35 Burst results for "Andrew Johnson"

"andrew johnson" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

History That Doesn't Suck

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on History That Doesn't Suck

"For Short, which is helping formerly enslaved blacks as well as poor southern whites to find food shelter and employment. It's hard not romanticize what Lincoln might have done. Had John Wilkes booth not indicate the bowling for its theater. Americans have all stripes from radical Republicans to former confederates wonder what might have been and claimed their vision of reconstruction best aligns with the deceased ealing rail splitter. But as much as we can speculate on how his political genius mink delivered reforms Black Americans deserve the needed along with the graciousness ex confederates Craig. Will never really know..

73: Reconstruction Part 1: The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

History That Doesn't Suck

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

73: Reconstruction Part 1: The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

"Today. We venture into the first of a few episodes that will take us through one of the least well known errors of American history. Reconstruction. This is the decade and change after the civil war during which the United States grapples with hard questions about readmitting the seceded states and what the end of the institution of Slavery Really Means and as you can tell from that opening, these won't be easy questions to answer in violence didn't end with the war.

United States
Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

Black History in Two Minutes

02:40 min | 3 months ago

Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

"The months following the civil war, and the start of reconstruction offered African Americans in the south hope for equality. It also offered the possibility of owning land. Within months African Americans would be betrayed by a harsh reality. You probably heard the phrase forty acres and a mule. Here's what happened. In January eighteen, sixty, five, a meeting in Savannah Georgia. Between Union, Military Leader General William to come Sherman and a group of twenty black ministers resulted in a plan to redistribute confiscated and abandoned confederate land from south, Carolina to Florida. They. Call the Land Sherman's reserve. Newly freed slaves would be allocated forty acres of land along with a mule, the phrase which became well-known, even then spread quickly. The plan had the potential to revolutionize race relations in the south and the economic future of the African American community. The significance about formerly enslaved being given the land that they had actually worked was that they would be able to generate wealth as well as create wealth generation. But the summer of eighteen sixty five thousands of black families had settled on portions of the Sherman Reserve and were excited to plot their futures. But later that year, as part of his reconstruction plan, actually intended to appease the former confederacy President Andrew. Johnson abruptly cancelled the order giving the land back to its previous owner's. The United States had the opportunity to make it possible for the formerly enslaved people to be. Independent and the country failed to do it. That initial meeting more than one hundred years ago between General Sherman and Savannahs, leading black ministers was historic at least for a brief moment in history, the opinion of black leaders had led directly to a radical public policy initiative remarkably over a century and a half later on June nineteen, two, thousand nineteen, the House of Representatives held a hearing on H R forty, a bill named in honor of the famous phrase, forty acres and a mule. The bill would establish a commission to study the concept of reparations for slavery and Jim Crow Segregation, including the merits of a formal apology by the United States government.

General Sherman Sherman Reserve United States Jim Crow Segregation African American Community Savannah Georgia House Of Representatives President Andrew General William Johnson Carolina Florida
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

12:04 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Extent. Tim of sheer will. Education is misinterpretation. Oh my God poor bubby house. He's the poster now now. I know what they claimed. That Johnson's intent was to test the very constitutionality of the tenure of office. Act Before the Supreme Court which he had the right to do so also he made a mistake. He's only human but also it was on purpose. Yeah also he was doing it to strengthen S. S. Constitution it's like when you're lifting weights and you Max out. Like how much can you bench. No yeah like the Muslim Hindu. Do we need. We need a strong Skoda's lead. You got a sense of Ron Johnson. In the Scotus he'd be a much better chief justice. My God. I'd pay for that. Pay to see that on the issue of appointing Thomas as the interim officer the defense team noted that Johnson was attempting by necessity to keep the war department staff and operational. The Brits could come back you never know never know. Pirates aritz pirates. Always a problem. The president's actions they noted had resulted in no public injury sufficiently grave to warrant the removal from office. Nothing the we're fine so fine. There were not. They're not you. Greens why are we crying. It was that bad. Like like was a bad. Yes but it wasn't that bad. Have we heard this before any of this sound like yes it was bad but like impeachable impeachable Jabbour come on. Oh like to keep the war department staffed. Gino would have kept the war department. Staff is keeping win right. Yes ask you didn't have to do anything if there's nothing to be done now they're going to be done. No defense have yet to hear a defense from this team is not laughable. Sure there were twenty five prosecution in sixteen defense. Witnesses called no witnesses which is nice. Nice all the impeachment trials we've seen in history have had witnesses and this one such a long trial a long time to hear all the witnesses because they had twenty five prosecution and sixteen defense witnesses and right now we were like can we just have the one. Can we just have the John John gives one with like no no. No you get three days. No witnesses that's it. Yeah Yeah these guys at eleven weeks and what is that forty one witnesses is that the yes. That could be the math that that is. That's the math is the math as a math Most hosted the trial was conducted in open session but the galleries were closed for the debate of the actual eleven articles may fine fine the Republicans who had brought the impeachment charges against against Johnson. We're we're this is also according to the Senate. Oh God the official Senate website were impressed with his behavior and good faith measures to make amends. Okay I'll get him. He's trying trying he's trying he's trying to get credit for that really trying to turn it around uh-huh so Johnson promised to enforce the reconstruction acts because he realized he was in trouble. He was like those are not gonna go my way and none of these people are of my party. I got to do something to like. Let me correct correct. Yeah so he promised to Rian to enforce the reconstruction acts. He promised to stop giving speeches attacking. Congress I'll stop giving my loud speeches. I will be quieter play slots US off with A. Yes Yeah Thou II and their speak softly yeah. And he promised purpose to appoint General John M show Feld of as the new secretary of war. who is liked by most of the Republican why not Edwin I think Edwin. He's he didn't want to talk he's like this is the halfway point not back guy. Yeah I'm not going to give you bovine. Forget when we will take John Juggle. Take John even though the majority of the articles of impeachment were how win. Hope nobody stood up for you in the end. He's just log on his gone off goat. Johnson's opponents decided to hold a vote on only three of the eleven articles of impeachment as a strategy to pass the ones that they thought were the strongest arguments for release. Tell me it was the one about US voice it was. I think it was one two and three days. I know opportunity. I know it was really a shame. I mean we would have had precedent president. How you're seeing? How could they have foreseen? They really So I may sixteen eighteen sixty eight. The Senate acquitted Johnson by a one. Vote Margin Gosh Dang it I know one king boat I live. We live right now. We're like we have four people know amazing amazing The vote against him in the Senate was closer than the vote to bring the articles of impeachment to the Senate and the first article thirty five senators voted to convict the president of high crimes and misdemeanors while nineteen voted to acquit. Which is one vote? One vote shy of the two-thirds needed to I know ten days later they held votes on the second and third articles only to have the same result they voted to acquit acquit. Him quote because this because as efficient minority wished to protect the office of the President and preserve the constitutional balance of power. Oh my God how can we stop trying to protect the office of the president and just like deal with what's happening to what extent. Are you like your denial. So you wish you value in the office of the president devaluing the other arms of government. Why at the same time? It's like three birds. One stone changed because one of the reasons is that that was floated around that Lisa Murkowski decided to vote against having witnesses. Because she didn't want to be the senator who would then force John Roberts to have to cast a tie breaking vote and she didn't want to put the office of the Supreme Court in that in that position and I'm like that what he's air for. Yeah absolutely the Joe is going to be. That's why he's got this job. I'm like what are you sure it's not your decision like I'm Gonna I'm GonNa take certainly saw we saw. This is not your job. That was one of the things I was like. What are you talking about? That's the whole reason. We put in place a tie-breaking. Vote right we. We don't have a problem. Giving Mike Pence pens the opportunity to cast a tie breaking vote. Yes exactly that's like us anyways you so mad. Unlike John's going to be fine. Yes he's shaky but he's going to be fine seven Republicans for in Johnson's impeachment. Trial defied their party to vote to acquit Senator James Grimes of Iowa concluded quote. I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious working of the Constitution for the sake of getting rid of an unacceptable president. Like what's the point of impeachment like what's the point of it but not to get rid of an unacceptable president right but also like if you told me that like Lisa Murkowski as you said that I would believe you. Bas- basically what she said. Yeah it just take the word constitution out and put Supreme Court. I cannot agree to destroy the harmonious ace workings of the Supreme Court for the sake of getting rid of and that's that's literally what it is. It's also not a disruption revolutionist. I'm not somebody WHO's like let's burn it out of the ground around. You think there are definitely things to change. But I'm not somebody who thinks like we're going to start from scratch. I literally like obviously. They had their problems. They started from scratch. Here we are today but you know it is anathema to me. The the sentiment of like we have to protect the institutions. What in your mind then would be? He wants enough. What's enough what's the thing that would break your back? I don't understand everybody's looking very gravely you wishing and explanation institution's point that's the whole point of these institutions is to make these decisions and like we said before it's setting Horrible precedent where each president has like more and more and more power. We're no longer in a democracy uh-huh exactly okay. Let's talk about post trial. So sort mm-hmm. I constantly for the rest of his time as president. Johnson continue to veto reconstruction bills even though he promised not to. Yeah but the Republican liar but the Republican paths for reconstruction continued as Congress continued to override. Those vetoes vetos later that same year. Republican Ulysses s grant won the presidency. Johnson left office on March fourth eighteen sixty nine and in eighteen seventy four. Gosh darn it. Johnson won back his Senate seat but died in office in eighteen. Seventy five five. Oh I know he is deceased Adidas East now man. Yup It's crazy easy. This whole thing is absolutely bonkers Zane. That's that's all that's it. Yeah Oh my God answer. Kate is is gonNA actually end this episode with a fun fact which is the actual amount of time Edwin. Stanton was locked in his office. Do you WANNA come here okay. This is producer. Sergei doing our research for US Johnson's trial began in late March. Meanwhile Stanton had remained barred in the war. Department's headquarters for weeks weeks four weeks four for weeks over weeks art weeks. Yeah yes F. O. R. and it seems to insinuate that it was for like the entire trial so the eleven eleven week. That's briefly that is did. He have his sustenance. I I mean I'm sure or he did but how under the door he opened it up. It was like a symbolic bearing food. Anybody trying to get in there are like just stay. I don't care like we have another office John Coming in. There's literally four. It's the it's the capital happened like we were filled with offices like we'll just find a different one man poor Edwin. Oh Gosh Ashwell. Let's Weinstein the true unsung hero of Johnson impeachment trial. But KYW's that's our episode number. Thank you so so much for going on this journey with us. Of course surprise surprise I mean why did this is where it all started up. Yeah you can just see you jozy. it all ties to it and it really like yeah. There's how many how many years between but one hundred and fifty. It's the exact same same thing process. It is the exact same says. It's a big of warning one when other than that. The whole structure the politics of it. It doesn't matter that the context is different than what they're fighting over in the Ukrainian aid reconstruct. That doesn't matter. It is the same politics the same concerns. We have gone nowhere. Josh Amazing Let's end on that very sorry. Whatever whatever do you have anything coming up? Do you WANNA plug anything. Can we find you anywhere. Yeah you can find where I'm joking around the city on my website Amber Rallo Dot Com A. M. B. R. O. L. L. O. DOT COM and. I'll put up other stuff.

Ron Johnson president Senate Supreme Court John John Lisa Murkowski Congress US Tim Thomas KYW John Juggle Mike Pence John Roberts officer Gino Rian Stanton
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

04:36 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Oh my God. I would be on the same page absolute on the same page. I want to go into twenty twenty with a thirty ninth. Congress mood yes absolutely absolutely. They were taking names except for Andrew Johnson. Yeah we got only name we have in our mind okay all right well and Edwin. Don't try I hope you're okay Edwin. Okay Logger tell us about the case of the trial God again in In the Senate on March Fifth and continued for eleven weeks. Well we one week for each thing Pat Article Pass more or the we. Don't I know but I love that. There might be a week of everybody talking about. Yeah he very loud. Even witnessing the loudness loudness I saw Andrew Johnson speak on March first eighteen fifty five and I never recovered. I got consumption from the whole ordeal. I had to drink afterwards. I would say his tone is downright. Rude ooh disgrace disgraceful okay. The Republicans had a two thirds majority in the Senate and chief justice. Salman Chase is presided names Salman Salmon Ullman Image as I is it Salman or is it. We don't know are we there. No we only have the parchman and that just are the way. Honestly I like it. Yeah I don't know I'm I'm into Salman Solid Salmon. It's okay chief. Justice Salmon Makes John. Roberts seem very like a snooze is best yes well Dan Roberts is news. What is he doing has also doesn't have the right frames for his face and he is shaky shake a lot he very nervous? Yeah he was overseeing. Although I don't know how much work he's putting into it always doing his reading shit he is but as I yeah no reading aloud it could be your and you can't beat chief justice John Roberts being like bubble. How do you say say this? Do you see that word. How do you say hey senator? How do you pronounce your last name? Alderman Amazing Johnson didn't appear at the trial and his lawyers. They they they recommended he avoid and he did but arrangements were made for press interviews. Of course which is not helpful considering what are the articles about how he talks yes very loud very loud. One of Johnson's lawyers was attorney. General Henry Stanbury like the Attorney General of the United States Carfax. Absolutely can't it would not surprise me if William Bar was an attorney for Donald trump a trial that absolutely. That's right happen one hundred ten. I mean he already is essentially a whole. has this whole like pony. Joe Henry Stanbury the Attorney General Journal of time resigned his post to devote all of his attention to the guide. William page. Take a page of the book. Johnson's team of five lawyers argued that his actions John Johnson's actions had not violated the tenure of Office Act since Stanton had been appointed by Lincoln. Oh awesome dead guy into can't defend himself he's dead. Johnson was not obligated to continue his service. Don't talk about Babe. It is shots fired. That's not cool that suited to Susan. I don't care what he thinks he's He's like I didn't choose this. This was Babes decision. Not Me not me okay. Drew Drew Babe. They argue that even if the Act Act was constitutional. Johnson couldn't be impeached for misinterpreting. Take the law. He didn't know any better. Know anybody through sheer will educated misinterpret things when you absolutely sure will. Education is not a credit for university extent. Tim of sheer will. Education is misinterpretation. Oh.

Alderman Amazing Johnson Dan Roberts Edwin Salman Senate Salman Chase Salman Salmon Justice Salmon General Henry Stanbury Joe Henry Stanbury William Bar John Roberts Attorney General Journal of ti Congress Donald trump Pat Article attorney senator Tim
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

07:37 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Twenty mood. I'm just gotTa lock by that. Is that is literally white. Like it's like I can't you can't do anything if I'm locked in my office. Office squatters rights. Well yeah it's like try and get the key I guess what you don't there's only one key fucker you're with me. This lock has made a Brat. You'RE GONNA try to Mel this shit here. Yeah Oh good gift for Edwin. Yeah Yeah Oh my God i WanNa approach everything like this. I know I didn't know the this was part of negotiation tactics just wine. I've been taught to do the opposite of this promotion. And now okay yeah not to knock yourself interim next time I see what happens. They don't give it to me. I'm going to lock himself in the interview room. Stay there until they slide slide contractor to the door. Either you give me the author. Let's go I love it good for my inside locked myself in. I also like this idea that the other Republicans were like you have our blessing to talk about like what I give have. I know Like hey whatever you need to do and if you need to lock yourself in the room that would you do we stand by you we are. We are behind you not in the room but now outside the outside outside of the room outside the room one hundred ten percent with you not with you now. We have things to do our job. Yeah I can't lose it. We actually have a meeting in twenty minutes but I knew you come on man. What a fraternity spirit around around? I know that's what so. That's why they impeach him because he's like not he keeps not doing the reconstruction stuff that they've passed time and and then they tried this whole like to fire Edwin stand thing like last Straw. It's the last Straw. They're angry they're angry. Let's talk about Co after Edwin don't Gladwin and and let's talk about the impeachment. I go like this tallying of the bunch. Why would you like so I don't know he probably like you know like cooked? You know like like I only made especially yeah. Okay the impeachment yet so obviously the house did not like to be trifled with and just obeyed so they decided to impeach the president on February twenty fourth eighteen sixty eight. The House voted to impeach Johnson by a vote about one hundred and twenty six to forty seven. I know that's the overwhelming overwhelming majority like. Remember the population is very small. That's why this vote seems very small. In comparison to now there are some missing members short because during the confederacy. Yeah okay so it they. They voted with a resolution of impeachment. The Joint Committee on reconstruction produced eleven articles of impeachment. There's there's let me count the ways. One of they charged him with violation of ten violation of the tenure of office. ACT IT and bringing into quote disgrace ridicule hatred contempt and reproach the Congress Of the United States. Yeah they hated it. Oh my God. They were headed with the articles of impeachment. Were as follows. I will odsal eleven twelve blow through these number. One stated that Johnson ordered Stanton removed with the intent to violate the act totally chew three and eight eight alleged that the appointment of Thomas to replace Stanton without the advice and consent of the Senate was a further violation of the Constitution Institution. So Thomas is as full title is Major General Lieutenant. Thomas Adjunct General of the army absolutely. Yes that's who it is that he had been authorized and empowered to act as secretary of war in the interim He was the interim love. It love it absolutely love it and they had three different amendments Johnson said that not only. I know this is how to recall. Yes you forgotten. We're going to bring it up again. Articles four through seven accused Johnson of conspiring with Thomas Honest to remove Stanton citing such conspiracy as a high crime in office thus illegally depriving Stanton of his rightful eightfold position. Wow this is very dramatic daft management. What's the eighth article? Charged Johnson with conspire cons-. My God conspiring to deprive stanton of his rightful possessions. This is literally just like eleven ways to say the same thing for sale of you. Article Nine accused this Johnson of diverting orders and instructions related to military operations through the general of the Army Bypassing Secretary Stanton. Tim Did Stanton Bright this himself. He's in the office. They're just I. Yeah Yeah I like how. We don't have how long he was locked away. And I I WANNA know curious. I've just like it's like an hour and then we're all really disappointed right and then there was there. I'm sure you can do a quick google. How long was Ed? Wynn Stanton ten locked in his office. Okay Wow I'm just going to show you his picture really quickly because OMG yeah ninety glasses Gore instagram because this will be post. Oh my God off-key could live in Williamsburg that is not the correct correct frame for his face but you know he's a Ranasinghe it. It's the keys confident like somebody who had locked himself in his off. He was looking into flannel with logger. On Fifth Avenue. Walking down the street on Jefferson throws axes on the weekend absolutely. He's chopping wood up and you know saugerties so this the civic but this is what history dot Com says which is quote Stanton later resorted to briefly barricading himself and his office when Johnson tried to remove him so briefly reverts briefly barricading which is still the mood. It is just barricade. It yourself is resorting to something. Very I love Elsa loved the Senate was like so we read before like from the United States. It's on it and the Senate paints a very. They want you to think that he is locked in this office. Like you know I taking. I'm thanking Stan. Dan Okay back to the articles that were proposed so another article proposed Massachusetts Representative Benjamin Butler charged Johnson with making speeches beaches quotes with allow voice. Oh certain how do you say this word. Temporary intemperate inflammatory and scandalous. How do you you say this word? HARANGUES harangues with the intent to disgrace Congress. He's.

Johnson Wynn Stanton Senate Thomas Adjunct General Congress United States secretary Mel Edwin google Gladwin Williamsburg army Joint Committee Massachusetts Stan Elsa Tim
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

Let's Get Civical

02:15 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Let's Get Civical

"Yeah sure he's like living in Lamar Alexander. Sure okay. who was Johnson Vice? President Johnson had assumed office After John Wilkes booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln on April Fifteenth Eighteen. Sixty five. So we're in the middle of the civil war that's like you know and the Democrats crafts at this. Time are the ones who are slavery we want it. Let's keep it. Let's go there like let's let's secede from the United States the confederacy. They're doing all of that gorgeous gorgeous stuff and so. When Abraham Lincoln Republican dies who you know leader of the union basically somebody who is A? He's a he was a pro union Democrat but huber racists who was like. Okay fine they you know they don't have to be slaves but like no rights right no right but he didn't want them he didn't. He wasn't pro secession now just for context yes. He was bad so that so he became became president in this very crucial time towards the end of the civil war so all of reconstruction the fact that we got things like Jim Crow. You can just tie it back to Andrew Johnson's the presidency because he really stood in the way of giving people who were formerly enslaved their full rights as citizens which was the whole going. You killed half of our population for this one thing. And then Andrew Johnson came in was like oh no direct trek okay. So more about Johnson Jr is a little bit so little little snippet. So uh-huh Johnson had grown up in poverty was tailor's apprentice. You remember when that was what you did before. Running for president was like a Taylor or were being apprentice or being apprentice. You're right yeah remember apprentices. Oh Gosh up Renti- per anti thank you. I don't know no this is gorgeous. He had no formal education absolutely amazing. Oh President New States as the Senate describes quote through the sheer force of will but he became a self educated man.

President Johnson Abraham Lincoln Republican Johnson Vice president Johnson Jr huber Abraham Lincoln Lamar Alexander John Wilkes United States Senate Taylor Jim Crow
What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

06:43 min | 8 months ago

What Happens When A President Is Impeached?

"My name is evey. Im seven years. Old I live in Downers Grove Illinois. I my question is what happens when presidents get impeached. Have you been hearing about impeachment. It's been in the news because the US President Donald Trump trump has been impeached. And there's been a lot of news and conversation about whether he did something so bad that he should no longer be the US president as we're putting this this podcast episode out the trial to decide that is still going on. We thought you might appreciate having a little bit. More of an understanding of what impeachment actually is is how it works and when it has happened before in. US history so we called up. Jessica Levinson to help us with this. She's a professor or a teacher. Sure of law at Loyola Law School in California so she teaches people how to become lawyers. She also focuses on politics and government in her work so she looks at the rules around elections and she looks at government ethics. How people should behave in government so she really knows what's going on when it comes to impeachment? Here's Eve these question again. What happens when presidents get impeached? So impeachment is basically a way of removing one of our leaders in government. We have a couple of ways to remove people from their jobs so they don't get to keep doing what they already do and one of them is through elections and we can choose to vote somebody out of their current position. We can choose to say you. Don't get to keep your job. Somebody else's going to do your job now and we could also also decide to use a process called impeachment which means that people will basically decide. You did something. That is really bad in really problematic attic and that it's so bad that we might have to remove you from your job Before the next vote before the next election and so so. That's that's basically. What impeachment is a way so that people don't get to keep doing their job because they did something pretty? Bad impeachment is a process that was written into into our Constitution. The constitution is the document that was created to lay out the fundamental rules of what the United States was going to be. Here's our other guests to help explain lane the history. I am candidacy Davis. The author of don't know much about history. Impeachment is simply a term that was adopted by the men who drafted and wrote the United States constitution in seventeen eighty seven and the word comes from an old English term for how to remove an official if he somehow did something that was wrong. Corrupt criminal unethical ethical or some other form of needing to be removed. And so this was an idea that was important to the founders of with the country because they were getting a great deal of power to one man in particular the president does they finally decided on it as well as other federal officials and is important to remember. That impeachment isn't only for president. It's also for other high-ranking federal officials officials who might have to be removed from office including federal judges because our presidential elections only happen every four years the men who wrote the US Constitution thought there needed to be away to remove the president in between elections. If he had done something so wrong that he shouldn't be president anymore even before for an election happened. And I'm saying he here instead of he and she or her because back in the seventeen hundreds the founders couldn't imagine that a president or a judge judge or a person in that kind of power would be a woman one of the most important things about a democracy where the people choose their leaders is just that that the people choose so it needs to be a really big deal for a president to be removed from office by other elected officials instead of by the voters in an the election so the writers of the Constitution created rules around win and how a president can be impeached. The House of Representatives can bring bring charges against the president when they think he has done something wrong if a majority more than half of the members of the house votes to bring those charges to trial then a president has been impeached. That has happened three times so far in. US history and that's what happened to the current president. Donald Trump Andrew through Johnson in eighteen sixty eight was the first president to be impeached. The second one was Bill Clinton in nineteen ninety eight so it was more than a hundred thirty years between the first two impeachments Bill Clinton Andrew. Johnson were not removed from office now. There was one other career impeachment in that time. Richard M Nixon who was the president elected in nineteen sixty eight resigned from the office in Nineteen eighteen seventy four because he was going to be impeached and it was quite certain that he was going to be removed from office because of what he had done. In what we now know as Watergate so impeachment is pretty rare but it also might be a little confusing because being impeached. Doesn't doesn't mean that you're no longer. The president. Being impeached is kind of like being accused of doing something wrong. Here's how Jessica Levinson describes it just because because that first group of people the House of Representatives decides to impeach you nothing actually happens to president it might be that it's really embarrassing Maybe the people who don't like what happened. Use this against you. Think about something that happens at school where somebody does something. Like take a marker that wasn't theirs if the teacher tells the whole class look at this person they took the marker that's really bad that's kind of like impeachment if nothing thing happens other than the teacher just saying that's really bad but it's really what happens next which is called a trial in the Senate where you might be able to lose your job. The trial in the Senate is kind of like if the teacher says. That's so bad that you don't get to use markers for the rest of the day and so there's this consequences to that so it's up to the Senate to hold a trial and if enough of them. Two thirds agree that the president should be removed only then then what a president have to step down and that has so far never happened in. US history

President Trump United States Jessica Levinson Donald Trump House Of Representatives Senate Downers Grove Illinois Loyola Law School Bill Clinton California Donald Trump Andrew Richard M Nixon Professor Bill Clinton Andrew Davis Johnson Official
"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

11:06 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"What about people's points of view? What about the way people are treated read and represented in government? You know so absolutely. They were the the technical reason or the what I said the straw that broke the camel's back all of that. Yeah without a context it makes no sense but the context is everything to what material things things Did Johnson I mean. Is it possible to assess what material things Johnson actually precluded in the. Let's say we had not necessarily Lincoln but And I and I don't know you know I don't know but but let's say let's say Lincoln had not Pinchot I mean and you know I think that he certainly was probably you know the radical Republicans probably felt the throughout the war that he wasn't going hard enough in some respects so he could be considered a moderate. Let's say what what what would have been different in other words. What the Johnson prevent that was within sort of even a moderate grasp in terms of where what this country could be going forward? Well it's interesting what he tried to prevent because fortunately the opposition party the Republicans had the majority vote so he tried to prevent civil rights. He tried to prevent you know Equal opportunity you tried to prevent you mentioned education education If Lincoln had lived yes probably the radicals would want to push them farther but But they had pushed him you they they had pushed him and he did. Listen the thing about Lincoln was he always listen so if he was a moderate moderates themselves joined together with radicals to create the fourteenth amendment. I think there would have been Quicker reconstruction along the lines of much more equality. Lincoln was already open part of the reason I think John Wilkes booth was like driven. Nuts cuts was lincoln was already opened to maybe giving. What he said was some black men? The vote people who served in the army for example and so if he was open to that you know early on them and see March eighteen sixty five imagine what what he would have been able to listen into so perhaps then if the south had been able to reenter congress sooner and along fairer lines and maybe more money would have gotten to help rebuild parts of the south then after that. Think of the people who could've gone down to the south to help rebuild schools roads. You know what we call today. Infrastructure really would've instead of instead of those people that in the history books were called scalawags and carpetbaggers bad people north. Who came to rip off off the south? So I you know. We don't know what would have happened. My sense is that my my reading Lincoln. My sense about Lincoln is yeah. He wasn't as radical as the radicals but he was a man who could change could listen It he knew how to get things done. That's the other thing about Lincoln he could. He could get things done. This is very pragmatic in terms of all right. Well so let's let's I wanNA SORTA SORTA and with this question and it's a big one a little bit. I mean you know and and it it. It's almost similar to the to the opening question as to why we know so little like what like in many respects reconstruction in this era and this impeachment which which embodied that sort of the struggle of that era. How much of it had to do with like this? The loss 'cause myth how much it had to do with our inability to address or desire tir to avoid racial issues so that we didn't have to actually like meet the promise of of of why you know like I mean you know we're we're talking following this. We have Jim Crow laws for decades upon decades after that it takes another almost one hundred years until the boat. The vote is actually you know meaning fully protected and we should say that meaningful protection action has been undone by Supreme Court. That's very similar to one that existed around that era as well I mean yeah I mean you know where the people arguing against Jim Crow you know in separate equal plus versus Ferguson happened to be this guy was a radical radical Republican. You know This is later in the century. Of course but but you know to go back to where we started to. I would say from my point. Maybe one hundred percent was because of racial issues that we didn't know about what happened was because this lost cause sort of history. Riders riders lost cause terminology. This sense that Oh those former slaves. They don't know anything that can't really be in the legislature. They ruined everything all of that kind of white. Supremacist rhetoric that you see. You know forming in the late nineteenth century. Certainly by the turn of the century. And you've got you know clansman. And you've got to wreak kearns or the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. You've got birth of a nation. I think all of that work together to really what was really a wonderful opportunity with people a vision Asian. who fought hard to make the country free and fair and I think we don't know about what happened? We don't even know their names sir. And that's that's a real loss and it shows that just to Kinda historical in Nesia but Kinda historical Oracle prejudice prejudice. You know that I think was long with us. Probably probably the tide began to turn in the nineteen sixties. When you mentioned suddenly now we have a real civil rights legislation but took another hundred year? It took one hundred years so yeah it is. That's what it's about the more I Read about reconstruction and and things like the loss 'cause which you know If I should say for folks who because I feel like there's just a tremendous I dorothy of of of awareness of this period. The loss caused just this sort of the idea that you know this is about protecting a southern culture. The as much of what we heard about you know when we went through these taking down the statues of confederate leaders. Rian vote all that stuff. It doesn't nobody talks about it that way So much but it is fascinating how much this era mirrors the era following the a civil war and I learned something. Well that's a lot ask. The book is springs. Eternal Brenda one apple. The book is the impeach the trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of adjust nation. We we will put a link to this book at Majority Dot FM. Ken Brenda Wine Apple. Thank you so much for your time today. I really really appreciate. I appreciate it to. Thanks so much SAM. All right folks Can't recommend that that book enough start to crack it and it Very important era came up actually with an interview. I did with Carol Anderson on a on Wisconsin second time that we had her on in regards to the similarities between what the Supreme Court was doing that. And what it's doing now and let's hope that we're not running a one to one repeat because that would put us about sixty or seventy years out from cleaning up this mess. What if we're just on one big the hamster wheel that would sort of suck but the flat circle? Yeah that would be a drag on the hastened the great philosopher Matthew mcconaughey. Well I mean I think some of the work he's been doing on the The Lincoln commercials really does resonate with me. I I saw the how many Korean movie he was in Brandon maybe you can remind me with the name of it. Is the Sand Beach Bum. Yeah or he's like a beach bum in Miami. I have not seen that one spring breakers I did not see that one brilliant film. What really captured the guys of late? Capitalism SORTA similar I remember seeing the clips of of harmony when he was going around trying to get people to beat them up and shooting those videos that was pretty cool folks just a reminder you can support this program by becoming a member. Brad joined the majority report DOT Com. We got so much going on right now the so much first of all the am the AM quickey. He has been Reborn and we're improving it every single day. First of all it's getting out the door by. Am Easy. I think what we're GONNA do not sure maybe we'll put we'll see about that may put it but we're getting a lot of feedback appreciating both that we're getting it out earlier and that we've sort of tweaking it and we're going to tweak it a little bit more but it is a great way to start your day get a sense of what the news is so you you come in. And it's done all within five or six minutes complaints. Oh it was was five minutes and thirty five seconds Edwin here that but we try and make it Tight try and give you the irrelevant facts. Tried to add a little bit context too. So that you're not flying the blind and when you sign up for it it it's it just expands what we're doing here We'll be able to solve ads against it and not gonNA put more ads than there are in it now but we have one slot Fred so thirty seconds and you can sign up at am quickie DOT com. You can listen to it via our apple. Majority APP DOT COM as long as well.

Lincoln Andrew Johnson Jim Crow apple Supreme Court Ku Klux Klan John Wilkes Sand Beach Bum Matthew mcconaughey The Lincoln army Pinchot Ken Brenda Wine Edwin Fred Nesia Wisconsin kearns
"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

01:47 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of a just nation professor. Brenda wine apple be joining us. Also on the program today. Republicans plot to ignore. Order the Bolton bombshell as the durhush argues it's not abuse of power when the president does it while spreme court okays expansion of public charge coincidentally on the Holocaust the cost Memorial Day and that public charge policy also coincidentally wants us to denied Jewish refugees from Europe during said Holocaust Maine. Wow Washington Post suspends. A reporter for tweeting a three-year-old story or article on Kobe. Bryant's rape charge. Doug Collins to run UH in the Georgia Senate jungle primary further pushing the implications of impeachment on these vulnerable Republican Senators House. Democrats plan to pass a bill to strike down. Trump's travel ban. It will die die in the Senate Netanyahu drops his immunity bed criminal proceedings on fraud and bribery. Move Foreword all this and more on today's program Welcome.

Georgia Senate Senate Andrew Johnson Doug Collins apple Trump bribery professor reporter Bryant rape president Europe Maine fraud
"andrew johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:08 min | 8 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"I read he Andrew Johnson truck the radical Republicans like the radical Democrats today sees Andrew Johnson's bank records there was no income tax back then they seize this bank records there was nothing there Macy's whatever private information they could again Sandra Johnson there was nothing there Andrew Johnson is not a sympathetic figure Johnson was in many ways hasta el after the civil war to reconstruction Andrew Johnson had a drinking problem Hey Andrew Johnson was wrong you see the house passed a law saying that the president Johnson could not remove a cabinet officer without the permission of Congress Johnson said sure I can he vetoed the bill the Republicans after the civil war had over one majorities in the house and the Senate they overrode his veto Johnson fired his secretary wars that who had inherited from Lincoln and he said I'm going to do this and there's not a damn thing you can do about it hi the president run my cabin choose my cabinet office you get to confirm them but once the confirmed I decide if they stay so the impeachment fifty years later the Supreme Court issued an opinion that said fifty years later Congress cannot can for any president from firing cabinet officers Donald Trump says you don't get to call my chief of staff my national security adviser and so forth this is my inner circle of advisers we have Supreme Court decision set up hold executive privilege we have Supreme Court decisions had recognized that a president cannot function if the opposition party is sitting in the oval office with him taking notes and running to the public to try and undermine him but the house demanded testimony from these individuals anyway and then drop the Adam Smith had a mischief the chairman of the house intelligence committee saying every time you do that Mister president we can use that as a peach meant fact against you under an impeachment count obstruction of Congress you can't stop us we have a majority in the Senate today the debate over witness what you see over TV they think it's a football game well they get witnesses what they get rich this is will be reciprocity won't there be reciprocity they want several of the same witness that the president would not agree to where I could not agree to in the house just like the attempt to prevent Andrew Johnson from firing cabinet members this is an assault by the Democrats on the constitution the power and independence of the presidency it is an assault on separation of powers art from impeachment which I've talked about many time obstruction of Congress they.

Congress football Mister executive chief of staff secretary assault Andrew Johnson house intelligence committee chairman Adam Smith Donald Trump Democrats Supreme Court president Lincoln Senate Congress Johnson officer
Trump adds to legal team as impeachment trial begins

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 9 months ago

Trump adds to legal team as impeachment trial begins

"They say the president's legal team figures the trial will last no more than two weeks which would be far shorter than Andrew Johnson street while in eighteen sixty eight and bill Clinton's in nineteen ninety nine but they're still a question about whether the Senate will allow more witnesses which could extend the trial it takes a super majority to convict sixty seven senators both Johnson and Clinton were acquitted and president trump figures he's next there was nothing done wrong a person familiar says the president's boosting his legal team before opening arguments next week adding former Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz and X. independent counsel Ken Starr among others Sager make Donnie at the White House

President Trump Senate Professor Alan Dershowitz Ken Starr Sager Donnie White House Andrew Johnson Bill Clinton Harvard
Trump impeachment: What you need to know about the Senate trial

Monocle 24: The Globalist

10:15 min | 9 months ago

Trump impeachment: What you need to know about the Senate trial

"Today. The big news coming out of Washington should have been the presentation of the articles of impeachment. Went to the Senate. The swearing in the chief justice to preside over the trial and of senators to serve impartial. Justice list was eclipsed however by new revelations revelations about trump's efforts to pressure Ukraine policy. Well we've Geoffrey Howard professor of political science at UC L. to come in and bring us up to date with the fast moving eating events have US domestic politics. Thanks so much for joining us. Jeffrey set who is left Pon us and what does he said. So let's partners is an associate of Rudolph Giuliani. Most people remember. Rudy Giuliani as the mayor of New York City. During nine eleven many thought he would go down in American history as one of its most storied figures. Someone who inspired brought the city together but this is a very different Rudolph. Giuliani we see before us in twenty twenty. He is the personal lawyer to the president of the United United States and by all accounts spent the last couple of years going around the world doing the president's bidding doing the president's alleged dirty work and life partners ukrainian-american American is one of his associates. One of his henchmen some have put it Who It seems has been spending quite a bit of time in Ukraine meeting with Ukrainian officials playing playing a key role in trying to pressure The Ukrainian government to fabricator find dirt on Joe Biden which the president could then use to smear near him with if Joe Biden turns out to be his opponent in the upcoming general election? And he's given this this huge interview where he absolutely says that trump knew exactly what it was going on. How credible is he? Well I think he certainly deserves a good amount of skepticism. He is himself under indictment partly for participation in he's very allegedly nefarious activities But what he's saying is corroborated by everything else. We've learned over the past few months. So this trove of voicemail as mail messages and texts in calendar entries demonstrates that there has been a concerted effort by trump's associates by Rudolph Giuliani and and his men To try to pressure the Ukrainian government to cook up this investigation Into into the former vice president Joe Biden That the president has known about it all along that the Attorney General Bill Bar has known about it all along the so many people have suggested that well maybe rudy. Giuliani has been up to no good but maybe the top people in the White House weren't totally sure that he was doing all this. He was just doing it on his own initiative well of left parties right The president has known about this all along then absolutely vital and orchestrating it and some of the elements of this evidence are really striking. Some of them are are handwritten notes scrawled on sheets of paper from the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Vienna And they demonstrate that there was a wide range of tactics that were deployed by eh trump's or rudy Giuliani's men including left in Ukraine. It looks like there may have been in operation to Sir Vail then American ambassador acid to the Ukraine by Rudy Giuliani's own men. So I mean this really is the stuff of a of a movie plot. You really couldn't make it up and inevitably they will be a movie about about the We also heard yesterday that an independent nonpartisan office that works for Congress says the trump administration broke the law when it withheld held military assistance to Ukraine. So what has the Government Accountability Office said. Why does it matter so will it matter that is the question for the US Senate as we approached this This trial So the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office. It's a it's a national watchdog organization and it did indeed find that the decision to withhold military aid for Ukraine dangling over the government in exchange for a promise to look into a Abidin was indeed a violation of the law. Now as we know the president cannot be prosecuted as part of a traditional Legal investigation it. There is a special process. The founding fathers of the United States for better or worse put into place with respect to holding the president legally accountable and that is the the impeachment process. Which of course begins with the House of Representatives? The Lower Chamber of the Congress deciding whether to charge the president with a particular offense Which has done that is why he's been impeached? And then it goes to the Senate to decide Whether to convict him the offense and if they do convict him of the events he will be the I president. US history removed from office. And that is where we are now the opening formalities of the Senate trial of happened. We've had the swearing in of jurors as we know the Senate is controlled told by Donald Trump's party the Republicans will the jurors be impartial. Well that's the big question. We're learning to find out so A month ago Mitch. McConnell the the leader of the Republicans in the Senate said that he didn't intend to be an impartial juror and he emphasized that this is a political process And of course there's a sense of what she's he's right that it is a political process. This isn't a standard ordinary legal process. It is a a decision that the senators get to make for themselves. They get to ask themselves. Do we think that this conduct that the president has engaged in amounts to what the constitution refers to as high crimes in misdemeanors has the president by allegedly abusing. His power demonstrated that he is fundamentally unfit for office such that he ought to be removed. That is not a matter of showing that the president violated highlighted some particular law on the books. It's it is a political judgement but that doesn't mean it has to be a a a narrow minded self interested partisan judgment political judgments can still be moral judgments and so when the chief justice of the United States who very intriguingly to preside over. This whole process swore the senators in in yesterday He got them to swear that they would do impartial. Justice in this context with that means I would argue is that they need to Genuinely we look at the evidence. Look at the facts And that really goes to the question of whether this will be a fair trial because we do not know for sure yet whether there will actually be witnesses called or or whether it will be a very quick process where they have opening statements And then basically closing statements and then it ends because trump had originally said he wanted witnesses. Nice Nice seems to be tons of them. Well it's it's not exactly clear what the president wants here One thing we know for sure is that if the president if we do have witnesses in this process For example the former national security adviser of the United States John Bolton long celebrated and regarded as a very important vigour by Republicans but who is said to have referred to Rudy Giuliani's little inquiry in Ukraine as a as a drug deal that he didn't have anything apart a part of he has said that if he's subpoenaed he'll be willing to testify. No doubt if left parnassus subpoenas. He would testify Now it could be that some of the more. Moderate Republicans pins people like Susan Collins from Maine who are going to rely in their next reelection. On more moderate members of their state voting for them will want to be seen as not just in the tank for trump as somewhat more independently minded Someone like Mitt Romney. For example the senator from Utah also wants to be seen as an indeed is more independently hundley minded. They may well go with Democrats in supporting calling witnesses. You might even get more Republicans than that to support calling pulling witnesses. But then they'll perhaps want include witnesses. That don't seem to have much particularly to do with whether trump is guilty not such as Hunter Biden and so if we start seeing people like Hunter Biden called in this thing could degenerate into a circus quite quickly and I mean such a huge week ahead then for the US and not just for the Republicans for the Democrats. Not Because of course we have Iowa coming up on one of the unintended consequences of this. Trial is the fact that two senators who are also running for the Democratic nomination not table to get on that campaign trail so Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders both needing to be in Washington to actually be at this trial absolutely absolutely and so then. They're going to have to go so there. Of course the two most important ones given their rankings in the polls Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota also needs to participate cle Bennett a senator from Colorado running for president. I saw the other day. He's still running for Pres- wasn't aware that he was still in the race. He hasn't been in the limelight bat. Much of that's four senators that have to Interrupt their campaigns and go back and so might that given a slight edge to South Bend Indiana Mayor Pete Buddha judge and the former former vice president Joe Biden it probably will and just indulge me here in a in a best case justice doing its job no partisan interest Outcome where trump is simply judged on whether he broke the Laura or not and we know he did really How soon could he be gone? Well it could happen quite quickly. So the Clinton trial took just over a month. Um that was in nineteen ninety nine. The previous impeachment was the impeachment of Andrew Johnson in nineteen sixty eight and that took about two months So if you manage to get so there are fifty three Republicans in the Senate. They're forty five Democrats there to independence any two two thirds of the Senate to convict and remove the president from office. Which means you'd need to get the forty five Democrats which you'd get you get the to independence and then you need to get Twenty or so little more more than twenty Republicans To sign on as well and that seems extremely extremely unlikely Because you can get someone like Susan Collins who will be able to say. Well we broaden auden witnesses. We looked at all the evidence and we just decided he was bad with the president. Had but it didn't rise quite to the level of an offense such that we should remove him from office and that might be a way. She's able to save face but if for some reason the political winds change dramatically. Maybe John Bolton gives a dramatic testimony that shifts public opinion radically medically and you do get that twenty those twenty or so senators. Well then trump could be gone within a couple of months Jeffrey. I'm holding my breath. Thank you very much indeed. That's Jeffrey free. How it

President Trump Rudolph Giuliani Donald Trump Us Senate Ukraine United States Senator Joe Biden Vice President Jeffrey Free Congress Government Accountability Offi Ukrainian Government Susan Collins Washington Hunter Biden John Bolton Professor Of Political Science
What Clinton's Impeachment Can Teach Us About Trump's Upcoming Trial

Morning Edition

05:44 min | 9 months ago

What Clinton's Impeachment Can Teach Us About Trump's Upcoming Trial

"Lawmakers lawmakers will will come come back back to to Washington Washington DC DC next next week week and and the the next next phase phase of of the the impeachment impeachment process against president trump will start senators are still debating how the trial in the Senate will work and since we don't know it makes some sense to look back at the trial of president Clinton twenty one years ago here's Clinton talking just after his Senate trial I want to say again to the American people how profoundly sorry I am for what I said and did to trigger these events then the great burden they have imposed on the Congress and on the American people Clinton of course was impeached but acquitted so was president Andrew Johnson and it's likely to be the same with president trump constitutional scholar Kim Whaley wrote an essay in the Atlantic about why this matters she's in studio with us good morning good morning so you have raised such an interesting question is impeachment really attack on presidential power if a president has never been removed from office well it's really sort of a a matter of human nature if we are concerned about consequences for certain behavior then we check that behavior so in this moment it's still exists as a means of basically conveying to future presidents listen there's a red line and if you cross that red line they'll be consequences on to ensure that the president stays accountable to the people and not to him or herself you are concerned about what happens if they are not consequences in your racing another really interesting point you're saying the important thing is that Bill Clinton and Donald Trump when peach for different reasons Clinton was impeached for lying under oath perjury which is a crime and president trump for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress which at the moment no one is calling a crime right right so so president Clinton some of the critiques of that impeachment process war that what he did was not about abusing his office to the extent to which he sort of took advantage of a young intern that is an abuse of office but in the same way that any sort of senior person in an organization with but he was acquitted not withstanding that he was basically charged with perjury which is a crime an internal justice system for president trump we have an abuse of office but we don't have him charged in the articles of impeachment with a crime so the kind of different sides of the same coin if you cannot you you commit a crime no abuse of office your quitted you don't commit a crime at least charged with a crime and there is an abuse of office and your quitted the question becomes what's left of impeachment what what in the future is impeachable may I ask you what you think the answer to that question might be you know I eat arguably it's something like bribery treason causes are specifically listed in the constitution it's difficult to imagine even in this moment the Republican Congress convicting president trump had he then actually impeached for bribery of course obstruction Congress itself is a crime so I think going forward that's a question for Americans if because of the D. O. J. memo that you can't indict a sitting president did you just a branch is not available to base as a check on the presidency impeachments the only thing left other than an election if impeachment is basically treated as a nothing burger because nothing is impeachable then we have an office of the presidency that's really above the rule of law and then what do we do you know I'm into the constitution is he is my only guess but well amending the constitution the constitution does have an impeachment clause but a you know like anything if you don't enforce a rule if there's a ban on speeding but use but there's no consequences for speeding people were speed and we see this with the constitution we as Americans in understand if parts of what it exists are not in force we can take out our black marker and cross it out and I think impeachment in this moment is one of those questions future presidents could say at impeachment doesn't really mean anything nothing's really impeachable anymore it so political and that we have to understand means whoever's in that office regardless of party has more power and ultimately the framers understood it's human nature to abuse power if you have it one major argument against both the impeachment of president Clinton and also president trump was that it's just too partisans what people said back then they're saying it now do you think impeachment as a process is inherently flawed because it is political it in this moment it is and I don't think the process is flawed but the way it's playing out is flawed because we've got the Senate Majority Leader saying listen I'm in lockstep with the presidency we don't have Republicans in this moment in Congress committing to independent sort of measured thoughtful oversight of what's happening in the office of the presidency I'm to your prior question I think one possibility would be to create another means of checking the presidency through the criminal justice process basically passing a law that would override the DOJ internal memo saying you can't prosecute a sitting president that would probably be challenged as unconstitutional I I think in this moment the rationale for why you can't prosecute a sitting president doesn't really hold water but of course for the same reasons despite this sort of partisan Congress won't impeach this particular man I it's it's impossible to imagine that there be legislation that would come through both houses that would actually operate as a check going forward on on the presidency and with us with an account of a presidency we all are safer we every American regardless of political party needs to make sure that there are two tickets issued for speeding in the White House because that pot that office just has so much power you are a constitutional scholar and a couple seconds we have left room for optimism reason for optimism well reason for optimism if we can see you know in a in the Senate trial a thoughtful measured process that's overseen by the the Supreme Court justice the chief I think that will make it more meat meaning fall but we'll just have to see I I wish I were more optimistic to be quite honest Kim Wheatley constitutional scholar thank you

Donald Trump Washington President Trump
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

11:47 min | 9 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"When Lincoln shot at Ford's theatre shortly after the start of his second term Andrew Johnson races to be by his side while he's he's treated by doctors on his deathbed a few hours leader? Once Lincoln passed away. Andrew Johnson was sworn in as president. Didn't how does Johnson were his will but his leadership talk that he draws on. I mean you mentioned. He can be stubborn. But can you talk a little bit more about the way that he tries to get people to do what he when he wants. Unfortunately with Johnson. So much of what you think about with him is not how things worked but how things didn't work. The thing that I was then that I am struck about another people stuck about with Johnson is is how consistent he is particularly his his opinions about things that it You know all the way through. He's very consistent about he's going to do what's right as he sees it and he'll say that again and again that I would rather be right and and on an stand on principle and be voted out of office or be in the minority rather then be elected and compromise my principles and sometimes that's that's a a wonderful quality if you're on the union side during the civil war and here's this this person who is saying he was going to stick with the Union. He was again very much like Andrew Jackson. In that point of view where South Carolina's thinking about senior are having this vacation. Crisis and Jackson says the Union right or wrong. Well that's Andrew Johnson. So he he looks like a very principled stand handed person but then that same leadership quality that you can admire about him ends up being something of a detriment to him in in his interactions with Congress during the first years of reconstruction. Now we've seen conflict and drama between the president and Congress before but never quite right like this. WE'RE NOT GONNA go into all the minutia about reconstruction policies but in terms of examining Johnson's leadership. The main thrust of the conflict between him and Congress is that he has a different view about what the conditions need to be for southern states to to re enter fully into the Union. Now that the war is over at this point in Congress there are a lot of radical Republicans as they were called and some of the key things. These radicals are pushing for our voting rights for African Americans and also for the southern states that seceded to have to jump through a lot of hoops in order to be granted full status in the union again. Well at least one of these aspects Johnson Hughes pretty close is to Lincoln in that he doesn't think the state's ever legally had the right to leave the union and so he thinks how is it constitutional national to force a lot of restrictions and conditions on them. When they aren't technically being readmitted? Johnson agreed with Lincoln. No there is no such thing as state suicide that they were states in rebellion. They never stopped being states. We bring them back estates and that's that's it with some of the Republicans on the more radical Stripe Dake. They thought that the states committed suicide. And that you had to go through through a much more stringent policy for for coming back into the union but the trick of it is. Congress was in recess for the first six plus months of Johnson's presidency. So Johnson uses this time to basically come up with and start implementing his own reconstruction plan then congressman return and this long messy volleying match begins where Congress is knocking down everything that Johnson laid out that he wants to do and then Johnson in his vetoing left and right everything that Congress is starting to say that it wants to do to to be fair. Think any president was going to have a difficult time. I'm in reconstruction. It's a huge job. You're trying to bring the the sections back together again. You know not necessarily always amicably. There are the issues of African American rights to deal with. All of this is very impressive and so so I do have sympathy for Johnson. Because he really he'd only been on the job for what six weeks when I as vice president when he ousted has to take over in this difficult situation but I think the things that he does about being consistent assistant of if it's not our job to do this. I'm not GonNa do it and I'm gonNA veto. Anybody who tries to it sets him up in conflict with Congress with the radicals in a way that someone who was more flexible about seeing the grey areas would have been a little bit more savvy about how to work with the radicals articles are. And there's where I think that. Even though Lincoln would have had a difficult time getting the nation reunited that he would have found more he would have more political savvy of how to deal with interpretations of the Constitution. What is Judy is and working with Congress on that score and it? Also it doesn't help that Johnson He does have this kind of pugnaciousness about him. So for example in eighteen sixty six so Johnson is is president starting starting in April of sixty five and in sixty six. He's trying to. He's still trying to kind of shore up his his own policies and he does. What's what's called a swing around the circle tour? He's going out and campaigning for midterm elections. Trying to get more politicians into office who support his agenda. It starts out all right then along the way he starts getting heckled by the crowds and he heckles back and it's so undistinguished anguished and he's taken ulysses grant on the tour with him because grant is the most popular man in America and even grant writes home to his wife and any says. Oh this is just you know. This is disgraceful. And keep that under your hat because publicly. I have to be supportive of the president and I want to make sure that he trusts me. But you know I'm sick of these political tours. It's just a national disgrace. What's happening so Johnson doesn't necessarily always read the political signs very well and and what was supposed to be a good electioneering tour? Turns out to be a more disgraceful display because he allows himself to get drawn into these who sort of shouting matches with some of the crowds. Not only with Lincoln had more of a capacity to navigate the politics and to be more diplomatic but he likely would have had more of a commitment to promoting the rates of the roughly four million slaves who are now suddenly free after the civil war. Johnson has this sort of strange duality where he ended up strongly supporting emancipation during the war and and yet as president he decides that he's really not going to support African American men getting the right to vote or things like the Freedman's bureau which twas an agency designed to offer protections for these newly emancipated slaves on one level during the war he claims to while he's wartime. I'm governor. He actually declared a Mansa pation and any claim to be the Moses of African American people and claim to be their friend whether he was doing that out of the heat of the moment or out of political necessity but then other people will comment privately that he seemed to have an issue with with African Americans. His his secretary says there's an instance where they're out on the grounds of the White House and all he sees these are are African Americans working out on the grounds and he comments essentially have all the white men been fired or where the white men here and the secretary response or records in a way that it wasn't just a question it was more. He seemed to have an issue and we know that that he didn't necessarily stand up while he he didn't stand up for African American rights. Now again some of that is tied into his own. Ideology is that. If the Constitution doesn't provide provide the federal government with the the clear mandate to do something then and it should be left to the states in his in his mind or it should be left to the people. He's a lot of things he wants to leave to the people because they're the the basis of the Constitution of the base of government govern power so with the Freedman's bureau for example. He didn't think that the constitution allowed the war department to continue that. But no I don't think that he He had a a lot of fun feelings for African Americans. Ori Certainly did not put put their needs ahead of you know constitutional national issues. And despite his his negative feelings about planter aristocracy. He allowed them to get pardons to when the planter aristocracy Chrissy is allowed to come back into power than that's going to be a double blow for African Americans who might if they had a better advocate in the White House. Then the things might have gone a little bit differently. The other thing about Johnson Zoo's a fiscal conservative that he consistently throughout his career that he does not. I don't want the government spending money on things that he doesn't think that they have the authority to spend on so for example he didn't want the Smithsonian that James smithson gifts is this money to to to America for the increase and diffusion of knowledge and the Smithsonian Institution is is proposed and Johnson Johnson votes against it. Because not because he thinks it's a bad institution necessarily but because it might cost us money so repeatedly you can see that if anything is going to cost the government money and he doesn't think it's legitimate constitutional purpose he's going to vote against that with Many of the reconstruction acts even when they might appear to someone else to be a very either a good use of government resources or a legitimate function. He vetos it because he doesn't think it's constitutional and these things come up again and again Johnson and vetoes so many things that eventually congress just can't take it anymore and one of the things that they end up doing. is they pass a tenure of office act which basically strip the president of the power to remove certain government officeholders without the Senate's approval. Well Johnson is so mad add at this confrontation and this sort of usurp tion of his presidential right as he sees it that he decides rides. He is going to remove some of his cabinet members. Basically just to test to Congress and it's this tied up of course with all of the other issues shoes that have been going on between him in Congress that prompts the House of Representatives to impeach him in February of eighteen sixty eight this becomes the first impeachment trial in the history of the US presidency. And when he's when he's impeached because he seems to have violated.

Andrew Johnson Congress president Johnson Johnson Lincoln Union Johnson Zoo Johnson Hughes congress Andrew Jackson Ford America White House South Carolina vice president Freedman Stripe Dake James smithson
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

03:45 min | 9 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Okay so before we get too ahead of ourselves. How does this man even get to the White House first of all? He's one of the very rare president so far who did not ever become a lawyer while he had his tailoring business in Greenville. Oh he started to get involved in local politics as the town Alderman and then eventually as mayor and this is around the time that Andrew Jackson is president and and so the common man populist politics of Andrew Jackson are very much resonating with Andrew. Johnson Interestingly Johnson would later reflect that he basically got into politics because of his lack of education. Johnson said if I'd had more education patie- in my life. Or if I had more control over how I started I would have been a schoolteacher or chemist but Johnson didn't so he keeps climbing the the political ladder from Greenville's mayor to Tennessee's state legislature he then becomes a US congressman than Tennessee's governor and then finally just as civil wars breaking out he goes back to Washington to serve his first term as a US. Senator this is then how he basically gets noticed and tapped to be vice president for Lincoln's second term. Lincoln's first term vice president. Hannibal Hamlin is in. I'm going to stay on so by the election of eighteen. Sixty four. Th Republican Party is trying to find a new. VP running-mate for Lincoln. And and they're looking for someone who can help reflect the ideals on the concept of what they hope will soon be reunited nation. They end up with Andrew Johnson at center. They look to Andrew Johnson because for one thing that stubborn personality had really shown itself that his state seceded from the United States. Tennessee seceded from the Union gene and Andrew. Johnston didn't go with them. so He's a senator from Tennessee and he refuses to cede with state he's in fact the only senator senator from any southern state who stays in the Senate during the civil war back in Tennessee they hang an effigy of him. They loot his home and they basically drive his wife and his daughters. Who are still living there out of the town Johnson's refusal to leave? The Union is obviously being lambasted in the south but it is proving him to be a man of unwavering commitment to the Union to the constitution and to his own principles. So if if you're looking for a Democrat because essentially that's what he is that even though he's on a nominally Republican ticket they. They don't call themselves Republican Party. It's it's more reunion party. But here's someone who's been very consistent in terms of his democratic politics but he's going to be on the ticket because he's a southerner he had been a slave holder but he came over to the emancipation side. He refused to secede with his State. He he is very outspoken about thinking that confederates traders and that they need to be punished for for it so he seems to be a very solid union man non surly Republican in but a very solid union man and that would be an attractive ticket for eighteen sixty four trying to appeal to northern Democrats but also may be looking in terms terms of what the nation could be. If the war's one by the Union and the United States is so. That's how Johnson gets on the ticket and you. He looks like a really good choice..

Andrew Johnson Tennessee Republican Party Union Senator United States Andrew Jackson president Andrew Lincoln vice president Greenville Hannibal Hamlin White House confederates VP Johnston Washington Senate
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Resign the presidency effective bedroom combined. Dave Limb The guest you just heard talking a minute ago is Michelle shell crawl. She was on last week's episode. She's an expert in the manuscript division of the Library of Congress and so this week for episode she's going to elite us through the life and the presidency of Andrew Johnson. He was born in eighteen. O Eight in North Carolina and after Lincoln's death. He became team president from eighteen sixty five to eighteen. sixty-nine personally think with Andrew Johnson to understand him as president. Hugh half half to at least have some familiarity with his early life. So Johnson like Lincoln even more than like it actually is really a rags eggs to riches story to some degree. He's even more like his own political hero. Andrew Jackson they both had very rough starts with a father's dying young in really having to to make it on their own. His mother and father were both basically illiterate and had worked humble. Menial jobs odds that a local in in the way his father died was from getting sick after jumping in a creek to rescue two men whose boat had capsized one. One of those men was actually the editor of the Raleigh Star newspaper. Andrew Johnson was three years old at the time when his father died because his mother couldn't couldn't financially support and care for her children. She had Andrew and his brother become apprentices to a local tailor in Raleigh North Carolina. This is when Andrew was about fourteen and it's fairly similar to what we heard about with Millard. Fillmore apprentice ships. Were almost sort of an indentured servitude for her children but they were fairly common among poor families. Andrew Johnson though ends up so miserable in his that he eventually runs away. He'd had enough enough of it. He ran away with his brother and so there was actually a newspaper advertisement seeking him just as you would runaway slave having to describe him and and how much they're gonNA give for him. He and his brother hide out all by themselves for a couple years dodging capture. They never went back to working for that Taylor but they did did eventually return home to their family. Long enough for everyone to pack up and move to Greeneville Tennessee. Andrew is about seventeen years old at this point and when they get to Greenville he starts his own tailoring business. He also meets a young girl named Eliza who was the daughter of Greenville's Schumaker they get married and while Andrews working in his tailor shop sewing clothes Elisa sits there and she reads to him and teaches is him how to write and spell and she helps him understand math and basic finances because up until this point Andrew Johnson hasn't really had much of in education at all one of the things that we have here in the Johnson. Papers in the Library of Congress are early financial records words of his tailoring. So this particular page. I've pulled out page sixty which is starting in eighteen thirty three and it's a an account for Mordecai Lincoln and I pulled that one partially because Mordecai Lincoln was the man who married Johnson and his wife Eliza but Mordecai Hi Lincoln was also a cousin of Abraham Lincoln's so showing you that there's a lot of connection in early life so with this you can see he is making a suit. He's making a coat for Robert Johnson. He's he does cutting he does sewing and this is actually how he he makes a start. Miss by as a laboring being man and I think for Johnson that history was something that was really crucial to understanding him that he identified with laboring people that he understood how hell high he had risen in life he was all. He's very consistent about wanting to to do things for people like himself so when he got into Congress from eighteen forty six on. He's introducing either in the house or the Senate homestead axe so that laboring poor like himself twelve or how he had started out could get free land and be an an an asset to the country and terms of spreading agriculture sure and and and spreading settlement but also this was a way that people like himself would would have a chance to to get ahead and I think another thing that comes from those those early beginnings to that he remains very consistent with is that he has a I don't want to quite say a hatred but he has a a lot of negative feelings about aristocracy but then again on the other hand Johnson was part of that to some degree because he too was a slave holder so so he you know he had ill feelings about about an aristocratic class. That always looked down upon laboring classes like himself but then again Dan he had many of those same feelings About African Americans to and that all comes into play into his presidency.

Andrew Johnson Mordecai Hi Lincoln Andrew Library of Congress Andrew Jackson Abraham Lincoln North Carolina Dave Limb Michelle shell Congress Raleigh Star Raleigh Eliza Hugh Tennessee Greenville Senate editor Taylor Millard
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

Can He Do That?

05:10 min | 9 months ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Can He Do That?

"Hi Everyone Alison Michael's here and this week on. Can he do that. We're doing something a little different as you probably know by now how. President trump is just the third president in American history to be impeached and the forced to face impeachment proceedings. And my colleague Lilian Cunningham knows all about out those three other presidents. She created the posts presidential podcast which spent almost a year going back through American history to examine the life and legacy of each and every American president. That of course includes presidents Andrew Johnson Johnson Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton this week. We're going to share those original presidential episodes about the only three other presidents to fees impeachment proceedings. But I I wanted to talk to lily about the president or podcast Lily welcomed. Can he do that. Thanks longtime listener first-time guests on under show. It's true longtime colleague. I guess so. You may the presidential podcast back in two thousand sixteen for our listeners. Who aren't familiar with it? Tell us about that project. Sure so presidential. Was this big audio project that I did. In the most recent presidential election year and and the idea I had was to chronicle the Ark of American presidential history by going through and doing an episode on each each American President one a week starting in January twenty sixteen all the way up through election day so easy ever right forty four episodes forty four for weeks forty four presidents and to create those episodes I interviewed a historians and journalists biographers and the result was is this massive group of forty four episodes that look into each of the president's lives and then their legacies while they were in the Oval Office. And of course you know I created created this back in two thousand sixteen but the episodes are kind of timeless and we've been finding people are still discovering them and using them as resource to to better understand. US presidential history so the episode. We're going to play for. Can he do listeners. Today is about President Andrew Johnson right so Johnson Johnson was of course the first American President who was impeached and that was back in eighteen sixty eight so he was. Abraham Lincoln's Vice President End Lincoln was assassinated Andrew. Johnson took office and only a few years into being president himself faced impeachment by Congress. I think it's so interesting to hear. The story of WHO this man was how he became president and then of course what caused congress alternately. Think for the first time in history that we might need to remove if this man from office. We're GONNA play the whole Johnson episode here now but where can listeners. Find all of your other presidential episodes they can find them on any of the A podcast platforms apple goal stitcher spotify or they can go to the Washington Post site go to Washington Post Dot com slash presidential. And you'll find all forty four. The episodes all right here from Lily's presidential podcast is the story of Andrew. Johnson's life. Welcome Tierney the Andrew Johnson episode of presidential. If you listen to the previous episode about Lincoln you'll remember how one of the things we talked about the power and beauty of Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural address the one that goes with malice toward none with charity for all. It's one of the most famous speeches in American history. So you might have been sitting there listening to the episode and thinking you know. What would it have been like to witness that Momentus? Second inauguration of Lincoln's in eighteen sixty five well Would have been interesting because right before. Lincoln gave that speech his new Vice President Andrew Johnson gave his own address and he was absolutely absolutely horrendously drunk so Johnson Johnson gets up for his swearing in for his speech. And it's kind of embarrassing at one point. He's he's talking to the various cabinet members and he points to seward and Stanton and he looks at Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles and he can't remember his name him and he talks says now. WHO's the secretary of the navy? Oh yeah you and you know. It's just it's not. It's not an auspicious start for for for Johnson. It's an as vice president. A senator from Michigan. He he writes to his wife and he says something to the effect of you know if there had been a whole nearby would have crawled into six weeks later. Johnson is suddenly and surprisingly the actual president of the United States. I am William Cunningham with the Washington Post and this is the seventeenth episode of presidential.

President Andrew Johnson Andrew Johnson Johnson Richard Vice President End Lincoln president President Vice President President trump Johnson Lilian Cunningham Washington Post Bill Clinton Lily Oval Office United States Alison Michael Congress Washington William Cunningham Michigan
Bill Taylor testifies on Ukraine aid delay and Republicans react

America in the Morning

02:38 min | 1 year ago

Bill Taylor testifies on Ukraine aid delay and Republicans react

"A career diplomat testified into the evening to three house committees considering impeachment White House correspondent Bob Constantini has details still Taylor of the highest ranking US diplomat in Ukraine now delivered a fifteen page opening statement indeed he talked of an official diplomatic channel and it unofficial one featuring Rudy guiliani Taylor described in detail how he eventually came to realize military aid being held up by the trump administration was ordered stopped by president trump one down the chain via chief of staff Mick Mulvaney in his statement Taylor talks of how he learned that everything meaning the military assistance and the desired meeting at the White House by Ukraine's president was contingent envelope Amir's Lynskey making a public statement that Ukraine was going to investigate a conspiracy theory involving the Democratic Party and former vice president Joe Biden and his son hunter as Taylor was quoted in text messages released last month misstatement reiterates he thought it was quote crazy to withhold security assistance for help with a political campaign one phrase used to describe what Taylor is alleging is that president trump wanted someone ski to clear things up Democrats leading the hearing think one thing is clear there was a quid pro quo Eric Swalwell is a member of the intelligence committee if I hear any drop literally as the ambassador laid out his opening statement taking to Twitter president trump delivers a distraction the president seems resigned to being impeached based on comments and this tweet he hopes Democrats will take as a warning so some day if a Democrat becomes president and the Republicans in the house even by a tiny margin they can impeach the president without due process or fairness or any legal rights all Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here a lynching reaction was swift especially from black democratic house members including James Clyburn of South Carolina Andrew Johnson never describe what was happening to him this way and Sir Bill Clinton didn't know that Nixon this president is hopefully an anomaly Republicans generally say they wouldn't have used the word lynching history in our country I would not compare this to ensuring that was unfortunate choice of words that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell though South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham agrees with Mr trump's analogy when this about trump cares about process long as you get it yeah this is a lynching and every census is on America the White House and deputy press secretary Hogan Gidley out to do damage control in a spirited give and take with reporters he has used many words to describe the way he's been relentlessly attacked and ninety three percent of the news coverage against him is negative

James Clyburn Press Secretary Senate South Carolina Twitter Chief Of Staff Official Hogan Gidley America Mr Trump Senator Lindsey Graham Mitch Mcconnell Nixon Sir Bill Clinton Andrew Johnson White House Correspondent Eric Swalwell Hunter
Presidential historian explains impeachment process

The Takeaway

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Presidential historian explains impeachment process

"With the speaker of the house Nancy Pelosi backing an impeachment inquiry into president trump we started wondering about other presidents who've been impeached president Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton were both impeached by the house of representatives and eventually acquitted by the Senate here's Chief Justice William Rehnquist back in nineteen ninety nine it is therefore ordered in a judge that the said William Jefferson Clinton be any hereby is acquitted of the charges in this that articles president Richard Nixon resigned in nineteen seventy four before the house could impeach him I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow joining me now to walk us through all this history is John Meachem presidential historian Pulitzer Prize winning author and co author of the twenty eighteen book impeachment in American history welcome to the takeaway John thanks so much let's start with the way that impeachment came into our constitution what was the intent behind article two section four of the constitution which spells out impeachment it was a tend to eat at yet another check and balance to what was a document that is James Madison put it was designed to make ambition counter act and dish the sense was that there had to be some check on a wall was president you can be impeached for bribery treason or other high crimes and misdemeanors the phrase from the English common law it's undefined as Gerald Ford later said a high crime misdemeanors whatever the house of representatives decides at a given point it is

Andrew Johnson Bill Clinton Senate Richard Nixon Pulitzer Prize James Madison President Trump Gerald Ford Nancy Pelosi Chief Justice William Rehnquis John Meachem Bribery
A legal expert analyzes the impeachment process

99% Invisible

04:48 min | 1 year ago

A legal expert analyzes the impeachment process

"First. Let's distinguish a criminal prosecution from impeachment the Constitution specifies. How certain federal officials including including the president and vice president can be impeached or removed from office? The House of Representatives decides whether to issue articles of impeachment these are formal accusations accusations if it thinks that the person has committed treason bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors once that happens the Senate presides over the trial of the person being impeached. No all the sounds like a criminal prosecution but it really isn't impeachment is different because of the outcome of a Senate connection. The person is removed from office. That's it no other consequences now. An actual criminal prosecution of course carries with it a lot of possible very serious. This consequences prison fines probation things like that. No one argues about whether the constitution itself considers the president subject to impeachment who's right there in black and white article two of the Constitution specifically names the president as one of those people who can be subjected to impeachment conviction fiction and removal. We've never seen the whole process happened before but presidents. Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton came pretty close both were impeached by the House House and tried by the Senate Nixon of course resigned in nineteen seventy four after the House Judiciary Committee approved three articles of impeachment but before the house us as a whole voted on them now what about the criminal prosecution of a president while a vice president can clearly be prosecuted and in fact they have been. It's not quite clear that the president himself could be now if you look at the text of the Constitution itself. There's nothing there that says a president. President is immune from criminal prosecution. The closest thing that exists in the constitution's text is actually about impeachment in article three section three three it says that the person removed by impeachment shall nevertheless be liable and subject to indictment trial judgment and punishment according according to law so what most people think this means is that a person who's been impeached can also be prosecuted separately but it doesn't answer the specific question of whether they're a sitting president you know someone who still in office can be criminally prosecuted whether impeached or not the supreme court has never decided a case that resolves this question what what we do have instead our legal memos written during both the Clinton and Nixon presidencies that give us some opinions on the subject. They're not binding and the way that a supreme court the case would be but because they were written to provide official guidance. They're still pretty useful. In one thousand nine hundred eighty eight independent counsel Kenneth Starr asked Ronald Rotunda a well known conservative law professor an expert on constitutional law to write a memo on whether a sitting President Clinton of course could be prosecuted. Rotunda responded with a fifty six page legal memo. It's basic point was yes. Yes a sitting president can be prosecuted. Rotunda thought that the president could delay imprisonment but not the prosecution itself you know but there's an important qualifier to rotunda memo. He said he was analyzing president. Clinton's Clinton's very specific situation. Keep in mind. Clinton was ultimately impeached for obstruction of justice and perjury relating to the Paula Jones case this. This was a case that had nothing to do with the presidency itself. Rotunda was saying Yup Clinton can be criminally prosecuted for those things to in fact Rotunda made Ada clear and said I express no opinion as to whether the federal government could indict a president for allegations that involve his official duties as president and then there's Nixon who ultimately resigned because of the Watergate scandal this of course involve the president trying to cover up the scandal in nineteen seventy three the office of Legal Counsel in the Justice Department prepared illegal memo that concluded that the president was immune from criminal prosecution while in office. I can see why Nixon in one that opinion out there in March of nineteen seventy four grand jury handed down indictments. These are formal charges against seven. White House aides regarding Watergate now President President Nixon was named as an Unindicted Co Conspirator. That term refers to a person who's alleged in an indictment to have engaged in a conspiracy. That's an agreement meant to do something illegal but that person's not personally charged in the Indictment Special Watergate prosecutor Leon worse kfi advise the jury that in his view a president doesn't could not be prosecuted in these circumstances in another memo dated August Ninth Nineteen Seventy four the same day that Nixon resigned Gysky Gorski

President Trump President President Nixon President Clinton Vice President Ronald Rotunda Senate House Of Representatives House House Fact Rotunda White House House Judiciary Committee Bribery Official Andrew Johnson Kenneth Starr Paula Jones Federal Government Justice Department Prosecutor
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"And yet he also supported emancipation right he he he was forced to I mean basically Lincoln who is this kind of master craftsman. When it came to politics got him in a position where he had to in a certain sense I mean because he was military governor Lincoln appointed military governor of Tennessee see and and Lincoln basically said don't you think it would be great for propaganda value and so forth zone what sugars impeachment what does he do what finally hires the Republicans and try to get moot remove him from one thing? That's interesting think about this for today. In a certain sense is that especially the radicals have been trying for a while in other words. This didn't happen overnight. It was Kinda. Slow burn and there were votes. The impeachment went into the Judiciary Committee for an investigation. They voted against it. Then they voted fourth in the House voted against it so nothing really was happening until Johnson actually violated a law in the law he violated had been passed to protect the white southerners. There's and African Americans who were given voting rights in the south by the Republican Congress and because there had been so much violence in the south perpetrated by white people against danced what were called you know White Republicans or loyalists and all blacks that Congress acted in such a way as to divide the south into military zones and send the military down to the South to protect act those people when they went to the polls right. This is a very kind of modern thing in a certain sense and in charge of the military was U._S.. Grant and Edwin Stanton was the secretary of war so congress than new that Johnson was firing people left and right they wanted to protect stanton. They passed the tenure of Office Act which protected a civil officer Lyco cabinet member who'd been approved by the Senate so if you've been approved by the Senate you're firing had to similarly be approved the Senate that was all the law was Johnson violated the law and then once you actually do that thumb your nose at Congress then the sort of lukewarm Republicans those who hadn't been very excited about impeachment thing he was a bridge too far finally. They said we can't tell this anymore and they voted overwhelmingly to impeach Andrew Johnson that was in February eighteen sixty eight. I mean lost a lot of democratic support as well and he has been very little Democrat support. By that time because by that time he'd been campaigning this this blows your mind to he'd been campaigning against the Fourteenth Amendment Campaign Against the Fourteenth Amendment he he had vetoed civil rights legislation he vetoed legislation left and right congress past these vetoes but to enshrine just to enshrine citizenship in due process the Fourteenth Amendment Johnson stood against it in the Democrats is on partisan. Just say you're for it. Just just you know cool yourself Alpha little bit so that you can be more politically savvy. He wouldn't do it so most articles of impeachment that we're voting on eighteen sixty five were about the tenure vilely violation which by the way the Supreme Court later found was unconstitutional..

Andrew Johnson governor Lincoln Republican Congress Senate congress Edwin Stanton Judiciary Committee Tennessee Supreme Court Alpha secretary Grant officer cabinet member
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"South right I mean with trying to protect trying to protect them in in the simplest way to start which is just citizenship never mind voting rights which becomes kind of you know in a contested form never mind the confiscation of the land of the planters the white southerners where these people had worked in sort of dividing it up and giving you know redistributing the wealth in that sounds never mind all of the basic right of due process of citizenship which ultimately became the fourteenth amendment. That's what they stood for and what's interesting to me is that in a sense from my point of view they were visionaries you know they're they're. They seem so contemporary say to Mike exactly this before and I and I want you to back up and just tell the story of <hes> Andrew Johnson his rise to power and then the impeachment but I was saying to Mike before the podcast what's so extraordinary. Sorry about some of these radical Republicans thaddeus Stevens throw sumner is that if you transpose their words with some of the Progressives today the language might be a little more ornate but it's essentially the same words same sentiments and it's amazing how forward thinking they were. I know but let's talk about Andrew Johnson was he. Where did he come from? How did he what we know how we rose to the presidency but what was political rise and then we'll talk about about <hes> what he did to inspire the action that the Congress ultimately took yeah well what's interesting? There are two things interesting about Johnson one is he was really very poor. He came from as much or as worse in a sense poverty already that we associated with Lincoln in the log cabin and all that but Johnson as boy was <hes> was apprenticed out he became an indentured servant which is only one's wrong. I mean it's an important wrong but it's a wrong about slavery which means that he is owned by the person that he's farmed out to which happened to be Taylor. It's where he learned his trade so he really came from absolute poverty. In the sense he ran away. There was a wanted sign as if he had been a fugitive of sorts swords and he worked his way up into politics which was in a sense away for white person white male to change class and he was able to do that. He had some money and in fact when he got some money he actually went. Pau Slaves is a kind of mark of his rise in status. Even though the plant or the aristocracy would never accept him so that's one aspect the other aspect. It's so interesting about him. To all of us really is that he is the only only United States senator from the South who stood up and opposed secession which if you WANNA profile and courage strangely enough is very courageous thing to do. I mean when you think of the sort of known senators at the time like Jefferson Davis. They were horrified that Johnson said in no uncertain terms. I'm against secession. You know this is it will destroy the Union. I am for the Union at I love the constitution so he was reviled in the South and he was beloved in the North and in fact he was considered what was called a war Democrat was a different party than Lincoln's so when sort of fast forwarding when Lincoln <hes> was afraid he was actually afraid in eighteen sixty four that he would be not elected he wanted to sort of what we think of. Today is balanced the ticket because Lincoln's first vice president was someone else Hannibal Double Hannibal's but he was. He's a good guy. It was a good guy but he was a Republican Republican and he was in his anti-slavery had all the right things but but he didn't bring anything new to the ticket so if you want a southern Democrat especially if you're running against big general McClellan in you weren't winning the war at the time things change you put Andrew Johnson on the ticket so and and you know like everyone <hes> even. During wartime even Lincoln didn't really think he was going to be killed. nope presidents have been assassinated and an an a vice president is innocuous. So that's John Price President what does he do you get the ire of actually starts in Congress well. Everybody's happy every you know. It's a it's a smooth transition of power. You just had a war. You've got a dead president. You know shot by southern. It's awful time is very smooth transition. He keeps the cabinet he said I'm against treason so everybody.

Andrew Johnson Lincoln Taylor vice president senator thaddeus Stevens Congress Mike president first vice president Jefferson Davis United States sumner Union Hannibal McClellan John Price
"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

Skullduggery

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on Skullduggery

"She writes and Johnson's impeachment was a noble endeavour to write grievous wrongs and horrific abuses being inflicted on an oppressed minority party with all is in Washington this week on former special counsel Robert Muller's upcoming testimony and with as many as eighty Democrats now demanding that the House Judiciary Committee opened up impeachment proceedings against trump. We'll look back in America's his first impeachment on this episode of buried treasure because people have gotta know whether or not their president's while I'm not a crook I told the American people I did not trade arms for hostile to my heart to my best intentions still tell me that's true but the facts and the evidence tell me it is not I did not have sexual relations without him. There will be no allies lives. We will honor the American people with the Truth and nothing else we now have with us. Brenda wine apple the author of the impeach the trial of Andrew Johnson and the dream of just nation Brenda wine apple welcomed to buried treasure. Thank you great to be here. I'm so there's so much to talk about in your book. It's really an incredibly compelling read need but I want to start off with the obvious question what prompted you to want to research and write the a history of the Andrew Johnson impeachment now and was it inspired acquired by any current occupant of the Oval Office. I began the book six years ago. The idea of trump was not even a bad dream that point there was no way anybody could have imagined he she would be the next president. We were deepen the Obama administration and if anything I thought if there's going to be an impeachment coming people would try to impeach Hillary Clinton. Why not you know in because so many people hated her so so yeah well they did another story so keep it in the family but in any event so when I started it had nothing to do really with current events at all it was to me an event in American history that I knew little about out and I thought if I'm a fairly you know fairly literate person? I'm a fairly well educated person. How is it that I don't know anything really about this? Major event. It's the first ever presidential impeachment and what's even more significant significant and strange about it occurs you know really on the heels of the first ever presidential assassination which itself occurs on the heels of a terrible civil war so I imagine what was going on in the country. How could that happen at that particular time and I didn't know the answers to those questions and I didn't know the answers to the question of why didn't know about and so that's what started me and so when you started to read up on that event? What did you learn about what the historical narrative was at that particular moment in how it was interpreted over the years by scholars well there too? There's a kind of popular way of interpreting in the scholarly way and actually they're pretty much the same in they converge in John Kennedy's profiles encourage which came out in the late fifties was I don't know how it must have sold very well but it was a Pulitzer Prize winner an obviously Kennedy went on to win the presidency residency perhaps partly on the wave of that book among other things in that with a lot of heavy lifting by writing a book which is the subject of litigation former former editor Evan. Thomas told US oh when his father was the editor of the book. Oh no kidding oh my gosh it was actually deposed as part of the lawsuit between Kennedy and Drew Pearson. Intimated that book written by Kennedy Yeah as far as we know he did write his college thesis which was published into a book and did very well. I think it was nine while England slap door while England sir thank you anyway we digress. That's okay caster fascinated <hes> so there's a significant chapter in that about a man named Edmund Ross is more or less loss to history..

Andrew Johnson president John Kennedy Hillary Clinton Robert Muller House Judiciary Committee Edmund Ross Brenda wine America special counsel Washington editor apple England Pulitzer Prize Obama administration Oval Office Drew Pearson Thomas
Referee who told wrestler to cut dreadlocks claims defamation

Pat Farnack

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Referee who told wrestler to cut dreadlocks claims defamation

"It didn't take long for the video to spread all over social media, showing Buta high wrestler. Andrew Johnson reluctantly having his dreadlocks cut. He'd been told by referee. Alan Moloney that he'd have to forfeit his match. Otherwise, new court filings now indicate Maloney is. Planning to sue for emotional distress character defamation and a one hundred thousand dollar loss in income. He hasn't officiated at all since that match in December as it's still being investigated. Baloney also tries to defend himself in the document claiming he fairly applied the rules governing. A wrestling match the filing names twelve possible. Defendants everyone from Yuna high's. Athletic director to school board members to officials in the state's high school sports governing organization Johnson's lawyer speaking with the Philadelphia Inquirer calls the filing

Andrew Johnson Maloney Alan Moloney Philadelphia Inquirer Buta Director One Hundred Thousand Dollar
Buehner Regional School District, New Jersey And New Jersey High School discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Buehner Regional School District, New Jersey And New Jersey High School discussed on Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

"A New Jersey high school referee who ordered a student athlete to cut off his dreadlocks in order to wrestle is now filing a defamation lawsuit. The buehner regional school district. In New Jersey announcing that it's not going to send any of its sports teams future events officiated by Alan Moloney. After he reportedly told wrestler Andrew Johnson during a match in December. He had to cut his hair or on the spot or forfeit Maloney since has been barred from officiating any meets pending investigations by the states Interscholastic Athletic Association, and the division of civil rights the courier post in New Jersey is reporting the wrestling official, Ellen Maloney has filed a torch notice. That sets his right to sue a dozen defendants, including the district, the high school's athletic director and the wrestling coach, plus the Interscholastic federation.

Buehner Regional School Distri New Jersey New Jersey High School Alan Moloney Ellen Maloney Interscholastic Athletic Assoc Andrew Johnson Interscholastic Federation Wrestling Director Official
Referee who told wrestler to cut dreadlocks claims defamation

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Referee who told wrestler to cut dreadlocks claims defamation

"Seven south jersey, high school wrestling referee, who is at the center of a controversy involving a wrestler's dreadlocks is preparing to file a lawsuit. Here's WCBS reporter, Steve burns character defamation emotional distress a hundred thousand dollars loss in income. That's what south jersey high school wrestling referee al-din baloney says he's been subject to ever since a ruling he made went viral last December eight till a high wrestler, Andrew Johnson, either cut his dreadlocks or forfeit his match Johnson complied and went onto win Maloney's naming twelve possible defendants in his court filing. Including officials at the school end in the school district and the state's high school sports governing body bolognaise filing. According to the Philadelphia Inquirer claims he properly performed his duties as the referee and fairly applied the rules baloney hasn't officiated any matches since the incident it's still being investigated by New Jersey's Interscholastic Athletic Association, and the state attorney general's

South Jersey High School Andrew Johnson Steve Burns Philadelphia Inquirer New Jersey Interscholastic Athletic Assoc Reporter Maloney Attorney Hundred Thousand Dollars
Black wrestler's lawyer says referee's lateness led to haircut

24 Hour News

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Black wrestler's lawyer says referee's lateness led to haircut

"The attorney representing the parents of a local wrestler forced to cut his dreadlocks is calling out the referee for not showing up on time nor raising a red flag about the wrestlers hair. This is the viral video of Andrew Johnson moments before a match last week referee. Alan Moloney ordered the regional wrestler to cut his locks or forfeit. Maloney said Johnson's hair cover was not sufficient some believe the referee's decision was an act of racism Melania's white Johnson is black Johnson's parents released. This statement through their attorney saying, quote, the Sook scholastic wrestling rules, clearly state that the referees to inspect wrestlers appearance and determine any roles or violations prior to the start of the meet the referee here was late to the meat and missed wayans when he did a valuate Andrew he failed to raise any issues. New Jersey's governing body for high school sports says the division of civil rights is investigating. It's been recommended Maloney, not be assigned to any event until the matter matter has been.

Andrew Johnson Maloney Attorney Alan Moloney Scholastic Wrestling New Jersey Wayans Melania
High school wrestler forced to cut off dreadlocks or forfeit match

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

High school wrestler forced to cut off dreadlocks or forfeit match

"Eight hundred the New Jersey high school wrestling referee who forced a black wrestler to cut his dreadlocks before a match has now been banned for matches involving that school district escorting to the daily news. Alan Maloney, who is white was wrapping a match in the Buena regional school district. It's in south jersey, and he determined that the wrestler. Andrew Johnson could not use a cover for his treads. So we may Johnson cut them off Johnson won the match the state's Interscholastic Athletic Association is now investigating Maloney has been criticized by governor Phil Murphy in the states chapter of the. The ACLU for what happened. They're calling it racist. Meanwhile, the national federation of state high school association says there are rules regarding hair length and hair covers for wrestlers. And that the nature of the incident is still being

Alan Maloney Andrew Johnson Buena Regional School District National Federation Of State H New Jersey High School Interscholastic Athletic Assoc Aclu Phil Murphy
Abuna Regional High School, Jordan Burroughs And Burrow discussed on Bill Handel

Bill Handel

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Abuna Regional High School, Jordan Burroughs And Burrow discussed on Bill Handel

"Years. A high school wrestler wins a match, but loses some hair. Fox's Derek Dennis reports tough choice for high school wrestler. Kutcher dreadlocks or forfeit the match wrestler. Andrew Johnson Abuna regional high school in New Jersey complied submitting to the impromptu courtside haircut just to keep competing, but was visibly distraught. Still he won the match his ordeal catching the attention of Olympic champion wrestler. Jordan Burroughs who called what happened to the high schooler and abuse of power racism and just plain negligence also wondered where were the parents in school staff to intervene burrow, says he's never seen anything like it in a quarter century

Abuna Regional High School Jordan Burroughs Burrow Derek Dennis Kutcher Andrew Johnson FOX New Jersey
High school wrestler forced to cut off dreadlocks or forfeit match

WCBS Programming

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

High school wrestler forced to cut off dreadlocks or forfeit match

"To find. Now. A referee told a New Jersey high school wrestler that he could not participate in a match unless he cut off his dreadlocks. Now the referees accused of racism, Wayne a regional high school student. Andrew Johnson stoically submitted to the impromptu haircut. He went on then to win his match CBS reports that the rules of the match state here shall not extend below the top of a shirt collar, the air lobe, or

New Jersey High School Andrew Johnson CBS Wayne
Ex-Congresswoman who voted to impeach Nixon: Trump firing Sessions brings back troubling memories

Democracy Now

11:56 min | 2 years ago

Ex-Congresswoman who voted to impeach Nixon: Trump firing Sessions brings back troubling memories

"That gives Democrats subpoena power for the first time since President Donald Trump was elected two years ago a day after the election, Trump fired attorney general Jeff Sessions Trump's firing of sessions has led to many comparisons between Trump and former president Richard Nixon on Wednesday CNN's Jake tapper cold sessions ouster another chapter in quote, a slow motion multi-month Saturday night massacre. He was referencing the infamous Saturday night massacre in nineteen Seventy-three when then attorney general Elliot Richardson, and his deputy resigned after president Richard Nixon ordered Richardson to fire the special prosecutor investigating the Watergate scandal for more. We continue our conversation with Elizabeth thoughts. C'mon. Former US congresswoman from New York, she served on the House Judiciary committee that voted to impeach Richard Nixon for over forty years. She had the record of being the young woman ever elected to congress. Her new book the case for impeaching Trump is out Monday still with us. David Cole national legal director for the American Civil Liberties union, so the Saturday night massacre. I mean as you were watching this unfold yet yesterday, Liz, you must have. It must be you must have been flooded with memories. Oh, yeah. And it's not just happy memories is very troubling memories. In fact, you can say that you get you know, tangling up and down your spine from the repetition here. What what triggered Richard Nixon's impeachment was his view that he was above the law, and particularly that he could not be held accountable. He and his staff and his colleagues accountable under the criminal law. So when the special prosecutor. Asked for his tapes, Nixon had White House tapes and the tapes could prove whether or not he had ordered a cover up. Nixon said, no, you're not getting the tapes, and you're going to be fired and the American and he ordered the special prosecutor fired the America, and to the attorney general resigned deputy attorney general resigned, and then Robert Bork's number three fired at the American people. Understood what was going on. They knew that the tapes could prove whether the whether the president of the United States had engaged in a cover up or whether John dean who led she'd been involved in the cover-up was lying who was telling the truth. They understood this, and they said congress you have to do something about it. And these were tapes that Richard Nixon had secretly ordered himself the thing of the White House. Correct. And so at that point the impeachment Corey started, we didn't know exactly where it was going to go. But that's when it started. And right now you have. The president of the United States who had weighed deliberately till after the midterm election. So it would have no adverse political impact on him to fire the turn general the United States. Why did he fire him? There's nothing that as Mr. call set has nothing that sessions did that was contrary to his political view. I mean, political agenda the president's political views or political agenda, except then he wouldn't take control and he wouldn't oversee and he wouldn't supervise and he wouldn't interfere with Muller's investigation. And that was a NASA to this president because this president just like Nixon wants to control the criminal process that's gonna take place against him and his friends, and that is if we go down that road, we're becoming a banana Republic that's not the United States of America where a country that's committed to the rule of law and the president cannot put his finger on the thumb on the scale his thumb on the scale of Justice. That's. Not going to happen. And if it does happen, then God helped merica, well, independent Senator Bernie Sanders has warned that any attempt at obstruction on Trump's part of -struction of the Russia probe would be an impeachable offense. He tweeted Wednesday, quote, any attempt by the president or the Justice department to interfere with Muller's probe would be an obstruction of Justice and an impeachable offense goes no question about that. That was the firing of by Richard Nixon. Of Archibald Cox special prosecutor to stop and squelch that investigation was one of the grants, but the impeachment vote against Richard Nixon. So it may not you don't even need to go much farther. I think than even the appointment of Mr. Whittaker because it seems a parent that Mr. Whitaker is there for one purpose, which is to control an interfere with this investigation. And that turns out to be an congress can investigate that. And if it turns out that the purpose was to interfere with this investigation that in and of itself becomes not only basis for becomes the basis for the removal and impeachment of Donald Trump. So Liz Holzman last week the national archives released documents from the Watergate scandal, including new information relating to the indictment against president Richard Nixon the draft documents known as the Watergate roadmap show plans to charge Nixon with bribery conspiracy. Obstruction of Justice and obstruction of a cr-. Criminal investigation. Nixon was never charged with crimes though, a number of his aides were and someone to jail the documents were released after a lawsuit requested they'd be made public citing their relevance for special counsel Robert Muller, if he decides to issue a report to congress as part of the ongoing probe into whether the Trump campaign colluded with alleged Russian meddling in the two thousand sixteen election. So talk about you know, well, what this indictment was of Richard Nixon. Well, let's just make one point Richard Nixon was named by the grand jury as an unindicted co-conspirator. That is the only time that's ever happened in the history of the United States. So the grand jury wanted to indict Richard Nixon this wasn't a hypothetical draft indictment. The grand jury said we want to indict Richard Nixon. They were told by the special prosecutor, you can indicted sitting president I don't necessarily agree with that. And so as an alternative they issued this they charged him as being an unindicted co-conspirator. But yes, the the roadmap pointed to these were criminal charges that we're going to be made against the president of the United States. And the supporting evidence impeachment is not a criminal proceeding impeachment is a civil proceeding by congress to preserve and restore our democracy doesn't require criminal standard of proof. It doesn't require any of the trappings of a criminal proceeding. What its purposes is to take a president who is a threat to democracy. And remove that president from office. That's what the framers put impeachment into the constitution for. And that's why the House Judiciary committee voted to impeach Richard Nixon in part because he obstructed the investigation into the break into the Watergate hotel complex, the Democratic National Committee headquarters and Donald Trump has done has tried to interfere with this investigation. He hasn't succeeded in in derailing, it he hasn't succeeded in stopping it. But he's put Whitaker. They're clearly the appearances to shut it down. And what does that mean? What if Whitaker shut it down or starved at a funds? What does Muller need to have in place now, and what would happen if he were fired could the indictments be made public? If there are some already sealed. Well, it's a very interesting question as to what would happen. I think we would have a national crisis. First of all if the American people. At that point don't rise up to protect our democracy. Then maybe nothing can preserve it. Because that's what happened in Watergate. The American people force congress Democrats who are in control Republican president. But the Democrats didn't wanna bring impeachment proceedings, Eric and people force them to do that. That's the critical point. Why didn't they because they were in a way? I mean, this is a very critical issue. I mean, Nancy Pelosi who said she's gonna write for house speaker Guinness famously said impeachment is off the table because it's an unknown process because the first time the congress ever did an impeachment of the president was against Andrew Johnson. And that was done in a partisan way. And it left a historical taint. We did the Nixon impeachment process. We did it in a bipartisan way, we did it in a fair way that should have given the American people a sense at this process works to preserve democracy. But then we had the Clinton impeachment which was again abusive power as as Andrew Johnson impeachment was, but the issue is the I I don't really I wasn't privy to why the speaker of the house and the majority leader Dempo Democrats did not want to proceed with impeachment proceedings until. The Saturday night massacre. I think it's because they just didn't know what was going to happen. The preceding itself was you know, had bad taint, historically, and they didn't have the public was gonna react. No, really take down president, Richard Nixon. Unlike Trump who squeaked through as in his election. Richard Nixon was elected with one of the biggest landslides in American history one thousand nine hundred ninety two nine hundred seventy two so for an impeachment to take place you'd have to change the minds of a majority of American voters, Democrats were sure that could ever happen. So they were worried about the political consequences for themselves instead of thinking about the country. But the American people demanded they said, congress you've got to protect our democracy, and congress did we didn't take knows camp before we started. We didn't even know what when I I remember we started the impeachment proceedings. Nobody even knew at a high crime and misdemeanor as what's the standard for impeachment. None of us had studied this. What happened in the end, why Nixon left Richard Nixon left because the House Judiciary committee proceeding in a nickel? Fair transparent open and bipartisan fashion voted that. He engaged in impeachable offenses, and ultimately every single Republican on the committee, initially when we voted there about eleven twelve Republicans who'd enjoin we had seven or eight who did. They when when there was a tape recording that was released that showed Nixon himself orchestrating the cover up from the very beginning. All the Republicans joined with all the Democrats and saying Richard Nixon should be impeached, including the most conservative at that point the handwriting was on the wall. It was cleared every single member of the House Judiciary committee, including conservative Republicans and conservative southern Democrats supported impeachment. The house is going to support impeachment overwhelmingly, and he would be removed vote convicted in the Senate and removed and he saw the handwriting on the wall. He didn't want that humiliation. It was bad enough that he had to resign became the first American president to resign. But it was because the process was fair open and won the respect of the American people many of home. Most of whom it's supported Richard Nixon in the election just a year and a half before. So it can be done. So Richard Nixon resigned and didn't get impeached. No. There was a vote to impeach in the House Judiciary committee. That was enough for Richard Nixon to get the message. He had to get out because otherwise he'd be forcibly removed by the house full house and the Senate. Well, let's go back to two sessions replacement. Matthew, Whitaker

Richard Nixon President Trump President Donald Trump Congress House Judiciary Committee United States Prosecutor Robert Muller Mr. Whitaker Liz Holzman American Civil Liberties Union Attorney White House David Cole CNN Jake Tapper America Elizabeth
Bill Clinton, Michelle Nap and President discussed on Retirement 360

Retirement 360

03:22 min | 2 years ago

Bill Clinton, Michelle Nap and President discussed on Retirement 360

"Now, a look back at this week in history this week in one thousand nine hundred thirty six harnessing the power of the mighty Colorado. River the Hoover dam begins sending electricity over transmission lines. Spanning two hundred sixty six miles of mountains and deserts to run the lights radios and stoves of Los Angeles this week in nineteen fifty six New York Yankees right hander Don Larsen pitches. The first no hitter in the history of the World Series, even better. It was a perfect game. That is there were no runs no hits. And no errors. And no batters reached first base Larssen's performance anchored. His team's third straight win against their crosstown rivals. The Brooklyn Dodgers this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty two eighteen year old Michelle nap is watching television inner parents living room in Peekskill New York when she hears a thunderous crash in the driveway. She went outside to find a sizable hole on the rear end of her car. A matching hole in the gravel driveway underneath the car and in the whole a bowling ball size. Meteorite? While meteorites are fairly common. Meteorite hitting a car is not a car is after all very small object on a very large planet. In fact, as far as scientists know it has only happened twice before once in Illinois during the nineteen thirties and once in Saint Louis and this week in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight the US house of representatives votes to proceed towards impeaching President Bill Clinton on charges of perjury and obstruction of Justice by December nine hundred ninety eight the Republican led house had gathered enough information from an investigation committee vote in favor of impeachment which in turn sent the case to the Senate. Bill Clinton was the first president to be impeached by the house of representatives since Andrew Johnson in eighteen sixty eight Johnson was also acquitted. That's your look back at this week in history. I times the most iconic brand in the booming cannabis industry. Just went public joined the IPO now high times investor dot com. Don't miss your chance to be part of history in the making visit high times investor dot com. That's high times investor dot com. Hi

Bill Clinton Michelle Nap President Trump Hoover Dam New York Yankees Don Larsen Andrew Johnson Brooklyn Dodgers Los Angeles Colorado Bowling Larssen Peekskill Cannabis Perjury Saint Louis United States
"andrew johnson" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on We The People

"Thanks so much for that uh well uh the e the consensus of uh the committee was that obstruction was the strongest claim for nixon it was similarly the strongest claim for clinton so uh keith can you remind us what the impeachment charges against president clinton were and how they fared in the senate yes impeachment charges against um clinton focused on um is pasta leave him a committing perjury in his testimony associated with a lawsuit by a civil lawsuit by paul johnson against him um and so you broadly conceived at least uh also related to questions and of obstructing interfering with a judicial proceedings it didn't it took places in a similar political context than sense of lots of conflict between the president and up an a congress controlled by the opposite party um but without rooted in the same sort of a mix of other or um kinds of offenses um that people were um arguing were uh potentially impeachable the same way that um uh radical republicans were arguing uh relative to andrew johnson or that some democrats were arguing a relative next richard nixon so the clint impeachment was much more targeted um then on on this perjury charge that was enough to get through the house um but ultimately not much support for trying to um uh impeach a move the president um uh in the senate uh over that and and the arguments were serve of two types one of being whether or not this even rises to the level of impeachable offense uh even if it's true and can be proved in addition there were arguments about whether.

clinton keith senate perjury paul johnson president congress andrew johnson richard nixon clint
"andrew johnson" Discussed on We The People

We The People

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"andrew johnson" Discussed on We The People

"Ticks at princeton university he co wrote the interactive constitution explainers on the impeachment clause with neil kim cook kim cough and we the people listeners i want you to read those explainers as homework for this podcast and david oh stewart is the writer historian and former appellate lawyer who is the author of many books including impeached the trial of president andrew johnson and the fight for lincoln's legacy keith david thank you so much for joining thank you my pleasure david let's jump right in with you hugh chronicle this riveting constitutional tale in your book on the trial of president andrew johnson why was president andrew johnson impeached and what was the resolution while the real reason he was impeached was he was rude uh incredibly obnoxious son of a gun who would not compromise over anything and got very cross wise with a overwhelming republican party majority in congress he was a democrat historically and had been lincoln's running mate uh when lincoln was trying to appeal to democrats need to 64 election when he succeeds lincoln uh he discovers that he really doesn't much care for the peoples in the party that elected him and he uh reaches out to bring the southern states into back into the union in a way that the republicans found just noxious he allowed the formation of the racist and highly discriminatory governments in the south uh when congress tried to intervene and that he obstructed congress to the extent he could uh when the army was occupying the south in attempting to enforce these federal laws.

princeton university president lincoln keith david hugh chronicle congress army neil kim david oh stewart writer andrew johnson