> fifteenth. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it is not to lead <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to join lillian. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> President's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> day virtual tribus <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> event <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> it starts at eight <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> pm and <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> there will be prizes <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and special guests <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> including <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a brief appearance <Speech_Music_Female> from yours. Truly <Speech_Music_Female> what <Speech_Music_Female> i am personally. Most excited <Speech_Music_Female> about is that. There's <Speech_Music_Female> also going to be <Speech_Female> a demo of <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> how to make president <Speech_Music_Female> warren g <Speech_Music_Female> harding's favourite <Speech_Music_Female> cocktail from <Speech_Music_Male> one hundred years ago <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to register to <Speech_Female> watch and join <Speech_Female> in on the fun. Find <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a link in today's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> show notes and add <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> reports dot <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> com. I'm <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> martine powers. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We'll

McConnell says Trump was "practically and morally responsible" for Washington, DC riot after voting not guilty

WTOP 24 Hour News

03:33 min | 4 months ago

McConnell says Trump was "practically and morally responsible" for Washington, DC riot after voting not guilty

"Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell delivered a scalding denunciation of former President Trump calling him morally responsible for the attack on the U. S Capitol. But before that, of course, he voted not guilty in the president's impeachment trial. Joining us for more is Ken Walsh, White House and political analyst for U. S News and World Report. Can it looks like that High wire act continues for many Republicans and their relationship with the former president. Well, it does. And you know, this basically is a rebuke to President Trump because It was 57 to 43 vote to find him guilty of inciting the insurrection, But it failed to reach the 67 votes two thirds needed to convict. So it was a majority vote, including seven Republicans. Of course, what it is basically, it's it's sort of an outcome without a conclusion and It's um there's still a special congressional commission that's going to proceed to look at the events of January 6th when the capital was invaded. At the state level their investigations of President Trump's conduct and trying to overturn the election in Georgia and in New York. So This really has not resolved very much, And there's a lot of sense of disappointment really around Washington as to how this has all come out. Wasn't worth doing. And, of course, this such a ferocious partisanship in the air that, um, the House managers and the Democrats who pushed this field was worth doing because President Trump needed to be rebuked. But of course, he was not convicted. And so a ZAY say there's just the sense that this is, um This does not really resolve anything and that we're just as polarized as we had been with President Trump with the center of that of former President Trump in the center of that. And, um, we're gonna be talking about this, Uh, for well into the future. Did you find it interesting, though, that McConnell pointed specifically to criminal courts is a possible future forum for this kind of thing for the president. The former president? Yes. Yes, he did, And he sure almost invited that to happen. On But, you know, they're just step back and look a historically, um, in our first um, really two centuries we have one impeachment of Andrew Johnson 18 68. Ah, then, 130 years later, we had, um The beginning of appeared where we had three Bill Clinton. In 1998 and then Donald Trump twice in 2019 2021. So what's happened is that I think, partly because the presidency has gotten so powerful, and there's an effort in Congress to rein it in. And partly because we have become so partisan on polarized as a country, impeachment has become not the rare process that the founders envisioned, but something that's used as a As a weapon by both parties really against the sitting president. So we've had three impeachments now since 1998. And that's a really a remarkable historical development that impeachment has become. More of a regular eyes thing in our country. And as I say, three of them since

President Trump Ken Walsh U. S News And World Report Congressional Commission Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump U. Senate White House UM Georgia Mcconnell Washington New York Andrew Johnson House Bill Clinton Congress
NASA's Mars rover Perseverance is in the home stretch of its journey to Red Planet

Innovation Now

01:13 min | 4 months ago

NASA's Mars rover Perseverance is in the home stretch of its journey to Red Planet

"When you do the landing on mars it has to work perfectly the first time and so we have to just do our jobs perfectly to make sure that that happens. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Andrew johnson a technologist at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory serves as one of the managers for the guidance navigation and control system on mars twenty twenty when building the system. The team conducted tests to make sure the hardware could survive launch and its transition into the vacuum of space and during the spacecraft's seven month journey to mars. Andrew and his team have continued to check the camera high performance computer and inertial measurement unit that. Make up the navigation system on cruises. We can make sure that we can collect data from the camera. And then we can collect data from the i m you and that the computer can do the processing it's required to do but certainly we can't test out exactly what we're gonna do during landing but we can make sure. Each of the pieces works correctly and now andrews team is ready for entry descent and landing on february eighteenth as mars twenty twenty touches down

Andrew Johnson Nasa Andrew Andrews
Biden says Trump skipping inauguration is a "good thing"

Joe Pags

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Biden says Trump skipping inauguration is a "good thing"

"Trump reveals he will will not not attend attend the the inauguration inauguration later. later. This This month month fucks fucks is is Kevin Kevin Corke Corke reports reports from from washing. washing. Into Into the the president president announced announced via via Twitter Twitter that that he he would would be be skipping skipping Biden's Biden's pending pending inauguration inauguration when the few things he and I've ever agreed on, it's a good thing. I'm not showing up. President Trump will become the fourth outgoing president and not attend his successors. Inauguration. The others John Adams, John Quincy Adams and Andrew Johnson, so not unprecedented, but it hasn't happened since. 18 69. Following President Trump announcing that decision on Twitter, the Social Media Service sided his messages justification for suspending his account.

Kevin Kevin Corke Corke President Trump Biden Donald Trump Twitter John Quincy Adams John Adams Andrew Johnson Social Media Service
Jones' 3 lifts No. 4 Texas over No. 14 West Virginia 72-70

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Jones' 3 lifts No. 4 Texas over No. 14 West Virginia 72-70

"Andrew Johnson a three pointer with one point eight seconds left to lift fourth ranked Texas to a seventy to seventy victory over number fourteen West Virginia the game winning bucket came after west Virginia's Emmitt Matthews missed two free throws with eleven seconds left Courtney Ramey scored nineteen points for Texas which trailed most of the game and had to come back from nine down in the second half Jones finished with sixteen points including the one thousandth of his college career Ted Sherman scored seventeen points in your call for added fourteen with sixteen rebounds for the mountaineers I'm Dave Ferrie

Emmitt Matthews Andrew Johnson Courtney Ramey Texas West Virginia Ted Sherman Jones Dave Ferrie
Trump to skip Biden swearing-in — Biden's fine with that

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Trump to skip Biden swearing-in — Biden's fine with that

"For the first time since a few years after the civil war ended in incumbent president will skip his successor swearing in president trump says he will not be at the capitol January twentieth which is fine with Joe Biden with a few things here and I've ever read on the outgoing and incoming presidents have traditionally traveled to the capital together underscoring America's peaceful transfer of power the last incumbent to skip it Andrew Johnson another one term president who was impeached in the house more than one hundred fifty years later Biden says it's a good thing this president won't attend Sager mag ani Washington

Donald Trump Joe Biden Andrew Johnson America Biden Sager Mag Ani Washington
Dallas-Based SMU Presidential Historian Says Better For Nation If Trump Attends Biden Inauguration

Rick Roberts

00:31 sec | 5 months ago

Dallas-Based SMU Presidential Historian Says Better For Nation If Trump Attends Biden Inauguration

"To President Donald Trump's decision not to attend President elect Joe Biden's upcoming inauguration January 20th Jeffrey Angle is the director of the Center for Presidential History at S M u and says the last president not to go to his successors. Inauguration was Andrew Johnson and 18 59 3 presidents to have been impeached, refused to attend their successors Inauguration on Lee Bill Clinton was able to show up Martin Van Buren, John Adams and John Adams son John Quincy Adams for the only other presidents who sat out their successors inaugurations. Tex

President Donald Trump President Elect Joe Biden Jeffrey Angle Center For Presidential Histor Andrew Johnson Lee Bill Clinton John Adams Martin Van Buren John Quincy Adams
President Trump won't attend Joe Biden's inauguration

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 5 months ago

President Trump won't attend Joe Biden's inauguration

"For the first time since the civil war era in incumbent president says he will skip his successor's inauguration in a video yesterday president tropic knowledge Joe Biden will be inaugurated January twentieth my focus now turns to ensuring a smooth orderly and seamless transition of power but the president says he will not attend to the actual handover tweeting he's going to skip the bidens and alteration traditionally the incoming and outgoing presidents ride to the capitol to gather for the ceremony the last one to blow it off was Andrew Johnson in eighteen sixty nine vice president pence is expected to attend soccer mad Donnie Washington

Joe Biden Andrew Johnson Soccer Donnie Washington
Trump says he will  not attend Biden inauguration

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Trump says he will not attend Biden inauguration

"President trump says he will not be on hand when Joe Biden takes the oath of office yesterday the president finally conceded that his time in office he is nearly up a new administration will be inaugurated on January twentieth but he won't be there when it happens the president tweets he will not attend Biden's inauguration you'll be the first president since Andrew Johnson to skip his successor swearing in the president's giving no clues about how he'll spend his final days and hours in office amid growing talk of being removed through the twenty Fifth Amendment or impeachment Sager mag ani Washington

President Trump Joe Biden Andrew Johnson Biden Sager Mag Ani Washington
New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 9 months ago

New Law Mandates California To Study The Issue Of Reparations For Slaves' Descendants

"This is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly and I'm Elsa Chang in January. 18 65 As the Civil war staggered into its final months, the US made a promise. It would take for 100,000 acres of confiscated southern lands stretching from South Carolina to Florida and redistribute it to formerly enslaved black people in 40 acre parcels. Well, that order did not last long. Within the year, Lincoln's replacement president, Andrew Johnson, broke that promise and handed the land back to plantation owners. That was the nation's first systematic attempt to provide reparations for slavery. More recently, the late Michigan congressman John Conyers, tried and failed for nearly three decades. Yet Congress to consider the same issue. Now California has taken Conyers bill and used it as an inspiration for a new bill signed into law last week. It is the first state law of its kind. California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber is the author of that Bill, and she joins us Now. Welcome. Thank you. It's good to be here. Good to have you So what this new law does is basically set up a task force to study the issue of reparations for the descendants of enslaved people and To make further recommendations from there. Tell me what are you hoping to see? Come out of this task force. Well, I think they're a couple of things we hope will happen. Obviously, we hope there will be a number of recommendations on what the state needs to do in order to repair the damage that's been done. But hopefully in addition to that, we will have robust conversations about the really deep and long and pervasive impact of slavery and racism in California and across the nation. I talked to too many people who tell me I'm not a slave holder. I didn't I didn't own any slaves. What does that mean to me? Well, you may not have owned them, but the impact of your forefathers owning them. As what is the impact of the various laws and limitations placed upon African Americans That made it difficult, if not impossible, for them to compete educationally and economically and socially still has its lingering impact, and we see that in the streets today, we'll give us some concrete examples of what form Might these reparations take Well, you know, it could be like it is a Georgetown where those folks who was slaves that landed Georgetown, every descendant of those individuals now could have access and free education of Georgetown. We could look at the issue of loans and grants for people starting businesses, and we have businesses that are suffering and sometimes failing in this pandemic. Because of our let the lack of support and financing that made it almost difficult, if not impossible, for them to own land and only businesses. We need to look at housing patterns. California had some very, very racist housing patterns that existed. But they're they're number of things that need to exist and to indicate that is tremendous amount of damage was done and puts California on the hook as well, because he basically California was a free state, right. A lot of people don't think of California as a slave state, but exactly what role California did play when it came to slavery. Well, we had one of most racist governors who talked about removing all black people from state of California free or slaves. We created laws that prevented them from being able to testify in court against white person. We had lots of things embedded in our land ownership that prevents folks from buying or selling homes to African Americans. All of those things are important, as they began to say, is this wide African Americans continue to struggle have the least amount of wealth amassed have low homeownership, all those kinds of things that even after generations and generations of struggle. We still find that these things prevail. And even though a few sneak through the vast majority do not Now let me ask you dealing with the legacy of slavery is an issue that this entire country needs to reckon with. So there are a lot of people say, Let's look to a federal solution. How would you respond to that? Well, we have We lived for federal solution for 30 to 40 years. At this point, it's just not happening at the federal level. And so after waiting, we said, You know what California could do this? And I've governor said, You know what we can lead the way and that we think will motivate others to do. Likewise, California state Assemblywoman Shirley Weber was the author of a new state law to study reparations for slavery. Thank you very much, thank you for the opportunity.

California Assemblywoman Shirley Weber John Conyers NPR Mary Louise Kelly United States South Carolina Georgetown Congress Lincoln Andrew Johnson Michigan Florida President Trump Bill Elsa Chang
73: Reconstruction Part 1: The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

History That Doesn't Suck

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

73: Reconstruction Part 1: The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

"Today. We venture into the first of a few episodes that will take us through one of the least well known errors of American history. Reconstruction. This is the decade and change after the civil war during which the United States grapples with hard questions about readmitting the seceded states and what the end of the institution of Slavery Really Means and as you can tell from that opening, these won't be easy questions to answer in violence didn't end with the war.

United States
Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

Black History in Two Minutes

02:40 min | 1 year ago

Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

"The months following the civil war, and the start of reconstruction offered African Americans in the south hope for equality. It also offered the possibility of owning land. Within months African Americans would be betrayed by a harsh reality. You probably heard the phrase forty acres and a mule. Here's what happened. In January eighteen, sixty, five, a meeting in Savannah Georgia. Between Union, Military Leader General William to come Sherman and a group of twenty black ministers resulted in a plan to redistribute confiscated and abandoned confederate land from south, Carolina to Florida. They. Call the Land Sherman's reserve. Newly freed slaves would be allocated forty acres of land along with a mule, the phrase which became well-known, even then spread quickly. The plan had the potential to revolutionize race relations in the south and the economic future of the African American community. The significance about formerly enslaved being given the land that they had actually worked was that they would be able to generate wealth as well as create wealth generation. But the summer of eighteen sixty five thousands of black families had settled on portions of the Sherman Reserve and were excited to plot their futures. But later that year, as part of his reconstruction plan, actually intended to appease the former confederacy President Andrew. Johnson abruptly cancelled the order giving the land back to its previous owner's. The United States had the opportunity to make it possible for the formerly enslaved people to be. Independent and the country failed to do it. That initial meeting more than one hundred years ago between General Sherman and Savannahs, leading black ministers was historic at least for a brief moment in history, the opinion of black leaders had led directly to a radical public policy initiative remarkably over a century and a half later on June nineteen, two, thousand nineteen, the House of Representatives held a hearing on H R forty, a bill named in honor of the famous phrase, forty acres and a mule. The bill would establish a commission to study the concept of reparations for slavery and Jim Crow Segregation, including the merits of a formal apology by the United States government.

General Sherman Sherman Reserve United States Jim Crow Segregation African American Community Savannah Georgia House Of Representatives President Andrew General William Johnson Carolina Florida
"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Prememento Podcast

The Prememento Podcast

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Prememento Podcast

"Johnson. Comes in star this season on hits the ground in a wide it's like Oh my God. I can't believe what's happening in six goals in his first seven games. They don't lose any of them and fundamentally I was hoping to they this life was hoping this is a three victory over Liverpool in there and it was under Rapid Benitez for David Moyes disowned the last times I remember being. To Disney and I go. Fucking mad at Dr Intrical I'd also I'm pretty sure if you don't remember these Games, Dora Dvd's that much I do know it's still there itself sex in terms of best evidence. Just can't reprinting it. Basically, you know you've got some classic books been imprinted light four, hundred, hundred years this DVD. Just keeps second round. But I can laugh at it now because of what's happened since but everyone had gone through as I mentioned ups and downs, and this was a list start to the season was more of a case of Ikea we're back. We're GONNA do this again unfortunately for David Moyes evison end somewhere in the middle it's up to Johnson he comes in record son. Point six, million house. This great star he's. Gathering tide is turning and. Big Dogs anymore. Okay. They would've good as eyebrows arrays. Okay. We'll see what's going on here referred at one point of course about season. As, interesting, interesting to allergens actually. So if you're listening, this is when the diving accusation start coming in Allardyce carnivals ago few of mine is ever going in terms of how you know you just looking for the contacts and his four goes off a cliff. Yeah and if you really look at, it sounds of his career nowhere near of the same player again in terms of the numbers to an interesting one because account remember that many English plies you've had this accusation level we see on a weekend we kept vices with implies we've run five routes with all picked our own guys that we go. Yeah, he. Doesn't matter what they do Dover, but generally speaking I, don't tend to being these plies Jenny speaking even when they are it spun in a completely different way. It's always clever destroys. He corrected the contact don't seem to recall off the top of my head an English apply that was vilified in a why the he was also. Same. Can you remember a number example of a Playa vilified for Donovan who just start scoring pretty much the result because I can think of a few players who had a reputation for diving but I still carried out scoring goals. I mean you kind of non example you know Renaldo, this periods at united us known as a diver English players Ashley Young knows dive even in a little nibbles in terms of innovation but deliver that was one that was spun a different way. You know being clever carnival hurricane but none of those kind of in a situation like our you've had your hand corner cookie jar..

Dora Dvd David Moyes Johnson. Rapid Benitez Big Dogs Donovan Liverpool Ashley Young Renaldo Dr Intrical Disney Allardyce Dover Jenny
"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Prememento Podcast

The Prememento Podcast

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Prememento Podcast

"About, some of them economy mirrors a currency him in primarily this season Boyne a lot plays in the summer thinking these flies aren't so bad. But these plays broad like just did not work out so and you look in terms of their record overall, they come bomb and you know there's ways and means of coming bomb. Four wins journey course an entire season Geez sewer home to I. They come fourteen points off seventeenth, which is fifty points because of the goal-difference. This must have been an absolutely dreadful from start to finish. No hope everyone crying every week but there was a point during the course of this season up until caught in the middle of March they were four points off safety and now planets seventeen and it's got nothing to do about Johnson. They played Villa Miller March they just want to games on the bounce I'm have all the talk was our redknapp. He's going to scrape and lead keep you on that game villa. Dreadful. We realized in Soft Sharma. First off some I think at Bond Horse Gordon ask asking I wasn't wasn't great villain free to keep yards did not win a single came to that the rest of the season. Wanted Him. You Win that game there. One point of safe to. Talk about crashing and burning I thought who boxer afraid into to early. But you know kind of in bit fortify where they get the fighters together and the wreck on and goes spoke you in the dressing room you've got to keep it clean kind of all the touch globes especially equivalent gallbladder defense. Close to half of me. To get out of it. I'm sure Ashley seen a boxer much to walked. In with a game ever since. Not. Really to Johnson to be honest but his last. Appearance was his last week so We have to address and it's just the fact of is not that much to do on the Johnson is because the whole season for? In the thing is like it wasn't there. So it was involved it was involved supposed to go. Could he made a difference keeping them off but then you can fifteen voices a lot. It's my but I suppose you might have been slightly forever above water to begin with if he'd been involved, you know scoring goals and all that ever GonNa, keep your down to be fair but I think he was symbolic of how disastrously wrong that keep your seats and when it comes in injured almost immediately. Replied coming in not really doing a lot in the grand scheme of things. Touch upon why I've actually done. Howdy been there for the sheriff up to ease the following season. When they're in the championship, keep your he plays seventeen games schools to. So it gives me an indication of like not quite at the peak of his power. Should we saw now I suppose the injuries probably can affect at this stage because crucial as well. You would have probably needed another season to get back to where you were. That's in your best years. Let alone you'll get a little. Yeah..

Johnson Boyne Villa Miller Soft Sharma Horse Gordon Ashley
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

12:04 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Extent. Tim of sheer will. Education is misinterpretation. Oh my God poor bubby house. He's the poster now now. I know what they claimed. That Johnson's intent was to test the very constitutionality of the tenure of office. Act Before the Supreme Court which he had the right to do so also he made a mistake. He's only human but also it was on purpose. Yeah also he was doing it to strengthen S. S. Constitution it's like when you're lifting weights and you Max out. Like how much can you bench. No yeah like the Muslim Hindu. Do we need. We need a strong Skoda's lead. You got a sense of Ron Johnson. In the Scotus he'd be a much better chief justice. My God. I'd pay for that. Pay to see that on the issue of appointing Thomas as the interim officer the defense team noted that Johnson was attempting by necessity to keep the war department staff and operational. The Brits could come back you never know never know. Pirates aritz pirates. Always a problem. The president's actions they noted had resulted in no public injury sufficiently grave to warrant the removal from office. Nothing the we're fine so fine. There were not. They're not you. Greens why are we crying. It was that bad. Like like was a bad. Yes but it wasn't that bad. Have we heard this before any of this sound like yes it was bad but like impeachable impeachable Jabbour come on. Oh like to keep the war department staffed. Gino would have kept the war department. Staff is keeping win right. Yes ask you didn't have to do anything if there's nothing to be done now they're going to be done. No defense have yet to hear a defense from this team is not laughable. Sure there were twenty five prosecution in sixteen defense. Witnesses called no witnesses which is nice. Nice all the impeachment trials we've seen in history have had witnesses and this one such a long trial a long time to hear all the witnesses because they had twenty five prosecution and sixteen defense witnesses and right now we were like can we just have the one. Can we just have the John John gives one with like no no. No you get three days. No witnesses that's it. Yeah Yeah these guys at eleven weeks and what is that forty one witnesses is that the yes. That could be the math that that is. That's the math is the math as a math Most hosted the trial was conducted in open session but the galleries were closed for the debate of the actual eleven articles may fine fine the Republicans who had brought the impeachment charges against against Johnson. We're we're this is also according to the Senate. Oh God the official Senate website were impressed with his behavior and good faith measures to make amends. Okay I'll get him. He's trying trying he's trying he's trying to get credit for that really trying to turn it around uh-huh so Johnson promised to enforce the reconstruction acts because he realized he was in trouble. He was like those are not gonna go my way and none of these people are of my party. I got to do something to like. Let me correct correct. Yeah so he promised to Rian to enforce the reconstruction acts. He promised to stop giving speeches attacking. Congress I'll stop giving my loud speeches. I will be quieter play slots US off with A. Yes Yeah Thou II and their speak softly yeah. And he promised purpose to appoint General John M show Feld of as the new secretary of war. who is liked by most of the Republican why not Edwin I think Edwin. He's he didn't want to talk he's like this is the halfway point not back guy. Yeah I'm not going to give you bovine. Forget when we will take John Juggle. Take John even though the majority of the articles of impeachment were how win. Hope nobody stood up for you in the end. He's just log on his gone off goat. Johnson's opponents decided to hold a vote on only three of the eleven articles of impeachment as a strategy to pass the ones that they thought were the strongest arguments for release. Tell me it was the one about US voice it was. I think it was one two and three days. I know opportunity. I know it was really a shame. I mean we would have had precedent president. How you're seeing? How could they have foreseen? They really So I may sixteen eighteen sixty eight. The Senate acquitted Johnson by a one. Vote Margin Gosh Dang it I know one king boat I live. We live right now. We're like we have four people know amazing amazing The vote against him in the Senate was closer than the vote to bring the articles of impeachment to the Senate and the first article thirty five senators voted to convict the president of high crimes and misdemeanors while nineteen voted to acquit. Which is one vote? One vote shy of the two-thirds needed to I know ten days later they held votes on the second and third articles only to have the same result they voted to acquit acquit. Him quote because this because as efficient minority wished to protect the office of the President and preserve the constitutional balance of power. Oh my God how can we stop trying to protect the office of the president and just like deal with what's happening to what extent. Are you like your denial. So you wish you value in the office of the president devaluing the other arms of government. Why at the same time? It's like three birds. One stone changed because one of the reasons is that that was floated around that Lisa Murkowski decided to vote against having witnesses. Because she didn't want to be the senator who would then force John Roberts to have to cast a tie breaking vote and she didn't want to put the office of the Supreme Court in that in that position and I'm like that what he's air for. Yeah absolutely the Joe is going to be. That's why he's got this job. I'm like what are you sure it's not your decision like I'm Gonna I'm GonNa take certainly saw we saw. This is not your job. That was one of the things I was like. What are you talking about? That's the whole reason. We put in place a tie-breaking. Vote right we. We don't have a problem. Giving Mike Pence pens the opportunity to cast a tie breaking vote. Yes exactly that's like us anyways you so mad. Unlike John's going to be fine. Yes he's shaky but he's going to be fine seven Republicans for in Johnson's impeachment. Trial defied their party to vote to acquit Senator James Grimes of Iowa concluded quote. I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious working of the Constitution for the sake of getting rid of an unacceptable president. Like what's the point of impeachment like what's the point of it but not to get rid of an unacceptable president right but also like if you told me that like Lisa Murkowski as you said that I would believe you. Bas- basically what she said. Yeah it just take the word constitution out and put Supreme Court. I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious ace workings of the Supreme Court for the sake of getting rid of and that's that's literally what it is. It's also not a disruption revolutionist. I'm not somebody WHO's like let's burn it out of the ground around. You think there are definitely things to change. But I'm not somebody who thinks like we're going to start from scratch. I literally like obviously. They had their problems. They started from scratch. Here we are today but you know it is anathema to me. The the sentiment of like we have to protect the institutions. What in your mind then would be? He wants enough. What's enough what's the thing that would break your back? I don't understand everybody's looking very gravely you wishing and explanation institution's point that's the whole point of these institutions is to make these decisions and like we said before it's setting Horrible precedent where each president has like more and more and more power. We're no longer in a democracy uh-huh exactly okay. Let's talk about post trial. So sort mm-hmm. I constantly for the rest of his time as president. Johnson continue to veto reconstruction bills even though he promised not to. Yeah but the Republican liar but the Republican paths for reconstruction continued as Congress continued to override. Those vetoes vetos later that same year. Republican Ulysses s grant won the presidency. Johnson left office on March fourth eighteen sixty nine and in eighteen seventy four. Gosh darn it. Johnson won back his Senate seat but died in office in eighteen. Seventy five five. Oh I know he is deceased Adidas East now man. Yup It's crazy easy. This whole thing is absolutely bonkers Zane. That's that's all that's it. Yeah Oh my God answer. Kate is is gonNA actually end this episode with a fun fact which is the actual amount of time Edwin. Stanton was locked in his office. Do you WANNA come here okay. This is producer. Sergei doing our research for US Johnson's trial began in late March. Meanwhile Stanton had remained barred in the war. Department's headquarters for weeks weeks four weeks four for weeks over weeks art weeks. Yeah yes F. O. R. and it seems to insinuate that it was for like the entire trial so the eleven eleven week. That's briefly that is did. He have his sustenance. I I mean I'm sure or he did but how under the door he opened it up. It was like a symbolic bearing food. Anybody trying to get in there are like just stay. I don't care like we have another office John Coming in. There's literally four. It's the it's the capital happened like we were filled with offices like we'll just find a different one man poor Edwin. Oh Gosh Ashwell. Let's Weinstein the true unsung hero of Johnson impeachment trial. But KYW's that's our episode number. Thank you so so much for going on this journey with us. Of course surprise surprise I mean why did this is where it all started up. Yeah you can just see you jozy. it all ties to it and it really like yeah. There's how many how many years between but one hundred and fifty. It's the exact same same thing process. It is the exact same says. It's a big of warning one when other than that. The whole structure the politics of it. It doesn't matter that the context is different than what they're fighting over in the Ukrainian aid reconstruct. That doesn't matter. It is the same politics the same concerns. We have gone nowhere. Josh Amazing Let's end on that very sorry. Whatever whatever do you have anything coming up? Do you WANNA plug anything. Can we find you anywhere. Yeah you can find where I'm joking around the city on my website Amber Rallo Dot Com A. M. B. R. O. L. L. O. DOT COM and. I'll put up other stuff.

Ron Johnson president Senate Supreme Court John John Lisa Murkowski Congress US Tim Thomas KYW John Juggle Mike Pence John Roberts officer Gino Rian Stanton
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Oh my God. I would be on the same page absolute on the same page. I want to go into twenty twenty with a thirty ninth. Congress mood yes absolutely absolutely. They were taking names except for Andrew Johnson. Yeah we got only name we have in our mind okay all right well and Edwin. Don't try I hope you're okay Edwin. Okay Logger tell us about the case of the trial God again in In the Senate on March Fifth and continued for eleven weeks. Well we one week for each thing Pat Article Pass more or the we. Don't I know but I love that. There might be a week of everybody talking about. Yeah he very loud. Even witnessing the loudness loudness I saw Andrew Johnson speak on March first eighteen fifty five and I never recovered. I got consumption from the whole ordeal. I had to drink afterwards. I would say his tone is downright. Rude ooh disgrace disgraceful okay. The Republicans had a two thirds majority in the Senate and chief justice. Salman Chase is presided names Salman Salmon Ullman Image as I is it Salman or is it. We don't know are we there. No we only have the parchman and that just are the way. Honestly I like it. Yeah I don't know I'm I'm into Salman Solid Salmon. It's okay chief. Justice Salmon Makes John. Roberts seem very like a snooze is best yes well Dan Roberts is news. What is he doing has also doesn't have the right frames for his face and he is shaky shake a lot he very nervous? Yeah he was overseeing. Although I don't know how much work he's putting into it always doing his reading shit he is but as I yeah no reading aloud it could be your and you can't beat chief justice John Roberts being like bubble. How do you say say this? Do you see that word. How do you say hey senator? How do you pronounce your last name? Alderman Amazing Johnson didn't appear at the trial and his lawyers. They they they recommended he avoid and he did but arrangements were made for press interviews. Of course which is not helpful considering what are the articles about how he talks yes very loud very loud. One of Johnson's lawyers was attorney. General Henry Stanbury like the Attorney General of the United States Carfax. Absolutely can't it would not surprise me if William Bar was an attorney for Donald trump a trial that absolutely. That's right happen one hundred ten. I mean he already is essentially a whole. has this whole like pony. Joe Henry Stanbury the Attorney General Journal of time resigned his post to devote all of his attention to the guide. William page. Take a page of the book. Johnson's team of five lawyers argued that his actions John Johnson's actions had not violated the tenure of Office Act since Stanton had been appointed by Lincoln. Oh awesome dead guy into can't defend himself he's dead. Johnson was not obligated to continue his service. Don't talk about Babe. It is shots fired. That's not cool that suited to Susan. I don't care what he thinks he's He's like I didn't choose this. This was Babes decision. Not Me not me okay. Drew Drew Babe. They argue that even if the Act Act was constitutional. Johnson couldn't be impeached for misinterpreting. Take the law. He didn't know any better. Know anybody through sheer will educated misinterpret things when you absolutely sure will. Education is not a credit for university extent. Tim of sheer will. Education is misinterpretation. Oh.

Alderman Amazing Johnson Dan Roberts Edwin Salman Senate Salman Chase Salman Salmon Justice Salmon General Henry Stanbury Joe Henry Stanbury William Bar John Roberts Attorney General Journal of ti Congress Donald trump Pat Article attorney senator Tim
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Twenty mood. I'm just gotTa lock by that. Is that is literally white. Like it's like I can't you can't do anything if I'm locked in my office. Office squatters rights. Well yeah it's like try and get the key I guess what you don't there's only one key fucker you're with me. This lock has made a Brat. You'RE GONNA try to Mel this shit here. Yeah Oh good gift for Edwin. Yeah Yeah Oh my God i WanNa approach everything like this. I know I didn't know the this was part of negotiation tactics just wine. I've been taught to do the opposite of this promotion. And now okay yeah not to knock yourself interim next time I see what happens. They don't give it to me. I'm going to lock himself in the interview room. Stay there until they slide slide contractor to the door. Either you give me the author. Let's go I love it good for my inside locked myself in. I also like this idea that the other Republicans were like you have our blessing to talk about like what I give have. I know Like hey whatever you need to do and if you need to lock yourself in the room that would you do we stand by you we are. We are behind you not in the room but now outside the outside outside of the room outside the room one hundred ten percent with you not with you now. We have things to do our job. Yeah I can't lose it. We actually have a meeting in twenty minutes but I knew you come on man. What a fraternity spirit around around? I know that's what so. That's why they impeach him because he's like not he keeps not doing the reconstruction stuff that they've passed time and and then they tried this whole like to fire Edwin stand thing like last Straw. It's the last Straw. They're angry they're angry. Let's talk about Co after Edwin don't Gladwin and and let's talk about the impeachment. I go like this tallying of the bunch. Why would you like so I don't know he probably like you know like cooked? You know like like I only made especially yeah. Okay the impeachment yet so obviously the house did not like to be trifled with and just obeyed so they decided to impeach the president on February twenty fourth eighteen sixty eight. The House voted to impeach Johnson by a vote about one hundred and twenty six to forty seven. I know that's the overwhelming overwhelming majority like. Remember the population is very small. That's why this vote seems very small. In comparison to now there are some missing members short because during the confederacy. Yeah okay so it they. They voted with a resolution of impeachment. The Joint Committee on reconstruction produced eleven articles of impeachment. There's there's let me count the ways. One of they charged him with violation of ten violation of the tenure of office. ACT IT and bringing into quote disgrace ridicule hatred contempt and reproach the Congress Of the United States. Yeah they hated it. Oh my God. They were headed with the articles of impeachment. Were as follows. I will odsal eleven twelve blow through these number. One stated that Johnson ordered Stanton removed with the intent to violate the act totally chew three and eight eight alleged that the appointment of Thomas to replace Stanton without the advice and consent of the Senate was a further violation of the Constitution Institution. So Thomas is as full title is Major General Lieutenant. Thomas Adjunct General of the army absolutely. Yes that's who it is that he had been authorized and empowered to act as secretary of war in the interim He was the interim love. It love it absolutely love it and they had three different amendments Johnson said that not only. I know this is how to recall. Yes you forgotten. We're going to bring it up again. Articles four through seven accused Johnson of conspiring with Thomas Honest to remove Stanton citing such conspiracy as a high crime in office thus illegally depriving Stanton of his rightful eightfold position. Wow this is very dramatic daft management. What's the eighth article? Charged Johnson with conspire cons-. My God conspiring to deprive stanton of his rightful possessions. This is literally just like eleven ways to say the same thing for sale of you. Article Nine accused this Johnson of diverting orders and instructions related to military operations through the general of the Army Bypassing Secretary Stanton. Tim Did Stanton Bright this himself. He's in the office. They're just I. Yeah Yeah I like how. We don't have how long he was locked away. And I I WANNA know curious. I've just like it's like an hour and then we're all really disappointed right and then there was there. I'm sure you can do a quick google. How long was Ed? Wynn Stanton ten locked in his office. Okay Wow I'm just going to show you his picture really quickly because OMG yeah ninety glasses Gore instagram because this will be post. Oh my God off-key could live in Williamsburg that is not the correct correct frame for his face but you know he's a Ranasinghe it. It's the keys confident like somebody who had locked himself in his off. He was looking into flannel with logger. On Fifth Avenue. Walking down the street on Jefferson throws axes on the weekend absolutely. He's chopping wood up and you know saugerties so this the civic but this is what history dot Com says which is quote Stanton later resorted to briefly barricading himself and his office when Johnson tried to remove him so briefly reverts briefly barricading which is still the mood. It is just barricade. It yourself is resorting to something. Very I love Elsa loved the Senate was like so we read before like from the United States. It's on it and the Senate paints a very. They want you to think that he is locked in this office. Like you know I taking. I'm thanking Stan. Dan Okay back to the articles that were proposed so another article proposed Massachusetts Representative Benjamin Butler charged Johnson with making speeches beaches quotes with allow voice. Oh certain how do you say this word. Temporary intemperate inflammatory and scandalous. How do you you say this word? HARANGUES harangues with the intent to disgrace Congress. He's.

Johnson Wynn Stanton Senate Thomas Adjunct General Congress United States secretary Mel Edwin google Gladwin Williamsburg army Joint Committee Massachusetts Stan Elsa Tim
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Yeah sure he's like living in Lamar Alexander. Sure okay. who was Johnson Vice? President Johnson had assumed office After John Wilkes booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln on April Fifteenth Eighteen. Sixty five. So we're in the middle of the civil war that's like you know and the Democrats crafts at this. Time are the ones who are slavery we want it. Let's keep it. Let's go there like let's let's secede from the United States the confederacy. They're doing all of that gorgeous gorgeous stuff and so. When Abraham Lincoln Republican dies who you know leader of the union basically somebody who is A? He's a he was a pro union Democrat but huber racists who was like. Okay fine they you know they don't have to be slaves but like no rights right no right but he didn't want them he didn't. He wasn't pro secession now just for context yes. He was bad so that so he became became president in this very crucial time towards the end of the civil war so all of reconstruction the fact that we got things like Jim Crow. You can just tie it back to Andrew Johnson's the presidency because he really stood in the way of giving people who were formerly enslaved their full rights as citizens which was the whole going. You killed half of our population for this one thing. And then Andrew Johnson came in was like oh no direct trek okay. So more about Johnson Jr is a little bit so little little snippet. So uh-huh Johnson had grown up in poverty was tailor's apprentice. You remember when that was what you did before. Running for president was like a Taylor or were being apprentice or being apprentice. You're right yeah remember apprentices. Oh Gosh up Renti- per anti thank you. I don't know no this is gorgeous. He had no formal education absolutely amazing. Oh President New States as the Senate describes quote through the sheer force of will but he became a self educated man.

President Johnson Abraham Lincoln Republican Johnson Vice president Johnson Jr huber Abraham Lincoln Lamar Alexander John Wilkes United States Senate Taylor Jim Crow
What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:43 min | 1 year ago

What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

"My name is evey. Im seven years. Old I live in Downers Grove Illinois. I my question is what happens when presidents get impeached. Have you been hearing about impeachment. It's been in the news because the US President Donald Trump trump has been impeached. And there's been a lot of news and conversation about whether he did something so bad that he should no longer be the US president as we're putting this this podcast episode out the trial to decide that is still going on. We thought you might appreciate having a little bit. More of an understanding of what impeachment actually is is how it works and when it has happened before in. US history so we called up. Jessica Levinson to help us with this. She's a professor or a teacher. Sure of law at Loyola Law School in California so she teaches people how to become lawyers. She also focuses on politics and government in her work so she looks at the rules around elections and she looks at government ethics. How people should behave in government so she really knows what's going on when it comes to impeachment? Here's Eve these question again. What happens when presidents get impeached? So impeachment is basically a way of removing one of our leaders in government. We have a couple of ways to remove people from their jobs so they don't get to keep doing what they already do and one of them is through elections and we can choose to vote somebody out of their current position. We can choose to say you. Don't get to keep your job. Somebody else's going to do your job now and we could also also decide to use a process called impeachment which means that people will basically decide. You did something. That is really bad in really problematic attic and that it's so bad that we might have to remove you from your job Before the next vote before the next election and so so. That's that's basically. What impeachment is a way so that people don't get to keep doing their job because they did something pretty? Bad impeachment is a process that was written into into our Constitution. The constitution is the document that was created to lay out the fundamental rules of what the United States was going to be. Here's our other guests to help explain lane the history. I am candidacy Davis. The author of don't know much about history. Impeachment is simply a term that was adopted by the men who drafted and wrote the United States constitution in seventeen eighty seven and the word comes from an old English term for how to remove an official if he somehow did something that was wrong. Corrupt criminal unethical ethical or some other form of needing to be removed. And so this was an idea that was important to the founders of with the country because they were getting a great deal of power to one man in particular the president does they finally decided on it as well as other federal officials and is important to remember. That impeachment isn't only for president. It's also for other high-ranking federal officials officials who might have to be removed from office including federal judges because our presidential elections only happen every four years the men who wrote the US Constitution thought there needed to be away to remove the president in between elections. If he had done something so wrong that he shouldn't be president anymore even before for an election happened. And I'm saying he here instead of he and she or her because back in the seventeen hundreds the founders couldn't imagine that a president or a judge judge or a person in that kind of power would be a woman one of the most important things about a democracy where the people choose their leaders is just that that the people choose so it needs to be a really big deal for a president to be removed from office by other elected officials instead of by the voters in an the election so the writers of the Constitution created rules around win and how a president can be impeached. The House of Representatives can bring bring charges against the president when they think he has done something wrong if a majority more than half of the members of the house votes to bring those charges to trial then a president has been impeached. That has happened three times so far in. US history and that's what happened to the current president. Donald Trump Andrew through Johnson in eighteen sixty eight was the first president to be impeached. The second one was Bill Clinton in nineteen ninety eight so it was more than a hundred thirty years between the first two impeachments Bill Clinton Andrew. Johnson were not removed from office now. There was one other career impeachment in that time. Richard M Nixon who was the president elected in nineteen sixty eight resigned from the office in Nineteen eighteen seventy four because he was going to be impeached and it was quite certain that he was going to be removed from office because of what he had done. In what we now know as Watergate so impeachment is pretty rare but it also might be a little confusing because being impeached. Doesn't doesn't mean that you're no longer. The president. Being impeached is kind of like being accused of doing something wrong. Here's how Jessica Levinson describes it just because because that first group of people the House of Representatives decides to impeach you nothing actually happens to president it might be that it's really embarrassing Maybe the people who don't like what happened. Use this against you. Think about something that happens at school where somebody does something. Like take a marker that wasn't theirs if the teacher tells the whole class look at this person they took the marker that's really bad that's kind of like impeachment if nothing thing happens other than the teacher just saying that's really bad but it's really what happens next which is called a trial in the Senate where you might be able to lose your job. The trial in the Senate is kind of like if the teacher says. That's so bad that you don't get to use markers for the rest of the day and so there's this consequences to that so it's up to the Senate to hold a trial and if enough of them. Two thirds agree that the president should be removed only then then what a president have to step down and that has so far never happened in. US history

President Trump United States Jessica Levinson Donald Trump House Of Representatives Senate Downers Grove Illinois Loyola Law School Bill Clinton California Donald Trump Andrew Richard M Nixon Professor Bill Clinton Andrew Davis Johnson Official
"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of a just nation professor. Brenda wine apple be joining us. Also on the program today. Republicans plot to ignore. Order the Bolton bombshell as the durhush argues it's not abuse of power when the president does it while spreme court okays expansion of public charge coincidentally on the Holocaust the cost Memorial Day and that public charge policy also coincidentally wants us to denied Jewish refugees from Europe during said Holocaust Maine. Wow Washington Post suspends. A reporter for tweeting a three-year-old story or article on Kobe. Bryant's rape charge. Doug Collins to run UH in the Georgia Senate jungle primary further pushing the implications of impeachment on these vulnerable Republican Senators House. Democrats plan to pass a bill to strike down. Trump's travel ban. It will die die in the Senate Netanyahu drops his immunity bed criminal proceedings on fraud and bribery. Move Foreword all this and more on today's program Welcome.

Georgia Senate Senate Andrew Johnson Doug Collins apple Trump bribery professor reporter Bryant rape president Europe Maine fraud
"andrew johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I read he Andrew Johnson truck the radical Republicans like the radical Democrats today sees Andrew Johnson's bank records there was no income tax back then they seize this bank records there was nothing there Macy's whatever private information they could again Sandra Johnson there was nothing there Andrew Johnson is not a sympathetic figure Johnson was in many ways hasta el after the civil war to reconstruction Andrew Johnson had a drinking problem Hey Andrew Johnson was wrong you see the house passed a law saying that the president Johnson could not remove a cabinet officer without the permission of Congress Johnson said sure I can he vetoed the bill the Republicans after the civil war had over one majorities in the house and the Senate they overrode his veto Johnson fired his secretary wars that who had inherited from Lincoln and he said I'm going to do this and there's not a damn thing you can do about it hi the president run my cabin choose my cabinet office you get to confirm them but once the confirmed I decide if they stay so the impeachment fifty years later the Supreme Court issued an opinion that said fifty years later Congress cannot can for any president from firing cabinet officers Donald Trump says you don't get to call my chief of staff my national security adviser and so forth this is my inner circle of advisers we have Supreme Court decision set up hold executive privilege we have Supreme Court decisions had recognized that a president cannot function if the opposition party is sitting in the oval office with him taking notes and running to the public to try and undermine him but the house demanded testimony from these individuals anyway and then drop the Adam Smith had a mischief the chairman of the house intelligence committee saying every time you do that Mister president we can use that as a peach meant fact against you under an impeachment count obstruction of Congress you can't stop us we have a majority in the Senate today the debate over witness what you see over TV they think it's a football game well they get witnesses what they get rich this is will be reciprocity won't there be reciprocity they want several of the same witness that the president would not agree to where I could not agree to in the house just like the attempt to prevent Andrew Johnson from firing cabinet members this is an assault by the Democrats on the constitution the power and independence of the presidency it is an assault on separation of powers art from impeachment which I've talked about many time obstruction of Congress they.

Congress football Mister executive chief of staff secretary assault Andrew Johnson house intelligence committee chairman Adam Smith Donald Trump Democrats Supreme Court president Lincoln Senate Congress Johnson officer
Trump adds to legal team as impeachment trial begins

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Trump adds to legal team as impeachment trial begins

"They say the president's legal team figures the trial will last no more than two weeks which would be far shorter than Andrew Johnson street while in eighteen sixty eight and bill Clinton's in nineteen ninety nine but they're still a question about whether the Senate will allow more witnesses which could extend the trial it takes a super majority to convict sixty seven senators both Johnson and Clinton were acquitted and president trump figures he's next there was nothing done wrong a person familiar says the president's boosting his legal team before opening arguments next week adding former Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz and X. independent counsel Ken Starr among others Sager make Donnie at the White House

President Trump Senate Professor Alan Dershowitz Ken Starr Sager Donnie White House Andrew Johnson Bill Clinton Harvard
Trump impeachment: What you need to know about the Senate trial

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:15 min | 1 year ago

Trump impeachment: What you need to know about the Senate trial

"Today. The big news coming out of Washington should have been the presentation of the articles of impeachment. Went to the Senate. The swearing in the chief justice to preside over the trial and of senators to serve impartial. Justice list was eclipsed however by new revelations revelations about trump's efforts to pressure Ukraine policy. Well we've Geoffrey Howard professor of political science at UC L. to come in and bring us up to date with the fast moving eating events have US domestic politics. Thanks so much for joining us. Jeffrey set who is left Pon us and what does he said. So let's partners is an associate of Rudolph Giuliani. Most people remember. Rudy Giuliani as the mayor of New York City. During nine eleven many thought he would go down in American history as one of its most storied figures. Someone who inspired brought the city together but this is a very different Rudolph. Giuliani we see before us in twenty twenty. He is the personal lawyer to the president of the United United States and by all accounts spent the last couple of years going around the world doing the president's bidding doing the president's alleged dirty work and life partners ukrainian-american American is one of his associates. One of his henchmen some have put it Who It seems has been spending quite a bit of time in Ukraine meeting with Ukrainian officials playing playing a key role in trying to pressure The Ukrainian government to fabricator find dirt on Joe Biden which the president could then use to smear near him with if Joe Biden turns out to be his opponent in the upcoming general election? And he's given this this huge interview where he absolutely says that trump knew exactly what it was going on. How credible is he? Well I think he certainly deserves a good amount of skepticism. He is himself under indictment partly for participation in he's very allegedly nefarious activities But what he's saying is corroborated by everything else. We've learned over the past few months. So this trove of voicemail as mail messages and texts in calendar entries demonstrates that there has been a concerted effort by trump's associates by Rudolph Giuliani and and his men To try to pressure the Ukrainian government to cook up this investigation Into into the former vice president Joe Biden That the president has known about it all along that the Attorney General Bill Bar has known about it all along the so many people have suggested that well maybe rudy. Giuliani has been up to no good but maybe the top people in the White House weren't totally sure that he was doing all this. He was just doing it on his own initiative well of left parties right The president has known about this all along then absolutely vital and orchestrating it and some of the elements of this evidence are really striking. Some of them are are handwritten notes scrawled on sheets of paper from the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Vienna And they demonstrate that there was a wide range of tactics that were deployed by eh trump's or rudy Giuliani's men including left in Ukraine. It looks like there may have been in operation to Sir Vail then American ambassador acid to the Ukraine by Rudy Giuliani's own men. So I mean this really is the stuff of a of a movie plot. You really couldn't make it up and inevitably they will be a movie about about the We also heard yesterday that an independent nonpartisan office that works for Congress says the trump administration broke the law when it withheld held military assistance to Ukraine. So what has the Government Accountability Office said. Why does it matter so will it matter that is the question for the US Senate as we approached this This trial So the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office. It's a it's a national watchdog organization and it did indeed find that the decision to withhold military aid for Ukraine dangling over the government in exchange for a promise to look into a Abidin was indeed a violation of the law. Now as we know the president cannot be prosecuted as part of a traditional Legal investigation it. There is a special process. The founding fathers of the United States for better or worse put into place with respect to holding the president legally accountable and that is the the impeachment process. Which of course begins with the House of Representatives? The Lower Chamber of the Congress deciding whether to charge the president with a particular offense Which has done that is why he's been impeached? And then it goes to the Senate to decide Whether to convict him the offense and if they do convict him of the events he will be the I president. US history removed from office. And that is where we are now the opening formalities of the Senate trial of happened. We've had the swearing in of jurors as we know the Senate is controlled told by Donald Trump's party the Republicans will the jurors be impartial. Well that's the big question. We're learning to find out so A month ago Mitch. McConnell the the leader of the Republicans in the Senate said that he didn't intend to be an impartial juror and he emphasized that this is a political process And of course there's a sense of what she's he's right that it is a political process. This isn't a standard ordinary legal process. It is a a decision that the senators get to make for themselves. They get to ask themselves. Do we think that this conduct that the president has engaged in amounts to what the constitution refers to as high crimes in misdemeanors has the president by allegedly abusing. His power demonstrated that he is fundamentally unfit for office such that he ought to be removed. That is not a matter of showing that the president violated highlighted some particular law on the books. It's it is a political judgement but that doesn't mean it has to be a a a narrow minded self interested partisan judgment political judgments can still be moral judgments and so when the chief justice of the United States who very intriguingly to preside over. This whole process swore the senators in in yesterday He got them to swear that they would do impartial. Justice in this context with that means I would argue is that they need to Genuinely we look at the evidence. Look at the facts And that really goes to the question of whether this will be a fair trial because we do not know for sure yet whether there will actually be witnesses called or or whether it will be a very quick process where they have opening statements And then basically closing statements and then it ends because trump had originally said he wanted witnesses. Nice Nice seems to be tons of them. Well it's it's not exactly clear what the president wants here One thing we know for sure is that if the president if we do have witnesses in this process For example the former national security adviser of the United States John Bolton long celebrated and regarded as a very important vigour by Republicans but who is said to have referred to Rudy Giuliani's little inquiry in Ukraine as a as a drug deal that he didn't have anything apart a part of he has said that if he's subpoenaed he'll be willing to testify. No doubt if left parnassus subpoenas. He would testify Now it could be that some of the more. Moderate Republicans pins people like Susan Collins from Maine who are going to rely in their next reelection. On more moderate members of their state voting for them will want to be seen as not just in the tank for trump as somewhat more independently minded Someone like Mitt Romney. For example the senator from Utah also wants to be seen as an indeed is more independently hundley minded. They may well go with Democrats in supporting calling witnesses. You might even get more Republicans than that to support calling pulling witnesses. But then they'll perhaps want include witnesses. That don't seem to have much particularly to do with whether trump is guilty not such as Hunter Biden and so if we start seeing people like Hunter Biden called in this thing could degenerate into a circus quite quickly and I mean such a huge week ahead then for the US and not just for the Republicans for the Democrats. Not Because of course we have Iowa coming up on one of the unintended consequences of this. Trial is the fact that two senators who are also running for the Democratic nomination not table to get on that campaign trail so Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders both needing to be in Washington to actually be at this trial absolutely absolutely and so then. They're going to have to go so there. Of course the two most important ones given their rankings in the polls Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota also needs to participate cle Bennett a senator from Colorado running for president. I saw the other day. He's still running for Pres- wasn't aware that he was still in the race. He hasn't been in the limelight bat. Much of that's four senators that have to Interrupt their campaigns and go back and so might that given a slight edge to South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Buddha judge and the former former vice president Joe Biden it probably will and just indulge me here in a in a best case justice doing its job no partisan interest Outcome where trump is simply judged on whether he broke the Laura or not and we know he did really How soon could he be gone? Well it could happen quite quickly. So the Clinton trial took just over a month. Um that was in nineteen ninety nine. The previous impeachment was the impeachment of Andrew Johnson in nineteen sixty eight and that took about two months So if you manage to get so there are fifty three Republicans in the Senate. They're forty five Democrats there to independence any two two thirds of the Senate to convict and remove the president from office. Which means you'd need to get the forty five Democrats which you'd get you get the to independence and then you need to get Twenty or so little more more than twenty Republicans To sign on as well and that seems extremely extremely unlikely Because you can get someone like Susan Collins who will be able to say. Well we broaden auden witnesses. We looked at all the evidence and we just decided he was bad with the president. Had but it didn't rise quite to the level of an offense such that we should remove him from office and that might be a way. She's able to save face but if for some reason the political winds change dramatically. Maybe John Bolton gives a dramatic testimony that shifts public opinion radically medically and you do get that twenty those twenty or so senators. Well then trump could be gone within a couple of months Jeffrey. I'm holding my breath. Thank you very much indeed. That's Jeffrey free. How it

President Trump Rudolph Giuliani Donald Trump Us Senate Ukraine United States Senator Joe Biden Vice President Jeffrey Free Congress Government Accountability Offi Ukrainian Government Susan Collins Washington Hunter Biden John Bolton Professor Of Political Science
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"You know what do you think are the big presidential leadership takeaways when we look back at his time in office and it sounds like one of them is maybe how important it is to have the ability to sort of massage politics and these different positions but are there are there other lessons that also took out and the one thing that we have to understand about Johnson is is not. Everybody disagreed with what he did either. So either the radical Republicans were not necessarily always popular. You can look at some of the documents in our papers after after the impeachment trial for example you see people writing in and saying we're we support you. Do you know. Stick it out or you know calling the radicals you know. We'll we'll we'll get up an army to to go after those crazy hounds. Yeah no offense to dogs and one of them literally says that they compare these radicals into a pack of dogs and then apologizes on behalf of dogs everywhere. There really are very very Passionate disagreements on on both sides so not everybody is is necessarily against Johnson. But I think that he doesn't know how to go about things the right way. So one of his his supporters says you know he's GonNa stick to his principles and but he never does it at the right time so I think that's the takeaway for Johnson is that on one level it's fine to be consistent but on the other level that you in that there has to be some understanding of where the other side is and how to to navigate Johnson space with Congress his impeachment trial all of this ushered in a period that will see play out for several presidents to come where congress ends up more than ever being the one to pull the strings and the presidency itself is decidedly weakened Johnson story also for me at least gives a lot to think about well. What exactly are the leadership benefits and downfalls of stubbornness and where is that outline between being usefully principal old and being just kind of uselessly obstinate? That's a question. We'll keep stewing on for are episodes to come but to close this episode. Since last week we looked at how accessible Lincoln's language was. I thought we'd spend just a moment here on on some of the accessible language of Andrew Johnson's and the way that his personality could shine through his words. Let's see so I mean he says this an eighteen forty seven but this is the kind of anger that can arise in in an him and he's he's angry with some of the people back in Greeneville Tennessee about a property issue and so he says if I should happen to die among the damn spirits that infest green. Fill my last request before death would be for some friend. I would bequeath the last dollar to some Negro to pay to take my dirty stinking carcass after death out on some mountain peak and they're leave it to be devoured by the vultures and wolves or make a fire sufficiently large to consume the smallest particle. That might pass off and smoke and ride upon the wind in triumph over the Godforsaken and hell deserving money loving hypocritical backbiting Sunday praying scoundrels of the town of Greeneville. Wow it is exactly now. Of course they should say you know he he stayed in Greenville for the rest of his life and that is where he is is buried. And to the best of my knowledge everything is okay in Greenville and this was also something written privately to a friend so you know. He's not putting that in the newspaper but you know this is the kind of of anger or the kind of personality that Johnson can have when when when he's roused to anger so he can give it back as as well as he can take it even though he's in the same letter he's you know I'm trying to serve my friends my principals my party and my country faithfully so that's sort of the two sides of Johnson Johnson that on one level. He's trying to service his his country. The way he's he sees that it should be in in his own mind and then there's that kind of You know down and dirty sort of side to this has been a special edition of. Can he do that. Featuring an episode from the presidential podcast. Next time you'll hear the Richard Nixon episode of presidential it Lillian Cunningham interviews reporter Bob Woodward about at the personality traits that led to Nixon's demise. It's a fascinating. Look at the only president so far to resign in American history. Can he do that. Is A team effort here. The Post it's produced by Christmas Carol Alderman with production help from Arielle plotnik design. Help from cat rebel Brooks logo art from the ran. Randburg Leo and Theme Music by Ted Muldoon contributions to post helping hand go directly to services who says run by beneficiaries bright beginnings and St village and so others might eat that provides shelter food education and other services to those less fortunate in the Washington D._C.. Region learn more at post helping hand dot com..

Johnson Johnson Tennessee Congress Richard Nixon Greeneville Greenville Carol Alderman mountain peak Arielle plotnik principal Ted Muldoon Lincoln Bob Woodward St village president Washington D._C Lillian Cunningham reporter
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

11:47 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"When Lincoln shot at Ford's theatre shortly after the start of his second term Andrew Johnson races to be by his side while he's he's treated by doctors on his deathbed a few hours leader? Once Lincoln passed away. Andrew Johnson was sworn in as president. Didn't how does Johnson were his will but his leadership talk that he draws on. I mean you mentioned. He can be stubborn. But can you talk a little bit more about the way that he tries to get people to do what he when he wants. Unfortunately with Johnson. So much of what you think about with him is not how things worked but how things didn't work. The thing that I was then that I am struck about another people stuck about with Johnson is is how consistent he is particularly his his opinions about things that it You know all the way through. He's very consistent about he's going to do what's right as he sees it and he'll say that again and again that I would rather be right and and on an stand on principle and be voted out of office or be in the minority rather then be elected and compromise my principles and sometimes that's that's a a wonderful quality if you're on the union side during the civil war and here's this this person who is saying he was going to stick with the Union. He was again very much like Andrew Jackson. In that point of view where South Carolina's thinking about senior are having this vacation. Crisis and Jackson says the Union right or wrong. Well that's Andrew Johnson. So he he looks like a very principled stand handed person but then that same leadership quality that you can admire about him ends up being something of a detriment to him in in his interactions with Congress during the first years of reconstruction. Now we've seen conflict and drama between the president and Congress before but never quite right like this. WE'RE NOT GONNA go into all the minutia about reconstruction policies but in terms of examining Johnson's leadership. The main thrust of the conflict between him and Congress is that he has a different view about what the conditions need to be for southern states to to re enter fully into the Union. Now that the war is over at this point in Congress there are a lot of radical Republicans as they were called and some of the key things. These radicals are pushing for our voting rights for African Americans and also for the southern states that seceded to have to jump through a lot of hoops in order to be granted full status in the union again. Well at least one of these aspects Johnson Hughes pretty close is to Lincoln in that he doesn't think the state's ever legally had the right to leave the union and so he thinks how is it constitutional national to force a lot of restrictions and conditions on them. When they aren't technically being readmitted? Johnson agreed with Lincoln. No there is no such thing as state suicide that they were states in rebellion. They never stopped being states. We bring them back estates and that's that's it with some of the Republicans on the more radical Stripe Dake. They thought that the states committed suicide. And that you had to go through through a much more stringent policy for for coming back into the union but the trick of it is. Congress was in recess for the first six plus months of Johnson's presidency. So Johnson uses this time to basically come up with and start implementing his own reconstruction plan then congressman return and this long messy volleying match begins where Congress is knocking down everything that Johnson laid out that he wants to do and then Johnson in his vetoing left and right everything that Congress is starting to say that it wants to do to to be fair. Think any president was going to have a difficult time. I'm in reconstruction. It's a huge job. You're trying to bring the the sections back together again. You know not necessarily always amicably. There are the issues of African American rights to deal with. All of this is very impressive and so so I do have sympathy for Johnson. Because he really he'd only been on the job for what six weeks when I as vice president when he ousted has to take over in this difficult situation but I think the things that he does about being consistent assistant of if it's not our job to do this. I'm not GonNa do it and I'm gonNA veto. Anybody who tries to it sets him up in conflict with Congress with the radicals in a way that someone who was more flexible about seeing the grey areas would have been a little bit more savvy about how to work with the radicals articles are. And there's where I think that. Even though Lincoln would have had a difficult time getting the nation reunited that he would have found more he would have more political savvy of how to deal with interpretations of the Constitution. What is Judy is and working with Congress on that score and it? Also it doesn't help that Johnson He does have this kind of pugnaciousness about him. So for example in eighteen sixty six so Johnson is is president starting starting in April of sixty five and in sixty six. He's trying to. He's still trying to kind of shore up his his own policies and he does. What's what's called a swing around the circle tour? He's going out and campaigning for midterm elections. Trying to get more politicians into office who support his agenda. It starts out all right then along the way he starts getting heckled by the crowds and he heckles back and it's so undistinguished anguished and he's taken ulysses grant on the tour with him because grant is the most popular man in America and even grant writes home to his wife and any says. Oh this is just you know. This is disgraceful. And keep that under your hat because publicly. I have to be supportive of the president and I want to make sure that he trusts me. But you know I'm sick of these political tours. It's just a national disgrace. What's happening so Johnson doesn't necessarily always read the political signs very well and and what was supposed to be a good electioneering tour? Turns out to be a more disgraceful display because he allows himself to get drawn into these who sort of shouting matches with some of the crowds. Not only with Lincoln had more of a capacity to navigate the politics and to be more diplomatic but he likely would have had more of a commitment to promoting the rates of the roughly four million slaves who are now suddenly free after the civil war. Johnson has this sort of strange duality where he ended up strongly supporting emancipation during the war and and yet as president he decides that he's really not going to support African American men getting the right to vote or things like the Freedman's bureau which twas an agency designed to offer protections for these newly emancipated slaves on one level during the war he claims to while he's wartime. I'm governor. He actually declared a Mansa pation and any claim to be the Moses of African American people and claim to be their friend whether he was doing that out of the heat of the moment or out of political necessity but then other people will comment privately that he seemed to have an issue with with African Americans. His his secretary says there's an instance where they're out on the grounds of the White House and all he sees these are are African Americans working out on the grounds and he comments essentially have all the white men been fired or where the white men here and the secretary response or records in a way that it wasn't just a question it was more. He seemed to have an issue and we know that that he didn't necessarily stand up while he he didn't stand up for African American rights. Now again some of that is tied into his own. Ideology is that. If the Constitution doesn't provide provide the federal government with the the clear mandate to do something then and it should be left to the states in his in his mind or it should be left to the people. He's a lot of things he wants to leave to the people because they're the the basis of the Constitution of the base of government govern power so with the Freedman's bureau for example. He didn't think that the constitution allowed the war department to continue that. But no I don't think that he He had a a lot of fun feelings for African Americans. Ori Certainly did not put put their needs ahead of you know constitutional national issues. And despite his his negative feelings about planter aristocracy. He allowed them to get pardons to when the planter aristocracy Chrissy is allowed to come back into power than that's going to be a double blow for African Americans who might if they had a better advocate in the White House. Then the things might have gone a little bit differently. The other thing about Johnson Zoo's a fiscal conservative that he consistently throughout his career that he does not. I don't want the government spending money on things that he doesn't think that they have the authority to spend on so for example he didn't want the Smithsonian that James smithson gifts is this money to to to America for the increase and diffusion of knowledge and the Smithsonian Institution is is proposed and Johnson Johnson votes against it. Because not because he thinks it's a bad institution necessarily but because it might cost us money so repeatedly you can see that if anything is going to cost the government money and he doesn't think it's legitimate constitutional purpose he's going to vote against that with Many of the reconstruction acts even when they might appear to someone else to be a very either a good use of government resources or a legitimate function. He vetos it because he doesn't think it's constitutional and these things come up again and again Johnson and vetoes so many things that eventually congress just can't take it anymore and one of the things that they end up doing. is they pass a tenure of office act which basically strip the president of the power to remove certain government officeholders without the Senate's approval. Well Johnson is so mad add at this confrontation and this sort of usurp tion of his presidential right as he sees it that he decides rides. He is going to remove some of his cabinet members. Basically just to test to Congress and it's this tied up of course with all of the other issues shoes that have been going on between him in Congress that prompts the House of Representatives to impeach him in February of eighteen sixty eight this becomes the first impeachment trial in the history of the US presidency. And when he's when he's impeached because he seems to have violated.

Andrew Johnson Congress president Johnson Johnson Lincoln Union Johnson Zoo Johnson Hughes congress Andrew Jackson Ford America White House South Carolina vice president Freedman Stripe Dake James smithson
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"So if I walked into a room. And there's Andrew Johnson. Could you describe him for me. Is he outgoing team. mm-hmm attractive. I I suppose you could say he. He was attractive. That's the I guess you could say I. Yeah I probably wouldn't put now. He's he when you look at pictures that I've got him. Yeah yeah well he he. He was charismatic. In the sense that he was he was a very good stump speaker. Well for one thing at least dressed well because he was a tailor so he would probably have a good sense of how how you're closer supposed to fit. He strikes me as someone who is very determined. I guess us that to to get to the place that he was in life that you have to be stubborn. You have to be persistent. You have to be you know to some degree. Sure of of the rightness of your cause and and all that so I think he probably would be compelling and he doesn't strike me as a happy go lucky kind person or is humorous person. That could just be me looking at other. People might have felt differently about him but he he didn't back down from a fight either. So I I get the sense of kind of pugnacious character under Baker. Well that that was a problem on on inauguration ration- day that that was that was for sure You know I don't. I don't think he was an inveterate drinker but definitely and he gets that reputation definitely early. Because of what happened on inauguration day and that I would be happy to tell that story so what seems to have happened is that Johnson may have been then recovering from an illness may be typhoid or recovering from illness and either he had been carousing a little bit too much the night before or or as a way of of trying to sort of combat not feeling well He had some probably whiskey before he was he was sworn born in his vice president. So he's sworn in I in the Senate Chamber and then they're going to move outside to the East Front for Lincoln to be inaugurated what happens next is is the drunken mess that you heard about at the beginning of the episode. Michelle pulled out some documents that still exist where people present at. The inauguration recorded bear impressions of Johnson speech so so for example. The wave that Gideon Welles describes it. And he's the secretary of the navy he says the vice president elect made a rambling and strange harangue which was listened to with pain and mortification by all his friends. My impressions were that that he was drunk yet. I know not that he drinks. He has been sick and feeble and perhaps he may have taken medicine or stimulants or brain from sickness may have been overactive in these new responsibilities. Whatever the cause it was all in bad taste and so then he continues in the he had said to Stanton? Johnson is either drunk crazy somebody nobody else says. The man is certainly deranged So everybody thinks Oh. This is not good now. On Wells' point of view he turns it around that later. Ron Wells will be one of Johnson's most loyal cabinet secretaries. But it's not an auspicious start there. That's that's for sure yeah. Decorative handler says The inauguration went off very well except that the vice president elect was too drunk to perform his duties and disgraced himself and the Senate find banking a drunken foolish speech. I was never so mortified in my life. Had I been able to find a small hole I should have dropped. Threw it out of sight. But then he says the president's inaugural was brief and good so for some but yeah. That's one thing that people really take away from. The inauguration is that that Johnson didn't did not perform well and they didn't really want him to save anything more when he got outside Another interesting thing about the inauguration is the way Frederick Douglass response to it. Frederick Douglass the noted abolitionist and an order had been standing in the crowd and he talks talks about when Lincoln Johnson came out of the capital. So the Lincoln can take his oath and give his inaugural that that he was watching them mm-hmm and Lincoln than sort of pointed to to Douglas in the crowd or notion motion to to Johnson. The Douglas was there and and Douglas. Glycerine Johnson's is like hatred or disgust. And then he realized that Douglas was looking at him and then he changed his expression. An and Frederick Douglass will remem- remembers after that that that was also not a good portend for the relationship that that African Americans we're going to have with that president either so a few things on on inauguration day were were not auspicious beginnings.

Glycerine Johnson vice president Lincoln Frederick Douglass president Douglas Baker Gideon Welles Ron Wells Michelle typhoid Senate Senate Chamber Stanton remem
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Okay so before we get too ahead of ourselves. How does this man even get to the White House first of all? He's one of the very rare president so far who did not ever become a lawyer while he had his tailoring business in Greenville. Oh he started to get involved in local politics as the town Alderman and then eventually as mayor and this is around the time that Andrew Jackson is president and and so the common man populist politics of Andrew Jackson are very much resonating with Andrew. Johnson Interestingly Johnson would later reflect that he basically got into politics because of his lack of education. Johnson said if I'd had more education patie- in my life. Or if I had more control over how I started I would have been a schoolteacher or chemist but Johnson didn't so he keeps climbing the the political ladder from Greenville's mayor to Tennessee's state legislature he then becomes a US congressman than Tennessee's governor and then finally just as civil wars breaking out he goes back to Washington to serve his first term as a US. Senator this is then how he basically gets noticed and tapped to be vice president for Lincoln's second term. Lincoln's first term vice president. Hannibal Hamlin is in. I'm going to stay on so by the election of eighteen. Sixty four. Th Republican Party is trying to find a new. VP running-mate for Lincoln. And and they're looking for someone who can help reflect the ideals on the concept of what they hope will soon be reunited nation. They end up with Andrew Johnson at center. They look to Andrew Johnson because for one thing that stubborn personality had really shown itself that his state seceded from the United States. Tennessee seceded from the Union gene and Andrew. Johnston didn't go with them. so He's a senator from Tennessee and he refuses to cede with state he's in fact the only senator senator from any southern state who stays in the Senate during the civil war back in Tennessee they hang an effigy of him. They loot his home and they basically drive his wife and his daughters. Who are still living there out of the town Johnson's refusal to leave? The Union is obviously being lambasted in the south but it is proving him to be a man of unwavering commitment to the Union to the constitution and to his own principles. So if if you're looking for a Democrat because essentially that's what he is that even though he's on a nominally Republican ticket they. They don't call themselves Republican Party. It's it's more reunion party. But here's someone who's been very consistent in terms of his democratic politics but he's going to be on the ticket because he's a southerner he had been a slave holder but he came over to the emancipation side. He refused to secede with his State. He he is very outspoken about thinking that confederates traders and that they need to be punished for for it so he seems to be a very solid union man non surly Republican in but a very solid union man and that would be an attractive ticket for eighteen sixty four trying to appeal to northern Democrats but also may be looking in terms terms of what the nation could be. If the war's one by the Union and the United States is so. That's how Johnson gets on the ticket and you. He looks like a really good choice..

Andrew Johnson Tennessee Republican Party Union Senator United States Andrew Jackson president Andrew Lincoln vice president Greenville Hannibal Hamlin White House confederates VP Johnston Washington Senate
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Resign the presidency effective bedroom combined. Dave Limb The guest you just heard talking a minute ago is Michelle shell crawl. She was on last week's episode. She's an expert in the manuscript division of the Library of Congress and so this week for episode she's going to elite us through the life and the presidency of Andrew Johnson. He was born in eighteen. O Eight in North Carolina and after Lincoln's death. He became team president from eighteen sixty five to eighteen. sixty-nine personally think with Andrew Johnson to understand him as president. Hugh half half to at least have some familiarity with his early life. So Johnson like Lincoln even more than like it actually is really a rags eggs to riches story to some degree. He's even more like his own political hero. Andrew Jackson they both had very rough starts with a father's dying young in really having to to make it on their own. His mother and father were both basically illiterate and had worked humble. Menial jobs odds that a local in in the way his father died was from getting sick after jumping in a creek to rescue two men whose boat had capsized one. One of those men was actually the editor of the Raleigh Star newspaper. Andrew Johnson was three years old at the time when his father died because his mother couldn't couldn't financially support and care for her children. She had Andrew and his brother become apprentices to a local tailor in Raleigh North Carolina. This is when Andrew was about fourteen and it's fairly similar to what we heard about with Millard. Fillmore apprentice ships. Were almost sort of an indentured servitude for her children but they were fairly common among poor families. Andrew Johnson though ends up so miserable in his that he eventually runs away. He'd had enough enough of it. He ran away with his brother and so there was actually a newspaper advertisement seeking him just as you would runaway slave having to describe him and and how much they're gonNA give for him. He and his brother hide out all by themselves for a couple years dodging capture. They never went back to working for that Taylor but they did did eventually return home to their family. Long enough for everyone to pack up and move to Greeneville Tennessee. Andrew is about seventeen years old at this point and when they get to Greenville he starts his own tailoring business. He also meets a young girl named Eliza who was the daughter of Greenville's Schumaker they get married and while Andrews working in his tailor shop sewing clothes Elisa sits there and she reads to him and teaches is him how to write and spell and she helps him understand math and basic finances because up until this point Andrew Johnson hasn't really had much of in education at all one of the things that we have here in the Johnson. Papers in the Library of Congress are early financial records words of his tailoring. So this particular page. I've pulled out page sixty which is starting in eighteen thirty three and it's a an account for Mordecai Lincoln and I pulled that one partially because Mordecai Lincoln was the man who married Johnson and his wife Eliza but Mordecai Hi Lincoln was also a cousin of Abraham Lincoln's so showing you that there's a lot of connection in early life so with this you can see he is making a suit. He's making a coat for Robert Johnson. He's he does cutting he does sewing and this is actually how he he makes a start. Miss by as a laboring being man and I think for Johnson that history was something that was really crucial to understanding him that he identified with laboring people that he understood how hell high he had risen in life he was all. He's very consistent about wanting to to do things for people like himself so when he got into Congress from eighteen forty six on. He's introducing either in the house or the Senate homestead axe so that laboring poor like himself twelve or how he had started out could get free land and be an an an asset to the country and terms of spreading agriculture sure and and and spreading settlement but also this was a way that people like himself would would have a chance to to get ahead and I think another thing that comes from those those early beginnings to that he remains very consistent with is that he has a I don't want to quite say a hatred but he has a a lot of negative feelings about aristocracy but then again on the other hand Johnson was part of that to some degree because he too was a slave holder so so he you know he had ill feelings about about an aristocratic class. That always looked down upon laboring classes like himself but then again Dan he had many of those same feelings About African Americans to and that all comes into play into his presidency.

Andrew Johnson Mordecai Hi Lincoln Andrew Library of Congress Andrew Jackson Abraham Lincoln North Carolina Dave Limb Michelle shell Congress Raleigh Star Raleigh Eliza Hugh Tennessee Greenville Senate editor Taylor Millard
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Hi Everyone Alison Michael's here and this week on. Can he do that. We're doing something a little different as you probably know by now how. President trump is just the third president in American history to be impeached and the forced to face impeachment proceedings. And my colleague Lilian Cunningham knows all about out those three other presidents. She created the posts presidential podcast which spent almost a year going back through American history to examine the life and legacy of each and every American president. That of course includes presidents Andrew Johnson Johnson Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton this week. We're going to share those original presidential episodes about the only three other presidents to fees impeachment proceedings. But I I wanted to talk to lily about the president or podcast Lily welcomed. Can he do that. Thanks longtime listener first-time guests on under show. It's true longtime colleague. I guess so. You may the presidential podcast back in two thousand sixteen for our listeners. Who aren't familiar with it? Tell us about that project. Sure so presidential. Was this big audio project that I did. In the most recent presidential election year and and the idea I had was to chronicle the Ark of American presidential history by going through and doing an episode on each each American President one a week starting in January twenty sixteen all the way up through election day so easy ever right forty four episodes forty four for weeks forty four presidents and to create those episodes I interviewed a historians and journalists biographers and the result was is this massive group of forty four episodes that look into each of the president's lives and then their legacies while they were in the Oval Office. And of course you know I created created this back in two thousand sixteen but the episodes are kind of timeless and we've been finding people are still discovering them and using them as resource to to better understand. US presidential history so the episode. We're going to play for. Can he do listeners. Today is about President Andrew Johnson right so Johnson Johnson was of course the first American President who was impeached and that was back in eighteen sixty eight so he was. Abraham Lincoln's Vice President End Lincoln was assassinated Andrew. Johnson took office and only a few years into being president himself faced impeachment by Congress. I think it's so interesting to hear. The story of WHO this man was how he became president and then of course what caused congress alternately. Think for the first time in history that we might need to remove if this man from office. We're GONNA play the whole Johnson episode here now but where can listeners. Find all of your other presidential episodes they can find them on any of the A podcast platforms apple goal stitcher spotify or they can go to the Washington Post site go to Washington Post Dot com slash presidential. And you'll find all forty four. The episodes all right here from Lily's presidential podcast is the story of Andrew. Johnson's life. Welcome Tierney the Andrew Johnson episode of presidential. If you listen to the previous episode about Lincoln you'll remember how one of the things we talked about the power and beauty of Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address the one that goes with malice toward none with charity for all. It's one of the most famous speeches in American history. So you might have been sitting there listening to the episode and thinking you know. What would it have been like to witness that Momentus? Second inauguration of Lincoln's in eighteen sixty five well Would have been interesting because right before. Lincoln gave that speech his new Vice President Andrew Johnson gave his own address and he was absolutely absolutely horrendously drunk so Johnson Johnson gets up for his swearing in for his speech. And it's kind of embarrassing at one point. He's he's talking to the various cabinet members and he points to seward and Stanton and he looks at Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles and he can't remember his name him and he talks says now. WHO's the secretary of the navy? Oh yeah you and you know. It's just it's not. It's not an auspicious start for for for Johnson. It's an as vice president. A senator from Michigan. He he writes to his wife and he says something to the effect of you know if there had been a whole nearby would have crawled into six weeks later. Johnson is suddenly and surprisingly the actual president of the United States. I am William Cunningham with the Washington Post and this is the seventeenth episode of presidential.

President Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson Johnson Richard Vice President End Lincoln president President Vice President President trump Johnson Lilian Cunningham Washington Post Bill Clinton Lily Oval Office United States Alison Michael Congress Washington William Cunningham Michigan
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"South right I mean with trying to protect trying to protect them in in the simplest way to start which is just citizenship never mind voting rights which becomes kind of you know in a contested form never mind the confiscation of the land of the planters the white southerners where these people had worked in sort of dividing it up and giving you know redistributing the wealth in that sounds never mind all of the basic right of due process of citizenship which ultimately became the fourteenth amendment. That's what they stood for and what's interesting to me is that in a sense from my point of view they were visionaries you know they're they're. They seem so contemporary say to Mike exactly this before and I and I want you to back up and just tell the story of <hes> Andrew Johnson his rise to power and then the impeachment but I was saying to Mike before the podcast what's so extraordinary. Sorry about some of these radical Republicans thaddeus Stevens throw sumner is that if you transpose their words with some of the Progressives today the language might be a little more ornate but it's essentially the same words same sentiments and it's amazing how forward thinking they were. I know but let's talk about Andrew Johnson was he. Where did he come from? How did he what we know how we rose to the presidency but what was political rise and then we'll talk about about <hes> what he did to inspire the action that the Congress ultimately took yeah well what's interesting? There are two things interesting about Johnson one is he was really very poor. He came from as much or as worse in a sense poverty already that we associated with Lincoln in the log cabin and all that but Johnson as boy was <hes> was apprenticed out he became an indentured servant which is only one's wrong. I mean it's an important wrong but it's a wrong about slavery which means that he is owned by the person that he's farmed out to which happened to be Taylor. It's where he learned his trade so he really came from absolute poverty. In the sense he ran away. There was a wanted sign as if he had been a fugitive of sorts swords and he worked his way up into politics which was in a sense away for white person white male to change class and he was able to do that. He had some money and in fact when he got some money he actually went. Pau Slaves is a kind of mark of his rise in status. Even though the plant or the aristocracy would never accept him so that's one aspect the other aspect. It's so interesting about him. To all of us really is that he is the only only United States senator from the South who stood up and opposed secession which if you WANNA profile and courage strangely enough is very courageous thing to do. I mean when you think of the sort of known senators at the time like Jefferson Davis. They were horrified that Johnson said in no uncertain terms. I'm against secession. You know this is it will destroy the Union. I am for the Union at I love the constitution so he was reviled in the South and he was beloved in the North and in fact he was considered what was called a war Democrat was a different party than Lincoln's so when sort of fast forwarding when Lincoln <hes> was afraid he was actually afraid in eighteen sixty four that he would be not elected he wanted to sort of what we think of. Today is balanced the ticket because Lincoln's first vice president was someone else Hannibal Double Hannibal's but he was. He's a good guy. It was a good guy but he was a Republican Republican and he was in his anti-slavery had all the right things but but he didn't bring anything new to the ticket so if you want a southern Democrat especially if you're running against big general McClellan in you weren't winning the war at the time things change you put Andrew Johnson on the ticket so and and you know like everyone <hes> even. During wartime even Lincoln didn't really think he was going to be killed. nope presidents have been assassinated and an an a vice president is innocuous. So that's John Price President what does he do you get the ire of actually starts in Congress well. Everybody's happy every you know. It's a it's a smooth transition of power. You just had a war. You've got a dead president. You know shot by southern. It's awful time is very smooth transition. He keeps the cabinet he said I'm against treason so everybody.

Andrew Johnson Lincoln Taylor vice president senator thaddeus Stevens Congress Mike president first vice president Jefferson Davis United States sumner Union Hannibal McClellan John Price
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"She writes and Johnson's impeachment was a noble endeavour to write grievous wrongs and horrific abuses being inflicted on an oppressed minority party with all is in Washington this week on former special counsel Robert Muller's upcoming testimony and with as many as eighty Democrats now demanding that the House Judiciary Committee opened up impeachment proceedings against trump. We'll look back in America's his first impeachment on this episode of buried treasure because people have gotta know whether or not their president's while I'm not a crook I told the American people I did not trade arms for hostile to my heart to my best intentions still tell me that's true but the facts and the evidence tell me it is not I did not have sexual relations without him. There will be no allies lives. We will honor the American people with the Truth and nothing else we now have with us. Brenda wine apple the author of the impeach the trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of just nation Brenda wine apple welcomed to buried treasure. Thank you great to be here. I'm so there's so much to talk about in your book. It's really an incredibly compelling read need but I want to start off with the obvious question what prompted you to want to research and write the a history of the Andrew Johnson impeachment now and was it inspired acquired by any current occupant of the Oval Office. I began the book six years ago. The idea of trump was not even a bad dream that point there was no way anybody could have imagined he she would be the next president. We were deepen the Obama administration and if anything I thought if there's going to be an impeachment coming people would try to impeach Hillary Clinton. Why not you know in because so many people hated her so so yeah well they did another story so keep it in the family but in any event so when I started it had nothing to do really with current events at all it was to me an event in American history that I knew little about out and I thought if I'm a fairly you know fairly literate person? I'm a fairly well educated person. How is it that I don't know anything really about this? Major event. It's the first ever presidential impeachment and what's even more significant significant and strange about it occurs you know really on the heels of the first ever presidential assassination which itself occurs on the heels of a terrible civil war so I imagine what was going on in the country. How could that happen at that particular time and I didn't know the answers to those questions and I didn't know the answers to the question of why didn't know about and so that's what started me and so when you started to read up on that event? What did you learn about what the historical narrative was at that particular moment in how it was interpreted over the years by scholars well there too? There's a kind of popular way of interpreting in the scholarly way and actually they're pretty much the same in they converge in John Kennedy's profiles encourage which came out in the late fifties was I don't know how it must have sold very well but it was a Pulitzer Prize winner an obviously Kennedy went on to win the presidency residency perhaps partly on the wave of that book among other things in that with a lot of heavy lifting by writing a book which is the subject of litigation former former editor Evan. Thomas told US oh when his father was the editor of the book. Oh no kidding oh my gosh it was actually deposed as part of the lawsuit between Kennedy and Drew Pearson. Intimated that book written by Kennedy Yeah as far as we know he did write his college thesis which was published into a book and did very well. I think it was nine while England slap door while England sir thank you anyway we digress. That's okay caster fascinated <hes> so there's a significant chapter in that about a man named Edmund Ross is more or less loss to history..

Andrew Johnson president John Kennedy Hillary Clinton Robert Muller House Judiciary Committee Edmund Ross Brenda wine America special counsel Washington editor apple England Pulitzer Prize Obama administration Oval Office Drew Pearson Thomas