35 Burst results for "Andreas"

Apple reportedly steps up effort to build Google search alternative

Mac OS Ken

07:15 min | 3 d ago

Apple reportedly steps up effort to build Google search alternative

"Financial times ran a piece saying that apple is working on an alternative to Google search an interesting story. It's an interesting idea. According to the paper apple is stepping up efforts to develop its own search technology as us anti-trust authorities threatened multibillion dollar payments multibillion dollar payments. Google makes secure prime placement of its engine on the iphone already. There's so much about this story that's fascinating to me. It looks like first of all apple. Search engine is already running. Although it's not really a search engine exactly. The financial times says when people type in request for info from the home screen in iowa. Fourteen apple has started showing its own search results looking directly to websites rather than going through a third party in iowa. Fourteen today view. The report says the operating system shows apple generated list of search suggestions rather than the google results these results include auto compete style. Excuse me auto. Complete style. suggestions generated by apple showing that it is learning from its one billion users common queries. Okay see i kinda just want to read the whole story to you and then go back. Point-by-point it's the financial times. Why don't we start there. It's the financial times so of course. They're concentrating on the money. Part of it as if apple just started doing this yesterday. They keep saying that the doj is suing. Google for anticompetitive behavior at the center of that suit or near. The center of that suit is the fact that google pay somewhere between nine billion then twelve billion dollars a year to be the default search engine in safari. Everybody says for iphone. But it's for safari right. The doj in the past few weeks at right were suing. And i know we've known that that was coming for a while. But it's not like falcons can suddenly turn on a search engine from nothing. of course they haven't turned it on nothing Two and a half years ago. The got john john andrea. I'm sure i'm pronouncing that wrong He was the head of google search supposedly. They said it was to Increase their artificial intelligence capabilities and siri virtual assistant but he also brought eight years of experience. Running the world's most popular search engine the financial times. Points out. I mean sorry. It doesn't mean that apple is in creating an alternative to google i. I'm going to go ahead and keep reading. And then we'll i should have read the whole thing right. Experts financial times talked to Some of whom used to work for google. Say it wouldn't cost that much for apple to do this. And that apple has hired the talent to do it. That apple could do it because you can't just go in license somebody else's search technology if you're going to be an alternative google. I did not know until. I was reading the financial times story here and this could explain. Why dot go. I love duck duck. Go doug goes. Was privacy focused search engine and you can go there instead of google and you can type in your queries. And they're not being tracked and that's great They rely on being. It turns out their licensing beings technology. Now still your information as dang between you and duck duck go. It's not going anywhere. It's anonymous all that stuff. It explains why duct that goes results. Aren't necessarily as good as you might want. Duck tuck duck goes results to be apple. Can't just skin being. They can't just skin duck. Oh right they have to come up with something better if they're going to compete with google but not everybody thinks they're going to compete with google. Dan wong associate professor of business at columbia business. School said it would be extremely difficult for apple to ever catch up. Go-goes advantage comes from scale. He said and the endless user feedback helps to tune results and identify areas of improvement. Google gets hundreds of millions of queries every minute from users all over the world. That's an enormous advantage when it comes to data surprising. No one apple declined to comment for the financial times all right. There's so much about this. That's interesting and also i think kinda wrong in what. The financial times is arguing first of all. They're saying that apple is doing this because they're worried about losing the twelve billion dollars nine to twelve billion dollars that up. A apple gets every year from google for being the default search engine. I use siri as often as i can. I know people who don't use siri at all. Google still spending nine billion dollars even if he does get better. Google spending nine billion dollars for apple would not be a waste of money because there are lots of people who are always going to google it. They're not going to ask siri for whatever reason. I know that. When i'm out of the store i don't ask siri because i don't like to talk in public. I don't like to you know. Spread my business around. If i'm worried about a search engine tracking me. I'm certainly going to worry about you. Know saying out loud the grocery store or well. That's the only place. I go now saying out loud to the grocery store what i'm searching for. Nobody else needs to know that. At that point i will start typing stuff in at that point. Is it google that i'm going to. I have set my default search engine to duck duck go and that is another thing that this whole of this seems to sort of ignore. I mean the fact that we do have choices at this point. And i would imagine that somebody at least at apple will go ahead and argue. That what google is playing for is placement because people are lazy or people like google or don't realize they change it even though apple has made it clear that yes you can. Google earth could still pay nine billion dollars a year and not lose their money even if apple gets better at what. It's doing now as far as apple trying to build a search engine. That's going to replace google. I don't think so. I don't think apple is trying to replace a bill. The search engine that everybody is going to go to. Because i don't think apple wants that kind of headache. I think all of this stuff about siri better and about apple's being better. I think all of that is true. I think what apple would like is instead of going to any search engine you pick up your you ask a question you get your answer not kicking over to the. Here's what i found on the web. Not thinking oh. I need to go to google or i need to go to ulta vista wherever it is. I need to go to look up stuff. I need to ask jeeves by. Golly i think that's the part of this whole thing. That actually excites me. The most the idea that my virtual assistant could become more of an assistant unless a virtual thing that it could become a a source that i turned to to ask questions and get answers

Apple Google The Financial Times DOJ John John Andrea Iowa Dan Wong Falcons Doug United States Columbia Siri Headache
Are You Bringing Emotional Intelligence Into the Workplace?

Women Worldwide

04:23 min | 3 d ago

Are You Bringing Emotional Intelligence Into the Workplace?

"So how are you putting your emotional intelligence hat on your e. I hat in all of your interactions whether your word with friends with your family and how much are you. Harnessing your emotions. Well this is the perfect segue to my special guest today. Joining me on the show is andrea hoven. Andrea is the co founder and learning at. Og lice. laugh she's also a certified coach and a speaker and she helps professionals to hard as their emotions injury. I it is so nice to have you on my show. Welcome thank you. Thank you for having me. It's really wonderful to be here in. Share a little of what i know with women worldwide. We're happy happy because emotional. Intelligence is really important you know for any person professionally and personally is being able to get a handle on your own emotions so that you can work with others and that is something that you're doing quite a bit and before we dive into e i in all of your great work. Maybe you can just share a little bit about how you got to wanting to go down. Career path of emotional intelligence in helping professionals in coaching. Yeah sure it's the kind of a long circuitous journey like most are bank But i i started my career in corporate america and climbed the ranks as a sales manager and became a regional vice president with a big thirty million dollar territory and found that the part of that job that i loved the most was training people to be the best they could be. And when i could see light bulbs go on and see that. That was magic for me. And so that that led me down a path wanting to do that work more often And so eventually became responsible for job skills training at the organization. I worked at and found that my passion fell into the leadership development and coaching area. Where i work with people so that we could have more of those breakthrough moments and insights together. That help them do the things they wanted to do. And be the person's and people that they wanted to be so that's That's what led me to get certified as a coach to work as a coach to leave that organization and work independently for a while And and realizing along the way that emotional intelligence really is such a foundational set of skills that set the stage for so much more of what we wanna do as leaders or as people or as of families etc. You have to have your ability to recognize what you feel some self awareness around what's going on inside so that like you said you can harness their power and their wisdom of ear emotions to help you accomplish what you want to accomplish. So that's a little bit about how i got to this point. That's excellent and in. You did definitely just pinpoint something. That's so important around the emotional intelligence discussion. The fact that you have to be aware of what's going on with you and you know what is it. There's there's a lot going on in our world where emotions do run high zoa. People are feeling challenged in whether it's affecting you and your your work environment or your home environment. What are some of the ways it. Perhaps you can get to being more aware or more emotionally intelligent. Yeah well let's. I like name this moment as you just said. Two thousand twenty is such a crazy year and at the beginning of the year we started. We pulled You know hundreds of people across the united states to ask them what was the most predominant emotion that they were experiencing back in march. The answer then was anxiety. Which makes logical sense. You know it at. The heart of anxiety is feeling of uncertainty. That things that matter deeply to us are out of our control

Andrea Hoven Andrea America
As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 5 d ago

As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

"Or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's She's already already told told her her staff staff you you are are going going to to get get vaccinated. vaccinated. Some Some of of my my young young millennials millennials are are like like Saran Saran taking. taking. This This is is a a directive directive like like as as a a mandate. mandate. Is Is that that how how you you mean mean it? it? And And that's that's that's that's a scary thing. You know, like Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness. I believe in civil liberties and all those different things, but you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in. Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes, but her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management, He says Each request must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this.

Andrea Hsu Holly Smith Cafe Juanita Saran Saran NPR Johnnie Taylor Jr Smith Kirkland U. Headaches Society For Human Resource Man Dr. James Mcdevitt Washington LEE Diabetes Smithfield Mcdivitt Baylor College Of Medicine Johnny Taylor Jr Taylor
Hal Ketchum dies at 67 from complications of dementia: 'May his music live on forever,' says wife

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:37 sec | 6 d ago

Hal Ketchum dies at 67 from complications of dementia: 'May his music live on forever,' says wife

"He charted seventeen hits in the ninety country star. Hal ketchum has died his wife andrea on facebook. Tuesday she wrote with great sadness and grief. We announced that how passed away peacefully last night at home due to complications of dementia. May his music live on forever in your hearts and bring the taliban shoot up catching my grandma. Remember rose family early nineties with his debut album point of rescue and the first single small town saturday night. His wife revealed. He was struggling with alzheimer's in april of last year was no longer performing. He was sixty seven years

Hal Ketchum Andrea Dementia Facebook Taliban Rose Alzheimer
"andreas" Discussed on All The Kings Men

All The Kings Men

02:00 min | Last week

"andreas" Discussed on All The Kings Men

"Strong start to this year Obviously a little bit of like he's he's matured a little bit then now he he can find a relaxed. He knows it's been drafted by the kinks into second round. And he knows he's going to get probably get. Its chance if you if you do all this things right so he he can relax play and i i would say like he you know he gets a lot of power. Play time and you get a lot of lot of opportunities of the india. Office event obviously And we still. We still don't play him. I don't i don't wanna ruin in so we don't we don't play in this much maybe Still we we have a. We have a lot of great defensiveness in our team. So we we try to get everybody almost the same amount of ice time. We obviously have some veterans who gets over twenty minutes but then we have a couple of young guys Who gets you know. Seven eight minutes a game and that's something you have to learn to to learn to deal with into start right you have to You'd have to you have to earn your ice time and Right now he. Does it really really good in office. It ended but we have to work on a d. on the defensive. That's the that's that's the only issue i was saying. Hell if the recent issues like this ability to play zone and last question before i let you go and it's completely unfair and you don't have to answer it. Is helga a top line. Nhl defenseman would in time. I would say yes awesome. Great yeah without without problems. We wanted to hear perfect. Well thank you again for giving me your time today. Appreciate it thanks enjoy. Yeah and we're all pulling for the red hawk center not here. Thank you very much..

red hawk center india Nhl
Pompeo on Golan Heights: ‘This is a part of Israel, and a central part of Israel’

NBC Nightly News

00:47 sec | Last week

Pompeo on Golan Heights: ‘This is a part of Israel, and a central part of Israel’

"Overseas secretary of state. Mike pompeo step into controversy visiting the disputed west bank and golan heights firmly taking israel's side in the long conflict over those territories with more on that here's andrea mitchell. Today secretary of state. Mike pompeo trying to make it harder for the president elect to reverse the trump foreign policy becoming the highest ranking. Us official to set foot in an israeli settlement land. The palestinians also claim in the west bank settlements can be done in a way that are lawful and appropriate and improper another. First pompeo. Also visiting the golan heights. Viewed by most of the world has occupied syrian land. president trump recognized. The previous presence refused to do that. This is a part of israel in the central part of israel

Mike Pompeo Golan Heights Andrea Mitchell West Bank Israel United States
Democratic anger rises over Trump obstacles to Biden transition

NBC Nightly News

02:38 min | Last week

Democratic anger rises over Trump obstacles to Biden transition

"With sixty four days left his presidency. Donald trump's refusal to coordinate with the incoming biden administration is taking on new and serious national security implications tonight. Nbc news confirming the president alarming zone advisers has sought out military strike options against iran. Even he instructs the pentagon to start bringing troops home from iraq and afghanistan while president elect biden who could face the consequences of the decisions remain out of critical intelligence andrea. Mitchell has late details. President trump only weeks before he leaves office pushing for dramatic actions in iran iraq and afghanistan that could hamstring his successor's foreign policy before even letting the president-elect have intelligence briefings tonight nbc news confirming the president asked his national security cabinet about striking iran after un inspectors reported. Tehran was again stockpiling uranium. That could be used for nuclear weapons. According to two senior officials as first reported by the new york times but with iran's vast military power vice president pence joint chiefs chairman. Millie and even secretary of state pompeo and iran hard liner warning. It could quickly escalate into a wider war in his final days in office experts. Also alarmed where could they hit back. At american military forces in iraq at american naval and air assets in the in the gulf they try to kidnap or kill american citizens anywhere in the world. They've done that in the past military experts calling the president's suggestion reckless during a transition. It's highly irresponsible. For a sitting president in the waning days of an administration to take such dramatic steps and actions and the president also taking potentially irreversible steps by pushing the pentagon to withdraw thousands of troops from afghanistan after the fence secretary. Mark espera last week for objecting. The acting defense secretary announcing a rapid troop drawdown from both iraq and afghanistan by january fifteenth. Twenty twenty one our forces there size and afghantistan will be two thousand. Five hundred troops are four size in iraq will also be two thousand five hundred already tonight in baghdad iranian backed militias fired rockets near the green zone killing a child and wounded five civilians. The president's refusal to consulted successor on national security is unprecedented in modern times. Alarming experts at home and allies abroad.

Iran Biden Iraq Afghanistan Donald Trump Pentagon American Naval Nbc News NBC Andrea Mitchell Tehran Millie UN Mark Espera The New York Times Gulf Baghdad
NBA star Steph Curry on playing golf through the years

No Laying Up

05:46 min | Last week

NBA star Steph Curry on playing golf through the years

"Right stephane. Thanks so much for joining us. I want to start right away with background before. We came on start recording. You already give me bunch excuses about how you haven't been playing a lot so have feeling to know how this is going to go. But i i gotta know some back on. I think it is important. How you got into golf. How much you play grown-up all this started happening before we get into some of the events we've We've seen you play in no the The i've got all the disclaimers and qualifiers from our game got. Those one liners locked up. But i started plan back in By eight or nine my dad. He played six years in the nba. So it's kind of summertime. Hobby is normal kind of father son type of situation. You take me out drive a golf cart. He cut down a little putter. That i'd go hit with In that i started getting more and more Passionate about china learn how to play and by ten eleven playing full rounds them all play low high school golf for three years and then from there may have been bit by the bug ever since it is one of the things look forward during the most when. I'm outside of the court last similarities. To you know the the encore like ball competition what you experience in the in the league in how. I kind of transition that to china. Take everybody's money on the course so good. I was gonna say this from for later. But i want to understand what the gulf culture is like during the nba. Season right because you know guys season kind of your typically goes into june for you guys but you know releases into summer and you can play golf in the summer. How often are you playing during the season. Are you traveling with clubs. Do you need a certain time period on a road trip to be able to play on the road. Have the set course every city you go to. How's that work. All the above. I think the best way to explain it is I guess our team. We are in a little bit more freedom over the last five six seven years to be able to kind of even manipulate the schedule on road trips a little bit to bagan some golfing though so we'll probably play like twice a month during the season. Which is solid Mostly on the road coach. Kerr's amazing it. A go into a city will play. That night might have an early next morning but if we have an off day he'll give us a window to go play in the morning and then cash the plane to go to the next city and then we have the warrior golf team championship. Run a myself. Andrei igwe dollar klay thompson will play. We'd have some front office. Guys that will go out so we had to accrue whenever that wind opened up the group techs going. Hey time we plan where we're going so there's a. There's a golf culture for sure in. Our team is growing across the league. I think every year. I find like five ten guys that are either asking me about what club they should get or where they should get lessons. Or are asia coast cool which i'll bring in clubs on the plane type stuff so we get all those questions is by the by the year is pretty awesome to know. How much did you know that other people are enjoying the game. As much as i do because i think that was one thing especially for golf. Fans that stuck out about the last dance is how often jordan was like as soon as something was over a guy no no. We're going to go play golf. We're going to go play golf and be like a thing that is continually growing. I see andrea vall on twitter all the time. He's obviously you know a huge golf fan. But you know. I gotta be honest. I didn't really understand the depth of your game until you played in the ellie mae classic in two thousand seventeen. So what was you touched on high school golf but have you. Had you played in any golf tournaments since high school before you took on that challenge. Since high school tournament. We play the american century up. In lake tahoe. A play a maybe five or six summers out of out of the eight before i played nellie mae and that one is different experience. Because i think. If i'm on my game i should be like your top eight favorites a win even though haven't won it yet but when you get on alienate classic on the web dot com when it was a korn ferry now. I'm marie list. How far my game is from a professional that earns money is trying to carve out a career in this game. But i feel like i can hold my own so i had like this ghana irrational confidence in that respect but when i got not to the to the first day i i should say i did the practice round and all that really learning how they approach like the preparation for the week and a i'll put so much stress on like the practice rounds like trying to score and then i yo- you're gonna burn yourself out before that's thursday friday. That's not it. I learned that the first six holes. I was mad. I made a bogey or something like relax so it was. It was such a cool experience in five finals. Then play in front of nineteen thousand fans in crazy gentler russia's out in the court there is absolutely nothing to no way for me to really express how nervous i was on that i even had call him a name. I damn near blacked out on the on. The i just hoped i hit it got in the air it was. It was really kind of out of body experience so well. That's not your. It's not your sport sport. You go just go play. This is not your thing and you know you're doing it for a ton of eyeballs. Got to be that kind of feeling. One hundred percent and other thing that i learned which i don't think people appreciate washing these guys week after week after week is allies exhausted like mentally and physically Being in that mode for five hours straight like pre round during around post round. I get getting engulfed sheet. You know there's athletes out there but it's a different experience of staying locked in engaged in all the different ways that they approach kind of being on top of the game. It's is Is pretty awesome.

Golf NBA Andrei Igwe Dollar Klay Thomps Stephane Asia Coast China Andrea Vall Nellie Mae Kerr Ellie Mae Lake Tahoe Jordan Twitter Ghana Marie Russia
Phoenix Suns Agree to Trade for Chris Paul

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:54 min | Last week

Phoenix Suns Agree to Trade for Chris Paul

"Things are hot in phoenix and they have to be hot on a sports front because it was ninety two degrees again today. The latest. That has ever been this hot and phoenix somewhere. I think we're supposed to hit like ninety five tomorrow. So it is hot and happening and phoenix both on the sports front and just the warm weather front that being said sons. You're already pretty excited about the suns to begin with and now he got chris. Paul come to town. Well you know. Sons are in the midst of an eight game win. Streak you know other bubble team could say that. No other bubble team did that well and miss the playoffs but You know sons. I got a little bit of bonus basketball after the covid break they you know they got the bubble in orlando. Stick around for the playoffs. So they've had a little bit of a longer. Offseason i th. I'm sure that they're ready to go. And you put chris paul on the suns. You put the sons against the lakers on christmas day. you know. it's it's got some banana boat reunion on. I think it's a big deal for the sons. Were going anywhere with rookie. Ricky rubio and then dot the andrea. They're going to build around booker in eight and here I it goes far. As a short term solution. They gave up The up a little bit to get them. But i think the basketball should be exciting here. I think that they'll do a good job building on a pretty promising season. Your remember you know you have to go way back. You have to go back almost a year now To deandra eight and being suspended for twenty five games and yeah that's what did the sons then. They played their hearts out in the bottle. In third very promising team in the western conference or the contender. They're not but i think that they'll give golden state and the lakers a little bit of a raw. The clippers are dead in the west and Villas sons have a chance to penetrate through. I think that there are playoff team this year. How far they go Really depends on how well they're playing when the playoffs rolled around

Phoenix Suns Basketball Chris Paul Lakers Ricky Rubio Chris Orlando Paul Booker Clippers
Breaking down Kyler Murray-to-DeAndre Hopkins Hail Mary

ESPN Daily

03:24 min | 2 weeks ago

Breaking down Kyler Murray-to-DeAndre Hopkins Hail Mary

"Dominic. It is eleven twenty seven pm eastern. And i m almost done tattooing. Cuyler murray's name using a ballpoint pen across my chest. Go forward i'm with you. Want me wait why you finish your being supportive in a way. That bill barnwell. Why usually talk do right now. Isn't i think like he would be reasonable and discourage me from doing this. But you're a far less responsible character. It feels. I'm here for a good time now longtime just today's episode so i'm fumbled fox ready for sublime tattoo it. Let's have some drinks. Whatever you wanna do. Pablo dominique. Foxworth is a writer and commentator for. Espn he played seven seasons in the nfl at defensive back and he's espn dailies. fun uncle. Well what i wanted to do before we get hammered together is talk to you about this play. That is inspired all of this ink to be spill both across my chest and across the country. Because i think it's the play of the year. I think what we saw in this bills. Cardinals game is the play of the year. And it's worth noting for posterity that the bills had just one said gave right before it happened. Josh allen had thrown. I think the pass of his life to step on digs putting buffalo thirty to twenty six with just thirty nine seconds left. The snap man looks to his left. Choirs left side. Then go to the point steph. Both touchdowns catches a touchdown pass from josh allen. What cuyler murray then does rolling left. Let's hit pause as his bomb is launched from midfield in his dangling in the air. Because you are a cornerback in your blood in your soul. How do you even approach defending this sort of a play as db well. They did it wrong. Obviously they were all going for the ball which you don't necessarily want to do in that situation and trae white one of the best corn illegal that he was trying to catch it which any coastal tell you. Bet it down. So everyone's out there trying to pad their stats in the thing that i would normally do. Not ideology happens as a particularly big receivers but tall receivers will jump well over the arms can't catch a bomb like that with one hand if you do best one for you. So that's what they did wrong going for the ball in also trying to patch stats with an interception i. I was particularly happy towards the end of that game because on get up last week. I said that stefan digs is unstoppable. Man coverage way. You shut down passing offenses in this league. We all know it. It's tight man coverage you can't do that. Against stefan digs. He has been created the most explosive plays of any receiver in this league against man coverage. So he caught the game winning touchdown man coverage also said in that same segment the andrea hopkins is the best contested cats receiver in the league. He's one of the top receivers in a league in winning contestant catches so he can get open but the scary part about him is. It doesn't matter you put it anywhere his entity even if you're close to them you're buying he might bring it down and embarrassed boom so win for me. How about that back to back dubbed up.

Cuyler Murray Bill Barnwell Pablo Dominique Josh Allen Foxworth Dominic Trae White Espn Cardinals NFL Buffalo Bills Stefan Andrea Hopkins
Xbox Series S Review

DLC

03:43 min | 2 weeks ago

Xbox Series S Review

"The first console to launch. On tuesday of this last week was the xbox series x and s so i should just. We'll just start in chronological order and i. I have lots of thoughts about the xbox series x. But i'm actually very curious andrea about the xbox series s because i saw on your instagram and twitter that you have one of those the smaller less expensive consoles. And you're really. I think from what i read. Taken by the form factor. If nothing else right. I love that little thing. So xbox was kind enough to send what could games and xbox series x so i purchased for myself an xbox series s because i knew that i was going to need one in our. What's could game studio. But i also wanted one in the living room where i'm going to play it most of the time and so like well. I don't really need four k because streaming and four k still just isn't really a thing that's available on twitch rip mixer they really were doing high resolution streaming the best out of anybody. I know that caffeine actually doesn't pretty good um high resolution streaming as well. But i was like what the xbox series s is going to work for me in the studio because i don't need really more than fourteen forty p and i love the form factor. It's so small. And i love that compared to the vsbn. Which is just a monster ons. Which i know we'll get to in just a little bit but the value proposition. That microsoft is bringing with xbox game pass. Xbox game pass ultimate in for those who are interested xbox game cloud x. cloud wherever they're going to finalize that name to be. I think that it's a really great opportunity for people to get in and obviously we saw the news that we're gonna talk about just the second year that microsoft announced its their biggest console launch ever and that is to do because of the xbox series s. I agree having that low price. Point was really smart. i mean obviously. We've seen nintendo reap the benefits of having a low price point for new hardware for generations. Now and it. It actually like the sony and microsoft finally got around to realizing. Oh yeah if we don't charge through the nose for these things people buy more of them But tell me a little bit about your experience using the the s are you noticing Does it feel like a generational upgrade from your xbox one. It's interesting that you bring that up because that was one of my critiques of the new consoles that they didn't feel like a gigantic leap forward from the xbox one x specifically now i know that most consumers are probably changing generations between their original xbox one or potentially they have the xbox one s. But there's probably not as many people. Doing what i did going from the one x to these series x and the series as the low times of course are definitely faster. But i think microsoft. I don't know how. I really feel about the fact that they did not change the i like. They launched this he on the old generation and they kept at the same. I know that there's a big portion of the games out there that are like thank goodness. I don't wanna have to relearn something. But i just i think it kind of takes a little bit of that shiny sparkly new console feel away from it and overall. I just didn't think that outside of the loading times that there was anything dramatically new. And i think a lot has to do with the fact that there wasn't a first party exclusive game like now they have launched with halo infinite in halo. Infinite was running at sixty frames per second fourteen forty p on the xbox series s different story.

Vsbn Microsoft Instagram Andrea Twitter Nintendo Sony
How To Grow Your Business

Accelerate Your Business Growth

06:15 min | 3 weeks ago

How To Grow Your Business

"We are really fortunate that this podcast has continued to gain recognition as a great for small business owners. Business leaders sales professionals. Were you know we've been included on all sorts of lists of the best podcast. Listen to and that is because of the guests. These are folks who have expertise in particular areas of business and they are gracious enough to join me for a conversation where they share that expertise with all of you that way you get the information you need when you need it as you need it. I go back and listen again. You can reach out to the gas All good and that is all here to help you succeed and being more profitable and successful. Today is no exception. My guest today is andrea albright andrea. Who is recognized as a thought. Leader publisher is on a mission to create the next movement for authors and evolve the publishing industry. She's not just the publisher she's a legacy maker. Andrea has become the author of twenty five bucks reaching tens of millions worldwide in over forty countries. Now she's taken her passion for helping author sign the same success by publishing books with meaning. Thanks so much for joining me andrea hello alot. Thank you for having me wonderful to be here. I am thrilled to have you here. we're gonna be talking about marketing and growing business in an all that happy stuff. And i i'd like to start with what sorts of personal obstacles do you think entrepreneurs face when they're starting a business. Well obviously there are a lot of obstacles which is why the success rate of businesses staying in business is only about fifteen percents within five years which is really crazy to think that eighty five percent of businesses will be out of business before five years and so obviously there are lots of obstacles or else we wouldn't have these kinds of statistics. You know the beginning of a business is it's like the baby you know it's got very few resources doesn't have a lot of credibility or traction and doesn't have a history or a legacy all it has is the vision and the vision is. What an entrepreneur. Start a business and i. It's the moving out that visit why entrepreneurs fail especially in the startup phase. Really okay. So so they lose that vision. What happens there. Well you start a business. You see a possibility for something better. You are either innovating. An industry a product service at you. Think you know what i can do it better and so it really comes from a vision but what happens when you get into the day to day business. You'd because so overwhelmed with paying your cable at dealing with clients and changes in the economy and competition and so all these things began to weigh on the entrepreneur and the entrepreneur actually starts to treat their business like a job and that is the worst thing an entrepreneur can ever do because it is only the visionary the ones who are able to see beyond the today drudgery and the day today even. You're now the visionaries are ones who can see into the future. See where the market is evolving. And make sure that they stay on the cutting edge. Okay so. I signed that. So interesting i think it is so easy to get stuck just in doing and not staying above the fray so that you can really be directing it. It's i can see. How do you explain it. I can see how that could be How entrepreneurs lose that vision in quite get it when you originally when you set up but that makes perfect sense to me. It's unfortunate. yes. And i've been an entrepreneur for seventeen years now and i have seen over ten thousand entrepreneurs start a business and the amount of people who are still in business. It's just very rare very few and the statistics show. That will what happens. Okay the ones who have lasted are the ones who are the visionaries who didn't get caught up in the changes in the economy or a switch in the government know all of these things that people use as excuses for why they're going out of business. The ones who are truly innovating are so far ahead of the game that we saw all of this coming in some way or another and so we've been able to innovate. This is the time of innovation. And if your business has failed during this time now it's time to start a new one of the best history is start a business.

Andrea Albright Andrea Andrea
Chicago-Area's 14th District Race Between Rep. Lauren Underwood and Jim Oberweis Remains Tight

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Chicago-Area's 14th District Race Between Rep. Lauren Underwood and Jim Oberweis Remains Tight

"Chicago Gary Elections have been sorted out with one notable exception. The hotly contested 14 congressional race in the western suburbs at last Count. Republican challenger Jim Oberweis was clinging to a less than 900 vote lead over Democratic and come in Congress Woman, Lauren Underwood. A statement by Underwood spokeswoman says the race remains too close to call. The votes are still being counted. Spokeswoman Andrea Belknap says the Underwood camp was excited to see a record breaking turnout. Meanwhile, over why spokesman Travis taken, says the over wise camp is cautiously optimistic Challenger will win. But that over Weiss's not yet ready to make the call taken says we like that we're in the lead. Bernie Boy,

Jim Oberweis Lauren Underwood Andrea Belknap Underwood Camp Chicago Underwood Travis Taken Wise Camp Congress Weiss Bernie Boy
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | Last month

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate. So

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

They Call Us Bruce

05:02 min | Last month

They Call Us Chinatown Pretty

"Hello and welcome to another edition of they call Bruce Non filtered conversation about what's happening in Asia America I'm bill you and Jeff Yang, and this week we have a very special set of guests who are the authors, the creators of a very, very special book when his right in. The heart bone. Shall we say? It is a book called Chinatown Pretty. It is a book of incredible photographs and some just lovely words celebrating the elders who Don't just make up a the generation, the greatest generation of our community but who? Make. It beautiful with their very presence? So. We left a welcome to they cost Bruce. Valerie Lou in. Andrea Lo. Thank you guys so much for joining us. Thanks for having US have come. You guys have put together a really great project. Know it started off as kind of a Website Project And then is now an a full-fledged published book. It's Chinatown Pretty. Is Just A. Really. Great tribute to Chinatown Elders grandmas and GRANDPAS, but it hits on a very specific. Aesthetic. A fashion aesthetic. I think what's really great about is that you've taken sort of the The the style photography mold and apply to kind of the more most unlikely subjects I think. People who are very special in our community so Maybe, you guys could describe actually what is Chinatown Pretty Yeah. This is Valerie Chinatown pretty as a style that's common and chinatowns across North America It's really a patchwork of different. Eras right close from Hong Kong? They've had for thirty years mixed with like say supreme hat that they got from who knows where? A lot of colors. A lot of patterns sometimes I, four shades of pink or four different floral patterns in one outfit. And that's about keeping warm mostly So you could have a big puffy jacket but also keeping the sun out at the same time. So really white built a hats. I love that description just viscerally but I think for people who have not seen your blog and the book itself. Just a little bit more kind of literal color around that. So. When we talk about transparency pretty we're talking about people who are usually immigrants for immigrants who but who have lived here a while and who have. Synthesized a look and the fascinating thing is the look is different from person to person but somehow it all still fits this mold of Chinatown pretty it blends Western clothing it blends. Traditional clothing from. Historical closets as it were. Sometimes across gender lines. It's often incredibly colorful like you said, is layered it's branded, but it's also unique like there's a signature to how people. In that generation dress that feels so much more vibrant than you know those of us, who are I mean in in quarantine were like the sweatpants anyway. But I guess, what was it? That first struck you about the look of Of these elders and kind of lead you to coin the term and decided to actually explore it photographic in words. Yeah. This is Andrea I'm I'm the photographer behind the project and I think we would. have. Known each other for. Several years now, and we would hang out in Chinatown get dim sum and just people watch in the park. And that press was really fascinating Chinatown I feel like has some of the best people watching and I think what we? Both intuited without really realizing why is that? A lot of the outfits we would see on the senior so people sixty five and plus. They there's all this history woven into their outfits I think. For us we might think, oh, it's like this vintage jacket from the seventies but you know for them it's like close. It had ended preserved for decades. Mixed with with newer Chinatown fines and let the handmade clothing as well. So there's so much. Shown in one outfit it's like there's a lot you can extract from it, and so we were really curious about you know. Not only like where did you get these cool shoes but also yeah, how did this? Is just such A. Look in. So we're really curious. About the stories and the people behind it and so that's that was sort of the seed of. What led us to investigate.

Bruce Non Jeff Yang Valerie Lou Andrea Lo Valerie Chinatown Asia Bruce America North America Hong Kong Andrea
Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

Steve Scaffidi

00:33 sec | Last month

Wisconsin sees massive spike in deaths, new COVID-19 cases

"Virus cases across the state of Wisconsin could be a sign of things to come. The nightmare scenario of frankly, Wisconsin's chief medical officer, Dr Ryan Westergaard, says that nightmare could get worse than the fact that it's already highest levels. Widespread. And we think most people haven't been exposed yet is really a concerning scenario. Acting Health Secretary Andrea Palm said. Tuesday's numbers are a prime example of why they opened up the alternate care facility at State Fair Park. Despite it being sparsely used right now that exponential growth that we have talked about a number of times throughout this pandemic is coming home to roost like Spaulding

Wisconsin State Fair Park Dr Ryan Westergaard Andrea Palm Medical Officer Secretary
Virus pushes twin cities El Paso and Juarez to the brink

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last month

Virus pushes twin cities El Paso and Juarez to the brink

"A key battleground state Wisconsin broke records Tuesday for the number of coronavirus cases and deaths Wisconsin's chief medical examiner Dr Ryan Westergaard says the previous records were set just about a week ago it's a nightmare scenario frankly that this could get quite a bit worse in the next several weeks or months before it gets better health secretary designate Andrea palm says significant action needs to be taken we all need to stay home do not interact with people that you do not live with several months ago the Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down governor Tony Evers formal stay at home order if people stay at home we can call it whatever I call it saving life Iverson is pleading with people in Wisconsin to voluntarily shelter in place I'm at Donahue

Wisconsin Dr Ryan Westergaard Andrea Palm Wisconsin Supreme Court Iverson Donahue Secretary Tony Evers
Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

How I Built This

05:32 min | Last month

Interview With Robin McBride and Andra McBride John

"Okay so I warned you last time this story is epic right and I am assuming you're here because you've already heard part one of this two part story how two half sisters who didn't know the other existed until both were grown up went onto launch one of the biggest black owned wine companies in the world. But if you haven't heard part one, please stop listening right now and go back one episode and your podcast queue to hear it. As for the rest of you, you've now had a few days to dry your eyes and recover from the first half of the story. Which means we are at the business building part of what would eventually become the McBride Sisters Collection. Now, the thing about Andrea and Robin mcbryde is that despite both growing up in winemaking regions Robin in Monterey California, Andrea in new. Zealand neither sister had any real connection to the industry and neither had any real money to put towards a business. They were also young women of color trying to break into an industry that's often been dominated by older mainly white men. But now this matter they didn't care. They knew that they both shared a love of wine and that they both had a deep and powerful desire to work together. and. There was one other thing. They were motivated by mission they wanted to build a company that would make wine more accessible to disrupt and demystify the sometimes intimidating parts of wine culture. Grape varietals had a tasted regional nuances. Ratings even had a read labels. And when they I dreamed up the idea of starting wine company Robin, the older sister had been working at a corporate job and was married with three children and Andrea, was a college student at USC. I mean. Neither of you had a whole lot of start up cash if any did you Robyn did you I mean you had been working but you also family did you have any savings I mean not match you know it was kind of a nearly paycheck to paycheck. Already got married. We had recently purchased a home, but you know we have brand new twin babies and an older girl. So there wasn't a whole lot of cash available and under assuming given that you're on scholarship at USC in a college student, you probably were broke right I. Mean I got my scholarship checks in on. Where you could get a job and make money you know that was that was what I did. So the the the original idea was it sounds like what you guys settled on was let's just import wine and and Kinda put a label on it was that the initial idea. So we had this grand vision we felt like what was really critically important was that. Incredibly passionate about wine yes. Students of wine but we need to learn the business of wine and you know we could get this license in California, a federal import license that was like fifteen hundred dollars. It was like our total life savings and we could import other people's winds and we started by reaching out to two families in New Zealand, and then we could we could learn the business and we went to them and basically said, you know don't put all your eggs and basket. We think California could be a great market to grow your brands and your winds and we negotiated really long payment term so he could bring in the wine. Sell it. Click the cash, pay the light bill and then pay them back and then. As a part of the process was every harvest. We come back and you guys teach us how to make wine. And you Andrea ahead of some connections in new. Zealand 'cause you're from there and your family, your family farmers. Yeah. So when you first approach these wineries in New Zealand and they agreed to send you wine. How did that work like how many? How many bottles of wine did you initially by and then where did you go to sell them? So yeah so it was crazy. It was at the time at felt like it was an insanely huge amount of wine. In it was a palette which is. Fifty Four I. Like the the minimum of what you can put on a boat. But for us, that was just an insane an internet case of wine. There's twelve bottles. So right it just felt like a huge defeat to be able to get these licenses because you know the the sale of alcohol states is highly regulated. And it's very strict and so just the process of obtaining a license to import seemed and felt like such a huge rigorous process and then and then to convince people. You know to entrust in US and give US product and then to get on a boat and then and then bring it into the port of Long Beach at the time, and then put it into a federally bonded warehouse because you can't just like bring that to your house has to go into

New Zealand Andrea California USC United States Mcbride Sisters Collection Robin Mcbryde Robin Robyn Monterey California Long Beach
Be Willing to Experiment

A Slob Comes Clean

06:22 min | Last month

Be Willing to Experiment

"Thanks for joining me today this podcast number to sixty six and I'm going to call it. Freedom to. Experiment. 'cause this is one of those things I have been thinking about. It. Also I know I've been answering these questions from my super-secret facebook group of patriotic supporters. If you'd like to know more about being a patriotic supporter, you can go to patriotdepot dot com slash slob comes clean. That's P. A. T. R. E. O. N. DOT COM such a slob comes clean. That's also There's a link to that at a sub comes clean dot com slash podcasts. And there is also Lincoln show notes always. So pretty much. Always I forget anyway. So I've been thinking about this. I've had questions the last couple of podcasts I have been answering different ones and it's always interesting to me when I can kind of make the stuff. FIT under one thing like two weeks ago was basically the answer to every single question that I answered was five minute pickup. There was more to it than that but I like on a lot of bag on that podcast anyway, and then last week was. Something that I can't think of in this exact moment while I'm talking to you know it was what was it? Whatever it was. It was all basically around. A theme like there were quite a few different questions that could be grouped under that theme. And I was thinking. This was kind of going to be a okay. I'll just cover the last of the questions there which I didn't guarantee. I was going to cover all the questions, but it just worked out pretty well. And Just. Today I was thinking about something in my own life i. want you know that kind of is applies to all of those questions pretty much that I was GonNa talk about my next podcast. So we're talking about experimenting like the whole concept of experimenting I think sometimes for those of us who? Have spent a lot of our lives feeling inept at this homemaking thing who have felt unqualified or bewildered by or just overall overwhelmed and not confident in. What to do to actually keep our houses under control I think that we don't always fill out of freedom. In that way because like I I, it's just the same thing as I explained to my kids I'm like you. Once you get something down like let's say you get. You get you know my daughter's Andrea team now and she works on things and Oh, I heard y'all I just have to say it has been so much fun to I mean I'm telling you just since she tried out in May. When she was trying to do it and she was, you know she made it obviously. So she did great. But the improvement that just comes from her re just knowing more like she knows more and when you know more than you have the freedom to put a little pizzazz on you know we're talking about dance there but it's really the same thing for everything like once you. have some skills down what know what to do. Then you feel more confident when you feel more confident, you're like, oh I, can try this can try that. But for those of us who have lived our lives not feeling confident in this area sometimes we're scared to experiment. We're like, please just tell me what to do, which is the beauty of something like. You know the the twenty eight days to hope for your home, which is included in my book how to manage your home without losing your mind you know those twenty eight days of building four basic habits I mean I talk through every single day like you spend seven days. Getting a new habit down and we go through all of the weird things that are going to go through your brain and all that kind of stuff and like you know I hear all the time from people who say it helps me so much to know. When I don't know what to do do the dishes. Or War with the decluttering process from decluttering at the speed of life you know I look at a space that's overwhelming. I know to just focus on the trash trash is step one. Okay. So all of those things are very helpful because they know what to do. Okay. But for those of us who are desperate for that and who that is so incredibly helpful for you know there are people out there who like. You have to tie yourself to to the Tesha like who has to tell themselves. Like they just don't even understand. That some of us have to talk ourselves through that. Okay. Because those things are more natural or more obvious maybe or more clear whatever two other people anyway. But sometimes, those of us feel like we're just hanging on with like please just tell the next step we don't feel the freedom to experiment. Well, some of these questions get into some things where it's like. Well, you really do this different ways. So I went to give you the freedom to experiment. So my example you know I'm working on my next book who knows when it's going to be done. Because it's really hard for me right now 'cause anyway. So not like hard something awful is going on. I'm just really struggling. Okay with it. Anyway. I when I wrote my second book I think I did a podcast on breaking down a huge project and all that and. When I wrote my second book it was on a really really tight deadline. And part of my issue right now is they don't have a deadline which whatever because it's not actually under contract or anything yet but I had this deadline and I had to get it done and I really reaped the benefits of having written a book before like. The first book that I wrote, of course, that one was on a deadline to but. I spent the first probably the first three weeks to a month, just figuring out what I needed to do to be able to shift from the the blogging and podcasting and all the things that I normally did into this very different task of writing a book and I had to figure out how to break it down and then worked through the process to actually get to the finish line.

P. A. T. R. E. O. Lincoln Tesha Facebook Andrea
"andreas" Discussed on Unchained

Unchained

02:20 min | 2 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on Unchained

"Opportunity WanNa go grab some chests. Back to my conversation with Andreas and Dan. So Dan I was so curious this was something that I was you know kind of looking into before the show. So you know as he mentioned at a certain point when the block rewards stops, there will be a transition where miners will be compensated in transaction fees not in the block reward and the current amount that they earn is from fees is about nine percent of the block reward. and. So we'd have to see transaction fees, eleven x by a roughly twenty one forty, which is when the new bitcoins will stop being minted but I just wondered if we don't see. Like an increase in the amount of transactions that can at layer one than can transaction fees eleven x in that time or or will that require people to pay a lot more per transaction A great question and when I'm not sure how many people who are listening to listening to this work in Tech Intech we have something called are occupied by a key performance indicator in we use it as a calibration methods who coordinator efforts at a company and use that metric to define success. For example, they might be user sign ups or number of users trading at cracking, etc.. The. KPI. For this for what we're looking at right now, which the the question we're trying to answer is are transaction fees replacing the block subsidy in the block award. So our newly minted coins are the as those decrease is that value being replaced by the subsidy and so we can. We can calculate that would be a primary KPI so you could look at. Transaction fees over the subsidy transaction fees block divided by the subsidy and you brought up the that's at nine percent. If we look at that, historically, we make like a rolling sixty days to smooth it out a little bit and we look at this over time on a log curve. It's very much trending in the right direction where eleven x sounds like a lot. But bitcoin moves in really intense cycles where we've all seen it go from thousand, Ten, thousand or twenty thousand when that happens that means there's not an equivalent but a directional rise in transactions and transaction fees and we have seen the transit.

Dan I Andreas Tech Intech coordinator
"andreas" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

The Functional Tennis Podcast

04:30 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

"We spend time there. And when you're there, you find it easier to switch off from tennis Yeah, it's. It's for sure like she. The other is a lot of things to do specialty, no hiking or with the mountain by Canada. We've we both liked nature so so it's for sure Derived placed to be for us and yeah, we see. Are you going to be when all this covert nightmares over? You're going to be bringing the parents over there. Actually Miki's parents have been there already and my parents not yet, so they definitely WanNa when I come to see the place so Yeah, maybe he ferreting went. Is going wild with the call the end of the season or end of the year. They can. They can join us for a bit nice. Do babysitting for you exactly it's it can be hard to get. The Italian people travel outside of Italy. Sometimes. Yeah, right now for sure. Yeah, right now it's not easy. Especially now especially now, but yeah, the must be exciting, though it is there many Italians over. Over there in Colorado, yes. No No, no actually not. Actually not I mean. I haven't I haven't met one yet. So correcting papers for more like you know like tourists to remote. Tuesday Canadian likes New York or Florida or La's I'm that I think that's. Not Many won't question. We had from one of our listeners was. Are you into deficient at all? There's the between the Dolomites on the rockies. Fishing's meant be really good Yeah, actually I went already. Like more times in Colorado than here have to say. So I say I'm not really into it, but when when a hefty chance sometimes sir. I'm just A. I'm not playing into have some time. I go, but it's not like. That I'm really really into it. Well. Yeah, still learning like I'd like fly fishing in the river so yeah. You know it's a hobby it's. To Learn? And would just go to. We're going to slowly move onto tennis here. You say like Colorado and the APPS. Air Are Dolomites are very hard like too high, so the altitudes. Hi, it's good for fitness when you come down to sea level. Has That helps your fitness because I was doing so? And I'll see I've known. You're always in a big five sadder march over the years. Actually got your win percentage fifty one point two percent in five centres, which is I. Think it's pretty good record, but looking at the also have forty three out of one hundred fifty five matches of your five centers went to five sets, which is pretty crazy. Yeah, we're like I mean. Everybody knows the. deciders I mean especially grants, lands, and always like so I as you said, I had I had manual statman the. And as you said for sure the altitude. Bank can help your fitness. I mean. That's the good ball may be leaving. There are no like for sure you more comfortable lemon. Breathing Specialty, debriefing on sea level and our house where we listen karate's two thousand five hundred meter, so it's even higher so. It's. It's pretty high end and you you really. Do you really feel that at eleven feel just long's just breed freer especially at the beginning I mean. Of course. It's stiff, it's. When you go for high altitude too low you can adopt quickly tennis I mean I just need a couple of days, and that's fine, but we debris leading i. I feel it. I I have for for a couple of weeks for sure some Bull News. Let's say and But the difficult thing is the opposite from you know. The low is the to go to highlight hustle play you need. Much more time always like let's say a week or something to really adopt to death and the breathing, and so so yeah. Hi, let's take. Advantage, you know for sure for fitness and. Especially now in thirty six. You have to be to fit to fit to compete with a young young players. Truly he'd any advantage you can get you got has trained.

tennis Colorado Air Are Dolomites Miki Italy Canada Dolomites New York Florida
"andreas" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

The Functional Tennis Podcast

07:54 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on The Functional Tennis Podcast

"Welcome to the functional tennis podcast absolute pleasure to have you on hair on excited to talk to you, so tell me as the tennis go. You're getting a bit of practice in yeah I'm still like practicing, not the as much as I normally do because the. Tournaments still far away, so nobody knows now when the tour, we'll be back so I'm just keeping a seldom level of activity. In just trying to than to be ready wants to talk again and whereabouts Worthy Worthy Inari in clear in the rockies in Italy. We got back from Colorado. May. Also because yeah, we had the babying end of February you know at my parents Mitterrand's. There were like could some pressure. They WANNA see a team so so we came back to Italy. Nice, little baby girl. Yeah, exactly. Her name live ally, be very very nice, and it must be so mason. We just had her first baby nine just nine months ago and it's totally amaze. Has It changed your outlook on life? Yeah, of course. Yeah, it's I mean it's. Completely different experiences and In the end you know with all the problems we had virus and I think I. Think I was anyway likely to stay at least at home with. My wife and my baby for the first three months, so it was also nice to see her growing in everything, so yeah, I'd say that he's actually maze. You guys are travelling most weeks a year and I'm sure at your wife comes with you so makes with every week. So must be great. Tip Your Baby, and you must be getting good at the nappy changes, so yeah, yeah I know. I'm pretty good. I have to. Tell me. WHO DOES WHO does? The night shifts display tap between years. No my wife, she's still. Breastfeeding so anyway, she has to wake up for her about it was just a first first month because she was really tiny so just to point to kill us, so we had to wake her up every three hours to see her, but from the first month on actually. She's sleeping like the whole night so a nine hours so actually. We're pretty pretty lucky with that. That is pretty good. Our guy gets up still. He's up all night. All the time on breastfeeding was great for the first six months and then a change. They'll be putting that I wish all the best with live. That's exciting and quick. We Oh, speak into Rohan, bopanna yesterday and I was like. Oh, it any questions for Andy and you saying when you're in the rockies you're, he goes ask. Trainer was with Scott Davidoff I. Mean He was there coaching I, think the college team for several. Several years, so he he spent some time there also doing the tour, and now just yeah, during the Kobe to he was there for for weekend. catched up, actually you once on breakfast court, so yeah, it was nice seeing him. They're also great. Will I'm sure it Rollin listens to this I'm sure so he'll hear this hair, so you're from. You're from the Dolomites region. In Italy it's close to the Austrian border, and do you consider yourself fully Italian or is there bit of makes a no I would say I mean I consider myself a slightly Italian for sure about the most course. Say let's say I grew up with. With, German, so I ran the like say. Kindergarten elementary school to Germans good, and then actually I did the last five years. In Italian so so yeah, let's say actually my first language. The beginning was German so it's different. And how many languages do you speak now Like German and Italian and English. Let's say I mean I understand the Spanish. And talk a little bit, but speak a little bit but man not-so-good Spanish. Yeah, and what was it like growing up of? It's a mountainous area. It would beat it. Would it be known for its tennis? Players are for Thai level tennis. Of course like it's not like unusual place to play tennis. Let's say they're much more like winter sports here by skiing also and A. Little Bit Navy unusual to to to play on this Mutt. Likes now also Yanic you know is is on tour, so it's already to him in the. Not so many years I is Yannick from your region. Yeah, exactly, yeah, well, WH! When was the first time you actually practiced with Yanic? I saw him I I. I think when he was twelve. Because a good friend of mine like showed me. good so I so him I Kuan then. and I think would fourteen here. Eddie went to the. Tiny sent-off Ricardo potty and I was also there sometimes practicing with my coach so. Yeah I saw him like. Let's say early stages already diddy with the impressive. When you sell a twelve year old, you say this I know it's hard to tell but. Of course I mean you can see already know like share if somebody has some some good strokes or how? How as include I think you come? Tell a little bit, but of course like twice. In here. What you see in a young player be a teenager. Is that really sticks out that you go okay? This guy or girl could be really good in the future Yeah I. I think from the dispensary. The dedication in everything Antao. Somebody wants to improve and how how his listening and I'm trying to do things somebody else Bram, so. How quickly you know, he can do that so I think that's you know that's very important for somebody who? Who wants to learn to be like a good player? They gotTA learn quickly and not make the mistakes again and keep keep. Going and going Oh, come back to your from that mountainous area in Italy. How come you decided to relocate over in the rockies? Yeah, it's a good question a lot of. People ask me this question and there's actually no logic. A. Because the I mean Colorado is not the tiny place at all, so there is also altitude. It's like one thousand five hundred meter so. It's a little bit different and. Actually, it was just My Wife. She was some working there. One summer at deranged, because she really likes horse everything, so she was working there I went there a couple of times to visit her, and we had like around three pants. We really liked the place, so we just decided like one. See them through to go out to rent a house for for a month end to to play a little bit. Then see how it is, and then the end we ended up buying a house nine. Author man so yeah, and that was like endo, two thousand seventeen, so yeah, and now I mean during the year. It's anyway difficult to go there because you always on tour, but we always spend the off season there, and then in all sometimes during the the US tournaments like before in your whales or the US, open, sometimes we spend..

rockies tennis Italy Colorado US Dolomites mason Scott Davidoff Rollin Kobe Yannick Andy Eddie Antao Bram
"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

05:12 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"More scientific is a science not on engineering field. You won't understand which is the same as neuroscience in some ways what are the principles that enable the same network to perform the task in also do transfer learning from one to the other very fast it one of the areas that seeing some interesting research on the machine learning site is The idea of multi task learning so we can train these networks to do two things at the same time instead of one or and things at the same time instead of one and their You know that somehow has this kind of regularizing. You know that makes them perform better. Is there any kind of inspiration to that or biological parallel to to that? Yeah yeah actually. We discussed that in the paper. Also multitask train and When we see the world we don't just do up to condition we. We know that The distance of the object. We can grasp he'd we have some idea about the The texture a week we can multi scale perception that we can look at individual. You know eyebrow on someone's phase in Fades we can you know? Do you know figure someone sat up. So we do a multi task multi cultural embedding. And if you want the same brain is being all these things. So that's one of the areas. Where with the brains very different than my shade and I think there are people that are single case. Maybe we should like we train on network. All the tasks Mehboob generalize also better be more revised. It will be you know. So that Sorta of a in-interesting direction that we are interested in. Maybe you can. You're absolutely right. That's very important that the problem again becomes. How do you train these? Because if you rely on human labeling all this data that you need to have humor liberal the collar detect and then you sort of again limited by Jaba. You could like Brute force approach at least in toy examples to show that this is the right direction. Is there any one particular direction in Kinda this entire space biological systems to deep learning deep learning to biological systems that you're most excited about the good question? I think that Mostly thing right now in the next few years the most exciting directions the cognitive or behavioral level and the representation level. Because of you know like any maybe a practical thing because we we have good baseline models that relate covid cost function. What their training and the cover presentations that. We can measure right mostly excited about this to higher levels in term so building models that are going get information about best or inspiration in a more or less may be ambitious way from the brain to advance if you go down to the implementation level obliging. He may happen at some point this too much complexity down there in with understand. Why is this complex? It could be implementation it could be biological with where constraints for example energy constraints like you. The brain has chemistry any doesn't have silica and then Need neurotransmitters because of Biology..

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

03:34 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Ones we measuring the brain train. In some ways you can feel like neural network you. You have some laws on the top layer. Which is what the class by this stubble. Latent variables are lead free to do whatever they want right so we try to put some constraints in this middle layers in St Louis. Trying one of these layers to make it look a little bit more like the brain of a mouse and what we found was that that modell became more robust two participations. It was interesting because it became more robust to high frequency noise perturbations which are now. Starting we can expand the simpler way that it may be like. You know the more sensitive to low spatial frequencies but this is at least a proof of concept that you know even if these cases may be a simpler scenario that you should if you know that you could learn something of their presentation a level in a system and then translate Dover we have the tools to sort of movie daughter because we have a model over the brain deep neural network. And he's trained on data and then we have a neural network model that tries to Show that both models. They're both build of the same ingredient which is neurons. We sign up says ceiling can try now transfer information from one to the now but still not anywhere in my personal taste even if we were to do these in something. Incredible it's his Attack it was still not very satisfying. We're GONNA White Sobe. You know the mayor copying operation itself. You know you may word but for me personally to beside his fight I would like to understand why working and end up getting goes back to the some aspirin to predictability inside wage year. It almost kind of points to at least you're you're you're limited experiment. You know kind of calls to mind this future where instead of pulling a You know building a network up from conversational layers and pooling layers. Where you know. I'll use a mouse layer. And a flat worm layer players controlling. Yeah Yeah and I think the other thing is to show the ut lead you of these systems we need to come up with the right machine learning benchmark tests and right now the the focusing machine learning in the last ten years has been gained to create benchmark. Were very difficult in the nineties in the eighties. For computers. Like ultra Right Bud there hasn't been as much or more now but where you train. You want to build a visual of system as it possible visual tasks riding sigma More tracking action recognition can be doing where we started giving like the way. Biology system works right and fro main. Any male she'll have to who is working on the problem like if you're having genie are especially working in a company. They want to build on was driving. They don't care that sees damn the study group General because they'll never be tested on Sunday. You're is right. The or that same system is not the one that's going to talk to you to the driver right may be so but from if you're interested from the AI..

St Louis aspirin AI Dover ut
"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

02:28 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Let's say for radiology readings although others say what you care about maybe human Lebanon Ability is not possible even in the brain. And we've kind of fooling ourselves. You know by saying you know we understand this area. Does these in these areas. Does that Schumer temperate up. But I think that's uninteresting conversation debate that we will see more of it or into ability and I think we if there is such thing is interpreted ability and we understand it in the brain. Then he's going to be easier for engineers to like now. We know that thing exists. Let's try and figure out how we can put it in the bread and other presentational level where we'll call from yours and this is what would most of the the that perspective paper focuses on these representations level if we need to figure out interpret ability and the brain before we're able to get to interpret ability or explain ability in machine learning models. I think we're probably in trouble. Yeah that is true by the interesting though because the tools that people in mass shooting developing to gain interpret it exactly the two that we're not trying to implementing the brand so that's where there's a very strong link again between the two fields. Are there examples that come to mind of successes that we've seen already in Pulling over understanding that we've gained on the machine learning deep learning side to the neuro science side. Yeah so we got the paper in needs last year. Julie was the for stole for Judy's he to gum recordings in these kids from the mouths visualises them and and build. We built a model actor these inception Lube model and then we generated a similarity matrix physically. We showed let's say foul Naturally images the model and we computed the similarity matrix between May Johnny May J. in the models debris models mural spades gate and then we took a neural network and we tried instead of teaching it to say cats and dogs. We also tried to make representations to look more similar are in terms of these presentational seamlessly metrics to the.

Lebanon Schumer Julie Judy
"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

04:16 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Because this isn't the horses bore and has some e that network has not experienced the world. He varies information. The genetic code that wires it and then you get an Edward us something so you know and then the experience find Tunzi than improves on need but because a very strong inductive bias. That's approved that they are easy. We were understand the how to read out this inactive buyers then we will be able to build smarter machines now as another complexity to these. The learning algorithm may be titling to wind with these architectures. So you may have the perfect architecture but if you use a different objective function different learning algorithm then you will not get now the the right performance over the right model by so that's go. These things are related. How how we doing on this task of learning from the the brand and applying it to to deep learning I? I don't get the sense that of the most important things that we've learned about making deep learning work like you know. Drop out and learning rate tricks and things like that came from biological inspiration. Yeah these these is very interesting. Because I think that's interesting question of also from the larger scale of you want Elaborate so if you could try to understand the brain right Kids trying to vision visual perception right. In some ways it good test of it would be able to build a system based on what we think we understood. That does vision right. Because if I say I understand Nation works in their brain. Not some experiments in you know in humans animals whatever and I studied principles than my long term goal or as a field should be count. We now assemble the principle into a system that means the behavior of the system. Trying UNDERSTA right and that is essentially what the is go late. You saying from a neuro science perspective. We've got these models of cones and layers and all these things forget about this deep learning stuff we should just take our models and implement and they should be better in theory fear in Fiori. We understand it. I mean we really understood. Want we fully understand how vision works right? We should be able to reverse engineer. We should be able to take these principles. Put them together. Any should perform the tasks that the human visual system does I mean. That's sort of the very stringent test over hypotheses right. You have to test them like not now you may. I'm not saying you're going to be achieved in. Our lifetime may be knows or could take many many years. But that's the goal of neuro science right after maybe not necessarily but we're far away from that goal right. I mean it's very very there's only so toy examples where we've taken these principals and we've shown that we can achieve robust visa that we can achieve the two zero bustle trigger. Will is that based on gaps in our understanding or our ability to implement what we understand. I think he's based on two things. I think this is a more pessimistic view. It's based on our gobble understanding principles. I mean right. Now we've been doing more and these may be very difficult problem right and there's very there's a lot of technology. I said earlier that gives us incredible capabilities to understand the brain but new principals are much harder to understand fundamental principles and then we get lost in details and we don't know how we don't WanNa just Kobe because you see these different has also between understanding and I mean if we could take the brain and Kobe piece by piece would maybe we would achieve..

Tunzi Kobe Edward Fiori engineer
"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

01:41 min | 6 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on This Week in Machine Learning & AI

"Welcome to the Tuomo podcasts..

"andreas" Discussed on Venture Stories

Venture Stories

12:20 min | 9 months ago

"andreas" Discussed on Venture Stories

"Enable that is saying to a small subset of team fully remote in a way like these people were critically amount of people in that group that works remote to the whole team has to act like they are remote can beginning B. Yoga team your infrastructure team. Whatever right or generic and then you basically bring the patents that work to the rest of the company and you make a conscious decision. Either you want to take the rest of the company also remote or not but in reality. It's it's something you need to be very careful about like it's basically management's Kazoo just did which is the total remote office but area near existing offices is that sustainable or a path that you recommend folks it works I. There's like a common misconception. It's possible to hybrid themes you just need to be very aware about where the boundaries between the different communication areas are and you need to work in at least those sub-themes remote I okay. Let's put on our sort of Investor Hat or evaluating market. That we have you know fifty sixty folks here who are thinking about. Starting the next company them. A curious about what companies can be built or enabled or likely to be bigger because it remote You're investing in the space you. Have you have ideas that you wanna see people build you? I just sort of map out. The different types of sub spaces of companies that you think can be built because of motor stronger because of remote. And then we'll get into each case individually so I just drop ideas and use like how do you make sure you invest in them just categories yet so remote itself is like a weird needs to think about as a target right. Because if you think about your motors Nishi will end up with communication tools and maybe like payroll and benefits and this kind of stuff. You know maybe global health care like anything that comes out of the fact that you have a global insurance like this kind of stuff. You no good nice. He invested in Insurance Company for Remote Very Subtle. Very very subtle. So this is kind of instantly end up with these kind of things. Okay if a global team could need great and then you have communication tools. Like many of. The people are in different time zones. So maybe I need something to accommodate for that or maybe everybody's in the same time zone so better video level and there is iterative improvements under definitely especially when it comes to global payroll and benefits. There's a billion dollar company. They're period like the next. This is literally the stripe paternity for our generation Stripe when they started you had local credit card providers. We've horrible rates horrible infrastructure. Really hard to integrate and you need to almost every market separately in a way or go to a really big provider where you're a pretty much killed with complexity. And that's the same status right now doing global payroll and so you either go to all local employer record companies and like just go nuts or you go with like somebody like ADP or somebody like that And I'm not making friends but it's a little bit more complex that say for a small startup and so it's like one of the big obvious opportunities and there's multiple companies trying to do that right now. Some coming from a freelancing angle San Fermin plummeting Blah Blah Blah. It's an obvious big one. There's benefits and all this kind of stuff. Obvious big ones. The thing that how is think about remote is kind of in general every tool. It's good for remote team on the long run is good for any digital lodge crew right. So what's happening is a lot of companies that are trying to do tools for knowledge teams and are tackling remote as an early customer group so basically remote teams tend to have a little bit higher complexity needs are usually say like five x and so therefore they need maybe or let it tools that normally accompany reflects thirty forty people would meet so kind of start is a good target group to start with because they are willing to try your tool by. They don't have purchasing complexity or compliance complexity. And all this kind of stuff. So it's very natural for a lot of tools right now for example if you do an HR tool if it were recruiting tool if you do like digitally any suspect to be stuff. Future work stuff to target remote teams early on and I think that's a super interesting category from years and investor attacked a remote teams in my funders literally. Fifty Sixty maybe seventy people need to look at the number who are have all of them are either remote founders operator early stage investors and remote company veteran trying to hear but additionally there's a lot of stuff that comes out out of the concept that you have highly skilled people globally and you can think of it like as Gio arbitrage if you want but the same way as you right now have to hospitals longer doing the X. Ray in the hospital but like doing it somewhere else. You could apply for a lot of industries and you have a highly educated experts in multiple reaches of the world. And you don't even need to go there because of low prices but just like you can do really really interesting stuff like why is an architect? Same cities you all this kind of stuff because a lot of things that you could potentially leverage space labor marketplaces. You're excited so one thing. That's super interesting. Is writing a really really hard to get work experience in any for example startup unless you are actually based in San Francisco areas really really hard to get in there and I recently invested in a company? That does ten hours a week remote virk placements for students or anybody who is like early in their career with the idea that you join and you basically on the spot learn actual skills and build a folio and I think something like that convert from multiple areas and that's personally in general rethinking. Hiring is something. I'm personally really bullish. About because what we notice especially. San Francisco is as soon as it comes to global credentials. Most recruiters breakdown like very few recruiters. No good universities even in even Indian top name. Universities have barely known right and global credentials is something. That's really hard and especially a lot of people. Don't even have these university background. Maybe so how can you actually venue with them and you can evaluate them by actually giving them real work. Yeah so that's like wanting look more but because probably there was a team that you heard all the engineers and they were all citizens exact Provo- And so that was the company you just mentioned is is one approach would our other approaches that are sort of reinventing credentials or a hiring away that you're excited about or think that people should take a look at who he is really ambitious. Okay so I strongly believe that the future of private equities remote work and I know right now a lot of them tried to be completely under the radar but like I know companies like Equifax that have like several thousand people remote and they buy startups that go well but not necessarily like you know like the growth done. The Grove is done and they don't know what to do in the founders want to get out the by does and basically replace everybody with remote work and others like super cheap labor the competitive really fair prices but they have an infinite supply of amazing people who have done this multiple times and can just like nomadic companies that bought just like going. Replace everything build up using up and then skated and I strongly believe that private equity will be one of the areas that will in the long run Leverage remote work very very aggressively. I wouldn't be surprised if it's kind of becoming a cliche to work for a private equity fund. If you're remote engineer you also mentioned previous I okay so another like if you would ask me. What are the really big trends in remote that I could see the next three years number? One with the private equity going remote. I guess at least when you're focusing on tech companies and the other one I could really see is larger. Remote teams have completely unfair advantage. When it comes to the can literally go like guitar for example if they see an engineering team really liked it could acquire them. They don't need to get them to move to San Francisco. They don't need to have like a complex integration whatsoever. Right can literally hire them and like really really quickly they can hire product a byproducts basically if they want to so one thing that I could see is multiple founders intentionally going remote I maybe fully remote to beat very very aggressive when it comes to going appeal basically build up the dominant player in your area and then like start buying everything up to the balloon the company to go. Ipo which is a very common thing if in every other industry if you're trying to go IPO you kind of like trying to get a lot of assets. African inland more show. And I could imagine this intact becoming very very common to say you buying up like for example you're doing a company that's related to continuous integration or to testing quality insurance. And you literally buying everything up that your customer could need and by all of them to basically say hey together we will make a really interesting. Ipo or another like or maybe just like target As the case like I know people built very specialized engineering product and They are buying competitors like crazy to balloon. This up to dance added for Chateauneuf money off at you. And that's I think this would become almost like a t shirt in the next few years that if you want to do that kind of game remote I what about. Where does freelancers ball? What sort of intersect overlap? So it was yet. We always other companies that are common misconception. It like like a few concept of people put together to promote like working from a beach like this whole digital normal thing which in my opinion it does more damage to the brand of remote actually helps freelance like only working twenty hours a week. Flexible Burke whatever right. This is not the most remote workers I know are actually highly paid are working highly professional setup like either at their own place or like a dedicated office and have like the whole whole space optimized for productivity and in depth in their case like. I know multiple people that might become like a cliche for engineers. Like if. You're a senior engineer. Why do you let somebody else decide how you most productive because you know what what time of the day all you most productivity and know what you need to do during the day you need to take a nap you go to the Jimmy to playing with your kids? Whatever right and this is how you increase productivity so this common for remote focus already and I think it would be common for every engineer. And the interesting thing is especially with freelance. It's always like associate to it because right now. Most international remote work is kind of like illegal Grayson like you hiring. Full time. People internationally as a freelancer which is in almost every country and no go but nobody really cares yet because they're all small enough actual freelance and there's like the whole category of upper components audience. What is I'm so Polish on is like works to hire so basically? You basically get a freelancer you. You have anything to do. You put a task that they should do you. Give it to five people. The best person do this project if you like them hired him a few of them tried it and I. This is what I would personally recommend every early stage to because everything has it's almost as low and they anyway don't Andrea Likud yet evaluating people. They're good in evaluating corporation and let the outcome so give them reworked hired him as a freelance for the start and then a transition into full time an early stage entrepreneurial. We'd love to hear from you. Please hit US up at village global dot BC slash at work catalyst..

engineer San Francisco Equifax San Fermin ADP Andrea Likud Grayson senior engineer Chateauneuf Burke Jimmy
"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

11:30 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Take it without an engine combustion engine and this officers different opportunities new opportunities. It's the same or more excitement for designers because because we have so much opportunity all the space or that space which you can use S. S. space or negative spills that's right you both ways and And you just have to make it very deliberately. Yes and of course with you. Know the economies of scale that I assume obtained with your parent corporation. I mean that's basically battery central troll. So you've got all of the technological underpinnings and all the supply chain that you would potentially need to actually imagine an engineer and build those cars. Yep Ah in the same time. You're always looking for partners. The industry's moving. So fast. And one hand it is about hardware and the other hand it is about software or an ecosystem and services that you can provide and or there. We are here in in this situation this well in an area which is very very positive exciting exciting cooperation that never existed before almost of necessity but also with a mind for efficiency prophets. And everybody wants absolute absolutely. We are not anymore just designers or cobblers. We are not just companies. Who Do be to see as a business to the customers directly but now will be to be business to business we talk to other companies who offer services and be joined forces to offer services combined to customers that could be interested in our united forces? So it's very very interesting and do you have to start designing with an understanding a standing for business as well and for different different opportunities from the start so in other words potentially a you might have client come to you. WHO's looking to help Pew design something completely outside of the automotive arena but that would rely on your Expertise and your approach to problem solving. Yes yes we. It's not only design but several departments in our house Actually set up to be their own profit centers as well which is very interesting which is stimulating relating for the design team. They can be you know flying car. Come around or can be those interesting topics. We just designed third third boss fully electric bus which will dry for we sorta first prototypes already driving in in in China. They no kidding. They haven't China and it's impressive. The view approach this differently. And you learn for your own business again right. It's like a piece of architecture basically and now you learn that you can bring it back back and and learn as in mid-october we are opening our new design studio in in Iran. It's a brand new beautiful. You know long leg geico played off. Stephan Meyer measuring played. It's it's incredible. We designed our design. This design that there's so it's awesome. We'll be right back. Sometimes the exceptional is not the biggest budget. Sometimes the exceptional is someone's ability to actually take their soul and printed on the screen. For a moment. I WANNA learn everything that there is to know about the filmmaking process. I think part of art is hearing from the artists who created a number of different visions. A number of different qualifications that have to go into making any film is insurmountable and hearing those stories can be just as exciting and insightful as the navy's themselves certain movies or certain scores certain actors have shaped who I am as a person have such appreciation for the things that people produce and the work that goes into whether it's the writer who came up with this story in general or how filmmakers were able to take that from the age and put it onto screen and then from the actors themselves who are able to kind of bring that all to life. That is what I I wanna hear because it makes me love my favorite movies even more. I'm Scott to law. If you love movies like I do. You're going to love. Hollywood would unscripted wherever you get your podcasts. We're back now with cars that matter my guest Andrea stor. What a great glimpse of your past experience and and your present projects Andreas? It's great to talk to you about these things but we also want to talk about some stuff that is near and dear to our listeners. Certainly to me. That's cars that matter most to you. Let's dig into that a little bit. What are some of your favorites? The very first carded I owned and bored with the very first money that I earned Edwards Roy was seventy five Hi Romero. GT designed by. Batasuna is and that was very special for me. I I loved cards I think. Almost like the golden cats of how it stands. It's designed by young. Joo Jaro. It's right he was actually the same age when he designed that Carter was his first car because that was nineteen sixty one one design. The first step knows was around. Then is that right. Yes yes and then it went through I guess seventy five in Europe as the two thousand correct. Eso I've had one of the latest production cavs offs and that was amazing and gorgeous shape. It really is beautiful. It looks so dynamic and so simple as well you know we talk about. Simplicity and reduce would use reduction. has this full of tension this car full of tension and even being steady. It has a lot of motion forward motion to it. And you can just see. See Italian you know against him. Bev -solutely I love putting that car next to a BMW. Two thousand two. And maybe next to a Datsun. Five ten audio put all three together and he realized they were racing together at the same class and then all tearing each other up and doing an amazing job but talk about how culture in have a signature automotive design every single one. You can tell where those cars came from and Jaros little. Gt was really the most Italian car that you could have imagined from the time. So the Little Alpha really informed some of your original inspiration for cars. What else definitely Lee the indefinitely? Cars of the pre Ov face and the thirties. So definitely because you know this whole time seem to have been and so special in terms of pioneering or as well competition if it's the friendship it's the Bugatti of that time the you know the Atlantic is just just outstanding. But then as well what you know the defendant tools. Just look at the propential- Horta Phantom tool an amazing thing mile long hood arrogancy Colombani. It's over there yeah proportionally. There's probably nothing more wriggling stately and impressive than the car. The yeah you say the sheer presence and then as well how smart smart how tiny but yet perfectly fit the cabin wasp and right throws Heine just impressive just beautiful yeah so appre wars. It's interesting that a contemporary designers so affected by prewar designs. I think that says a lot about your appreciation for history whether you you probably see when you see the se one that there is. There's definitely something of drama. And something of that again. Pioneering Spirit and expressive oppressive presence from those days to imagine. Just have to imagine to. How would it feel to sit in the Spitfire and half half that knows in front of you or you know you're talking about a triumph Spitfire? You're talking about the airplane and Yes that is a magnificent view. Yeah and then you know in the you have this this Merlin engine in front of you of course now. We don't have an engine in front of us but still you celebrate. Proportions is celebrate power just with the proportions. And this there's something I'm convinced that something about proportions and stance that we just never age that's right. That's why a Jaguar e type looked so good today as it did the day it was born absolutely it looked like a starship landed. Actually we were as well thinking about common. We did. Yeah very interesting. Well I never want to be presumptuous. Assume that one thing informed the other but no question that the the se one has has that proportion stance and kind of perfection of line. What about driving you like driving driving? I like driving A. I'm I'm not sure if I'm very good drive. But a loved driving out and what you'd mentioned earlier the nine eleven as an example of a car that did you consider Cetera a great driving experience. There's some other cars that or some others that may have kind of affected you. And what I several portions of I like to drive. You know I love to drive a came in which has just absolutely fantastic to drive as well but then I was touched to drive the Phantom defendthem is just such a isn't that sounds like solid yet light and sophisticated feeling. I had a chance of one time to drive the civil ghost I did you really. Yeah the nineteen seventy ghost. Yes I mean I I. Shouldn't say driver was passenger. Yeah but yet that was an experience and drove it from Sunning Day over Windsor Castle and passing Escott. And you know all these beautiful old trees left and right and the whole context and you sit so high up. He said so close together. You have your feet very fast yet. Your Post just upright the whole experience of how you sit is just something because then you feel justice cower this energy yet so smooth. It's absolutely clear where you're going on rails. It's confidence without what question isn't it amazing. I've talked to some old guys that are owners of the original silver ghosts and Obviously not that one. That's probably those valuable car in the world but of that model and they still regarded as one of the most perfectly built and engineered cars in the world. You you just can't find fault with them hundred and something years later Yes yes yes. And that's what gives me hope because it was really the first series car and they had a car before like but not serious like it was their first series. Men's to publish and yet yet it was the best car in the world right there were two startups back. Then right there were the were established rush companies and nobody knew before that rose would be the best kind of world four hundred ten years now so that gives hope the first cut of we did. I just talked about Outta here. The Rivera drives fantastically. And it's not easy to pull off against sophisticated and as deputy brands like Porsche and Mercedes and to get that feedback from professional drivers. And you know on this. You can rebuild because because you'd be talking about experience we talk are possibilities off love new drive trains and that you have more space and this and that but the driving experience always is very very very important you can still make your statement despite connectivity. An ecosystem of this is important but the driving experience is something very very important. Well I look forward to driving Rivero and obviously best of luck with with that as you move forward with that and with other new projects that will ensure care about in the very very near future awesome. Thank you so much thank you. Andreas Surfing Karma Automotive for joining us on cars that matter join us next time to start a new conversation about the passions that drivers and the passions we drive.

Gt China Europe cavs engineer Porsche Stephan Meyer Andrea stor geico Windsor Castle Joo Jaro Andreas Iran Batasuna Rivero BMW Atlantic Hollywood
"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

09:18 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Was demeaning for me behind that address giver audience a Quick Glimpse of Parma's history as it is and what the opportunities and challenges were when when you came there so comma was bought by the one John Croup some like four years ago five years ago four years ago and one John is is the largest part supplier manufacturer in China but they have many many other businesses well as Juancho North America in the one Chun China insurance companies hotels and much much more but long John is a company with principals with Ray Noble Principles. We got to know the chairman and now his son unfortunately chairman dies but he was a hero he still is a hero in China. He never sold the company. It was always always good to his people he always. He did everything for his people and he bought calmer as well by saying he wants to not only be part supplier he want to bid up his own luxury brand to give back to his people and people believed him because he never took more for himself than up to really need it so his office was super simple. Firing story he flew flew economy. You know it was a billionaire with Andreas raise the forefront of new car design. I had to ask them take a look into a crystal ball to see where car design was going specifically through the Lens of luxury. What about battery? Electric pure battery vehicles. Is that going to be where we're going. I think for an interim time for sure if it is battery powered think definitely electric cars. But they are different ways to to power them as well for a period of a generation or two four. I'm I'm pretty convinced right now. Drive at home to electric cars and it's just so convenient and you know not not at all any feel of range variety. It's just not happen. It's just not there as ranging sightings awfully overblown by the way I just have to but in and say this somebody who was talking the other day. Like if you've got a problem or you insane what do you mean how many times do you drive from La to San Francisco Cisco or you stop in the middle behalf to stop and have lunch stopping Harris ranch you go. You plugged the car and you have a steak sandwich you come out and your cars fueled or electrified. You go on your way range. Eggs -IETY is absolutely overblown. Absolutely yeah it's it's by the way while at great joy and fun to drive life edge. Casino and electric costs are by the. Hi That's right. All the center of gravity is down. Low where you want it. And then you're basically flicking around a little go cart. Absolutely I mean I love. Driving cars are allowed to drive a porsche. It's just I think like a Swiss clock perfect in the same time I was. I don't say the brand now was driving allowed car which would have excited me some years ago very very much and I thought in the end caught a lot of noise for. You're very lit a lot of noise but of course I love sound but still this was like somehow especially at seven in the morning when you're going to work note so yes. There are great opportunities but you know technology should not be used for take off. Let's use more technology. It's supporting and experienced. That you WANNA bring across. Water is standing for what. What are your principles? What are your experienced Principles what does your company stand for and then you need to find some certain technologies that support that idea and the more discreet they are. They more on obvious they are the better. It is the antiquated from a design. Point of view. Yeah it maybe that takes us in a direction where my observation in has been that as things become more I'm GonNa say technologically bitcoin US in other words. Let's assume for the moment that auto manufacturers going forward adop- all electric platforms and all these guys do zero to sixty in three seconds or whatever I mean this is all you know. It's sort of a given all of a sudden performance is a given and it's astounding all of a sudden they adopt all of the technological amenities. So you've got your connectivity. You got all the kinds of the things that you want and frankly whether you're driving a prius or a phantom it's going to have all of those things so in a Lotta ways. The playing field has been leveled. Every car is equal every car. Performs to the Max. Every card delivers everything. You want at that point. My question is what will be the measure of a luxury vehicle. What role does design play in defining a one car as a real statement of of luxury and excellence? Well I think it's very very important role on again on how you get there. What are your authentic thoughts behind Hainan? How how does the whole team get there? What is the story for it? So what would be the authentic that you interact with your car. How you feel in your car again again? It's not a shell. One example is how something probably I learned. Egg Rolls Royce was cultivated. Let's say rose rose because I was always interested to to dig a little it deeper but what I do with my designers as well and now I sent them out not only for days but for for weeks and sometimes more than a month to work somewhere whereas not in the design studio they go to for example they worked at the Hollywood hits and stayed. There slept there and got the task for me to to try different things dress differently. Go and different restaurants and West Hollywood's going different libraries or galleries and see different people people with different eyes and experience. Something very unique and so when you experienced something very unique to yourself something very UN exchangeable then you can design something very unique and you can tell a story with your product that will inspire people as well. It's not exchangeable. You're basically offer something nobody as offers You take in materials from these experience from this context you take in feelings and and that is not the. I don't WanNa say you mentioned the any other car like it's not an exchangeable average car at desert certain our. There's there's a certain presence. There's a certain than confidence. And this will the the possibility for uniqueness because it's not good. It's it's experienced right so I ask are kind of material designed at the Hollywood heads. The first review the image boards was still full of beautiful pictures just from the Internet. Let's say now changed that now. You should at least spend half of your time now that the house or three quarter of your time but spending outside outside so make sure the next pictures come from your cellphone con from the Internet. Come from your come from yourself and then it is clear. No other design in studio in the world will have these same images. Well you know. We've talked about moving forward. Obviously I'd like to ask you what's happening with Carmen. Some secrets in the future there. I'm not sure you're GonNa told me much but in a nutshell. Can you tell us where you're going next where we have. We have outstanding Aref powertrain technology already ride with the Rivero the GT. And yes. I I can say that. I'm really more impressed. I'm touched by how good at drives. Drives extremely good at Monterey were we met yes. Journalists and former race drivers were testing the cars and they they feedback the engineering team. I can't take this democratic but our engineering and team got to hear from them that this 'cause superior to the stood cuts which is pretty damn amazing for the first proper ground up engineer engineer car for such a small company and I- small company by the way. Let me interrupt and just ask you how many people are with Karma. We are way way under thousand which is in the automotive industry or context very small has very intimate very intimate. What we have a complete full value chain be manufacturer we do after thing from A to Z Which is pretty amazing? But what I want to say the car already so the existing Padron already tries to chassis the way cop brakes since tears is fantastic and I can only encourage everybody to dry it out. This is the one side of our business we day and cultivate tate. Basically this serial hybrid. You always drive electric but you can generate nor new electricity and this is the Rivera. You're Rivera it's a fantastic driver's car fantastic drivers guy and that was positively shocked after say an driving and right now. I'm here with a car. Right fantastic the other aspect aspect so beware continued this poetry and and we will see lots of opportunities to to use this technology in different concepts in the same time we arrived now approaching complete new platform a bath platform which again hess a battery electric vehicle. But this is a purely battery driven..

Hollywood John Croup chairman China Andreas engineer Parma US Ray Noble Rivera Harris ranch porsche Juancho North America La Monterey I Chun China
"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

08:46 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"Robert. Ross with cars the matter and I'm here this afternoon with my guest Andrea Sterner greetings. Andreas Hi Robyn. Thank you very much for having me. there's GonNa be fun. Andreas is with Karma Automotive in Irvine California and has been there since two thousand sixteen. Now now he's the vice president of global design and architecture but I know before that there were some interesting goings on with Rolls Royce and BMW of a lot of history. There there you graduated from four time in in Germany the university in with transportation degree in two thousand and four is that right. That is correct. Yes but you leapfrog right. Go Away into an important job. You went to Rolls Royce. Yeah I was twenty five years old and basically no experience as a professional cars. I did my internship during the studies ladies with BMW Group in advance design was then invited to come back and do my finest thesis so the theme of my final thesis was the spirit of BMW W. Luxury in the future. I was fascinated by finding out. What was the spirit? Like of Denali class the seventies and what was all about and what is is the meaning for that for the future should any meaning be and so I wanted to find out instead a unique way of BMW way of doing this of challenging. That what I did I. I reached out how to this designers of that period I reached out to Manfred Renan to pope. Rock to boycott Boyer tried to arrange meetings with them board a nice bottle of wine. I'm always a good way to get the conversation about cars going exactly Asked them if I could visit them in their houses they were older gentlemen. They were happy to invite me into talk about the past. So what made that special y did they work. What was different to established companies at that time Macedo Macedo was established? Talk about like W was really the underdog it was the underdog they were basically not. Let's not a startup but the challenge for sheriff smallest symbols like they I recall they said you know we all heads short arm shirts. We did wear ties guys Mercedes would or ties and jackets and so on they saw at BMW there were very few people very small teams. You knew exactly recluse by first name. Who was responsible for dynamics who was responsible for this and that so you knew responsible for some very beautiful cars? Yeah yeah it's hard to imagine something more perfect as an exercise in economy and efficiency than the BMW two thousand two or something more beautiful than a three point O. CSL S. l.. Absolutely and then you listen and you hear about this more stories in the Vintana what he did in order to challenge the fords and so on. It's amazing voice. I was inspiring for me and then of course you heard not only the attitude holiday interacted. How fast how? They will how they describe the products like tailored suit just enough. Never never more than just in us. That's right perfect an understatement but under statement. That was absolutely right anyway. This was probably my start into something of a little bit more meaningful Karazin and really trying to bring the point across. Okay one can make a difference by showing that they are different approaches. My model was shown at BMW to the board. The board came down into designed to saw to see to review my Ska- more love the seven series. You know that never happened before. And I was then asked to present my I model to the group design chiefs of you know many hildebrand at that time in Cameron Roy's right and of course the at the time I'm Chris Bangle was in charge of things at BMW and Christina was leading. That so I was. I recall when I presented that was even before presented. If it's in our school and I was so worn out or sober out. I couldn't even think of any like CV or application. Or even fact I. I didn't want him to work in that industry at all. Because I was just tired I was just out I. I hadn't even started yet so I I already had an application go in go into Israel for one year and two keyboards ought to go the other application I had was to go on the boat and Netherlands for year and just play Guitar Karen. Just you know every everybody's dream but then Justin this presentation three or four of the different brands chiefs Give me a business card and one of them said we should talk. That's he and Cameron of course former design director at at Rolls Royce motorcars. And we've had in on the show and what a fascinating character is. I guess a bit of a mentor to you. Obstacle the mentor and And that's the thing one of the most inspiring people in this industry industry. Yeah later got different opportunities but really in brought his team around that same time. This was a small Rolls Royce Team within BMW. I'm W that was kind of bird special. Nobody saw them really. They were in their own corners and like the elite they just launched defend sent them some years ago debt Kearns by me and saga car that matters epcot at meadows so defendthem is thought such would not at all be possible anymore and and I was a student so that had a big impact. Still it was so far away for me. I would have never dreamed into applying there again. to work there was just too far away. So when in then protest team around and said can you wait and you know he proceeds Merrick Georgia rich and Dean Smith and Charles called him. America was responsible for the exterior of the Phantom. My right Merrick was the suspension design. And of course set the tone for the future of Ross with his styling emphasis this with with this feeling as well but everybody there was just so warmhearted and saw impressed by the approach. Not Everything the thing that I did for my thesis was wonderful a perfect when I looked today. The sketch don't even want to look at. The sketches artist is his own worst critic but I remember when when Ian I met in again for the interview and the first thing he said I mean by first name directly. Of course he's British so there's no worry about zero. Do Not know about Zine do and I remember that he said in one. He said to one of the other team members in the very beginning that he hired me because he liked my is. This is just. It's just. It was different I was just not about not about I had as well offers. Where would have earned in the beginning more more money but with I didn't even ask I didn't I didn't even know what we're going to earn right? It was just like oh it was just an honor. TASTIC will obviously we want to talk about what's happening at Karma and how a lot of these past experiences of yours and the great the depth of knowledge gained with BMW and Rolls Royce of kind of informed. Your notions of luxury with the new company. But you know let's go back before we kinda jump into Karma and talk about for a minute some of the things that really inspired you know I I had a chance to look could you with your portfolio and obviously the drawing is remarkable a lot of car designers quote unquote obviously have some great executive skills. This with the Pencil or the pin but drawing obviously something. That's really important to you and you have an art background and maybe WanNa talk about that for a moment. I think that very few designers have a fine art background and to me it seems like a rare connection that informs designer in a way that that would not otherwise be so informed. Yon Sketching Design means a lot for me even before I could probably articulate in any other way over sketching all the time my parents have four boys and they hey tell even when I was two three years old I was getting all the time to all the others later when I was in kindergarten and then in school I was asked by my older brothers us to sketch their homework when they were when they were back. In High School or IM- University. I did some art projects for them. They said it was the way were again. Ingress backed from our orders but it was very special this story as well let I love to sketch so much and then kindergarten teacher. Who who who let me do that right I I? Usually they're yelling at you. Young man put the pencil down and listen to this history lesson notice. This is actually really reason why why we decided. Here's as we're in California. Our boy goes to a while of kindergarten because he can be being created if this is the the best education you can have the academic education starts..

BMW Group Rolls Royce Robert. Ross Andreas Macedo Macedo Germany Cameron Roy Karma Automotive Andrea Sterner vice president Manfred Renan Irvine California Boyer High School Ian I Vintana Chris Bangle California Mercedes
"andreas" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"A really cool on where there was a wedding and so initially Axa's boys but then the wedding couple speaks as you ask them a question about. Where do I go for the wedding? What do I need a couple speaks to you and then you can like you said move the blind? I mean there's just so much that can happen and I think your video show a great mix of it. which makes it really exciting for anyone? That's traveling all the things that can be done with. Ease Charlie that wedding specific demo. It's a customized personalized recording from a Koppel and again that's put into the back end of our software and so when a guest that Araj the wedding. Let's say it's at the hotel. They arrived at the wedding. The hotel maybe even a conference or an an event old I have to say is Alexa. I'm for the wedding or maybe make it a bit more specific Alex. I'm here for the smiths wedding or the wedding and it's GonNa then throw out that. Personalized is recording from the wedding. Couple themselves to welcome them and it really adds a level of personalization necessarily example of already. We think thank hotels to really take it to the next level you know. Put in personal recordings from the hotel manager specific welcoming the guests. Maybe it's the first thing they experienced. Come on US Alexa. So again my say and that's a a personalized recording from the manager per se. And you're gonNA feel a connection to that hotel true that brain and again. We think that's going to loyalty. And that's what hotels are after and nothing's really strong very easy to do US migration with flowers office so from back in so we love it. It got my Asian to the empty agree as long as you have the imagination the hotels to do it and we can help. Yes and I your passion for it is just so wonderful. What has been the overall feedback from users or any data that you can share so far extremely positive and was seen even just the analytics in terms of how much guests using the devices ruined or not? You're looking at asked six to seven request specific to that loss you know and then we'd bet that it's the hotel sixty seven digital interactions with that guests. You know so guess to using it especially appropriate opera me in the US. Way Eh. Holden penetration again. Like I said is quite high so they understand how to use a little bit better you know again with over here in in New Zealand in the US again there the education so what we do. We don't see this collateral. We try to help them as much as we can. But it is pretty natural life when you ask a question. Overseas Union over the command is initial trigger. Forgot which I grew once. You've done that with the blouse subway. We've pretty much customizing. Any question in any barechested. How you ask that question so it's GonNa hit every time so even if asking for a cow slip is beginning to get that no matter how they ask that question? So that the daughter and the initial feedback getting of see the reviews that were saying. It's a little hard to get the exact specifics. All the reviews that they're generating revenue and that's a big one for us and big want a hotel it's L. as well as pushing guest to onslaught soon so they make requests Berlet's at cocktail or as the nearest restaurant with the best restaurant. Or what do you recommend with the hotel. We push them to the that restaurant we offer them at ten percent batch and then you know. Hotels are seeing a ten to fifteen percent increase in revenue to through those specific Beta news. That they have on side again six to seven requests. Not so you know and I asked hotel keeping track of your guests. Sixty seven more tongs day visit. Would you take and how much value would that be too. And that's kind of you know one of the big strong pitchers that we say that we think the Dodd is the reflects in revenue. And really right stuff that we can. We can do outside of those things. Yeah I mean. Roi Again always the big question. So where do you guys as long as the next phase of voice going in the hospitality industry specifically. Yeah okay I will you got the rest of the world and by me talking different dialects. Alex looks different accents. Broken English all these things so we are kind of limited to a Google and Amazon dot now into the bay support what languages they support night's eighteen Greek and then what we can integrate with. So it's already a matter of time but like I said Wiki ready quite easy go and when I'm already when hotel impossible to ready who tell and yet women waiting for at six months to a year. Let's do this so you've got the hotel industry which has got no ago. Roughly just too late fees you half a million beds or hop million and then that's just a hotel industry. You've got the whole ebb industry which we're really excited about a little bit of the scale of a little smaller property. But are we still think that you know that is revenue to be made there that you've got the whole cruise ship industry you go all of those on streaming saw about his age brings things vices he do h especially some of private ones with potentially adding impersonal. I'm accounts to H residents communicate with their their loved ones just from a simple voice come on human simple voice commands of automations that we spoke about sort of lower software and hospitality into those key sectors. Those few and again. It's only a matter of harms so much to this voice. Control make sense in terms of empowering certain industries booting revenue for some of them Helping you you know that age K.. You know improve their lot. dister small little things so the line of duty. A lot of Apply Limited by Amazon Bay saying yet. We're ready to go the by again soon as they already will be ready to six months to a year so again Exciting yes. Where can people learn more about? You talked about today on bare react on lengthy and on posting you know he's not everyday videos demonstrations so this driest Kufa on link Dean or our website. His voice systems are dodd. said yet which is going to link to videos Valera specific videos to ones. We're doing so you know you're in any part of the world and from the US the UK draws drolet. You can reach out David Muir same reach out to us. And also we can pretty much customized any solution that you want. Even if it's not an austerity ministry mystery. You know there's a lot you can do so it's exciting times voice. I'm excited to be part of the on. The first. If not in this part of the world does feel like you know anyone explaining the boy's face you know is You know an entrepreneurial trail breezy and it's real excited to be on the wave of the month and the last question we'd like to ask on this show to kind of help promote the voice as a whole is there a flash briefing scale or voice experience that you've been using a lot and really enjoying recently will for me it's actually the NFL. Oh on a pig. NFL supportive just with business. I don't often get a you know. Check it on the daily. So that's kind of one of the first ones that I say just getting updates. Yeah and it school specific. The biggest kind of that it's local weather earn sadly again some are slash three three for New Zealand Limited. Or maybe that somebody we helped with but formerly. NFL May just getting those those excites everyday. Really perfect thank you so much for sharing your energy and excitement for all that you do. Andreas knows absolute pleasure. Thanks for reaching out. Yeah I'm real excited to be on podcast. Thank you for listening to the inside voice podcast. We greatly appreciate you being part of our community and if you enjoyed this episode so you like the podcast we would love it if you would subscribe follow leg share. Leave a review of the show. If you have any questions comments feedback people you want to see on the show things you WANNA learn. Feel free to send us an email at Carey at motive dot com that's K. E. R. I at M. O. D. E. DOT COM and be sure to check us out online at Voice Summit Dot. Ai Thank you and we look forward to chatting with you next week..

US NFL Alexa Alex Voice Summit Dot Axa Koppel Charlie Araj Kufa New Zealand David Muir Dodd Berlet Overseas Union Amazon Bay Andreas Google New Zealand Limited Carey
"andreas" Discussed on Bad Science

Bad Science

10:28 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Bad Science

"Hi. Everybody welcome to bad signs. I'm an Edinburgh and today we're talking about the latest and greatest earthquake film Twenty Seventeen Know Twenty fifteen. Does anybody know in this movie any fifteen San Andreas. You can already tell my guests are brilliant. They we know the year of the film. I'm going to introduce them right now. We have actor writer and stand up comedian from the savage snowflake podcast Geoff Leach. Hello how are you. I'm doing Great Jeff. How are you all right? I love your radio Voice. I love your voice a wonderful well yeah. I've got a lot of depth as well yeah going but but you have like a demeanor that soon as we start talking on the podcasts you're like and now I am an official man. It's his job as well. It's a very professional show. I would never say anything out of the ordinary. If you're the you're the most professional you two different types of beverage. That's right caffeinated and Akwa base. That's right. It depends what you want but I always provide two different liquids. I love to different colored liquid one type of plug copies of the same color no. It's not going to happen on do that no but if you want one clear and one brown you come to the right place wow again different type of focus I think let's try and focus on absolute tragedy disasters. You told me this was. PG rated different colors liquids. It's just another tally on my fucked up list. I've just fucked up so many the times and here's another you're going to be no should I do you leave the end. I do leave it in his enemies. Oh my goodness. I'll be out on this one beeping his phonier. anyways I feel like it but instead incentive beeping it yeah. Can you see me going this up and put probably where I'm just going. Oh yeah no no no. Let's actually let's just get a few reactions so that I can throw those in leat. Stop Eat. Oh that one was like majestic yourself out okay. Well talk about a fucking smart dude. I'll introduce our other guests here to introduce me thanks I this guy is an associate staff seismologists from Caltech. Which is the school? They're discussing and shooting shooting at in. I don't know if they're shooting at it. I guess we'll ask him in the film San Andreas. It's Dr Min adrain mayor. How's it going very good? Thanks for having me. Did I say your last last name right. I feel like I was GONNA say mire. Mare your myers good Meyer. Okay good means go a lot going on I four he's a fucking brainiac Ri- Yes we just so as a over yet yeah unlike secondly he was playing ukulele minute go so he's like a double threat clearly ridiculously handsome. That's what I was gonNA. Say is the triple threat because clearly he could play bond but then also play instruments and it also measured the earth and he's White Adam straight want these women saw in life. It looks like he just got down from a mountain mountain and came in here today. This guy goes into rows that not only do they not follow him around up and down the aisles. They give him stuff to take away for free. Whatever you want doctor he's killing? She probably say something well. Let's talk about the movie I Sandra I had never seen before this morning. Okay great so fresh stayed like took talk just not even twenty four hours a guard okay great. It's still fresh very fresh well. What was your muscles fresh well? My initial thought is this the signs of why this film was even made okay. That was my biggest. I usually try to find like production not airs but just like why did it. Why was it hard making this movie because there's usually a big story about how it didn't work out and how they had to switch the director but it just seemed like everyone agreed movie should get made and then the rock was like I'm in and then it got married yeah and don't get me wrong? There's some great performances in it. Oh yeah good elements about it yeah but it's the simplest film that's ever been made isn't it. I think it's just a copy paste disaster right one with the train that's running away with them. Denzel and healthy headline one car three or something like that it's about run away and then the younger younger he's divorced from his girl but then he wants back then he saves the trainees here yeah. It's like the same thing. There's always got to be a love story and then there's gotta be one just as soon as the film starts there's going to be something terrible and exciting and then just domino effect boom boom boom boom boom climax to sitting in second major scientific question I had before stray off the bat again to the actual earthquake section sure why is the rocks daughter so translucent y Ou like I'll let you take that one because she she she's. She's the actress that goes play is of English Irish Italian and Hungarian descent like she can be more right yeah and the Rock I mean he's rocking a little something any he's GonNa little culture going on. I mean I didn't question it while I was watching it but now it now that you say it. I can't get out of my head the whole movie. I was just going well. I can believe this tidal wave is taking all these buildings but the Pale Skin God signs the same. Everything else is completely realistic right yeah uh that my friend was saying that the most unrealistic thing of the movies that somebody divorced dwayne Johnson the good point sexy accent as well L. he does. He Still Switzerland believe he's from Switzerland from Switzerland changed accent depending on who I talked to Ooh talk to American person or to your Irish it's up. I think he's Irish because you're like Oh. I should told you should have been from oil and and then just studying earthquakes wchs now learn English and then when I came here everybody thought I was from South Africa and lived there for a while and then people started asking from Germany snap. That's it's a step back isn't it the actor who plays Jack Stella in sons of anarchy odds because he's got like three accents none of them now. He's he's just got through it access which is then then automatically switch depending on who you talked loving so is it a Swiss accent. Were hearing does that. I don't know you don't know tell me girlfriends oh friends in the room so she can watch me fly outrageous throughout this whole punk fall. I mean she should be jealous. We haven't for actually a homosexual. I'm just European so the movie yeah Yeah Okay so wait. Let's go to the doctor here. When did you first see it? And what did you think of the film. I actually watched it on the plane here. When I moved to California how funny that's why I knew it was in two thousand fifteen okay and I saw a time to watch it possibly on the plane I can't move to? La Without having seen the movie our okay so I watched it and then they start the thing with you know where they go and rescue the car accident right yes becky that was called Natalie but it close enough. I hear Middle Games probably Yeah No. He does the thing where you know. He tips the hat. Ask The too much in case you didn't see it is caused the car to full first of all is the road to blades wind helicopter Johnson yeah well beyond you just can't fly helicopter like that anyways. It was almost on do that no question about that tipping the hat question the hat I almost wish film it was almost too much and we'd like ours. Good is that because of the wrong words for the rest of his crewmen who by the way a meant to be seasoned Marines Marines and he's just just when you're down there and make sure you do this really simplistic thing. The shouli should know because you're a professional department. I mean he's like chill about that. Guy was like very cocky about going down there and he goes. Hey we only have five minutes and he's like everything and then they do the whole procedure it goes wrong long and then somehow they're all happy about. Don't isn't the helicopter about to break down your timeline here. I wish the guy lost his arm. At the beginning he should've lost his arm. That would have been so so if a car traps your arm on the side of amount and you're gonNA have some kind of lost and damaged at least bit nerve damage convenient. He's just rocking through any should've taken his arm off he will well-trained and well-trained whoa triggering really strong forum so you didn't appreciate the tip the hat but you kept watching and enjoyed the Phil I did no I think it's great and you know it's totally over the top. Many regards says a lot of good elements suggest watching it whilst on edibles of Legal Age and you're allowed to do that in that something you're into you have an edible beforehand. That's smart. That's how I did. It and I found it pretty hilarious realistic yeah. It was a great comedy movie Yeah Yeah. I think there were funny. I will say I didn't find the parts that they meant to be funny funny but I did for any time. A building was going down. I was loving it hilarious. I love of that sharing. I know I it's probably terrible because you know you're also thinking how many people are in this building. How many people are getting crushed by this building etcetera etcetera but for some reason just watching Ching buildings go down is awesome? We need more of that in films all right nine eleven i. I was watching the whole time just thinking that I was just going eleven nine eleven way. We're making this movie because you could call you even mentioned those two numbers you can literally just got. Hey what's going out to the car. I would probably going to get between some nine eleven. I WANNA go. I don't WANNA go out. How dare you ruined my night? You can't say those numbers. They just can't drop him KNBR notice lock it. Was You know al Qaeda in festival season yeah which is my favorite festival season and they tip over right. He's one of the nine eleven conspiracy theories right it collapsed within themselves which is actually apparently really difficult to do. If you want to demolish a building on purpose you WanNa do it without you know destroying the neighboring buildings but is it just imploded so year theorist. I'm not oh I would love that if you were but the the triple threat just became yeah. I think it's a difficult physical problem of how these buildings actually will go down because we've never seen it. There's never been a really big earthquake close to modern city since we had skyscraper. Oh a ankle billions can collapse well high-rises. Can it's used it hasn't happened yet. It hasn't happened yet. What about the waves the way that because there is a few like super for wide shots of the.

dwayne Johnson Switzerland San Andreas Edinburgh Jeff official writer Geoff Leach Akwa Marines Marines Dr Min Caltech Meyer Sandra I Denzel director Jack Stella
"andreas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"andreas" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Where that problem is is slice noticeable. Sequel has been around for a very long time and the basics of sequel might not change very much from year to year but the underlying technology that implements those queries is undergoing constant innovation. The distributed sequel summit is a full day of talks about building and scaling distributed sequel systems in the cloud distributed sequel summit is september twentieth twenty nineteen in san jose california distributed sequel databases can globally w. distributed data and lastly scale while also delivering strong consistency and acid transactions the distributed sequel summit includes who'd speakers from google spanner amazon aurora facebook pivotal and yuga by db to find out about the latest innovations in large large scale distributed systems infrastructure mostly with a focus on distributed databases check out the disturbed sequel summit september twentieth twenty nineteen in san jose <music>. You alluded to the.

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"andreas" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"andreas" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"A broken this and you that i'm not gonna fix by till you pay put that halfback in any rely on karma i actually thought about writing her a note uh boy andreas writing like not cool and giving it to the way and saying here and they'll way interests in this war we let me what am i supposed to do she at her establishment i mean the turk place of business if she can't pass notes for you though she can guys in girls due to each other all the time yeah but no one your accusing someone of a crime i but all i'm saying is not cool this ice this feels like area sad crime movie there were watching in the waitress i la did i say i am i in the middle of it and at the end of this the waitress waitresses dead your fine the other woman has her hat in the waitresses okay yeah all right well well you took it to a new really took it agree throughout the on the happy monday everybody thanks for that we're going to put someone in time out when we come back not just that lady who stole that hat we've got another lady that were putting a timeout for jumping to conclusions about how good a gift may or may not be in for the rest of her life her hobbies going to have one honor or explain that's coming up next on my talk want us over one everything entertainment loriann julia we haven't heard her eyes so this is her new tract i need you and oh no neil young journeys this kind of funny looks but it could be catch jacobs a year later playing in found her and her son while you're being very very generous swirl that's because that's where i am that well thank you a lorry and julia with.

andreas julia