19 Burst results for "Andrew Chen"

"andrew chen" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

Noah Kagan Presents

04:46 min | 2 months ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Noah Kagan Presents

"Of a more compelling. I think the titles. Actually it's interesting because the title indestructible. I don't feel like. I'm not distracted in general like i feel like i'm relatively focus on accomplishments my goals but digital minimums like. What am i doing digitally that. I can now adjust if i'm more specifically what i'm actually doing. It had it maybe like unfold. People on twitter unfolded everyone instagram. On on youtube. Mindful of how. I'm online the guy i would mindless. They go to twitter and i'm just like why are we doing this all time. Yes so indestructible. It's not just about tech right. That was really important to me that you know. Plato talked about this problem. Twenty five hundred years ago. This is not a new problem. So i wanted to make the book about distraction in general. Sometimes you know work is a distraction if you say hey i want to be with my family or my friends and now you're working will work as a distraction or if you're at work and now you're on social media will that's a distraction if you're you know if you said that you're gonna watch tv and now you're doing something else like everything could be a distraction. If it's not what you plan to do with your time. And so. I wanted to make the boat much more broad than just tech products and i think frankly like a lot of the advice out there around you know digital detox or digital minimalism is like anti tech and i actually disagree. I think we can absolutely us. Tons of tech is wonderful. I love tech. If we use it. The right way right like people you know. People a an instruction manual for how to use their blender. But we don't sit and think about how we're these incredible tech tools. And so what i wanted to do is to help you both. Think about you know the values starting with. How do you actually want to spend your time in any way you want to spend. Your time is fine right. If you wanna play video games all day. I got no problem with that as long as what you say. You want to do with your time in advance as long as you do that with intent as to what most people do so. This is where we talked about. We talked about traction a distraction while we didn't talk about the internal and external triggers rights. Extra triggers are all these things and things that are outside environment is what people tend to blame for getting distracted these. Oh my cell phone rang. This happened that my kids my boss. Those are external triggers but that turns out to be only ten percent of the reason. We get distracted with the other ninety percent. The other ninety percent are internal triggers. And this romy was a huge revelation that we tend to think that distraction start from outside but actually the vast majority of distraction begins from within either internal triggers boredom loneliness fatigue uncertainty stress anxiety. This is the number one source of distractions. So all this other stuff doesn't matter right. Like all the other tips and tricks in gurus life hacks. None of that stuff works unless we understand that time. Management is pain management right. This is a really important point that ninety percent of the time we distract his because we are looking to escape but uncomfortable sensation with a distraction. Take my mind off of that feeling. And that's where we get distracted bath where we go off track. So that's step number. One is mastering the internal triggers triggered for me why he was thinking andrew chen. He's you know andrew..

twitter Plato youtube fatigue uncertainty stress anx romy andrew chen andrew
"andrew chen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

Techmeme Ride Home

02:55 min | 4 months ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Techmeme Ride Home

"A virtual yearbook signing app and a clubhouse for schools app. According to crunch base the company raised a two million dollar seed round led by floodgate fund in two thousand eighteen. Paparazzi appears to be. Its first big hit other. Vc's seemed to be circling signal fires. Josh constan wrote that. Paparazzi is quote the perfect app for hot vac summer while founder. Funds deleon aspirants. Hav john that a sixteen andrew chen has to offer the company a term sheet immediately and quote so next big thing alert. But i've been saying for a couple years now that these zag for social media projects going forward is likely to be leaning hard on making people feel good using social media as opposed to addicting them to doom scrolling engineering. For engagement is no longer cool. You know what's cool designing for delight. Maybe this is a bit of that. finally today. We have an interesting raise episode coming for ride home plus subscribers this weekend. But i couldn't resist telling you all about this one because it's such a huge raise for something that i had my doubts about. But what do i know neum is an app that purports to help people lose weight by changing their behavior and it's raised get this five hundred and forty million dollars. Sources say at a three point seven billion dollar valuation. But hey maybe here's why neum apparently had sales of four hundred million dollars in two thousand twenty going bloomberg neum founded more than a decade ago under a different name saul interests swell amid the coronavirus pandemic sales reached four hundred million dollars last year. Up from two hundred million dollars in two thousand nineteen said she financial officer. Michael noonan neum is expanding beyond weight loss to areas such as stress management to help with sleep diabetes and hypertension while it currently focuses on individual consumers. It's also reaching out beyond the app store tapping employers and possibly even health. Insurers pushing into the enterprise market will pit neum against a growing number of companies vying for that business. The digital is booming with starting pitching employers on technology to make their workers healthier and reduce their costs. Neum could go public within a year. The company has met with potential advisors to discuss an initial public offering eyeing evaluation of around ten billion dollars. A bloomberg has reported and as i read these words into this microphone. The microsoft bill conference is kicking off. But i have elected to cover that tomorrow. So expect a wrap up of a whole bunch of announces of interest to deb's tomorrow. I don't think we're expecting any hardware or gaming news but who knows anyway. Talk to you then..

Josh constan tomorrow Michael noonan four hundred million dollars andrew chen two thousand today last year two hundred million dollars two million dollar around ten billion dollars sixteen seven billion dollar more than a decade ago five hundred and forty million neum two thousand nineteen first big Paparazzi a year
"andrew chen" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Venture Stories

"An I'm trying really hard to just stay focused on creating a really high quality newsletter because that alone is really hard. Some just trying to say no to everything that's trying to pull me away into other things including joining a bundle i. also feel like people don't want more email. Necessarily and so just being like one part of like a mini email group. That helps and I think also the economics change and so I think in my case it's going well I, don't have any reason to consider something else but I think it makes a lot of sense for people starting out and and there's a lot of benefits to it for readers especially because it's a much better deal garrity guests person other people's publications. Yeah. That was actually a big way that I started the newsletters. I did a couple of guests post one with Andrew Chen's blogging than one on first round and that Kinda helped jumpstart the newsletter. Now now I find people want to do guest host in my newsletter and I love that because one it is less work for me in a week or it can kind of think ahead to the next week more quickly and and it gives a platform for new people to kind of build their own audience. Side do it less? So recently, cool I want to get into different elements of the craft itself. Lenny, I'll start asking you not even really jumping either with your point of view or an additional question and bright my producer will take out the last part of what I just said. Lenny how do you think about the ideation us in terms of what the post? So I have this Cheat Code, which is my newsletter is an advice column, which means people send me questions and so I have a long list, I think like fifty questions at this point of in a backlog. So that's that's the main source. Then there's also advised companies in Angel Invest, and that drives a lot of other questions that startups run you know send me..

Lenny Andrew Chen Angel Invest producer
How You Should Measure Your SEO Efforts |

Marketing School

04:21 min | 1 year ago

How You Should Measure Your SEO Efforts |

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them. To a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream. Host DOT COM slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School. I'm Eric Su and I'm meal and today we are going to talk about how you should measure your seo efforts so neil. I mean there's the old way of doing things and there's the new way of doing things. But how should we look at it in the Modern Day? Well most people look at. Seo As you get traffic to your website an how many of those people convert right away. You and I both believe marking has turned into Omni Channel. And it's not that we believe it. The data shows marketing has turned into Omni channel poetry. You can no longer build a business just off up one channel whether it's paper quick or social media or SEO. And I know companies have in the past but that doesn't exist anymore as Andrew. Chen says all good channels go to shit and SEO is one of those competitive channel. So I like doing when it comes to measuring my seo efforts when we're trying to increase rankings as we look at impression count and is it going up over time then of course as time goes on we get more impressions. We look at Click. Cow Are the clicks going up right because impressions tend to go first and then we look at revenue and conversions. But if I'm not mistaken you'll look at the same way when it comes to your efforts but the real question is how do you look at it from grand scheme of things with all the marketing? Do you lump it in together and combine it or do you keep it as a separate channel. Yeah so I mean I think the way I look at it is. I think there's a way to look at the blended metrics but I think you should always look at it separately to you know at the end of the day. Otherwise it's hard to kind of turn which efforts are actually working. What's not what I will say is how you don't measure them. You know sure you can look at a higher level. Metrics such as rankings and things like that but rankings doesn't always guarantee that you're going to be successful because what if you're ranking number one for something and then the search volume for that keyword is maybe fifty searches a month or something like that? Maybe it could be good for your business maybe to LTV. The lifetime value is good. But if you're selling a bunch of ECOMMERCE products and you're looking for volume that's not necessarily the way to look at. I think a lot of people when they played the game. They spend too much time looking at keyword volume they spend too much time looking at rankings. I certainly did that in the very beginning and ended up building. You know very small websites. That didn't get a lot of volume because I wasn't thinking about the bigger picture which is overall the big Pie. How do we drive more traffic? And then ultimately how does that convert to sales because just because we're driving traffic doesn't necessarily mean sales like I rank for something right now? I think strike through text generator and I actually made like a strike through text widget just for the hell of it and I think we rank pretty highly for. We're getting five figures and traffic. Each month from it literally converts to nothing. We've got nothing from it right so I think back to. Neil's point you gotta look at traffic conversions and and hopefully let Dahlan into revenue at the end of the day. And we look at it at the same way as you. Do we look at a separate and we look at as blended the big risk that you end up running into any look at blended you'll have some channels at a really poorly performing and people like. Oh yeah works like I know some people who spend a ton of money on paid advertising yet it loses a ton of money but they blended in with their SEO. Be like look it's profitable now and you have to be careful with that because spending more on pay doesn't necessarily help you increase your seo but on the flip side if you get a ton of Seo traffic and you're using it for remarketing purposes for paid while some of your paid attribution in the success of your pay campaign is also there because of your seo efforts but if you're spending a ton of money on paid usually we don't see a big correlation with spending a ton of money on paid boosting up your seo but we do see it the other way around because you can remark and people who read your content are familiar with the brand and then get them to buy. Yes so I think you have to look at it from the entire slice sure you can use Google analytics to measure but there are other tools now that kind of help you make use of your data there's customer data platforms out there where you can kind of see a timeline of user. And how they've been behaving then there's multichannel attribution for Google analytics. But there's other tools out there that you can certainly use as well. Are you familiar with any of them kneel one that we love?

Omni Channel Marketing School Eric Su Chen Andrew Neil Dahlan
Metrics and Mindsets for Retention & Engagement

a16z

10:26 min | 1 year ago

Metrics and Mindsets for Retention & Engagement

"The conversation that follows is one of our more popular episodes from a couple years ago featuring general partners Andrew Chen and Jeff Jordan. In conversation with me on how after you acquire users which we covered in another episode than how do you keep them engaged retain them and even resurrect or re engage them and what are the key metrics but first we begin with what happens after the initial acquisition as different kinds of users? Join a product or platform over time. What does that mean for engagement? And where do cohort analyses? Come in one of the things that you see. Is that people end up using these products very differently because the kinds of users that you're getting are changing over time you know when you look at something like rideshare. All the early cohorts are basically people in urban areas. And then these days all of rideshare is more like suburban or rural folks. Because you know you've saturated all of the center and so what you tend to see is as you acquire your folks you know your core demographic out that actually ends up showing up in the engagement and so you know going back to the natural like kind of gravity to the whole thing this gravity also hits the engagement side of things as well and then ultimately the LTV because your users are typically getting you know kind of less valuable. It may take years to see this kind of play out. But that's kind of the natural law and there is a progression these and particularly the ones that are really successful early on it's all about getting users users. If you're wildly successful at doing that you run out of users. Are you start running low on users and you have to go to engagement? So pitchers has a very high quality problem right now. Most women in America have downloaded the PINCHER staff for years. So some growth can come through. Okay there's some number of women new nerd pinter somewhere in the country but much more so they need to engage and reengage the existing audience. I mean we love engagement from an investor standpoint. Because it's just that stickiness some you can often hack your way into new users. It's really hard to hack your way into true. Engage someone spending twenty minutes a day on your site offer up pinchers and offer. The major investment thesis was. Oh my God look at that engagement kind of thing and you know if they can scale the user base. It's it's a beautiful right. What we mean by engagement is actually interacting with them and seeing their activity because two Andrew's three points of acquisition engagement retention. The third piece is keeping them. The way that will often analyze this as looking at cohort analyses. We'll look at kind of each batch of users that's joining in each week and really start to dissect like well. How active are they really and to compare all these cohorts over time your basically putting the users that come in from a particular timeframe. Let's say it's a week right and you're putting them into a bucket right and what you're doing. Is You want to compare all of these different buckets against each other. And so what you typically do you look in a bucket of cohort of users and you say okay while once. They've signed up the week after. How active are they? And what about the week after that and the week after that and you can build out a curve and it just turns out that these curves once you've looked at enough of them surprisingly human nature. They all look kind of the same Ivanko. They kind of all kind of curve down. And for the good ones they start to flatten out and Plateau and then for the really good ones. They'll actually swing back up and people will come back to the service to what you WANNA do. You WanNa compare the various cohorts against each other in time to see if you can spot any trends on how the usage patterns are increasing or decreasing when you add a new layer two layer cake. You know you might unlock a bunch of new behavior. Reminding unlock a bunch of new frequency. That didn't exist before or alternatively over long thresholds of time people tend to become less active as you move out of your graduates whether or not a specific organizers. Flattens out is really important. Because if you're in a world where they kind of slowly degrades and then all of a sudden it will actually go to zero. That means that you're naturally always kind of filling up the bucket. You know you kind the leaky bucket. You're constantly and what happens. Is that gets progressively harder as you because if you want to keep your overall growth rate because that means you have to double triple quadruple your acquisition in order to counteract for that one growth accounting equation. That's often thrown around is that you're use of your net. Monthly active users equals all the new people that you're acquiring right minus all the people that are churned. Right and plus all the people that you're resurrecting you know engaging reengaging executives that are coming back after they've turned and so what happens is for a new startup. You are completely focused on new users. Because you don't really have that many users to turn and overtime as you get bigger and bigger and bigger what you find. Is that your your turn. Rates starts to you know. It's a percentage of your actives and so the evolution of most of these companies as getting bigger tends to start with acquisition then focused much more on churn retention and then ultimately also Laron resurrection as well in the CO occurs a couple of other features that I love what usually in marketplace businesses the best models are built off of the cohort curves. You have to understand that degradation and where it goes using. Cohorts really give you a sense of are there network effects and network effect is the business gets more valuable than more users that use it if it gets more valuable. You're newer cohorts should behave better than your early. Because the service is more valuable given how many there there's ten times more restaurants you're going to get a whole lot more reservations per diner because you were serving more on the need. So the open table courts would climb up and get more attractive over time versus we. Oh we talked about typically they tend to degrade over time if you've reversed polarity and they're growing overtime. It means you made the business more valuable and then you start projecting forward okay. What way to know. The business is actually more valuable than thinking is valuable bleed over on. May in a network business. We always ask. Show us the cohorts everyone asserts. I'm a network effect. I'm a network effect. But when you say show me. The data cohort curves show at the other. Really interesting part is segmenting it to actually ask you. What are the buckets of cohort? All demographic data for a bunch of hyper local type businesses. The reason why segmenting based on market geography why. That's so valuable is because then you can compare markets against each other. You can say well you know this market which has much more density in terms of the number of scooters behave like this and you can start to draw conclusions sort of a natural ab test in order to do that. And I think the similar kind of analysis you can do for B. Two B. Companies is for products that have different sized teams using it. If you have a really large team that are all using a product. Well are they all using the product more as a result? And let's compare that to something right. And so this way you can start to disassemble the structure of these networks and do they actually lead to higher engagement. Slack would be a perfect example of that. You know if you have five people in the organization using slack you get one use curve if you have you know the organization it's the operating system for the organization. You have a very different curve. It's not just an accident you have to sort of architect it not just expect. Barron deputy to volunteer place so after you get the new users the way that you have to think about it is around quality right. You have to make sure that the news turn into engaged users. One of the things people often talk about is just sort of this idea of an Aha moment or a magic moment where the user really understands the true value of the product but often that involves a bunch of setups so for example for all the different social products whether that's twitter facebook or pinterest etc. You have to make sure that when you first bring a new user they have to follow all the right people they have to get the on boarding experience which by the way isn't just signing up but it's actually doing all the things to get to this like a Ha- where you're like I get this product for me and once you get that. Then they're kind of didn't have the opportunity to keep them in this engage state overtime. Is that really such a thing that there is a a Ha moment or is it? Sort of like accumulated a lot of the later users on facebook came because everyone else was already there is this only tied to new users. Mukisa facebook actually the fact that everyone was already there makes the Aha moment that much more powerful because all your friends and family. They're already there. You're feeds already full of content. And the first time that you see photos that may be someone that you went to high school with that. Thank you so excited when I saw an old friend right right. Yeah exactly and so what that means like you get the product and then afterwards when you actually are getting these push notifications or emails. That are like hey someone's birthday or whatever you've internalized what that product is and this moment is different for all sorts of different companies. I've always heard this referred to as the magic number when you show up and it's a blank slate. It's like what is this about. But they would drive you maniacally to follow people because when you got to their magic number where they'd statistically correlated the number of followers with long term engagement and retention. They would kill you to get you there. Doing what felt like a natural acts of lake. Yeah you log on to follow and you say no and yes but what got you there it kicked in and the service then quote work for you the Entrepreneur I work with. They're trying to figure out. What is my magic moment that then creates the awareness of the value prop so take the example PINTER's pinchers when it goes to a new market first of all. They figured out. They need a lot of local content to make a compelling the local users the US Corpus of image is doesn't necessarily is helpful in international markets but isn't sufficient and I don't only want like skirts. Wear your exactly. I haven't worn in North America. Then once you have the content set then you have to get compelling information to that individual in front of them which you know. You don't know the individual when they walk in the door. The faster they do that the more quickly the better the business performs engagement goes up retention goes up and at work so different entrepreneurs had to figure out what is that. What experience do they want to deliver? Where people get it and then. How do you engineer your way into delivering

Facebook Andrew Chen Slack And Plateau United States North America America Engineer Jeff Jordan Twitter Barron Pinterest
"andrew chen" Discussed on Naval

Naval

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Naval

"There's extremely little innovation in the venture capital business. It's actually quite easy to stand out you just. I have to be willing to do something that other people haven't done before in other words you have to be willing to take on accountability and the risk of being wrong. Do you think someone will try to build a brand around the buying common stock from entrepreneurs at some point instead of purchasing preferred stock. Some people have already done that. A little. Bit and recent Horowitz starting to do that in the sense that they became am registered investment advisor. So they can do secondary's you could argue. That's actually a core part of why sees brand. They buy very low valuation in that first round but they used by common and so they will completely in the same boat as you. There's no branded firm or angel investor. Who's writing large checks? That is in common. I think it's the very clever strategy and something something that we may yet see happening. It does have the problem where the company can shut down and keep your money. But they're clever ways around that you could say okay. I'm buying preferred stock but after two years it converts the Common Stock. So you're running your company for a while when you burn through my cash and you raise somebody else's cash at that point. I'm no longer sitting on top of you in a liquidation preference overhang but at the same time my money's been spent so it's not like you can shut down the company and run off with my money money. My original brand started out strangely enough growth hacking where I co built a facebook at twenty million dollars pretty quickly. I use that as my calling calling card. When I was going and talking to entrepreneurs this was back in the early growth hacking days before growth hacking had a bad name? A friend told me about twitter and I tried it and I liked the product at the time was is all text message based this is pre AP. I tracked down Evan Williams and every just given back investors a bunch of money for a failed podcasting venture called Odio. It kept twitter. which was the one thing at a studio that looked interesting? It's still very much a toy and went to ev about investing. At that point his round was done he had a little bit of allocation laughed and he basically he was posing the question of well. Why should I let you invest a got up on the whiteboard and I laid out what little I knew at the time about growth hacking this was before Andrew? Chen blew it open for the world. It did that for about half on our while. He and his deputy watched at the end. He said this sounds great. We're not going to do any of it. Because against her. Ethos and I respected him for that but he was impressed enough that I cared I thought about it that I got a chance to put him to twitter. And that was my first major angel investment. That worked out. Are there any new angel investors that you think have done a good job of building a brand recently recently. I don't know if they necessarily build a brand to invest but I think they'll have a brand through their natural activities and then that will give them the ability to invest the rest of it the judgment and the capital. Someone is still up to them. I think Ryan Hoover has a great France. His twitter game is among the best. I've seen in the world. He's always community building on twitter just by the side effect breathing. He's going to have a good brand as an angel investor especially into consumerist things. Another good brand is Patrick Freedman. He's basically the investing in startup. Countries and sovereign individual projects is a unique enough thesis. Unique if angle. That all the libertarian types and all the free state types are gonNA flock to him just by being the first one to put down a stake in the ground saying I'm going to fund these kinds of activities means you'll get to see all of the limited deal flow in that space and at the same time there are lots of other projects especially in Crypto. That aren't necessarily about starting a free state but they overlap and the people who start those companies have sympathies towards it's free state projects enter themselves sovereign individuals these people who signed the petitions to free Ross Olbrycht and Julian assange and so on. And I'm one of them by the way so they're going to be naturally naturally inclined towards letting him invest. There's probably some ways to build a brand that are going to get us stuck in ways that you don't WanNa be for example you don't want want to build a brand around just a specific market thesis right. You don't want to have a brand around the transition from ex technology to why technology because when that transition is complete so is your brand. You also don't want to have to narrow of a brand or branded the space that doesn't materialize if you have a clean tech brand that's focused entirely on solar and solar doesn't arrive on scheduled and your entire area of expertise shot when you're first starting out because of your expertise in your network and because you wanNA raise as capital. There's a pressure to specialize. But if you look at the top. VC firms actually rarely specialist. They're usually generalists and even when they specialize they'll specialize specialize in being weird like founders fund. This specialize in a lot of deep tech deals and we are deals but they don't specialize further than that they don't say we're Syn bio only or I machine learning. Only you have to resist that urge because very often these trends don't materialize. I'm old enough to remember when cleantech was a wave that cost Kleiner Perkins a lot of money or when Java was a wave the cost investors a lot of money because those never turned out to be massive markets or took a lot longer than people expected. You already in clean tech. If you got tessler SPACEX that forgave everything but also means if you didn't get into Tessler SPACEX if you weren't in the Elon Musk mafia and cleantech. You missed everything so you don't WanNa be he to narrow the same time if.

twitter SPACEX Tessler SPACEX Kleiner Perkins Horowitz facebook advisor Evan Williams Odio Chen Patrick Freedman Andrew Ryan Hoover
"andrew chen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Ecosystem in two thousand nineteen grew out of our internal deal team and was authored by legion who's on her deal team and she works very close with andrew chen. Who's one of general partners who's really interested in investing in podcasting startups and then avery seagal also authored a section in that report on podcasting casting china because it's huge in china and he works very closely with connie chan who's very interested in investing in podcasting startups and new media startups as well and then the third author was ben at karachi who did a lot of research on that report and they also really called a lot of the research out there so i wanna give a shout out to edison research. They produce the infinite dial study and tom webster. I've been following his work for like fifteen years. Is the main lead there in. It's a really thoughtful report so that's the context with that report. I think the big takeaways at a very high level are that podcasting is hitting a quote inflection point that it's becoming more mainstream now. I actually still don't think it's there. It's still very early. Days of my big reflection on modern podcasting is that it is becoming more mainstream but it is still phase one because we don't have the infrastructure that we need to really do podcasting well by that. I mean it's still lacks discovery. I mean how do you find a podcast. How do people find software engineering daily if they don't already know about exactly and as you know one of the ways people find podcast number one way to discover podcast is listen to other podcasts so that's basically how people find out then there's a complete lack of episodic discovery. Mrs big pet peeves. I don't believe everybody wants to follow. Every single episode of a podcast is not a serialized narrative show. They want topical things so what i want all the podcasts on quantum computing crafting fantasy novels and romance which are all things. I'm interested in kind of weird combo but i can't find that now so that's missing but what's some good news on this talking about modern podcasting is that google recently announced that they are transcribing podcasts which is a huge important move because now finally all that sort of dark voice for lack of a better phrase is is going to finally be indexed which will help a ton with the discovery side..

avery seagal connie chan andrew chen karachi tom webster china google edison fifteen years
"andrew chen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To software engineering daily. I'm so excited to be here. I know you it's mutual. I mean most of the time with a podcast broadcast. You have the ace symmetric intimacy. We actually have. Yes symmetric asymmetric intimacy. We actually know each other right. It's really funny when people come up up to you now feel like they know you and you're like. I don't know who you are but it's also great at the same time you host the sixteen z podcast. Why did it make sense for a venture capital firm to start a podcast. It's a really good question so first of all the broader context for the podcasts as white as a v._c. Firm have an editorial operation and the reason for that is that a six and z has always had a culture of writing and communicating and sharing ideas well before we built an editorial operation that was here before i even joined and and then there's this trend of a lot of i used to joke when i was at i was at wired at the time that it's really funny v._c._r. The new editors and it kinda said it in a snarky way because i felt like who are these people that think they know it's up in us. Editors have more things to say but then i realized that they were talking about more leading versus lagging indicators others and i got frustrated because i felt like i'm focusing on lagging indicators in my narrative work and i would like to go back to leading indicators which is why it came to a six z so before i joined there was another journalist who was here and i joined as editors and the model sorta shifted to more editing other people than storytelling in the third persons we went to a first person send model and that takes me to why a podcast so to answer your question why we did a podcast it actually existed three months before i even joined and and the it was i believe the brainchild of chris dickson and then kim lhasa vich and michael copeland helped with getting off the ground and it was intended to start off just sort of hallway conversations and dixon was an early blogger and so i believe that podcasting sort of potentially the next evolution of blogging and being able talk intimately but really started as an experiment but the night took over shortly after joining in the production and it's been growing since what lessons from the history of blogging apply to podcasting oh. I love that question jeffrey. I'm so glad you're asking that because i think about this all the time so it's funny a a lot of people complain about the end bogging or the nostalgically think of the heyday of blogging. I kind of roll my eyes a little because i feel like you know what you're just missing talking to each other what i love about podcasting. Is there something more inclusive about it that anybody can listen to a podcast on a mobile phone and it's not to say that blogging wasn't accessible because if you think about the history of the printing press and how the printing press made what would formally very elite ideas more available in the form of mass books similarly lee blogging sort of took what we're quote formally elite ideas in the form of certain media outlets articles into the form of mass blogs but there was even though i loved the early wave of blogging a little bit of elitism to it where it felt it was very much a bunch of bloggers who would talk to each other. There wasn't really this shared sense of an experienced. The whole community was having one of the parallels in podcasting is that in many ways podcasting is the next evolution of blogging because of the intimacy podcast. They're so intimate. You're really in someone's ear. The other similarity is the authentic nature of the communication. You don't have to write like a five paragraph essay and have it perfectly edited so podcasting is very similar and and that sort of you're really hearing someone's voice. You can't fake that but what's different is that podcasting is to me like shared community and it's a movement like people are really following a movement. You have a completely different relation to the people are listening to to go deeper there. A sixteen zero recently had a series about podcasting. There was a long p._d._f. There's a long article two hour long episode with connie chan and nick kwa. Did you have any any reflections on the spirit of podcasting in its modern form today from all that research in that grinding on that data yeah i mean you had an amazing post which is on pod sheets and your view on open source podcasting. You also did like a great overview of all the different players in the industry and i thought that was great. I loved loved it and very aligned with a lot of my own views too so the podcast about podcasting it was me in connie nick as you noted and nicholas known for doing hotpot newsletter which is one of my favorites and i know you're nodding that's one of yours too and the report on investing in the podcast ecosystem in two thousand nineteen grew out of our internal deal team and was authored by legion who's on her deal team and she works very close with andrew chen. Who's one of general partners who's really interested in investing in podcasting startups and then avery seagal also authored a section in that report on podcasting casting china because it's huge in china and he works very closely with connie chan who's very interested in investing in podcasting startups and new media startups as well and then the third author was ben at karachi who did a lot of research on that report and they also really called a lot of the research out there so i wanna give a shout out to edison research. They produce the infinite dial study and tom webster. I've been following his work for like fifteen years. Is the main lead there in. It's a really thoughtful report so that's the context with that report. I think the big takeaways at a very high level are that podcasting is hitting a quote inflection point that it's becoming more mainstream now. I actually still don't think it's there. It's still very early. Days of my big reflection on modern podcasting is that it is becoming more mainstream but it is still phase one because we don't have the infrastructure that we need to really do podcasting well by that. I mean it's still lacks discovery. I mean how do you find a podcast. How do people find software engineering daily if they don't already know about exactly and as you know one of the ways people find podcast number one way to discover podcast is listen to other podcasts so that's basically how people find out then there's a complete lack of episodic discovery mrs or my big pet peeves. I don't believe everybody wants to follow. Every single episode of a podcast is not a serialized narrative show. They want topical things so what i want all the podcasts on quantum computing crafting fantasy novels and romance which are all things. I'm interested in kind of weird combo but i can't find that now so that's missing but what's some good news on this talking about modern podcasting is that google recently announced that they are transcribing podcasts which is a huge important move because now finally all that sort of dark voice for lack of a better phrase is is going to finally be indexed which will help a ton with the discovery side. How would you encapsulate the competitive dynamics between apple spotify google well first of all. None of this is investment advice. I am not an investor. I'm commenting on mainly. The trends of these companies being really containers of interesting models that are happening in the podcasting industry. Sorry so it's funny because i've never seen this before where three platforms at all have the opportunity to own space seem to be really doing very different things so so spotify. It's really interesting because they have very openly said they wanted really grow podcasting. The ceo daniel is on the public record talking about in a speech. He gave this year about what all the investments are making. You know they acquired gimblett. Obviously they acquired anchor. All people whose work i've been following for a long time and they're realizing that audio wpro is music and podcasting and they're two different things and that's super important and they're obviously clearly thinking about the user generated side of things hence the acquisition of anchor so a lot of people will often say that they have to become the youtube of podcasting which they have a lot of potential for but i think what's really interesting about spotify always had really creative ways of thinking about a person's whole audio profile for the day and i believe third piece of this that is not currently in there is audio books because to me the definition of podcasting lasting in connie beliefs as to is. It's not just technically quote podcasts audiobooks. That's other audio. It's spoken-word basically not words that are sung spotify has a really unique opportunity because of their model with playlists and their ability to do more creative things on the recommendation side then google will have a really interesting play because as their their model has always been to index the world's information the ability to index podcasts is huge and i recently heard that there are more people coming to podcast ask via google then via spotify. I wanna double check. This stat google has an advantage. I'm be transcription side and being able to search and find podcasts and then the third player apple huge fan of that team by the way james boggs. Those guys in the past apple hasn't really invested deeply and podcasting. You know the classic story. There's like two people in the department winner by people or whatever it is it seems that they are now but the thing about apple is at because of their big position on protecting user privacy. They're not gonna do some other things that podcasters want which is like the ability to communicate with fans like to be able to send out an email for instance update to your fans and by the way none of these three are hosting platforms. They're all distribution platforms right. None of them are actually upload your podcast to spotify google or apple. They're basically taking second all the feeds. What is your provision for podcasting becoming social and is an inevitability. I do believe podcasting should be social inherently even though it's not i know elite. Our partner in the deal team also believes in social podcasting so far one of the leading social podcasting apps breaker but i think there's a lot of interesting innovation still what happened on this in this space. I'm interested in two things on that front. I definitely want the graph of people there's a classic thing you always ask other people what other podcast podcast you listen to and find out through word of mouth like here are the podcast that i want to hear but i'm also interested in people coming around live events around podcasting and sort of coming together in that that frame but for me and other piece of it as a creator. How do you communicate with your fans like right now. I'm in a room with two people sometimes recording something and dan. I can't engage with them so when i go on public and they're like we went self as we want to hang out is really cute and really weird and completely mind boggling that this happens but i would love to be able to continually early because if you think about it it's again movement. You're creating a world view in a glimpse into our world and how to think about tech imagine if we could send updates to them via apps apps and various things cruise is a san francisco based company.

google spotify connie chan apple connie nick jeffrey tom webster partner san francisco avery seagal chris dickson michael copeland connie andrew chen dixon
"andrew chen" Discussed on Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

10:34 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Breaking Bitcoin (Audio)

"They're not a bridge they are. They are the bridge they are the other side of the trade. They are the counterparty so when you're buying the the broker is selling to you right. They are there to provide liquidity in a P. Two P. or E. C. N.. Market that is the the role of a market maker. Okay so the idea that an exchange would take the opposite side of your trade is not inherently a bad thing that is how they provide liquidity okay now the they make money off of this so they are literally providing the liquidity for you to take your trade they make their money and four x by a spread which is a higher price than the market rate. Okay so say you know you wanNA take a trade. You'RE GONNA market by you are going to actually pay a few pips higher than the actual market price in the the exchange keeps that as profit now if you win your trade the exchange loses money because they have to the your profits are coming from. They're losing trade. Okay your profits are coming from the exchange rate so a winning trader takes their profits from the exchange and a a <hes> the exchange offsets that loss by the by the spread they charged you and if you lose your trade will the exchanges profiting off of you and they're getting the spread on top. She just the hustle. It's just the way that works another way that exchanges offset that loss loss. If you're a winning trader is because they are accumulating they are aggregating the losses of other traders right because we do have to remember that most traders are losing traders. Okay now non dealing desk brokers. They're abridge. They create the bridge. They linked to parties together. They create they provide an order book that that market makers come onto and make the market and other retail traders come in and put their trades as well so they just connect you right and the way that they make money <hes> the way that they make money is generally by charging commission okay. This is non dealing desk charge commission so they linked to parties together in a P._C._p.. An A. P. Two P. fashion. They do not take the other side of the clients trade and they do not directly provide liquidity toward the market so it actually takes less capital to create an E. C. N. dealing desk than it does to create a dealing desk operation to create a non dealing desk <hes> now they are bridge builders. They build a bridge between a buyer and a seller now they charge a commission for the bridge building or they raised the spread a little bit because they're not making money <hes> they don't make money whether you win or lose a trait. They're just connecting you right so they're capital is not directly involved in a trade but they they're capital is involved in building that bridge and maintaining the system so they charge a spread or they charge a commission generally almost always commission and spread as well so bit next is by this by nature according according to the official website and all public statements <hes> Bet Max is in S. t. p. which is a straight through processor okay. This is straight through pathway they are they. They don't provide the liquidity themselves they host the orderbook. They provide the platform and they connect to parties together other P._C._p.. So <hes> in this scenario bet next taking the opposite side of the trade is unethical illegal and wrong or I don't really think that that MEX is most likely taking the opposite side of the trade <hes> they're not. They are an S. t. p. he there's two types of dealing desktop nonfeeling. There's e- C._N._N.'s which is an electronic communications network which is basically linking multiple poles of liquidity together and then there's an S._t.. P which is just one pool of liquidity one orderbook this bit Max because they're not tapping into other pools of liquidity so as far as we know so they are an S._d._S. straight through processor <hes> straight through pathway everyone a call it now now that means that bit Mexico's not taking the opposite sides of traits were they on top of charging commission that would be quite unethical so however I just wanted to point out that there is nothing inherently bad about about an exchange taking the opposite side of a trade. If Bet Max is going to be the market maker right if they're gonNA make the markets but they're not market. Makers are getting rich on that Max market makers do not hot market makers are independent entities the come to bit next to make the markets and make money on top of that however it seems as if the market makers have fled today the order books are extremely thin over there on bet maxim for that's another reason why I'm completely had short the last time that I saw the orderbook this then on Bet Max. We was back in November when we dropped from six to four K. almost overnight so just keep that in mind as we've seen before it goes and I'll link this link this <hes> this baby pips dot com article in the show notes so you guys can go definitely check that out. This is really good. Good understanding to have about forex trading okay last thing to go over. Today is over there in in China China's again today recognize the legality of Bitcoin as a commodity now. This is not the first time that China has affirmed bitcoins legal status in China back in two thousand eighteen. The Shenzhen Arbitration Commission declared that an at the asset bitcoin should be quote protected in accordance with law and his legal to own and transfer so for all the fudd about China banning bitcoin. I think that's nonsense. bitcoin is a legally protected asset and Bitcoin has been since two thousand eighteen. It's just the legal to trade it and participate in I._C._O.'s it is a protected asset to own and to transfer in China now. I don't see Chinese crypto exchanges popping up anytime soon but this is in conjunction with what's happening in the United States. It's just indicative of a massive massive paradigm shift right we have the president of the United States talking about Bitcoin Congress losing their minds over Lieber coin doesn't mean global adoption or dismissal of Fiat is right around the corner it just lets us know in the crypto space as that. We are definitely doing something right so let's go into. Let's go into a couple things here. Hopefully guys can see this really really well. There's some good tweets and I thought this would be helpful to just kind of talk about here in <hes> here here in the market <hes> this is a tweet from this from senior Jeffey by he says <hes> you know <hes> B._G.. Erosion which is <hes> you know. He's a ripple promoter. He's. He's talking about problems in paradise. Hayden tiff is key or shit coin bags so hard right so I just wanted to show these <hes> these screen shots of <hes> of of <hes> you know Tiffany Hayden's tweets if not not following Hayden Jeff over on twitter. She's pretty funny to follow <hes> <hes> so <hes> I'm GonNa go through this threat and talk about my opinions on this <hes>. Why don't you think banks financial institutions and NGOs will run validates when they trust and liquidity and actually is X.? P. It is blah. Blah Blah Blah Blah percent cheaper to help secure network with others than do what they are are doing now with Fiat tiffany says if nobody does now there's no reason to think that they magically will if ripple shutters tonight. The network won't last much longer <hes>. Let's see here. <hes> let's find this one okay then then x are quoting but if China controls bitcoin essentially then China and the United States are in cahoots. I guess then right and this is again. I've talked about this like how stupid this is to say that China <hes> controls bitcoin mining just because there's a lot of minors over there because they provide cheap liquidity entity does not necessarily mean that government has control over bitcoin. Who Do you think is invested? The more miners are over the miners the ones that are invested in maintaining the network who do you think's GonNa stay up all night which is exactly what she says so China doesn't control bitcoin. I don't think anybody including the United States government cares hairs who minds it. I absolutely agree with this concept. I think that people get all up in there frigging arms about all this luminosity conspiracy Lizard Lord nonsense. I don't look at what actually makes sense in the real world. The government doesn't care who minds bitcoin as long as they have control over the network. They're not gonNA invest in mining bitcoin themselves. They can use their. That's not their hustle. They can just tighten the screws so that whoever whoever is maintaining the network if they were so interested to apply leverage to get a result that they want okay but again the nature of Bitcoin itself is designed to be government heart. Does that mean that it's implemented perfectly no but does that mean that we are set up to be resistant against government attack in the first place yes and then the majority of mining pools that control bitcoin are in China again that doesn't matter where they are that doesn't doesn't matter where they are. There is competition inherent in the network. They're not colluding together to run the network. They are all out for their own interests. The only reason they're in China is because of cheap energy costs right if that changes guess what they move somewhere else just because a mining pool is in China doesn't mean they're tied to the future future of the nation state of China they are tied to the health and stability of the bitcoin network and the only reason they're in China is because of cheap energy costs cheap energy costs. That's it. So what control do you think that these mining pools have over the price of Bitcoin okay. What control do you think that they have lower or again? I I like how where she goes with this. Let me ask you this. Let me ask you a different way. How do you think this differs from the X.? R. P. Ledger which entity other than ripple. Do you think closely monitors the network feels a sense of urgency when ballot or start going down alert others pulls all night troubleshooting sessions etc exactly this is the point. This is the Bitcoin bitcoin mining pools are inherently invested in the health and stability of the network because there is a financial incentive if they manipulate the price in the short term they get punished all right so going over here to another little tweet thread from Andrew Chen American kit and this is just kind of indicative of Wurley where you want to set your mind on in the path if I'm talking to my friends here in America from talking to anybody across the the world especially my brother's over there across the pond in the U._k.. Amar based on latest statistics American Kids WanNa be astronauts and Chinese kids are excuse me Americans Americans so here's the most popular <hes> here is the most popular answer of what do you WanNa be when you grow up so in the United Kingdom and the United States of logger or youtuber where is the most popular popular result. Everybody wants to be youtube famous and over in China the most the most popular answer overwhelmingly as an astronaut again. This is why I'm bullish on the Chinese you on long term guys okay <hes>. This is why I'm bullish on the Chinese he's economy. This is why I think the Chinese stocks are things to look out. Okay <hes> you know and this is this is pretty. It's just it's just sad. Manages go again. Go back and study. The you know the rise and fall of the Roman Empire <hes> all the stuff is pretty indicative negative to see when a nation is losing. Its you know its primary morals now. This is where I differ though from most other doomsayers out there right I think I think that's <hes> we're going to have a significant change. I think that we're going to have a significant change over the next fifty years in my lifetime. I.

China United States Bet Max China China secure network Shenzhen Arbitration Commissio Max Mexico official Jeffey youtube Hayden tiff twitter Fiat tiffany president Tiffany Hayden Fiat R. P. Ledger
"andrew chen" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

The Twenty Minute VC

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on The Twenty Minute VC

"Today to materials rates over seventy nine million dollars. NBC funding with front from some of the best in the business, including Bryan. Schreier sequoia, initialized uncork bold start an individual's, including Andrew Chen, elan gale, and Ray tone singers, to name a few today with over four and a half, bows, and customers one hundred plus employees in Paris, San Francisco, Amsterdam front, his one, the fastest growing companies in size, and, again, she materials rising, a must read and links can be found on the twenty minute. The dot com. But before we dive into our absolute stay with materials and VC's listening. Yup. Well, check out crunch. Dax crushed ICES the first company signal database on the market. It allows you to discover the world's fastest growing tack companies before anyone else. Check this out crunch date launched only two months ago. Yet it's already used by world-leading investors who collectively manager eight billion dollars worth of assets. So if you wanna stay ahead of the curve, check it out, crunched x dot com. A lot of what we do on the twenty minute is discussed, scaling businesses to experts picking the brains of founders and investors. You tell us about the trends to watch out for offered tips on fundraising and how to excel at any company stage there's no playbook for building a great business, but we can certainly learn from people who've done it before beyond listening to this podcast and talking to mental advisors in your own network. It's important to have resources, you can turn to when you attack in new challenge stripe builders resources for you whether you'd like to learn how to run a pricing baron, we'll build a knockout landing page stripe, TV information you need to start ROY. Running scale technology company, and then guides often written by feature people e kill experts in that space. You've probably huddled this ferry podcast and you can read my favorite guide on scaling engineering organizations and many more on stripe dot com for twenty T. W E, N, T, Y, V, and laws by no means least to scale unique customers and intercom offers a new better way to acquire engage retain customers. They've built a suite of messaging, I products from chat balls to.

Ray NBC Bryan sequoia Dax Andrew Chen elan gale San Francisco Paris Amsterdam twenty minute seventy nine million dollars eight billion dollars two months
"andrew chen" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

06:06 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Building kind of well balanced growth in and marketing teams. And so, I think this is kind of the next evolution of where, where it's going, I think that points, really important like if the modern wave of growth, people are effective. They almost have abstract themselves out of jobs in a way where we talk about this a lot and reforge Dan, myself and a bunch of others are involved helping your colleagues. Reforge ruko. Yes. A reforge is actually a program educational program that I, I respect deeply, I'm very loosely involved in. As heavily involved, but basically as a course to help train growth practitioners that are that are mid career folks that may come from different backgrounds of product analytics marketing, that want to go and take onto ears and growth. So, and it's put on Andrew Chen, Casey, winners, Dan, evolved. Brian ball, host of others. That really put together some great content there. But yet, we talked about this a lot in that group, which is if growth, people are effective of what they do. They've almost abstract himself away. And I think that when, when I think about the wake growth is evolving. I think when it Andrew actually popularized it is, I think growth hackers new VP marketing, I think is the original article he put out which was really thoughtful, but I think that almost led to this belief that growth can be hacked growth can be accumulated by a number of tricks that will end up growing attempting, and really the way we talked about it as more of a foundational understanding of how your company grows which really starts with analytics. And then from that there's kind of a set of a methodology and set of principles upon which you could really experiment over time. And that is something that I think can be built into functions of product management, or marketing, they don't necessarily need to be growth teams. But I think having a growth company can be a big accelerate actually getting to that place. Yeah. Into extend on that point, I think growth, as more of a growth mindset for entire company, and one of the, the basics they are is basically understanding what they what are the key drivers of your business will ever is. Do you have what outputs? Are you looking for and kind of building, basically model or framework to understand all those concepts and put it put it onto paper put into the spreadsheet, and then once you have those drivers in lovers, and inputs understood and outputs understood, you can, then try new things you can try different product, launches try, an AB test, so you can try to marketing tactics growth tactics, but boils down to release understanding bitterly the Ma. The model of the business. Right. And thinking innovatively about or the business equation as business equation. Today, we're going to get to how you guys do that in practice at tilt, but just close the loop on how groves evolved over time is there, sort of a simplistic, like diverse generation, they prioritize this we're in the second generation, and we prioritize, we think about it this way. And then the next the next day, we'll look like how would you give sort of a nice wrap up in terms of how the past present future of, of how growth is seen an industry? I think e v one was we've got all these new levers, no one else is using them. And so it's passively successful in many cases. Right. But if you do that without paying attention to whether or not you understand your customers, your building for them, and how product market fit. You can optimize yourself on the ground as many many businesses have done. I think the two is taking many of that those same levers and that same methodology and applying it to a much more standard product and marketing process. I'm not sure I've got your three steps, but at least two taking some of these huge advantage and building it back into a more traditional structure. I mean this stuff was always done before. I shouldn't say always stuff was done. Well before it was called growth like, yes. If you think about the classic examples that are brought up Airbnb Craigslist thing, even early days, pay pal morality, and what they were doing, like it's I don't think there were gro dedicated grow teams in those companies at that time these were just I think ways of building distribution into the product, which is something that we talk about now, in, in the growth world. I think it just has a has a label nowadays. So then five years, ten years, we got the gang back together come in forty four Montgomery doing another podcast. How are we talking about how the past five to ten years, have evolved in the realm of growth, in, and where we're at now ten years? No, I consume into the marketing wrongs. That's where my more recent experience on growth is, I think there's a recognition now I'll reference, Andrew Flannigan. He has counted, the law, should he click throughs, which basically means that if you could find early early gains on channel, they will not sustain as everyone else goes, and basically, your click through rates will decline with with scale. With volume and competition. So I do think we are in a wave right now, a lot of companies taking on a lot of venture money. And putting that money over on paid acquisition channels, generally ones that have the highest audience or the greatest audience, and the greatest ease of getting those channels up and running. So you're seeing Facebook and Google take a lot of dollars from BC's. You have a lot of a lot of companies that have growth teams effectively running those budgets. And I think in some ways that actually can be one of the most low overhead ways to amplify accelerate your growth as a company. But I think we're going to start seeing a lot of those stories as being short lived. And I think I would say the pendulum swinging back to product teams really operating with a methodical experiment driven way of actually building product and building distribution into product. I think that's I would say, I think we'll see the pendulum swing back that way versus kind of, I guess, overzealous kinda marketing spend now. Yeah. I think in ten years from now I think the concept of a good team, the gone, and instead of might be more back to, like, again, to what Mike say, but like the pendulum swinging backwards. Two product teams and marketing teams both of which deeply understand, again the business equation and are making decisions with a clear understanding of the desired output is. And maybe they're still looking analytic seems kind of like help empower those teams. But I think everyone in the company should be understanding of what the desired outcomes are

Dan VP marketing Brian ball Andrew Andrew Chen Andrew Flannigan Airbnb Mike Facebook Montgomery Craigslist BC Casey Google ten years five years
"andrew chen" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Mixergy

"And then it would say all right now, not only did your friend Sachin get this data updated. Do you want to update your address book just just become an account member? Then you become an account member. And suddenly everyone on your Email list with start getting that message asking them to update their contact information your address book, and when insanely viral you're saying you kind of learn from that I'm looking at an early version of your site where you typically said you can actually get reminded to follow up with someone within a week a month, or once I guess once a quarter or something like that the thing that stood out for me was number one that it was that's show was in a bunch of blogs because people did write about it. But number two Susan sue is on their Andrew Chan is on there. How did you know these people these are not that they're? On their their like models on the site. You showing your address book and how it could be used. What's your connection to Susan sue and Andrew Chen? So actually, I'm married to enter ten sister. Okay. So when I first moved to the Valley, I actually got to meet end drew a through Asia. And it was kind of awesome helpful way to kinda get plugged into. The valley's always been a huge supporter of everything. Ada in. I've worked hard and through Andrew I actually met Susan sue, and Brian Balfour and kind of a bunch of the other kind of growth focus people Andrew Chan has been a guy who's written about viral marketing and had really insightful opinions about tech companies. And now, he's a partner in recent Horowitz, isn't he? Yeah. That's right. Do you spend time actually talking to him in private about about your work? Or does it feel a little too weird? No all the time. We love geeking out intact. He do we're constantly geeking out about what he's working on the venture cider our startup and his ideas growth. And you're constantly spending time thinking about how do we kinda dull down at our growth in? No joy. And he's been a huge help for that. What's good idea that he's given you, you know, a lot of it has really just been about how do you bake in rally in the product from day one? You saw it right? When you went through the online experience sign up for no joy had he get people to invite from day one. If you use G suite on to go through that on by in mind that on boarding process and even recommend people, but you might want to invite. And so we're spending a lot of time reducing the friction of sharing mickan sharing his easiest as possible not as a growth hack, but really as something that's built into the product from day one as a core aspect of experience. I had asked you personal question. Totally fine. Andrew this just out about. But with Andrew Chen being your brother-in-law, do you ever feel like your your wife is kind of comparing you to Andrew success? And if you're not meeting it that maybe she's like not beat with someone who's successful. You feel that way at all. Or is that just me and my head? No, no, not at all. I think the things that eight and I really lined on is. I think I think success for different people means different things. And I think eight Anaya really kind of as I mentioned earlier on this path to self actualization. And actually what we realized is that it's not just about kind of making the most money or having the most success. But during away that's hundred percent, align with your values such that you're spending your time every day doing what you love as opposed to. You know, what that is? You know, I think it's been a long journey for me. Obviously, I was lucky enough early in my life to know. That software engineering was my passion. But it's really been kind of this iteration of getting to the point of realizing that entrepeneurship is my passion, not just building software. But then even doing in this specific way, right? Like, we're super lean team. We've bootstrap we think that actually gives us freedoms. And we of take advantage of those freedoms. It's been through a journey of going through different startups working at large companies like Microsoft, and Lincoln and enjoying it realizing it wasn't my ultimate dream to really find that..

Andrew Chan Susan sue Andrew Andrew Chen Horowitz Sachin Microsoft Asia Anaya Lincoln Brian Balfour hundred percent
"andrew chen" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"Now, two brothers and sisters Andrew Chen and ADA Chen has gone. Hi, this is the first brother and sister duo, hopefully, the first of many so thanks for having me over here. First off Andrew join interest in Hauritz is six months ago. Yeah, it's been on month five so I'm quickly. Like reaching my my half year markets, which gone incredibly fast. Nice. Are you completely swamped with meetings and pitches or how has it changed since like before injuries and Hauritz? Yeah. So when I was at Uber. I really loved meeting with startups in hearing about new ideas and saying in touch with the community, but I can only do it like first thing in the morning and on weekends and quickly like filled up my schedule, basically. So you know, like, I would work at Uber. And then I would do that basically. So the idea that I would do to thing that I wanna to do for fun like as my fulltime job at sort of field. Feels like I've won an ice cream eating competition. Like, the prizes more ice cream. So just, you know, just do as much as I want, which is which is super awesome. Yeah. And so your your background, just maybe those aren't super familiar your Uber right before this. And then kind of what's your your short version of your history? Yeah. Totally we were just talking about so eight who's my little sister. By the way, I want to clarify. She grew up in Seattle, and we both made our way to the bay area. The actually the funny thing is my first job ever was actually in venture capital. And so somebody I did right after college. And then after that, I ended up working at a series of startups, I moved to the bay area ten years ago to start my own company, I had actually met Mark and Ben here, and they actually led the seed round for start up. I was working on during the Facebook platform days everyone's working on like crazy viral apps. So I was working on you know. Yeah. Right. Yeah. That's exactly that's right around when we met, and they invested out of Horowitz Andriessen, you know, angel fund which was like really funny because that would have been like h sixteen and You you know. know, different anyway. So so yeah. So I met the man and I worked on that for a while and end up basically decided metal be better to go to a large organization ended up at Uber running various growth teams there. And so I spent three years they're really really fun experience pretty wild to right? Yeah. I was like really really incredible start up like hockey, stick everything in the less, eighteen months. We're very eventful. And everyone's read about it in the new so I don't have to summarize that. Yeah. Eighty you. You've had a pretty interesting journey at Microsoft Lincoln survey monkey and then a two person startup with your husband. Yeah. Yeah. Actually, multiple two-person startups as well as them. I I spent some time in the game spaces while it much media. So. After I graduated from college. I was in Seattle at Microsoft for year and Microsoft at the time, I was around eight thousand hundred thousand employees probably don't have account, right and very very structured worked in the ad center. Space online advertising..

Uber Andrew Chen Hauritz Microsoft Seattle ADA Chen Horowitz Andriessen Facebook hockey Mark Ben eighteen months three years six months ten years
"andrew chen" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"About so product. On is all about discovering new products and supporting makers and everything would love to do is talk about products. That knows about that. You love that everyone should know about are there things in your home screen that you think more people need to know about or is there product here in this room that you just love anything come to mind. This kind of come up recently. I I mean, this is so dumb. But it took me so long to figure out ever. And that's been really nice. Oh, no train. I gotta tesla recently. So I'm fan of the tesla app. I got the model three and it's really not. I'm like we bought it together. So we're sharing a Gaylon I which is very symbolic cool to like buy something with your partner because I've never done that with anybody. But we're sharing it and I loved my car intil. I drove that for two days in a row, a non like, oh my gosh. This feels like so outdated. Anyway, I never thought it would be that person. I don't drive all I that's crazy being in LA this law, right? Yeah. On the note of Tusla before I stop driving. I drove an electric Nissan leaf for two generations. And as I started working with Troy and Adam factory didn't have access to the same kind of supercharge her as I as I had before. And I and I loved the Nissan leaf, but definitely started having ranging diety because that one is a hundred miles that, you know, if you go on a freeway goes down to seventy pretty quickly when my thirty nine month lease ran out, which by the way were investors in a company that. We love called fair which makes that inflexible lease obsolete disclosure that we are in investor, but I actually do love the flexibility and transparency of that app. You could all do it in a swipe of app, and you could just go to the dealership to pick up the car and not have to negotiate with the salesman. But after driving the Nissan leaf and after the lease ran out. I just decided to go all in on the all day ride share. So my friends and even use you've given me a ride they know to ask do you need a ride here. I didn't realize that was why. Okay. And Choi makes me for that is of the food or the friend duper. So it's it's been fun to do it in L A though, because I do think that when we're talking about companies and apps that we love what lift in what Uber have done for Los Angeles. As ecosystem is really made it possible to to to to zip around, especially for nightlife. I think a previous generation of people who go out at night, their friend groups that all have do you is. But I think that that has also become obsolete in LA because you can you can hop from downtown LA too Hollywood to venison in one night by using the rideshare platforms, and I guess now in LA, we haven't we haven't gotten the same old. Maybe we will soon and it's in the process of happening. But you know, the the last mile mobility platforms bird, we saw probably a dozen birds on the way here. LA was where they launched. And I remember it was wintertime last year in LA knows complete summer winter in December in Andrew Chen and Brion Kimmel were visiting LA and we were having brunch. And he asked he he like have you seen one of these in Santa Monica, and I said, no, what is it? He's like, oh, it's bird. It's these doctors scooters that are going to be everywhere pretty soon and remember taking a little ride in it. And now less than one year later, how many cities are they in? You know, I don't know. It's in their last valuation was was at one billion or two billion to win to two. I thought what was really incredible a recent bird experience? I had was after breakfast and Culver city at destroyer, which is amazing little restaurant to bird over to the Hayden. Tracked in Culver city expo line and took that expo line to Fanta Monica to the KCRW office, and then took the bird from the explolite too. W? And so I think it was five dollars round trip everything from two birds as well as the expedite to get. And so I think that is kind of the pit ame- of what is possible, and it was basically a magical experience, and I had fun..

Los Angeles Nissan Brion Kimmel Culver city tesla Fanta Monica Troy partner salesman Santa Monica Choi Adam factory KCRW Andrew Chen Hollywood thirty nine month five dollars one year two days
"andrew chen" Discussed on a16z

a16z

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on a16z

"Hi, everyone. Welcome to the a six podcast. I'm sewn all today's episode continues our series on growth. The first part covered the basics of user acquisition. And so this part covers more specifically engagement and retention, including as always key metrics and how to think about them joining us to have this conversation. We again have general partners, Andrew Chen, and Jeff Jordan, and we cover everything from how to network effects come in to is there really a magic number or a Hamam for a product to who are the power users and what is the power user curve for measuring them. But first we begin with what happens after the initial acquisition phase as different kinds of users join a product or platform over time? What does that mean for engagement? And how do you analyze them using cohort analyses? One of the things that you see is that people end up using these products very differently because the kinds of users that you're getting are changing over time. You know, when you look at something like rideshare, you know, all the early cohorts are basically people in urban areas. And then these days, all of rideshare is more like. Suburban or rural folks because you know you've saturated all of the center. And so what you tend to see is as you acquire your folks, you know your core demographic out that actually ends up showing up in the engagement, and so you know, going back to natural kind of gravity to the whole thing. This gravity also hits the engagement side of things as well. And then ultimately the LTV because your users typically getting kind of less valuable. It may take years to see this kind of play out, but that's kind of the natural law in there is a progression in these and particularly the ones that are really successful early on. It's all about getting users just like users users. If you're wildly successful at doing that, you run out of users. Are you start running low on users and you have to go to engagement. So pitchers has a very high quality problem right now. Most women in America have downloaded the pincher stab. Ears, so some growth can come through, okay. There's some number of women new nerd Pinter, somewhere in the country, but much more so they need to engage in reengage the existing audience. I mean, we love engagement from an investor standpoint because it's just that. You can open hack.

Andrew Chen Jeff Jordan America
"andrew chen" Discussed on This is Product Management

This is Product Management

05:32 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on This is Product Management

"Shared his approach to watching premium products, understand the buyer's journey adoption, and then revenue and embed group people can product names next up is the benchmark that's Michael or flex on the next questions we have all reads, ask themselves. I don't think there's shortage of of good information out there on this. I mean, if you're trying to do growth in your trying to do frame him, the number one resource that I think is out there right now is Brian Balfour company in in blog. It's reforge dot com. And Brian offers incredible set of free resources to be able to get up and running, understand how to do this stuff and also offers an incredible course. It's a great academy in basically, it's, you know, you go in and you get the lessons in you. You'll learn how to actually do the work. But at the same time, you also really build a cool community network of people. And so I think Brian stuff is the best that's out there in. He's partnered up with Andrew Chen on that project. And I think that's far and away the best resource out there for people look in to get into free me to get into growth and look into put some really good frameworks around the stuff that they can take back to their company and put within their context and a super simple way. This is one where I think everyone's got a little bit of different bend on me. You know if I'm doing a startup and it's just me by myself, I'll tell you what, like, I'm just calling you up and trying to sell you some stuff, and that's all I need. And then I know exactly what I gotta do now at the scale that we're operating hub spot now that doesn't work anymore. So we have an incredible you x. research organization and within US you've got this really interesting dynamic where you've got core design. You've got you x. research which is really focused on very strategic research, answering really high level strategic questions in then you've also got a team that we call product insights analysts. Now, that team is really strong at digging into the data in their deepen our usage metrics and our business metrics, and they're kind of trying to patch the stuff all together until a really interesting story with the data. What we try to do with each of our product managers as we try to pair a product. Manager very closely with the US researcher in a product insights analysts and really kind of use that as a foundation between, you know, the product managers own internal network in contacts, external networking contacts to really kind of be asking the right questions and start to kind of hover around the right problems to solve and bringing enough data and qualitative insights to the table to start to really be able to to hone in on the right problems and to put stuff together in their mind. So that's the way that were approaching it at the moment. But I'll tell you what if I was getting scrappy startup, I would just be asking for credit cards and feel like I'd figure it out pretty quick. Yeah, I was telling you about this podcast, so I just sing s town is pretty incredible. I'm absolutely wrapped up in it. So I, I like that it's from the producer of this American life and that one, it's kind of like this really interesting. Mystery podcast right now. So on that I've been literally was listened to episodes on the way over here in the Uber, just like, can't take it off. I like walked in. I'm like walking down the hallway to open the door to your office and I'm like, got my ear buds in like, would it be disrespectful if I walked in while I'm still listening to the podcast, I'm like, honestly, I don't even care like I got out what's about to happen. That's the big one for me right now. So this one is actually gonna surprise you. I don't like to download apps. I've got like three apps on my home screen on my phone and you can't even swipe inbox zero. I'm like a super minimalist in everything. So I would say Uber is like it's like, I don't really pick up a lot of products. I don't test a lot of stuff like that. Like I'm not super crazy about like trying out a bunch of different stuff. Like I, I'm a minimalist. I keep the absolute basics that I need to do my thing. And you know, when it comes to build him product, I don't often think that you get the best product ideas from download another products or using other products trying to stuff. I'm just a big believer that if like you talk to your users, you're good at discovery. You do a good job of understanding the people that you're trying to serve that you can do the right thing. So don't put much equity your time in using products. Compact with Michael uplink, Dan, and learn more about his products at hubs, spot dot com. Michael was also hiring product people for his team. If you're interested in working with them, reach out Michael at m. p. it helps dot com. That's our show until next time. This is Mike fish pine from outlook. Enjoy the show, encourage you to go beyond itunes, Stitcher and south Oude subscribe on our website. This is product management dot com. Every Monday, you'll get an Email from me the latest episode, exclusive product management resources, this council conferences and opportunities to ask guests. Question aired on the show visit, this is product management dot com. Subscribe.

Michael uplink Brian Balfour US Andrew Chen core design dot Mike producer researcher Dan
"andrew chen" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Acquired

"This is where we should cut to the next section let's go to the okay that sounds good to me carve outs yeah there was an awesome podcast episode with andrew chen of injured chen dot co the amazing growth marketer who's formerly was growth at uber and now as a general partner at entries and horowitz as of about a month ago he was on inner calms podcast intercom has a great podcast on on growth and andrew is kind of the foremost thinker on this and was there at the early days of what is growth hacking and helping to define it and figure out that in a large organization you can have a growth team that really sits between product and marketing that is really thinking about what are intrinsic things we could do to the product that would make us acquire users better and cheaper and have sort of that viral growth rather than going and spending on advertising and he talks a lot about sort of strategies at dropbox where that was done the thing people always think about is that you know get free space by getting someone to to sign up but how so much more of it actually came from being able to share folders because that was an intrinsic tweak to the product that made it more inherently viral and cites a bunch of different other examples of similar things and what he looks for in b two b companies being able to leverage sort of consumer style network effects both within and outside of companies the big overarching point that he's making is that growth marketing is really about frontier technology and being a person who learns how to harness a frontier technology before it all turns into crap and eventually all acquisition channels turned into crap and how fast can you figure out what the new frontier tech is and harness that to be able to create something that that spreads viral on that that fits a person's need in a really perfect way and it's a really good it's not long it's like a half hour or something but really good framing anybody is listening to this podcast really doesn't care about long long but it's a really good it's a really good framing of what is growth marketing what should i be looking for in trying to create the next product that that grows like wildfire.

andrew chen general partner horowitz
"andrew chen" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on The B2B Revenue Leadership Show

"Yeah and what what mistakes do you think most cmo's are making that you know trying to go from that you know two million to ten million stage yeah that's that's a horde stage go from it's you've got to figure out how the scale you've got a you've got to do a lot of the things that i'm talking about i mean that's the stuff that i had learned the hard way of you know being systematic about it being scientific about at tracking everything you know rapid ration rapid testing so i actually went through a course goal reforge with brian belfour and andrew chen so brian was from hub spot and that was it was very illuminating experience because it was it was somebody that i actually sat down and systematized and and now all the stuff that i had figured out the hard way yeah but but yeah i mean that's what you've gotta get good i and you gotta get good at doing the entire funnel so i mean the the single biggest problem that i say with was sambo's is when they they're kamar compartmentalized so you know marketing has its metric which may be lead generation or maybe traffic to the website or whatever but it's not entire funnel and so that's one of the things that we really specialize in is you doing it from start to finish so lead generation making sure that those leads the right leads that they're converting well that sales supported they have a sales process i mean all the way down to product so young i mean i've got one client that i just took on right now that their their primary problem was product on boarding so they had apply percent conversion rate from trial to pay and it's me about an hour of going through the process and it was like all right well here's all the thing you know i came into the first meeting with an entire page bullet louis of hero things that we need to fix and that's not something that typically you would think of as a marketing role in but but i think that but i think that it has to be.

brian belfour sambo andrew chen
"andrew chen" Discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"andrew chen" Discussed on Mixergy

"Because it was different giving out equity in those like that's a that's a much easier thing i s i still have control but on and so this point i have ninety is changed a little bit recently about specter back was on an ninety six point five percent of a company i see who else has already a couple of key employees and then pat an ryan duck by ryan dealt i love ryan i feel like i didn't get into the heart of who he was in on maturity yeah i i so ryan actually flew to boise just as last weekend and we spent an entire weekend during a deep dive on everything related to convert its growth it he and i've been fronts were longtime he is the kind of person who he can get hold of absolutely everyone so when he ran growth gomert he got a even in the music scene he got taylor swift unom bon jovi justin bieber to also on gum road like through his connections purely through his hustle but he came up this weekend to do a di di with us like mild growth team on how exactly we can grow in a scaled away because unlike kind of a hassle sort of all come up with an idea do a bunch of work to get to like that next twenty five of are and then like all along stack those chunks of ten gave from us twenty five k from that cetera and ryan was were system focused that he did the whole plan with us and it was fantastic i've pages the civic what's one thing either this last time that he talked to him or some some other time to feel like he plays the same role that andrew chen does for a for no in that system thought out process.

specter ryan duck boise taylor di di andrew chen twenty five k five percent unom