30 Burst results for "Andrew Harding"

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:56 min | 2 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Day care center, a place where parents leave young children to keep them safe, was transformed into a scene of almost unimaginable tragedy after more than two dozen children were among the victims of a massacre. The sound there of grief, people gathering outside the nursery, following the attack, while the emerging details of what happened are rather distressing rather numbing a 34 year old former policeman has been identified as the suspect he's reported to have taken his own life, as well as that of his wife and son, but not before using knives and guns to kill more than 30 other people, most of them children. Well, we can go to northern Thailand. Now, and join chayat young chai from the BBC's Thai service, chai, just tell us what we know and what the latest is. So the latest is that there's two more people who enter earlier, just pass away recently at the hospital. So now the death toll is 38 instead of 36. So that what we know so far. And what about the circumstances? Can you talk us through what we understood happened? So what happened earlier this today is that today is supposed to be his trial for drug possession that he was arrested for last year. So after that, he just ran away and start doing this shooting and attacking people before he get to the nursery. He attacked the father and son and they pass away and after that bystander on his way, he just hit and run until he get to the day care and he chucked at 25 children, one of them survived 24 at the scene. And after that, he just went back to his home and had his own life his wife and his son. And why had he targeted the day care center? Do we know? We don't have any motive at the moment. This because he just killed himself. So nobody has this information and nobody really knows the exact reason why. But what his former Holly, who worked for the police officers, described that he has the violent history before this because he used a lot of track throughout the time that he was policemen until he was fired. And even until today he still takes drugs. And presumably this is a community but beyond that a nation in shock. Yes, the whole country is in charge because the mass shooting is very rare in Thailand. Last time it's happened was 2020 and it was done by a military military man, someone who had access to the gun and for the civilian life as it's not common to get the time at our home. You mentioned one child survived the only survivors. Is that what's understood? Yes. It's a girl. She was taking an app like the rest of her friends. And because she was solid sleep, the attacker didn't realize that this car still survived. So he thought that everybody was killed and he left. So he just woke up and everybody around her just died. Gosh, well that's very hard to imagine any of this really, but to try out many, many thanks, chart. From the BBC's Thai service. Well, let's look in a bit more detail at the question of how this man got hold of guns. What Thailand gun laws like doctor Paul chambers is director of research at the institute of Southeast Asian affairs at Chiang Mai university is an expert on security and democracy in the region and joins us now. So what is the answer to that? How easy is it to get your hands on a gun in Thailand? Thanks for having me. Actually, there is a law for guns and Thailand dating back in 1947. Section 9 of that law is very vague. It says that you can only get a license if you're for a gun if you're defending yourself or for sports or for hunting. So it's quite easy, but actually those such a law is rarely enforced anyway. It's very easy to get a gun if you have access. And as your reporter just said, access tends to be someone who is a security official. Like in this case, it was a policeman in 2020. It was a military official. Those guys have easy access to weapons in the military or in the police. And in fact, right now in Thailand, there is a counterinsurgency in the Deep South, military and police are rotated in and out of that counterinsurgency. It's easy for these sorts of officials to get weapons. Many bikers in Thailand can get these weapons because of their friendships with security officials. And so added to this is often a cultural culture of impunity where there's a market for all kinds of weapons, military and police can sell them. So it's very easy to get the weapons. Now, I guess the question in this case, this is an ex policeman who was in court on drugs charges, according to our reporter there. His ex colleagues saying, look, he is known to be abusing drugs. The question I suppose is how do you take away firearms from someone like this? That's difficult because they might be retired might be no longer part of the police, but they still have an association with the institution of the security service. And if you have an association, it's easy then to get a hold of sort such weapons. He probably had the weapon at his house still. So it's easy to have to get to get it to get the gun. Given the nature of this, the fact that young children, so many of the victims are young children sleeping at a day care center. Is that going to give a political impetus do you think to Thailand maybe reexamining its gun laws? Well, I think it will, but the problem is a lot of laws in Thailand have difficulty being enforced. And so I would expect that the 1947 law is going to undergo some renovation and there's going to be maybe a new law, but whether that can be adequately enforced is open to question. And given, as you say, it's a security services who are often linked to this, again, do they look at themselves and rethink perhaps? How they distribute firearms? Yeah, well, that's another issue. I think some of them do, but others see themselves as the protectors of the kingdom, the protectors of the people, and so they might think, well, these are a few bad apples, you know, that got in the way, in 2020 incident. And this incident today. But in general, there are very few massacres or killings by military or police people. And so they would go on wanting to these military people and it please would go on wanting to protect their privileges to the access to weapons. Doctor Paul chambers, director of research of the institute of Southeast Asian affairs at Chiang Mai university, thanks very much indeed. Now if you were listening to yesterday's program, you will have heard Andrew Harding's report from

Thailand institute of Southeast Asian a BBC Paul chambers Chiang Mai university Holly institution of the security se Deep South Andrew Harding
"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

05:12 min | 2 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"Weapons to the pro Trump rally and to be ready to fight and they go into great detail about mobilizing for this kind of violent campaign, one of the oath keepers leaders is on this recording, saying that people should bring a lead pipe with a flag on it, which I thought was quite an amazing encapsulation of that entire movement, in fact, the kind of nationalistic element of having the flag on it, but the lead pipe representing the violence that they were willing to use. This is a big trial because it involves 5 oath keepers leaders who are up on the charge of seditious conspiracy. So if they're found guilty of this charge, they will probably do up to 20 years in jail. And I guess it's just putting a spotlight on these right wing movements in the U.S. behind Trump who don't accept the result of the last presidential election, and who were willing to use a serious force in order to keep their man in power. So this is a very serious trial in this moment, but I guess it also has ramifications for the kind of peaceful election that we hope we might see in the U.S. in a couple of years time. To Africa now, specifically, Uganda tell us about this story on Museveni's son. And this is a remarkable story Georgina. I was watching this play out on Twitter yesterday. And it's being reported in the East African newspaper today. Mosey, can you? He's known colloquially just as muhazi in Uganda. He sent a tweet. Yesterday morning, apro nothing, saying that it would take the Ugandan army less than two weeks to capture Nairobi. The capital of neighboring Kenya. Twitter absolutely blew up. Asking, is this the Ugandan armies intention Emma Jose at the time was the commander of the land forces in Uganda. He's a very serious military player. He's the son of the president, as you've said, so if he tweets this kind of thing, people take it quite seriously. Suddenly there were diplomatic scrambles taking place ambassadors meeting with one another, all sorts of envoys trying to find out whether Uganda out of nowhere suddenly had intentions of invading neighboring. Kenya at mojo then had to send a series of tweets to say, oh no, no, I was kind of joking, but I was just trying to make the point that the Ugandan army is very strong. It's ready to act at a moment's notice, but in fact, we don't have nefarious intentions towards our good neighbor. Kenya. So this was playing out on Twitter all of yesterday. In response Museveni had to remove his son as the commander of Uganda's land forces, but about ten minutes later then promoted him to general he had been lieutenant general up until now and now he's now he's a full general. So I guess Museveni giveth and taketh away in the space of ten minutes. All of this, of course, is important, not just because of the relationship between Uganda and Kenya, I guess it also shows that impact of social media, but moji has always been suspected as being groomed for the presidency that there's a very strong sense in Uganda and this has been the case for the last 20 years that he's likely the next in line, but whenever Museveni dies, he's got his son they are ready to take on the family mantle and perhaps rule Uganda for as long as his father has. So the fact that he's very loose on Twitter and is willing to make jokes that can inflame these very delicate international moments suggest that he may not be fit for the office that he's been groomed for. Finally, I want to look at an absolutely awful story that Andrew Harding the reporter has been doing some Sterling work on. He's been in Somalia and warning of famine coming there, but honestly, some of the footage that's coming out is clearly already having a huge impact on the population. Indeed, Georgina, I see the BBC are one of the few outlets, really, that have been covering the Somali situation in any detail in the last few months. I think most international reporting has been on the horrific situation in Ethiopia and Eritrea, but what the BBC is showing is that the Al shabab conflict in Somalia has now escalated to a point where it's really blocking the government's ability to get food into particularly the southern and the western parts of the country and there are many people I think who are on the brink of starvation and of course it's not just the Al shabab conflict that is affecting this situation. It's also what's happening in Ukraine. It's issues of food supplies across Africa more broadly. But much of the international press was hot on the issue yesterday that the U.S. forces in the Horn of Africa had killed one of the top commanders of Al shabab, so there had been this real emphasis that perhaps the U.S. was starting to change the direction of this conflict and that perhaps Al shabab would be brought to its knees because it's one of its top commanders had been killed. I don't think that's true. I think that's fanciful and sort of misreads the reality of Al shabaab as an organization. But I think that a humanitarian aspect of this story has been sorely neglected that there are millions of people who are potentially on the brink of famine in various parts of Somalia over the next few months. And I think many of the international NGOs I'm sure will be rallying to try to help in this desperate situation. Phil, thank you very much indeed. That was Phil Clarke and this is the globalist.

Uganda Ugandan army Museveni Kenya muhazi Twitter Al shabab Emma Jose Georgina U.S. Museveni giveth moji Mosey Trump Andrew Harding Nairobi Africa Somalia BBC Eritrea
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:13 min | 4 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In the last week, which is a bunch of very accurate rocket attacks on key bridges near Carson. It's western artillery in western rockets, particularly these very accurate long-range high Mars that the Americans have sent over here that seem to be responsible for those pinpoint strikes on those bridges. Yeah, just quickly, your assessment on that whole counteroffensive because the, as you say, the Ukrainians are suggesting it's in the offing. We're hearing intelligence reports from western intelligence, UK U.S. suggesting it's gaining momentum. But what's your assessment? I don't think it's actually started. And I do think we have to be careful that we're not being played here, disinformation is very useful for both sides. We just come back from the Donbass where it seemed pretty clear that there was a lull in Russian fighting probably caused by western artillery and rocket strikes on logistics and ammunition supplies, but it's still not clear whether the Russians are going to make a big push for the Donbass, or whether they're diverting manpower and attention further south because they think this Ukrainian counteroffensive is real and is imminent. I haven't seen signs of a lot of trucks and troops and ammunition and artillery on the road. But that doesn't mean that things aren't being prepared behind the scenes or away from the main roads. BBC's Andrew Harding in southern Ukraine. Let's turn now to Ukrainian culture because here in London, the annual celebration of classical music, the BBC proms, is in full swing and among the new ensembles playing this year is a Ukrainian freedom orchestra it's been pulled together quickly and in extraordinary circumstances. The orchestra contains musicians who had already left Ukraine to pursue a career elsewhere and others who fled the country after February's invasion. While London is the second date on a tour that will take the orchestra across Europe and to the United States before playing at the Royal Albert Hall earlier today, Vincent dowd sat in on Saturday's rehearsals. What do you think? Saturday morning at the Albert Hall and the Ukrainian freedom orchestra is about to rehearse BBC prom 19 a the numberings unusual because this was a programming afterthought but an important one. My name is Juliet. I play violin. My name is Artem schmale, principal cello in Ukrainian freedom orchestra. Julia represents around half the Ukrainian freedom orchestra happily employed at home until the Russian invasion, whereas Artem had been playing for years for audiences in Antwerp, whose support earlier this year was vital to him. I couldn't do anything I couldn't think of anything and I was playing a project with Antwerp symphony orchestra. I think that was the very first orchestra in Belgium who started the concert with Ukrainian anthem. They were standing, they were crying with us, they were supporting us. Total support of Ukraine and Ukrainians. Yulia was asked if she'd leave lviv to go on the 13 date tour of Europe and the U.S. and said yes. I was very

Donbass Ukrainian freedom orchestra Andrew Harding BBC Carson Ukraine Albert Hall Vincent dowd U.S. London Artem schmale UK Juliet Europe Artem Antwerp symphony orchestra Julia Antwerp Belgium Yulia
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:55 min | 5 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And more organized criminal networks. And that was our Africa correspondent Andrew Harding speaking to me from Johannesburg on that shooting there in Soweto on Saturday night. Here in England, the women's Euro football tournament is being played and we're at the quarterfinal stage 2022 looks like it will be a huge year for the women's game with matches shown on terrestrial TV and record attendances. A new exhibition goal power at Brighton museum in the South of England celebrates the trailblazers in the women's game, one of them is Julie hemsley, a former captain of the England team, she now coaches the game in Florida in the United States, but is back in Britain for a reunion and to watch the Euros. So growing up in a suburb of the southern English city of Brighton, how did she start playing football? I lived on the street with boys really, and Fiona plays sports who played with the boys. And they played football and cricket. So I started asking if I could go and play with them, and it took a little bit of convincing, and then I said, all right, we'll let you and I'll prove that I could do it, and from then on, I got spotted in the street playing and a women's team asked me if I wanted to go and practice with them and play with them. I was 14, actually. And I thought, okay, but I can't get there. So a couple of the players used to come pick me up and take me to training. Without that help, I wouldn't be able to get there. And how different do you think it is then now for a 14 year old girl wanting to get into football? Oh my God, they can play with their own age group, you know, I mean the structure now is amazing. You don't have to play with full grown women. You can play with people your own age and I think that's great because that helps you develop with your mindset and your physicality and it's more social because you have fun together was when you were in an adult world being a youngster. Certainly different. And what has changed to bring on the women's game so much really in the last few years, it's pretty recent, isn't it? I mean, if you think ten years ago, there was hardly any women's football on TV. Well, ten years ago, you're right. Go back 15, 25 years ago. It was not even thought of, you know, could we be on TV? Could we be on radio? Could we be in the newspaper even? There were loads of people working behind the scenes to try and get women's football noticed, the biggest turning point was when the Football Association took over. The running of women's football and that's here in England. Here in England, and worked on structure, worked on pathways, worked on development by employing people to actually do it. I mean, I was lucky myself. I got implored by bright novel being football club in the community in 92 to work on developing women and girls. So I had a lot of experience going around schools, could play, you know, it was a good role model. You know, we all did a bit to make sure the game survived with players. I mean, women's football was more social than anything, but it became more professionally run, leagues were better and more teams popped up, you know, you'd go to the rural countrysides and you'd have a bucket of water to wash in instead of a shower. We went to donkey bells to play in the cup. We had to use a pickaxe to make a hole for the flags to go in because of the snow. So that was fun. Now you coach in the United States at the moment and they're arguably the most successful international team in recent years. How's it different there? There's more players. It's just numbers, and I guess there's a lot more money. You know, the states is vast. So the 50 states all have their own products and they work towards. I mean, a lot of it is a business as well. Where people run clubs, purely to be as big as they can get. And last question whether you're at the quarterfinal stage, you're thinking the Euros, who's your tip? Well, England, all the sweet. I did enjoy watching Germany, the other night. Seemed to be getting back to the strength could pass in machine, you know, very technical and tactical. England need to step up their game. I'm sure they will Spain had a good win against Finland. So yeah, I would say Germany can't write off Norway yet until Monday. Could be the old England Germany classic finale. That would be wonderful. Yeah. And that was the English former footballer, Julie hemsley, now a coach in the United States, and I'm reliably informed actually we're not quite at the quarterfinal stage with still at the group stages a couple of games today at Belgium have drawn one one with Iceland, and I can see France of playing Italy, Franz scored 5 goals in the first half and their leading 5 one with just a few minutes to go. Full details of all

football England Andrew Harding Julie hemsley Brighton museum Soweto Football Association Johannesburg Fiona Brighton United States cricket Africa Britain Florida Germany Finland Spain Norway Belgium
"andrew harding" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:30 min | 5 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WTOP

"Here by rocket mortgage. I'm Linda kenyon in Washington, hundreds of women and men gathered in Washington, D.C. yesterday to protest the Supreme Court's ruling that ended the roe versus wade abortion rights precedent. Rachel O'Leary carmona, who heads the group women's march, urged supporters to continue to fight against the court's decision. I want you to look to the side of you because the truth is, no one is coming to save us by ourselves. And so these are the people we're fighting with. At a protest in Indiana. I want them to listen to their constituents. I think that's key. And I need them to understand that they do not have the right to decide what happens to families in their bodies. Planned Parenthood and members of the public are demanding action from the state legislature ahead of a special session on abortion set to begin in two weeks. Another wave of COVID is upon us. They're 40,000 hospitalizations now in the United States, and that is way too many. Most are preventable with boosters in these medicines. And we have to use them so we can continue to live with the virus and ride these waves. CBS News medical contributor, doctor David agus, rising transmission rates in Los Angeles, could force a return to an indoor mask mandate. New York City's health department is urging people to wear masks in public indoor settings and around large gatherings outside. A mass shooting at a tavern in Johannesburg Soweto township has killed 15 people and left several others in critical condition. The BBC's Andrew Harding has the details. The attack took place soon after midnight, police said several gunmen entered the Orlando east tavern and opened fire, seemingly at random, no motive has yet been established, shootings are not uncommon in South Africa. But this is an exceptionally high death toll. Police are investigating reports that a group of men arrived in a many of us taxi and open fire on patrons. In a separate incident, four people were shot to death at a tavern in the sweet waters township. A meeting of G 20 ministers in Bali Indonesia has been discussing the war in Ukraine and how it is affecting the entire world. Leaders tried to pressure Moscow into dropping its blockade of grain from Ukrainian pores, which is causing a global food shortage. CBS Christina ruffini, high temperatures are not helping any as firefighters continue to battle wildfires in the west. Hundreds of firefighters are battling the washburn fire from the air and the ground. The flames still out of control in a southern corner of Yosemite National Park have forced evacuations and are threatening about 500 giant sequoias. It's some of the oldest

Linda kenyon Washington, D.C. Rachel O'Leary carmona David agus Andrew Harding Orlando east tavern Supreme Court CBS News Indiana Washington legislature Soweto sweet waters township Johannesburg New York City Los Angeles United States BBC Christina ruffini South Africa
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:51 min | 7 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"But there are other challenges here in the Donbass a region that once fueled the Soviet Union Many if not most of the aging minds have now shut down But the war has made it impossible to maintain them properly The management are worried that polluted groundwater could start flooding out An ecological threat now hangs over our town says Anatolia If the water floods to the surface it will poison the soil and the rivers It could be catastrophic But that's a longer term threat As the morning shift crowds into the cage there are more immediate concerns Above ground and the dangers still lurking far below That's Andrew Harding in Tourette's in eastern Ukraine You're listening to NewsHour from the BBC I'm Audrey Brown In Australia the newly victorious Labor Party is just short of being able to form a majority government with millions of postal votes still to be counted following Saturday's general election It saw the Liberal Party were conservatives lose power after more than 9 years concerns over climate change emerged as a key issue for voters with the Green Party and climate focused independent candidates poised to win at least 15 seats in Australia's lower house Labor's leader Anthony albanese is due to be sworn in as prime minister on Monday He will then fly to Tokyo for a meeting with the leaders of the U.S. Japan and India the so called quad Obviously.

Andrew Harding Audrey Brown Anatolia Soviet Union Tourette Labor Party Ukraine Australia BBC Liberal Party Green Party Anthony albanese Tokyo Japan U.S. India
"andrew harding" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:36 min | 7 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WBUR

"Bonds and birdsong in lissy chance one of several farming towns struggling to block a Russian offensive here in the Donbass region The Russians are now inching forwards in places Ukrainian army medics led by major Oli kravchenko have been furiously busy collecting casualties from the nearby front lines A lot of concussions as well From all the shelling It's a blah blah blah But extreme and where it is The Russians are making a big push to seize this whole region but their progress is slow and haphazard and Ukrainian forces say western military supplies are now helping them to hold the line Andrew Harding The European Commission has been holding talks with member states on additional economic sanctions against the Kremlin These could include a gradual ban on Russian oil imports as our Brussels correspondent Jessica Parker reports This being some reluctance and division within the EU about the idea of a ban on Russian oil but with Germany now signaling greater readiness to wind down supplies momentum is growing but this wouldn't be an immediate embargo diplomatic sources suggest a phasing out could run till the end of the year in part to avoid upsetting global oil prices too much but also to allow the most dependent countries like Slovakia and Hungary more time But no final decisions have been made and opposition may remain a compromise plan could be tabled tomorrow with ambassadors due to meet on Wednesday Meanwhile today EU energy ministers gather for urgent talks in Brussels particularly to discuss gas stops and the blocks preparedness for a supply crisis following last week's decision by Russian energy giant Gazprom to cut off Poland and Bulgaria Jessica Parker More than 5 million people have fled Ukraine since the war started It's thought thousands of them were Africans and many have reported racial discrimination at the country's borders From BBC Africa has been speaking to some of those who made the journey We are students We are not fighters We want to go We want to grow Africans caught up in the horror of the war in Ukraine This is not our war It is not our fight Trapped in cities under attack 12 good hours This is Jessica o'rourke ball She's a medical student from Nigeria who was based in western Ukraine She says on her way to the Polish border she was stopped from boarding a bus Literally looked me in my eye and said in his language only Ukrainians that's all that if you are black you should walk Another Nigerian trying to escape was doctor auf agugua A surgeon and university lecturer who had lived in Ukraine for almost 14 years He arrived at Ukraine's border with Poland alongside other Africans and says they were pushed to the back of the queue When some people try to complain they say well we are allowing just women and kids to pass But if you say women there are black women here as well They are women why aren't you letting them pass The temperature was freezing and there was no shelter Here's doctor again We were the last people and for over 18 hours when led to pass It was horrible It was uncalled for It was deeply inhumane I was at the Ukraine Poland border to talk to Africans making the crossing Even though they'd reached Poland there was still unease I still don't feel safe When I walk past I can see people's posterior I know they might do something They could attack me or something like that I was reporting alongside cameraman Amir Ahmed In the Polish city of chem we were the only black journalist that I saw there and we sensed this feeling of racism too We were turned away from two restaurants for no reason and were confronted by a menacing group of Polish men who demanded to see our BBC IDs The UN high commissioner for refugees has acknowledged racist treatment at Ukraine's borders The Ukrainian government has said Africans should be offered equal opportunities to return home and has promised to spend no effort to address the problem But not all Africans encountered racism as they escaped the conflict Yeah.

Ukraine lissy Ukrainian army Oli kravchenko Andrew Harding Jessica Parker birdsong Poland EU Jessica o rourke ball European Commission Bonds auf agugua Slovakia Gazprom Hungary Brussels Bulgaria Germany
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:07 min | 10 months ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In London The boat has landed The ship chartered by the government of Mauritius has arrived today in the disputed chagos archipelago in the Indian Ocean It's for each comes after the UN highest court ruled that Britain's occupation of the island is illegal Mauritius accused Britain of crimes against humanity But Britain has refused to hand control to Mauritius to reverse its move in 1972 to force some 2000 people off their island Part of what became the newly named British Indian Ocean territories were secretly handed over to the U.S. for use as a military base Her Africa correspondent Andrew Harding traveled with the group of chego islanders on their four day boat journey after a lifetime of yearning to go home I asked him what it was like when they finally reached the archipelago It was a mixture I think an awful lot of joy from the 5 chagossians who came ashore on this beautiful tropical beach They dropped to their knees some of them they kissed the sand they were weeping And later as they went in land and inspected the kind of overgrown ruins of their church of the buildings that have laid here rotting in the tropical heat for 50 years More different emotions came up A lot of anger here particularly from Olivier Blanco the man who spent so many years fighting in British courts for his right to return to live permanently on the place of his birth He was condemning the British government as racist saying they would never have done this if we were white blue eyed people like in the Falklands that the population islands which of course was forcibly removed 50 years ago Must be allowed to resettle here But everyone I think seeing this moment as potentially a game changer of course this is the first time the mauritian government in all its years of independence has ever dared to send its own boats to this archipelago And it's done so because it feels world opinion and international law is turning in its favor that they point out just 5 countries supported Britain in its last votes at the UN General Assembly the International Court of Justice has said stand the island's over as part of your decolonization Just watching now the jagos is walking past me here along the shore there about to head back to the boat but they've been erecting with mauritian government officials a flagpole that they're going to run up the mauritian flag on in the coming days as a real show of defiance against Britain But what else beside from hoisting a flag What else are they planning today Is it all mere mostly symbolic as important as that is It is symbolic They've been clearing out for instance the overgrown palms and the coconuts that litter the floor of their church They're planning to go along to the cemetery to do the same on the graves of their ancestors And they're also going to another island Salomon in the coming days To do something similar there But this is the logistics of this with the tides and so on pretty complicated So they don't have that much time on each island And what's your sense Andrew I mean this court case the United Nations decision is historic the boat itself that you the journey you made is as well Do you think that the tides could really be shifting It certainly looks that way Yes And I think this gamble if you like this rather provocative move by the mauritian government having informed Britain but having definitively not asks the permission Is a gamble diplomatically but it is hard to imagine that with world opinion and international law shifting so firmly against Britain that they're going to be able to cling on to this archipelago for too many more years And that was Andrew Harding reporting from the chagos archipelago.

Mauritius Britain chagos archipelago Andrew Harding chego islanders Olivier Blanco mauritian government Indian Ocean United Nations Falklands British government London Africa International Court of Justice UN General Assembly U.S. Salomon Andrew
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Sarah mccammond And I'm Steve inskeep This next story takes us to a country that is deeply divided by race even after Bishop Desmond Tutu he was one of the leaders in the fight against apartheid decades ago More than a quarter century after its end the journalist Andrew Harding finds a country divided between black and white rich and poor urban and rural And indeed when you move into the cities in South Africa there are plenty of success stories This is still a very vibrant country and it's possible to get out of bed and travel around the country and feel very optimistic about it But it is it's that land of deep deep contrasts and deep inequalities Andrew Harding reports for the BBC across Africa He also writes books including one about a double murder almost 6 years ago in a rural area It is called these are not gentle people In a South African region called the free state a few dozen white farmers own land black people work on them as laborers One day two black men who went by the names of Simon and Samuel showed up at the farm of a white man He says they wanted a rob him Others think they were demanding unpaid wages What is certain is that the farmer pressed an alarm button summoning help from white neighbors About 50 white farmers men and their sons came charging across the fields in their pickup trucks Most of them armed and they went and chased and hunted for these two black men and they found them pretty quickly and they arrested them essentially in the corner of a field and then over the next hour or two proceeded Very methodically and very brutally to beat those two men How severe was the beating The beating was severe enough to give both men multiple injuries all over their bodies and particularly traumatic head injuries so much so that both men lost consciousness both men were then thrown into the back of a police car which then drove for a few hundred yards over a bumpy field and then onto a smooth road into town where they were met by an ambulance transported to a hospital and then over the course of the next few hours were both pronounced dead So we have a kind of citizen's arrest that becomes an incident of beating and torture ends with police having custody of the men but they're dead at the end What did authorities do with this set of facts Well there was almost immediately an outcry a sense that this surely was a racial murder and that the white farmers involved should be arrested and put on trial as quickly as possible But it was almost impossible for the police initially to make any headway because of a kind of wall of silence from the white farmers who were led to believe that they could get away with this The white farmers most of whom were related felt that it was in their best interests to say nothing And it took months for the police to break that silence How did they do that finally Well what happened in particular was that they managed to hack into the mobile phones of some of the younger farmers they unlocked some WhatsApp messages and WhatsApp recordings in which some of these men shortly after the attack boasted and described what they've been doing And with those confessions if you like they went and arrested a number of the farmers and then essentially cut a deal with some of those farmers who'd basically been found guilty by virtue of what they did left on those WhatsApp messages And they ended up putting 6 men on trial whereas about a dozen men in all had been proven and eventually admitted to taking part in the assaults That sounds like a pretty devastating case against those who were put on trial and they were put on trial in a system that is led by a black majority government What was the result This is where the story showed the institutional rot because at every stage of the investigation And then in court everything let Simon and Samuel down And in the end all of the farmers were acquitted of murder they were found guilty of grievous bodily harm of aggravated assault but none of them was given any jail time whatsoever The problem for the prosecution is that the forensic evidence which was at the heart of the prosecution's case was flawed the original doctors who inspected Simon and Samuel's bodies may basic errors of fact and of medicine and the whole chain of evidence was contaminated by a mixture of incompetence and managerial and institutional failures which enable the defense to pick apart The prosecution's case and particularly the extraordinary matter of law which was brought up by the defense could it be that the two men died not from the beatings that rendered them unconscious but from the fact that they spent a few minutes in the back of a police car being driven over a bumpy field On that basis the judge found the men not guilty of murder Meaning that incompetence left a lot of room for reasonable doubt Exactly Why did you call the book These are not gentle people This was actually a phrase that emerged from one of the key characters the wife of one of the accused who used this phrase to me these are not gentle people She just said to me one day talking.

Andrew Harding NPR news Sarah mccammond Steve inskeep Bishop Desmond Tutu Samuel white farmers Simon South Africa BBC Africa
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:35 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the next Brian air show it's been a year marked by notable hunger strikes including yellow taxicab owners near city hall and environmentalists during the cop 26 climate summit We'll talk about the history of hunger strikes how far people have been willing to take them and when they're morally right and politically effective Also the iconic Miles Davis album ditches brew at 50 years old The Brian lair show at 10 a.m. on WNYC This is morning edition from NPR news I'm Sarah mccammond And I'm Steve inskeep This next story takes us to a country that is deeply divided by race even after it established a multiracial democracy South Africa this week is morning archbishop Desmond Tutu He was one of the leaders in the fight against apartheid decades ago More than a quarter century after its end the journalist Andrew Harding finds a country divided between black and white rich and poor urban and rural And indeed when you move into the cities in South Africa there are plenty of success stories This is still a very vibrant country and it's possible to get out of bed and travel around the country and feel very optimistic about it But it is it's that land of deep deep contrasts and deep inequalities Andrew Harding reports for the BBC across Africa He also writes books including one about a double murder almost 6 years ago in a rural area It is called these are not gentle people In the South African region called the free state a few dozen white farmers own land black people work on them as laborers One day two black men who went by the names of Simon and Samuel showed up at the farm of a white man He says they wanted a Robin Others think they were demanding unpaid wages What is certain is that the farmer pressed an alarm button summoning help from white neighbors About 50 white farmers men and their sons came charging across the fields in their pickup trucks Most of them armed and they went and chased and hunted for these two black men And they found them pretty quickly and they arrested them essentially in the corner of a field and then over the next hour or two proceeded very methodically and very brutally to beat those two men How severe was the beating The beating was severe enough to give both men multiple injuries all over their bodies and particularly traumatic head injuries so much so that both men lost consciousness both men were then thrown into the back of a police car which then drove for a few hundred yards over a bumpy field and then onto a smooth road into town where they were met by an ambulance transported to a hospital and then over the course of the next few hours were both pronounced dead So we have a kind of citizen's arrest that becomes an incident of beating and torture ends with police having custody of the men but their dead at the end What did authorities do with this set of facts Well there was almost immediately an outcry a sense that this surely was a racial murder and that the white farmers involved should be arrested and put on trial as quickly as possible But it was almost impossible for the police initially to make any headway because of a kind of wall of silence from the white farmers who were led to believe that they could get away with this The white farmers most of whom were related felt that it was in their best interests to say nothing And it took months for the police to break that silence How did they do that finally Well what happened in particular was that they managed to hack into the mobile phones of some of the younger farmers they unlocked some WhatsApp messages and WhatsApp recordings in which some of these men shortly after the attack boasted and described what they've been doing And with those confessions if you like they went and arrested a number of the farmers and then essentially cut a deal with some of those farmers who'd basically been found guilty by virtue of what they did left on those WhatsApp messages And they ended up putting 6 men on trial whereas about a dozen men in all had been proven and eventually admitted to taking part in the assaults That sounds like a pretty devastating case against those who were put on trial and they were put on trial in a system that is led by a black majority government What was the result This is where the story showed the institutional rot because at every stage of the investigation And then in court everything let Simon and Samuel down And in the end all of the farmers were acquitted of murder they were found guilty of grievous bodily harm of aggravated assault but none of them was given any jail time whatsoever The problem for the prosecution is that the forensic evidence which was at the heart of the prosecution's case was flawed the original doctors who inspected Simon and Samuel's bodies made basic errors of fact and of medicine and the whole chain of evidence was contaminated by a mixture of incompetence and managerial and institutional failures which enabled the defense to pick apart The prosecution's case and particularly the extraordinary matter of law which was brought up by the defense could it be that the two men died not from the beatings that rendered them unconscious but from the fact that they spent a few minutes in the back of a police car being driven over a bumpy field On that basis the judge found the men not guilty of murder Meaning that incompetence left a lot of room for reasonable doubt Exactly Why did you call the book these are not gentle people This was actually a phrase that emerged from one of the key characters the wife of one of the accused who used this phrase to me these are not gentle people She just said to me one day talking.

Andrew Harding Brian air NPR news Sarah mccammond Steve inskeep South Africa WNYC Desmond Tutu Miles Davis Samuel white farmers Simon BBC Robin Africa
"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Vaccination rate across the continent and secondly about a quarter 25% vaccination rate amongst health workers. And there are two reasons for that. And it's quite complicated. So for instance, in South Africa, you have plenty of vaccines now, supplies, not the problem that it used to be. But people just aren't taking it up anymore. And that's also a problem elsewhere in Africa. It's a combination of people simply not going to get their jabs when they're available, but also still this drastic shortfall in vaccines. And a lack I think probably of effective messaging by governments to persuade people to convince people that they need these jobs because a feeling has crept in to many countries in many communities that somehow Africa has not been affected as badly as other parts of the world. And it's still far from clear the extent to which that might be the case. And if so, why that might be the case, whether it simply about demographics and the fact that Africa is a very young continent and people are therefore not being affected so badly or whether there are more complex factors behind it. You mentioned that South Africa is in a good position because of its vaccination rates. What about the neighboring countries? There's 5 other countries that are on those travel bans from the UK and other nations at this point, but is there concern about spread in neighboring nations? There is, I can't give you exact figures for vaccination rates and all those countries, but they are substantially lower than in South Africa. And clearly this will be a concern, but again, I've got everybody else where we know it spreads fast. We don't know whether it is going to prove more severe in terms of health outcomes for populations. That was the BBC's Africa correspondent Andrew Harding talking earlier to Monica's Daniel beach. Now Monica's ton Edwards is here in the studio to bring us the day's other news headlines. Thank you very much indeed, Chris, ministers from France, Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium, along with the UK and the European Commission will meet in Calais on Sunday in an effort to forge a coordinated approach to the migration crisis unfolding on the EU's northern borders. In the meantime, France has canceled one to one talks with the UK in protest to a public letter issued by British p.m. Boris Johnson on the matter. The meeting follows the deaths of 27 people who are trying to cross the English Channel. The Polish Senate is voting today to allow the media access to the border with Belarus, something the EC has been pushing for since the beginning of the border crisis. The lower House voted last week to allow access to a limited group of media and the Senate may now look to expand that. Nigeria has announced the country's aiming to launch a new national airline by April and will seek to sell a minority stake to a foreign airline or financial institution. The airline will be called Nigeria air, and under the plan, the government will source a strategic partner to take a 49% stake in the new carrier and would not own more than 5% with local entrepreneurs holding the remaining 46% stake. And Indonesia is working to develop its next tourist destination after Bali. President joko widodo visited the island of Lombok to inaugurate a new racing track, the mandalika international circuit, as part of a giant state backed plan to rev up Lombok's existing tourism industry. See what I've done there, Chris. To read more on Indonesia's plan, subscribe to our daily news bulletin the monocle minute at Monaco dot com, forward slash. Minute Chris, those are today's news stories. Thanks very much Tom before you go, though we do have a bit of news from monocle itself about this weekend. That's right, a House news, if you will. The Christmas market returns to Midori house this Saturday and Sunday from ten a.m.. So if you are anywhere nearby, even if you have to make quite a significant detour, I'm urging our listeners to make it. Yeah, have we got reindeer? Yes, it's actual center flown in direct from Lapland, Chris the answer is yes, and there's all sorts of lovely other things. Lots of great Christmas gift.

Africa South Africa Andrew Harding Daniel beach Monica UK Polish Senate France Chris Nigeria Calais Boris Johnson European Commission President joko widodo Edwards Lombok
"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"With me, Chris. Now, many of us will have woken up this morning thinking when it rains it pours. We start off the show with news of a new COVID-19 variant, emerging from Southern Africa. The World Health Organization is convening as we speak to investigate the new variant, and its very unusual constellation of mutations. Now, as we heard at the top from the UK's Sajid javid, the concern is that it could be more transmissible and more vaccine resistant than the delta strain that is currently preoccupying so many governments and pushing much of Europe back into some form of lockdown. In response to the UK government has placed 6 southern African countries on its red travel list, that's one of a series of nations to take once again such drastic steps to protect their borders. Earlier today, Monaco's Daniel bate spoke to Andrew Harding, the BBC's Africa correspondent based in Johannesburg to get the latest. Daniel started by asking him what exactly we know about the new variant. So it is a heavily mutated new variant that was first discovered in Botswana, although that's no proof that that's where it originated, but it was picked up there and then in Pretoria here in the center of South Africa amongst a group of students who were tested and the PCR tests came back with anomalies that seem to imply a different variant. So their tests were sent off to a laboratory near durban, tested in the last few days and the results only yesterday announced first these heavily mutated strands which, of course, real concern here, even though doctors are saying scientists are saying, we don't know yet the implications of these mutations. But a lot of them look very similar to some of the earlier big mutations in the alpha beta and delta variants. So real course for concern that they may be able to latch more effectively onto human cells and they may be able to get around some of the body's defense mechanisms and vaccine defenses. What we do know, in fact, the only thing we know for certain at the moment about this new variant is that it is much more transmissible. And the scientists are saying they know that because within a matter of days, they've seen it dominate all the new tests for the virus are coming back with this new strand in it. This is actually from a fairly low base, South Africa is in a low, but there is a new wave coming a fourth wave and there's a real concern that this new variant, which does seem to be very transmissible, could drive that. We're told from scientists here that it could be several weeks before they know for sure, to any degree of certainty, how these mutations are going to play in real world environment. But as I said, there are, I think genuine causes for concern, but also a sense of caution of not jumping the gun in terms of becoming too alarmist. Now, of course, South Africa is a country that is used to dealing with variants. You touched on the other ones we all knew before. Authorities, health authorities are pointing out that they have moved very swiftly on this and it's good they've been able to identify. But what are they saying now about what the next steps are? So yeah, the South Africans, I think, in general and the experts here are caught between two feelings right now. One is a feeling of pride that South Africa and its scientists are incredibly good at tracking down these new variants, sharing them with the world and helping the world to cope with this pandemic and to help South Africa Coke. A really good early warning system. On the other hand, there is a feeling of frustration that the reaction from the rest of the world is normally very quick and very brutal in terms of locking down, setting off or flights is soon travel bans as we've seen from Britain. And a feeling that rather than being supported to help South Africa South African scientists. So the time when by the time these variants have been spotted and detected, they usually have already circulated way beyond that country. So it's probably far too late for a travel ban. They're not really being very effective in the past. There's a sense that South Africa is being punished for its success. And we see that today with the following minister of South Africa and LED Pandora, is through a statement saying Britain has rust the judgment on this and needs to be persuaded to back down and reopen its borders to South Africa, because it's going to be so damaging for the South African economy, particularly at a time when the summer tourist season is just arriving and this country really badly needs the tourist dollars that we're going to pour in and now of course at risk. Hong Kong and Israel saying they've also found cases there. Singapore, another country that spanning flights, but I'm curious about in South Africa, what happens there now? You mentioned the threat of a looming next wave. What will be the impact in South Africa? Do you think? How to be sure? I mean, this could be a blip. It does look like the start of a new wave, but one never knows for sure. The good news here is that vaccination rates amongst the over 60s are at around two thirds of people have had those jobs. So that is, I think very important, certainly in terms of any potential deaths from this new variant, the younger people, the rest of the population overall, it's about 42% who had at least one jab. So South Africa better off than most of the continent in that sense. The concern, of course, is if this variant spreads widely elsewhere in Africa where you have two pretty horrific statistics one, which is a 3% vaccination rate across the continent and secondly about a quarter 25% vaccination rate amongst health workers..

South Africa Sajid javid Daniel bate Andrew Harding UK Southern Africa World Health Organization Monaco Pretoria Botswana Johannesburg durban Chris BBC Daniel Africa Europe Britain Hong Kong Singapore
"andrew harding" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Enjoyed my heart. I'm a huge guedjali. Fan ole miss it for telecom. Anybody who's thinking of commodity singer they might ask And that's the orchestral volley projects you Music producer nazis russia anthem blah hamad. Defer yes the three together commodities usually performed by mail groups right. How unusual you and also that's like. Oh i line. You're not singing a language that you know that's my first language and second author and The language bike at home is tom. All i'm originally Sri lankan but growing up in london. I was always mixing with javi. Friends learning from jobe. Dotty we'll do everything so multiplayer dafur. I've known him for gosh more than half my life. And he was one that shade municipal daily khan. And i just i fell in love and i suppose being from south asia once you start meeting lots of different south asian people you realize you have a lot of similarities in your cultures and you know just different ways of expressing be adopting but also musically. Yeah he just saw. Every time i was just seeing something learn the meanings and we understand what i'm doing but it's just savvy to to perform abbey. Where can people find your music if they're just want to listen to more more all say we're on youtube instagram. Avi samper worship music. I'm amre and lots of different types. I'm will bring your electric vino with you. I definitely well thank you so much and thank you. So everybody's been getting in touch. We're gonna leave you with a bit of a message from helen. Who says four. Years ago i retired from my role three hundred thirty three years church minister to go and live by the sea and try and be a writer. This process begun with separation than divorce. It's not being straightforward. And i have quite often wondered if i made the right decision but we'll have to live with the decisions we make. It was also difficult to turn my back on a lifetime of wanting to do good and be useful to others in order to make this change which is all about me and my happiness have a very happy weekend thank you. That's all for today's woman's hour. Join us again next time. What's the link between poisoned underpants. They wanted something that ups against your skin plot to kill nelson mandela to find a poison that would cause cancer and have him die shortly after it and the deadly riots in south africa this year. I'm andrew harding with a tale of politics and paranoia. Some people wanted me dead out. And the link is jacob. Zuma south africa's former president and indeed it was quite strong poison. That's poison from bbc radio to listen to all five episodes. just search for seriously on bbc. Sounds i am sarah. And i'm kirby and work los angeles strike becton is regarded as top tier skin-care by professionals of all kinds. We personally love how. All of beckman's products are backed by science and independent clinical testing. If you're looking to strengthen a weakened skin barrier the brand just launched super be barrier strengthening oil which includes prebiotics to balance. Your skin's microbial. This oil doesn't leave her face. Greasy or oily feeling looks great under makeup 'em calms visible redness to learn more about stray becton visit strike. Becton dot com..

Fan ole blah hamad javi Avi samper jobe Sri lankan south asia russia khan tom andrew harding london helen youtube south africa nelson mandela bbc paranoia Zuma becton
"andrew harding" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:03 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Woman's Hour

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andrew harding tessa south africa James bbc cancer Stewart john Apple
"andrew harding" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Lives three m science applied to life. The last american troops have departed afghanistan. So what happens now to the people. Living in increasingly tenuous economic conditions live from london. This is the marketplace morning report from the bbc world service. I'm victoria craig. Good morning the sun has come up on afghanistan's first day in twenty years without international military presence taliban fighters insist they want a good relationship with the world but afghans are worried about their futures. Inflation is rising salaries haven't been paid. Cash is in short supply and banks in the country remained closed despite promises to reopen from the capital kabul. The bbc's camonte told me what the situation on the ground is like now for those desperately trying to get access to savings and essential supplies number of cash machines have reopened. But you're seeing huge queues. Outside them of hundreds of hundreds of people and i was outside one cash machine in the center of kabul. A few days ago one man telling me he was worried about being able to put enough food on the table children. Another woman breaking down in tears saying that she just didn't feel that it was going to be possible to stay living in this country. Under under this level of stress other problems include the fact that civil servants here in afghanistan haven't been paid for a number of months that predates the taliban's takeover but just speaks to the kind of sense of chaos that there's being in the country. A bus stand in kabul. Yesterday evening and employees there were telling me that they'd seen a doubling or quadrupling of people heading towards the borders with pakistan and iran. Most of them didn't have visas. Hoping to use people smugglers to crossover most of them achy citing economic reasons as the primary motive for leaving afghanistan. Saying that there's no work. They're not sure what the future is going to bring of course. Also uncertainty about what life under the taliban will look like. and why haven't the banks reopened. Despite those promises think one of the key issues here is large. Part of the afghan government's economy is subsidized through international aid. Those international contributions have been paused at the moment. So that's leading to one of the issues around cash flow as well. It's also about demand from what i understand are people able to get access to food and other basic resources there of the you know. I hate to use the word resilient but it is a resilient society there wide kind of informal networks to support families and neighborhoods struggling. So the moment when we're not seeing people starving that's not the reports that we're getting just yet but food. Prices are rocketing up for many everyday items. One of the concerns will be about the airport if trades through that can resume if trade can increase through the land borders. Then that will help stabilize the situation. The taliban's say once a new government has been formally declared which was still waiting for then everyday life will become easier but many people not willing to give them that time really not feeling that they can afford to give them that time and so already making plans to leave the country to davis successor. Commodity us in kabul. Thanks for your time this morning. Thank you we'll prices for goods like flour and rice in afghanistan have risen sharply as the value of the nation's currency there continues to plunge a quick check of some other numbers. Now fresh evidence today of a slowdown in china's economy factory activity this month expanded at a slower pace than expected. While service activity shrank still stock markets across the region ended the session largely higher european. Benchmarks are also making slight gains. The un has warned. Madagascar is on the verge of the world's first climate change induced famine communities in the southern part of the country are facing catastrophic conditions. After four years of drought while conflict has been blamed for similar crises in yemen somalia and ethiopia experts. Say the situation off. The east coast of africa is due to rising global temperatures. The bbc's andrew harding. Has that story in the pale dry hills of southern madagascar. A hungry families sits in the dust designing nicot. We eat insects. Now says maria mother of four holding a few dried locusts in but we have no water to clean them. She says and no rain to harvest what we've sown in the fields and so the grimly familiar scenes of listless children with desperately thin arms distended stomachs. It's not much better in the town's so many children start to bake in the street for small change to buy food. Tina endel runs a small charitable organizations. Seed the worst drought in forty years has left madagascar reeling. In the vast we know when the rain will come when people start to grow crops and when the harvest will be but now what this time is not known when the market you see less and less. The united nations is now warning that madagascar is on the brink of the world's first climate change. Famine shelly thakral works for the un's world food program. These people have done nothing to contribute to climate change. They don't burn fossil fuels and yet they are bearing the brunt of climate change. Some help is arriving now in remote villages like this one but not enough not after four years without rain. There's lots that we can do to improve water management at santa barbara university. Chris funk says the authorities in madagascar need to take bold action. We can often forecast when there's going to be above normal rains in farmers can use that information to increase their production but speed is key in southern madagascar. A sense of desperation is taking hold number hassle. Ivana has been camping in his field at night. Trying to protect his crops from thieves. But it's become too dangerous. Greece live for geared up. I find it scary or the seizure and so from a remote corner of an isolated island an alarming precedent as climate change pushes madagascar towards famine. That's the bbc's andrew harding reporting there. Climate change is a focus of discussion today in tokyo where the us climate envoy john kerry will meet with prime minister yoshida. Suge japan is the only g seven nations still building. Coal-fired power stations and to increase cooperation on cutting support for fossil fuels. Talks are likely to include plans by the asian development bank aimed at acquiring such power plants and then shutting them down early in london. I'm victoria craig with the marketplace morning report from the bbc world service..

kabul afghanistan taliban victoria craig camonte bbc afghan government madagascar andrew harding nicot united nations Tina endel london pakistan iran shelly thakral world food program Madagascar davis yemen
"andrew harding" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

Boomer & Gio

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on Boomer & Gio

"But he's not going. I guess i guess not going to put this big d thing out there. He did on instagram. He goes stepping out with the big d energy. That's what he said he said. Determine darling and dapper af and was just like a rock photo No it was just a picture. Him in a suit i think. Yeah he is a g. q. Looking guy no without a doubt is but he's also right now he's absolutely pathetic and he's in shambles because shale dumped them and went. Run an ex boyfriend. I gotta this ad. Is he still doing some baseball. Yeah yeah of course dad. Fortunately is he. We're not losing him anytime soon. Each morning show with boomer esiason in gregg giannotti boomer and geo. Apparently a ride added melanie. Collins nfl sideline reporter on that yacht with them. I didn't realize that he works for who explain this pictures. Who's working for cbs. I don't know if you kidding. But did this pictures. He's got the cbs microphone. I did they did announce the pairings right and they for the upcoming. Nfl season wasn't just for fox. Okay it's not a lot of different stuff didn't look probably i wouldn't think so. You know a lot of people i'd never heard of like really let me google. I'm looking at it now. I'm seeing a lot of people that i have heard of. Kenny albert. jonathan vilma k. heard of them Shining speak is a sideline reporter was working with. Adam amine in mark's ler yup madame means from espn. Yes yeah mark. Short know share with yes of course You have the burkhardt one right greg. Olsen and pam. Oliver he's with greg olsen he's with greg olsen now. Yeah recently retired. Ruggles i realize that. Okay joe buck. Troy aikman andrew harding of them. He's got them To chris myers her to him and darryl johnston. Oh that sounds brutal. Honestly darrell johnson. I've had enough draw. Johnson says a couple of the same words over and over again with whatever accent. He has opportunity in confidence he always says that was i think not allow. The defense really took advantage of this opportunity. And that's what happens when you play with confidence. Yeah but you know what that's also like the analysts talking about you gotta go. Vertical down the field. You gotta stop going side to side. So i mean they all have their catchphrases as we do. Here's a good one. All right new right new one kevin kugler and mark sanchez. Yeah we'll kugler started doing it last year or the year before. I didn't know mark. Sanchez was in so okay. You've heard of those guys. i have yes oh about. This might be the best one yet. Gus johnson i saw this one and keep your love it. I do love keep till he. He is awesome. He says what's on his mind. He certainly screams. That should be fun. All right so who do you not not know from our some more of their pairings. Yeah there are no. This is all of them. I'm going to go through balk. Aikman erin andrews. That's one then. Tom rinaldi's on that now from. Espn you know tom. Dosing those stories. Yeah burkhart greg. Oliver adam mean marshawn earth and shannon speak. Maybe that's the one you know now. Three albert vilma for sarah walsh. Lindsay's arnie ac..

gregg giannotti greg olsen Kenny albert cbs Adam amine boomer esiason nfl instagram andrew harding darryl johnston darrell johnson jonathan vilma melanie burkhardt chris myers Collins joe buck Troy aikman Ruggles baseball
Ethiopia's Tigray Crisis: Fleeing for Fear of New Ethnic Conflict

BBC Newsday

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Ethiopia's Tigray Crisis: Fleeing for Fear of New Ethnic Conflict

"The BBC is heard fresh reports of ethnic cleansing integrate T grain forces are continuing to extend their control of the region, prompting the Ethiopian government to abandon a unilateral ceasefire. More fighting is now expected in the west of Tigre, an area close to the water with Sudan from where our Africa correspondent Andrew Harding reports. Doing nothing for a young man is struggling to swim across the fast flowing Brown River. He's escaping the conflict into great Safely across the 18 year old tells us he was chased by another ethnic group, The, Um Harris, whose malicious still control this corner of Western to be able to get them. They know you were two grand. They kill or arrest you, He says the militias are everywhere. Within hours, I meet another group of four teenagers who just made the same journey. Some armed soldiers come home to home and they registered their means, and they sold them to leave home. Militia militia and their militias. I'm harem. Alicia's Yes, I'm on a mission. They gave us two days to leave home to to get out of former because we are immigrants. Like many others, these youngsters are fleeing Ethiopia's fast changing war into gray, a war that seemed to be winding down. That could well be just getting started. They've all ended up here on the far side of the river in neighbouring Sudan. The isolated Sudanese farming town of Hyundai at a Tigre and doctor is busy treating more new arrivals. Doctor terrorists to Farrah fled across the border last year. Now he sees clear signs. Of an upsurge of ethnic violence. So there is there is a new search of mass arrest. Thousands of people have been held in camps and with no food and no water, and particularly, they were being told that they are going to be punished by Hank punished by hunger and staffed. Word by

Ethiopian Government Andrew Harding Brown River Um Harris Tigre Sudan Militia Militia BBC Africa Alicia Ethiopia Hyundai Farrah Hank
"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"andrew harding" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Celebrations for millions. By the end of the year. The number who had lost their lives reached 76,000 birthday to you that included medulla sour he turned 50 years old last year. She and her husband were both in the hospital with Cove it at the same time. That was the last time I saw her. She was so beautiful. You're so free. She was so beautiful. The way she was looking when she came to my life, So that's the most precious memory. I have. That was the voice off the widow of medulla sour, who died earlier this year. And in that report from Jim Reed. Why does the U K among the richer countries of the world? Have one of the very worst death rates. There's no simple answer, of course. Linda Bald professor of public health at the University of Edinburgh and an adviser on covert to the Scottish parliament. Talked me through the various factors that have exacerbated a national disaster, starting with the idea that the UK has a comparatively unhealthy population. We obviously have an older population, but we also have some of the highest rates of non communicable diseases in the world. At those include cancers, heart disease, circulatory disease, diabetes, etcetera. And some of the main risk factors for disease very different over 19 like overweight and obesity are major issues in the UK in a 28% of our adults are obese were the heaviest nation in western Europe, so Those certainly are factors which have meant that people who pick up the virus and become unwell are more likely to be hospitalized and, sadly more likely to die. We also have a health system that although fated around the world Is chronically underfunded. Is that right? That's true, and that has been the case for arguably for decades, but certainly at the past decade of austerity have had major impacts on the NHS. It is actually being worse for public health. So public health services are clearly key to responding in a pandemic on we've seen cuts successively just figures I have in front of me here for England because public health has devolved around a 25% reduction in spending per person between 2014 15 and 2019 20. So we were not in a good position when the pandemic hit. It will be awed to assume a swell, wouldn't it that Government responses to the pandemic worry relevant here when the prime minister says that we've truly done everything we could have done to stop the deaths. Do you believe him? Absolutely not. I think that there was advice that was ignored. I have sympathy for the government of the beginning of the pandemic because we knew so little. I think there's things I could have done better then, but I think there's been successive failures throughout our response to the pandemic. Give us some examples. First. One obviously was the inability to recognize that testing was going to be key and to ramp up our response to testing and, in fact to accept the offer. From many facilities who stepped up to support the government so moving away from the reliance on NHS labs and and having a more diversified approach test as Germany did all that they started from a stronger base. That's the first thing second thing is. We didn't recognize the need to protect our care homes. We could easily have done that looking at what was happening in Italy, and we paused, building up our testing, tracing support and isolate system in March, which was probably one of the worst decisions actually taken during this pandemic. The government blamed the public successively so point Into individual behavior rather than policy failures, and then we very important for me as well and for my colleagues would argue that we didn't address international travel Now, Maybe it's understandable that was not recognized early in the pandemic, but To have come out of the summer where we got infection levels to such a low base on then to say to people. But if you go on holiday on then to have new strains reimported back into the country that was I think that was catastrophic and is partially explains where we are. Now. You don't sound very surprised that we've reached the 100,000 Mark. I think it's a tragedy. It's a system failure. But I'm not surprised because we can see. Unfortunately many months and now what the trends are you you see time and time again what happens when the incidents and prevalence of the disease rises in the community? How that translates to hospitalizations? Now 30% more better survival because of treatment and medication. But still we know how that translates into death. So unfortunate. The numbers are going to continue to rise because we've baked in. Additional cases from higher levels of infection that we had during the early parts of the year will just result in more deaths. The UK is doing well on vaccination. Yes, I mean, that is that is the good thing is the scientific community in the U. K is outstanding and our approach to clinical the treatment site and also vaccination has bean fantastic and let's celebrate that we've got over 6.8 million people vaccinated with their first does and as long as supplies are maintained, so I'm very optimistic about The Rollo to the vaccine's still some questions about how long immunity will last and whether vaccines are challenged by new variants. But I think this is said one element of handling of this crisis, which so far seems to be going really well. Professor Linda Bulled. South Africa's covert problem is display disproportionately big as well. It's made worse by the country's own new, more infectious variant and a chronic lack of buying power. When it comes to vaccines, and the authorities there have joined calls for fair a global vaccine distribution. The BBC's Andrew Harding has been speaking to Professor Salim Abul Corinne. Chief scientific adviser to the South African government, and these Corona viruses are quite widely and the ability to clear two mutations is quite significant. We can expect A lot of different variants to occur, and they probably out cutting wood. Probably just not looking for them enough, and if we start looking for them, we're going to see this recurring, much more commonly. And if it's going to become more commonly, we're gonna have to ensure that our vaccines are able to neutralize them, because if they're not, that means we're back to square one. So the idea that the vaccines they're going out now could mean that this pandemic is effectively over within a matter of months. You say that's not really feasible now. I'm not saying that I'm saying that we like to get to see many new variants and that as those variants start spreading, and as we vaccinate the population, we're going to see more off there inside the able to escape immunity. And in terms just broadly off the vaccine spread around the world of the distribution. Are you concerned, So fundamentally, there's must taken belief. By some countries that they can vaccinate their populations and that they'll be safe. It simply is not true in this world that we live in with this Corona virus. No one is safe. Until everyone is safe because of these new take use, because if you vaccinate in one country and you have continual spread of the virus in another.

UK NHS overweight and obesity Cove professor of public health Linda Bald Professor Linda Bulled Jim Reed Europe Professor Salim Abul Corinne prime minister England BBC Italy University of Edinburgh South Africa U. K
South Africa's COVID-19 Variant: What is the risk?

BBC World Service

04:12 min | 2 years ago

South Africa's COVID-19 Variant: What is the risk?

"Let's go to South Africa Festival, the variant of covert there is causing concern among scientists because it has more mutations. But there's no evidence it is deadlier, maybe faster spreading. Let's sir talk to the BBC's Andrew Harding. He's in Johannesburg. Welcome, Andrew. So tell us about this South African variant. We've been talking about it for a while. Here on news day. What is the latest information We have? Good morning. Yes, It's certainly very transmissible as transmissible is the one that's currently spreading so fast across Britain. Likewise here the mutation, one of the key mutations seems to allow the virus to spread to be caught more easily. There's no evidence as you say. Yet, although tests are still being performed here, no evidence that this new mutation makes the virus more deadly. That's the same in Britain and elsewhere. But the concern that people focusing on at the moment is a third mutation. And this is the mutation that Piss to affect the viruses. Ability to connect with other cells on gets that part of the virus that the vaccines are hoping to target on the confirm, which again is now being tested with great speed and urgency here in South Africa. The concern is that there is a theoretical risk that that particular mutation which we haven't seen in Britain or elsewhere. That particular mutation might just might make these new vaccines that are coming onto the market that being jabbed into people's arms already in parts of the world might make those vaccines less effective than might be. Some reservists calls from this new mutation. But scientists here are being very cautious and saying, Look, we will have an answer to that within two or three weeks are Scientists are very busy and are ahead of the curve if you like. They've been studying this aggressively for some time, and they're in a good position to find this out soon, but there is a theoretical risk of some level of resistance. And we know it's one thing we do know through this whole pandemic is that, you know, days matter. Never mind a couple of weeks. So what is the government they're doing whilst this crucial information Has found out about the whether this third variant is resistant to the vaccine. What's the government doing to Stop the spread. Well, I mean, there are two issues there. If you want. One is the vaccine is to South Africa is struggling on the vaccine front is struggling to secure supplies. The concern is that here and in other parts of Africa, it's going to be many months before vaccine start, arriving in sort of numbers needed to create herd immunity in the immediate term in terms of transmission and keeping this second wave under control, a new big, hard lock down Is in place here across South Africa on officials who I think will really caught by surprise By the speed and aggression of this new This new variant are doing what they can The tackle it and contain it. They're saying that look, it's not just the mutations that are driving the spread of this second Wait. It's also human behavior. People getting relaxed or tired people gathering in large groups and the government as well. Failing At least a month or two ago, failing to prevent mass gatherings. And you say there's problems with the vaccine getting through to South Africa, which one have they Ordered or have they ordered several well, they're working on the comebacks scheme that many poorer countries middle income countries are hoping will get them access. But the concerns you says there are multiple Different types of vaccine, and most of those have been pre ordered by wealthier countries on a lot of countries like South Africa of really been reluctant to throw money at vaccines that might not bear fruit, so they've been hedging their bets, and that's costing them in terms of finding that sells at the back of the queue now when it comes to trying to access the most effective Vaccines in the ones that are most

South Africa Andrew Harding Britain Johannesburg BBC Andrew Africa
How South Africa's 3-week lockdown will work

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

How South Africa's 3-week lockdown will work

"The security forces in South Africa have begun enforcing a three week nation wide lockdown there were long queues outside supermarkets as people stocked up ahead of the deadline food shops are allowed to stay open alcohol sales are banned South Africa has reported more than nine hundred coronavirus infections on correspondent in Johannesburg Andrew Harding says the government has issued a warning the president and his ministers insisting that that will be prison sentences and heavy fines for anybody who violates the terms of this very tough climb down the next three weeks so the country's borders closed you can move from one province to another old schools already because people must stay in their homes except to go out to shop and of course other essential workers can carry on working and

South Africa Andrew Harding President Trump Johannesburg
 Zimbabwe's Mugabe to be honored at state funeral

BBC World Service

00:28 sec | 3 years ago

Zimbabwe's Mugabe to be honored at state funeral

"But later today a state funeral will be held for Zimbabwe's former president Robert Mugabe he was ninety five he died last week in a private clinic in Singapore today state occasion in Zimbabwe follows days of rowing over exactly where he will be buried let's get more details from our correspondent Andrew Harding who joins us live from Harari wait preparations are underway for this state occasion enter. that's

Zimbabwe Robert Mugabe Singapore Rowing Andrew Harding President Trump
ANC, President And United Country discussed on Snap Judgment

Snap Judgment

00:45 sec | 3 years ago

ANC, President And United Country discussed on Snap Judgment

"South Africa's president is promising to build a democratic prosperous and United country after his party's victory in parliamentary elections, the BBC's. Andrew Harding reports in a subdued victory statements. The ANC acknowledged has made mistakes in government that is lost people's trust because of corruption greed and lawlessness, but the party set is now halted that downward slide was on the road to recovery and thanked South Africans for returning the ANC to power with fifty seven point five percent of the vote. Speaking results, Senate, president soul run oppose of knowledge. The fact that. Many people have lost faith in the country's hawed one democracy with more than half of eligible young voters failing even to

ANC President Trump United Country Andrew Harding South Africa BBC Senate Five Percent
African National Congress, Jacob Zuma And South Africa discussed on BBC Newshour

BBC Newshour

01:12 min | 3 years ago

African National Congress, Jacob Zuma And South Africa discussed on BBC Newshour

"Today is general election day in South Africa Opole which is seen as the toughest test yet for the governing African National Congress since that Hetty day in nineteen Ninety-four the first post vote which brought Nelson Mandela to power despite a reputation tarnished by corruption scandals, many linked to Jacob Zuma. The foam of president the ANC is expected to win again. Mr. Zuma, you'll recall was replaced by Cyril Ramaphosa who says he can fix the party and transform South Africa, the BBC's, Andrew Harding is in Johannesburg, Andrew. Yes. It is a fascinating election here in South Africa. As you say for the first time in the democratic era is a sense that the ANC is overwhelming majority could be under threat, ten years of economic stagnation and corruption have hit the party hog. But Stukeley the ANC Picton newly last year and has been of -nology it's mistakes and asking for another chance. So the question today is will voters gronk that wish or will they switch to the opposition parties? Justin for an advantage. Here. I've spent the day visiting polling stations here in

African National Congress Jacob Zuma South Africa South Africa Opole Nelson Mandela Cyril Ramaphosa Andrew Harding Hetty President Trump Johannesburg Justin BBC Ten Years
Ancient 'Hobbit' Study Reveals an Island That Forced Humans to Shrink Twice

Business Beware

05:54 min | 4 years ago

Ancient 'Hobbit' Study Reveals an Island That Forced Humans to Shrink Twice

"Years of vicious fighting and with hundreds of thousands of. People dead has Bashar our side, won the war in Syria he holds all the major cities and his forces have just retaken the province. Of DARA where the uprising began in two thousand and. Eleven he's Kurdish opponents have traveled to Damascus to begin negotiations so is the war over or is a new phase of the Syrian crisis about to begin in the north of. The country Turkey and the Kurds are eyeing each other warily although, the so called Islamic state has lost, most of its territory it. Is still able to wreak havoc so can peace be reestablished can Syria begin to rebuild? And how will it welcome home more. Than five million refugees that's the real story from the BBC Coming up after the news Hello I'm David. Harper with the BBC news the opposition movement for democratic change alliance in Zimbabwe says it does not recognize. The victory of the incumbent the incumbent Emmerson. Mnangagwa in Monday's presidential election Mr. Mnangagwa was installed following the coup which. Asked Robert Mugabe last year the MDC says it. Will launch a legal challenge it's leader Nelson Chamisa, one little. More than forty four percent Andrew Harding is in Harari Emerson mnangagwa's said he was humbled by the resultant urge Zimbabweans unite behind his presidency tweeting that this was a. New beginning for the, country he secured fifty point eight percent of the vote just. Enough to avoid a runoff but the opposition has questioned the remarkably high turnout and maintains that. The election has been stolen they've promised to take to the. Streets in huge numbers much now depends on whether they can prove that the figures are substantially out of step with credible independent tallies US counter intelligence investigators are Ported to have discovered a suspected. Russian spy working at the American embassy in Moscow the guardian newspaper says the woman came under suspicion two. Years ago Peter Bowes reports the Russian nationalist. Said by the guardian to have had access to internet and Email systems. Giving her a potential window into highly confidential material. Including the shadows of the president and the vice, president a. US government official has confirmed the woman was working for the secret service in Moscow and statement the US secret service said it recognized all foreign service nationals could be. Subjected to foreign intelligence, influence especially in Russia but he's not it they were never. Given or placed in a position to obtain national security information the US secretary of state Mike. Pompeo has met his Turkish counterpart in attempts to avert an. Estimating escalating diplomatic crisis gene Turkey and America the meeting was held on the sidelines of regional talks in Singapore the US has said It will freeze the property and US held assets, of two Turkish ministers in. Protest at the, detention of an American clergyman in Turkey Andrew Brinson faces terrorism charges and you study has suggested humans with short stature on the Indonesian island of Flora's evolve, independently fastened years apart scientists decoded the genes of the islands modern day pygmy population to. Find out if they might be partly descended from members of an. Extinct species which have come to be known as hobbits their fossilized remains were found fifteen years ago, Richard Green is, associate professor at the. University of California they are not related at all it turns out that the. Folks who live there now. Are short genetically for largely the same reason that elsewhere in the world would be short. Painted a pretty clear. Picture that this island favors short stature because it has driven hominids. To be small twice Well news from the. BBC defense officials in the United States say Iran's military. Has become a major naval exercise. In the Gulf the drills involve scores have small attack boats a spokesman for the US military central command said they were monitoring increased Iranian operations in. The Gulf and the straight of HAMAs the US is, due to impose new sanctions on Tehran on Monday The US department of, Justice has, told a court hearing that volunteers and activists should take the lead in locating the undocumented, migrants who have been separated from their children most of. The families split up under the controversial policy have been reunited following a court order but not all hundreds of parents have been deported while that children was, still in detention centers research scientists for the defense department say recently repatriated, remains of America's Korean war debt appear to be from the renowned. Battle of Chosin which took place in the, winter of nineteen fifty fifty five cents of the remains transferred from North Korea include written information about where they were found tens. Of thousands of Chinese and US troops were killed navy strategic reservoir An Australian, climate has been rescued from a maintain in New Zealand's southern Alps where he'd been. Trapped for several nights in sub. Zero conditions is believed to have dug a snow cave to stay alive I n ship is has the story the climber named his left and Terry heart had been. Trapped on mount aspiring since Tuesday when someone in the United States picked up the signal of, emergency beacon and called New Zealand rescue center a helicopter with four rescue workers manage to find, him on Thursday but weather conditions, made it, impossible to early him so two team state denied bringing much needed food and blankets a, break in the weather allowed you straighten climber to. Be. Taken to hospital on Friday a rescue worker said the man is lucky to be alive and probably wouldn't have lost his another night and that's the latest, BBC news Hello welcome to the real story. I'm.

United States BBC Syria University Of California Damascus Moscow Nelson Chamisa Bashar America Robert Mugabe Harari Emerson Mnangagwa MDC Russia Gulf New Zealand Emmerson Andrew Harding Zimbabwe
Amazon reports 1.7 million pound UK tax bill due to share deductions

Today

05:21 min | 4 years ago

Amazon reports 1.7 million pound UK tax bill due to share deductions

"Verified by Affair The MDC has further violence by the army two days, ago six position protesters were killed by soldiers in the capital Harare from. There our. Correspondent Andrew Harding reports Emmerson Mnangagwa said he was humbled by the resultant urge Zimbabweans to unite behind his presidency tweeting that this was a new beginning for the. Country he secured fifty, point eight percent of the vote just enough to avoid a. Runoff but the opposition has questioned the remarkably high turnout and maintains that the election has been. Stolen they've promised to take to the streets in huge numbers, much depends on whether they can prove that the figures are substantially out of step with credible independent. Tallies if not the international community is likely to give the governing Zanu PF the benefit of the doubt the process was seriously flawed and was overshadowed by violence security, crackdown but it was an improvement on previous elections A medical condition sepsis is killing far more people in hospital in England according to official NHL data. Figures given to this program by leading health safety experts Brian Jarman show an increase. Of. More than a third for two years don't just beneath there are several reasons including the growth in resistance to antibiotics his eye health editor coupon sepsis is. A serious complication which, can develop after infections without antibiotics it can result in organ. Failure and death so Brian Jarman says were just over fifteen thousand seven hundred tests recorded add. English hospitals in the two thousand sixteen seventeen year was sepsis, was the main diagnosis that was thirty eight percent increase over the course of two years NHTSA England. Says its efforts to increase recognition mean that cases previously recorded as simple infections are now classified as sepsis professor Jarman argues that might account for some of the increase, but there are other factors which need explain Being the UK sepsis trust says screening Volna Rable patients has improved. But hospital wards which is sometimes full and overstretched staff might. Have been factors in higher numbers of deaths Then you head of the. Armed forces said he will stamp on Boca's claims of misconduct against British, soldiers in his first interview since becoming chief. At the defense staff general cynical Carter told the BBC it was right that sapping and former service personnel were held to account but only if they genuine, need something wrong his defense correspondent Jonathan Beale general Carter that it. Was fundamentally wrong that serving and former British military, personnel were being chased by people making in his words Vic seychas claims that he said would not happen on. His watch you refuse to be drawn on any. Specific example including, that of a seventy six, year old former paratrooper who's currently under investigation for alleged, case of attempted murder the took place in Northern Ireland more than forty five years ago. General Carter, said was right that members of, the armed forces were held to account but he added that people needed to be reminded the British army He, had done an extraordinary and amazing job there for over thirty years Amazon's tax Bill in Britain fell last, year even though it's prophets nearly tripled the online retailer has faced criticism. But the amount of cooperation tanks at pace compared to high street shops Amazon says it pays all the taxes required in the UK dominicano reports the, glimpse into Amazon's tax affairs comes from, the accounts of Amazon UK services which looks after customer. Service and warehouses but not actual sales to customers in two thousand seventeen it had turnover of nearly two billion. Pounds and operating profits nearly tripled, to just short of eighty million pounds the tax liability was four point seven million pounds after it was able, to partially deduct the expense. Of paying staff in shares this cost fifty four million, pounds after deferring, some of the tax Amazon actually paid only one point seven million pounds which will be going for high street retailers, who are struggling to stay afloat because of the rush of shoppers online and Crippling business rates. The latest casualty is house of Fraser which is in, last-ditch talks with bidders after a Chinese risky deal fell through research, suggests regular exposure to even low levels Obama pollution may cause changes to. The heart similar to there is in the early stages of heart failure the study was carried out by the British heart foundation and Queen Mary university, in London John Donaldson reports it's estimated, air pollution is a contributing factor in the deaths of. Around forty thousand people in the UK each year the British heart foundation and Queen Mary university looked at data. From four thousand people most of, them lived outside big cities and in areas where air pollution was below UK government guidelines still it found those, who live near busy roads. Tended to have slightly bigger hearts often an early sign, of heart disease, doctrinaire young is from the university research team the heart tends to get larger one on the undergoes stressful situation we offer I can. See that in people are developing heart,.

Professor Jarman Amazon UK General Carter British Heart Foundation Heart Disease Queen Mary University MDC Emmerson Mnangagwa Army Andrew Harding Nhtsa Amazon Uk Zanu British Army England Vic Seychas NHL Editor
Chinese newspaper dismisses report of Google's 'censored search engine'

BBC World Service

05:26 min | 4 years ago

Chinese newspaper dismisses report of Google's 'censored search engine'

"Hello Neil Nunez with the BBC news in Zimbabwe supporters. Of president Emmerson, Mnangagwa and, his opposition rival Nelson Chamisa have been urged to wait in peace for the results of Monday's election appeals come after. Deadly street clashes from Harare Andrew Harding has this report Zimbabwe's army and the opposition both being blamed for the violence that erupted in Harare the government says MDC. Alliance protesters went on an unprovoked rampage burning cars and attacking buildings in order to disrupt the election before results being. Announced but the decision to. Send soldiers onto the streets is also. Being widely criticized the military showing little restraint as it swept through the. City attacking and shooting civilians the focus now returns does, symboblic electoral commission and whether or, not, it, will release the results of the presidential poll the opposition believes it's. Candidate Nelson Chamisa is being cheated of victory it's It's hard to imagine all sides will. Now accept the results President Trump has thanked the North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un for allowing the. Remains, of American soldiers killed in the Korean war, to be returned to the United States Laura bicker is in Seoul Donald Trump's tweet comes just hours after the means of what's thought to be fifty five US servicemen killed during. The, Korean war where flew into Hawaii their return was part of a pledge made by Kim Jong and President. Trump when the, two leaders, met in Singapore in June the tweet also hints at further contact and another meeting as Mr. Trump thanked chairman Kim. For his letter and said he looked forward to seeing him soon earlier this week US intelligence suggesting North Korea was continuing to build nuclear weapons was leaked to. The media and has led to concerns that Pyongyang has no intention of giving up its weapons Mr. Trump's tweet suggests. These reports have not set. Back the current rapprochement between the two. Countries The United States is seeking the, extradition of two Ukrainian citizens arrested in Spain and Poland who are suspected of being part of a hacking group a. Third suspect is already in. The US Dave Lee reports defense seven group is said to have attacks more than. One hundred companies most were in the US but others were in. The UK Australia and France the hackers targeted point of sale systems stealing details. For fifteen million payment cards the group is understood, to still be active but US attorney net Hayes said hackers were plain wrong if, they thought they could hide behind, their keyboards in far away places these. Really defense Minister, Avigdor Lieberman, has ordered another halt in fuel and gas shipments to Gaza he said the decision had been taken in view of what he called the continued Tara of incendiary. Balloons that have ignited hundreds of fires in Israel this is the latest world news from the ABC A Japanese newspaper, reports alleges that the Tokyo Medical University altered test, results female applicants to restrict the number of women. Students the Shimbun daily, said the manipulation of scores began in two thousand eleven after the percentage of female admissions increase to about forty. Percent it's against the discrimination aims to keep the percentage to about thirty on the basis that many female doctors quit when they married and had children A state owned newspaper in China has, dismissed American reports that Google is. Planning a return to the Chinese market with a censored version of its search engine Andrew would reports from. Hong, Kong a news, website the intercept was the first to report Google was planning a search engine, for mobile phones in China that would ignore controversial subjects and websites blacklisted. By Beijing the intercept said it had seen internal Google documents and had spoken to insiders but a state. Owned business newspaper the China Securities daily says what it called relevant, departments had denied that Google would be available in, China again eight years ago Beijing blocks Google searches. And Google closed its, operations on the mainland of China but people in Hong Kong can still use Google to search the web a. Study has suggested a link between abstinence from alcohol in middle age and developing dementia in later life the researchers found that those who are teetotal When they were fifty have a forty, five percent higher risk than those. Who drink moderately people who drink over the recommended limits are also at an increased risk the Canadian rap. Star, Drake is extra, release the official music video for his hit single in my feelings videos based, on the track have gone vowed and social media thousands around the world. Of attempted what's known as the KiKi challenge by jumping out of a moving car and dancing alongside it. There have been many injuries as a result Hello this is the thought show on the. BBC World Service with me Beth sake offensive and with me and the Bishop in today's program getting creative with statistics how, can we find a way to captivate entertain and inform people and we ask why female friendships a so vital in the lives. Women and girls from the highs to lows.

Google United States Donald Trump Nelson Chamisa President Trump BBC Harare Andrew Harding Zimbabwe China Neil Nunez MDC Kim Jong-Un Kim Jong Pyongyang Beijing Us Attorney Hawaii
California museum can keep Cranachs looted by Nazis: U.S. appeals court

Red Eye Radio

07:11 min | 4 years ago

California museum can keep Cranachs looted by Nazis: U.S. appeals court

"For. Sure if he's a doctor but he helps us out that's. All we know, that was son Judah we had that sound that must have been an awkward conversation it was Harriet. But this is actually frighteningly common, around half the people claiming to be doctors in India are fake they have. No medical qualifications whatsoever but I've been speaking to the real doctor who's been offering. Thousands of them crash courses in medicine is medicine really something you can. Teach with the crash course that's what I've been trying to find out is a very. Controversial idea crash courses in. Medicine than fake doctors that's coming up a, world hacks. After the knees Hello this is David Austin with the BBC. News intelligence officials in the United States say spy satellites have detected renewed activity at a. North Korean, factory which has in the past produced intercontinental ballistic missiles the reports come just over a month after President Trump said, North Korea no longer posed. A threat following his meeting with the country's. Leader from so here's Laura bicker Steinle satellite images and the. BBC has spoken, to one of the companies analyzing this they say it appears to show vehicles moving in and out. At the site does this break, the words that Kim Jong in made to Donald Trump in Singapore Kim Jong. Il has always said that he would not text another missile he's never said anything. About stopping any building or activity with regards to building nuclear missiles and. Indeed this is a number of US intelligence reports which suggest that North Korea is continuing With its weapons. Program counting has continued overnight in Zimbabwe following Monday's election Zanu PF and the opposition MDC alliance have both been predicting. Victory on social media Andrew Harding is in Harare an election officials have, only confirmed a high turnout. Here in Zimbabwe but on social media the. Opposition leader Nelson Chamisa and his supporters already declaring victory in contrast Zanu PF officials are insisting that early. Indications from, polling stations around the country showed their party is on track to. Retain power foreign observers said the voting process was peaceful and by-in-large orderly whoever wins, a credible election will go a long way to restoring Zimbabwe's international reputation. I'm lacking foreign investment and debt relief for an impoverished country president Emmerson Mnangagwa said he. Was receiving, extremely positive information on the vote Chinese investigators say a state-owned pharmaceutical company which produce Used sub-standard infant vaccines did so by accident Celia Hatton has the details in a. Brief report China's, state Drug administration blamed faulty equipment used at the Wuhan institute of biological products in. Central China at unevenly distributed. Ingredients in more than four hundred thousand vaccines made last November which, were meant to protect, against a theory tetanus and whooping cough and another case involving. Sub-standard infant, vaccines eighteen people have been arrested at Chang-shang pharmaceutical and private company in eastern China they were accused of falsifying data to bypass. Regulatory scrutiny rescue is in Indonesia have airlifted the last of. More than five hundred stranded hikers of a mountain on the island of Lombok where. They'd been trapped by rockfalls triggered by an earthquake rescue team. Is now waiting with the body of an Indonesian climber who was killed. By a, falling rock world news from the BBC A court in Indonesia has ordered the banning of the country's largest Islamist group Jamaa unsure dollar to finding it guilty of carrying it acts of terrorism and being, linked to the Islamic state group last. Month the group's leader amount of Dirac man was sentenced to. Death for terrorism, Afghan officials say a roadside bomb has destroyed a passenger. Bus in the west, of the country killing at least eleven people and wounding forty others a spokesman for the governor of Farah province had the bus was travelling from harassed to Kabul. When it struck an improvised explosive device he blamed the attack on the Taliban earlier a suicide bomber killed candidate in October's parliamentary elections The former Congolese vice president and ex warlord Jean-Pierre Bemba. Has said he intends to stand for the presidency in elections do this December but will accept the result if, he loses, bender told the BBC that so long as the election was fair he would abide by the result rather than taking up arms as you did before if it is a transparent yes of course election transparent the result there we all respected this story of again. Is over for any fight is through the the voter now that's what. We want, to achieve Mr. Bemba plans to return to the DRC this week from Belgium after, a decade in jail following the quashing of his conviction for war crimes by the international criminal court the US court has ruled that the museum in California can keep to sixteenth century. Masterpieces by the German painter Lucas Curnow the, elder which were looted by the Nazis during the Second World War the life sized panels depicting. Adam and eve had been taken in a forced sale from Jewish art dealer who died shortly afterwards while fleeing, the Netherlands they eventually purchased by the Norton Simon museum in Pasadena BBC news In a village outside of Kolkata. In India there's a tiny concrete building where people go to. Get help well that I'm. A numb, I mean my name is the. Village Dr But here's. The thing Goten isn't a. Doctor at, all he has no medical qualifications He's what some people might call a quack Goten. Above your door it, says, doctor, you've. Got the title doctor. That's actually illegal on you misleading. Your patients hey Johnny mama I know it's illegal and I'm reluctant to do but. If I didn't, call myself Dr the villagers wouldn't, understand what I do. Some people think he's a criminal, he poses a danger to his patience and needs to. Be stopped but this man a real doctor has another idea and it's very controversial so. These people you ask. Me I don't think they are blah, FAS, and they're cheaters they're not, on very clear. In that this are primarily. Ended up aerial informal healthcare workers we call them wildflowers so we've. Taught give, you, tell them hey to give you some education this might work so that. Was, a, beginning Well Hello and welcome to.

BBC United States Zimbabwe North Korea China President Trump Donald Trump Kim Jong India Indonesia Jean-Pierre Bemba Harriet Nelson Chamisa Tetanus Emmerson Mnangagwa Zanu MDC Harare
Zimbabwe says election is clean; opposition is skeptical

Today

02:07 min | 4 years ago

Zimbabwe says election is clean; opposition is skeptical

"It's understood Mr. Wolfman later apologized and was, told he would not, face further action the labor MP Luciana Berger has called for. Him to, be suspended and Labour's deputy leader Tom Watson tweeted last night that Peter Wildman was allowed mouth bully adding he disgusts me a. Labor spokesperson said the party didn't. Comment on individual cases the opposing signs in Zimbabwe's elections on both. Claiming to have done well but no official results have yet been released the opposition leader Nelson. Chamisa said his claim, was based, on results from the majority of more than ten thousand polling stations Andrew. Harding reports from Harare election officials have only confirmed a. High turnout here in Zimbabwe. But, on social media the opposition leader Nelson, Chamisa and his supporters already declaring victory in contrast Zanu PF officials are insisting that early indications. From polling stations around, the country showed. Their party is on track to retain power foreign observers said the voting process Was peaceful and by and large orderly but after years of rigged and disputed. Elections there is. Now an anxious wait and a close focus on the counting process. To ensure these results will be accepted by all sides the owner of British Gas Centrica, says it's prophets for the first half of the year were affected. By. The price cap on prepayment Mueller's introduced last year and the continuing loss of. Customers the firm has reported pre-tax profits of six hundred twenty six million, pounds for the six months to June the. Fall of less than half of, one percent but announced a twenty percent drop in underlying operating prophets for its consumer Centric. Is, chief executive in told us the firm was ready for any new price caps we, have to keep a, very close eye on wholesale costs on all the other input. Costs including, smart metering costs and other things in advance of potential price cap what we are doing is encouraging our customers off the standard. Variable Taryn and we are develop Ping and have, developed a large number of, other propositions for customers that they seem to really want councils in England say the issue of how to..

Chamisa Zimbabwe Mr. Wolfman Peter Wildman Nelson Luciana Berger Tom Watson British Gas Centrica Harare Chief Executive Taryn Harding Mueller Official Zanu England Twenty Percent One Percent Six Months
Zimbabwe counts votes after first post-Mugabe election

Houston Morning News

02:01 min | 4 years ago

Zimbabwe counts votes after first post-Mugabe election

"Zimbabwe or voting and their first election without Robert Mugabe on the ballots contest could open the way toward international legitimacy or signal. More stagnation if the vote is found to be. Seriously flawed many voters here say this election is poised to deliver a political earthquake in, real change but the governing Zanu PF now under new management having pushed out Robert Mugabe insists that it is best placed to revive a shattered economy and. Foreign investment Zanu PF remains a formidable election-winning machine with strong support in. The countryside several thousand local and foreign observers are looking to ensure a free and. Fair vote not something that anyone takes for. Granted here that's the BBC's Andrew Harding to. Italian artists they were arrested over the weekend for painting a large mural of formerly imprisoned Palestinian protester on Israel's West. Bank wall now left Israel news, and analysis townhall. Dot com Hurricane Harvey may have caught many Houston area residents without flood insurance but despite an estimated one hundred twenty. Five billion dollars in storm damage people are not rushing to sign up for coverage keen Harvey is one of several storms in recent memory who's destructiveness. Shows a pattern where flood insurance is concerned after. The catastrophe there is a spike in the purchase of policies but cancelation draw those numbers, back to pre storm levels theme is national flood insurance program has come under criticism for those declining numbers last year it's goal was to double the number. Of structures covered from four to eight million by twenty twenty two but. Despite the bump from Harvey coverage has continued to drop in most states over the. Past decade George Monzon any Washington McDonalds marking. The fiftieth anniversary of the Big Mac and. It is not messing with success that double decker sandwich change from it since its national rollout back in nineteen sixty. Eight more on these stories at, townhall dot com My name.

Robert Mugabe Zanu Israel Hurricane Harvey Harvey Coverage Harvey Zimbabwe Twenty Twenty George Monzon Andrew Harding BBC Houston Mcdonalds Washington Five Billion Dollars
South Africa Commemorates Mandela Centennial

Today

03:03 min | 4 years ago

South Africa Commemorates Mandela Centennial

"Time for, today's puzzle for today which has been set. By Hugh hunt reader an engineering dynamics and vibration at Trinity College Cambridge Wimbledon is a? Great distraction but between matches there's not much to. Do so Martha decided to count how many rectangles she, could find enclosed by the white lines painted on. A tennis court John meanwhile was doing the same. For a football pitch so how many more rectangles are there on a tennis court than on a football pitch and then, people told us to, get, a life Now one hundred years ago today the man who went on to become, the first leader, of a democratic South Africa was born in a small village in the Eastern Cape but on Nelson Mandela Tinari some of his fellow citizens are. Angry about, enduring inequality and feel the former president made. Too many compromises in his negotiations with the apartheid era government Andrew Harding our correspondent reports? From Johannesburg it's the hundredth anniversary of his legacy We wanna. Go bigger and better than last year It's that time of year again. In South Africa and on the face of it Nelson Mandela has. Lost none of his power to inspire this year we want to. W the usual frenzy of Mandela themed charity drives And foreign dignitaries invited to join in Thank you so much this is Barack Obama getting a huge welcome yesterday here in Johannesburg where he spoke. Of the enduring power of Mandela's legacy I believe in Nelson Mandela's vision I believe in a vision of equality and. Justice and freedom and multiracial democracy And, it's an awkward but five years after. Mandela's death some here in South Africa starting to question the great man's achievements On a cold ruling the rapper cheesy busies for a music video on. Actually Nelson Mandela bridge but the generation that never knew President Mandela is wondering, whether South Africa's enduring, inequalities partly his fault he should. Have done like three are, people more and not sell us out People be owning companies he's lazy is Bates but he failed so that got. By not pushing for us to be accused fee from the operation allied people When it comes to the businesses The land Some of this frustration is simply the product of a lost decade of, economic stagnation corruption and soaring, youth unemployment but there's more to it Public hearings to discuss, land reform and specifically proposals, to confiscate white owned land Let's move Take.

President Mandela Nelson Mandela Bridge Nelson Mandela Tinari South Africa Johannesburg Trinity College Cambridge Wimb Hugh Hunt Tennis Barack Obama President Trump Andrew Harding Martha Football Eastern Cape John Bates One Hundred Years Five Years