17 Burst results for "Andrea Wilson Woods"

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

01:48 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Ties <Speech_Male> with people especially <Speech_Male> when their family <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> close friends is <Speech_Male> is not easy, <Speech_Male> but it's the right <Speech_Male> thing to do for your own <Speech_Male> self care in your <Speech_Male> own <Speech_Male> or own <Speech_Male> personal Wellness <Speech_Male> so long and I've <Speech_Male> loved our conversation. They <Speech_Male> working people find <Speech_Male> out more about <SpeakerChange> you and this <Speech_Female> awesome work that you do. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Let's see they can <Speech_Female> learn <Speech_Female> more about the book of better <Speech_Female> off bald ba <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Ang. <Speech_Female> If they would <Speech_Female> like a lifetime <Speech_Female> free membership <Speech_Female> to cancer <Speech_Female> you they can learn about <Speech_Female> cancer you it's for <Speech_Female> newly diagnosed <Speech_Female> cancer patients and <Speech_Female> caregivers. They can <Speech_Female> go to cancer. <Speech_Female> University <Speech_Female> job when <Speech_Female> they apply <Speech_Female> in the <Speech_Female> drop-down menu. <Speech_Female> Am <Speech_Music_Female> I correct that this is <Speech_Music_Female> the breakfast <SpeakerChange> leadership <Speech_Music_Male> podcast, correct? <Speech_Male> Last <Speech_Male> time I checked you. Okay <Speech_Music_Female> good. I set it up that <Speech_Music_Female> way. <Speech_Female> So when a fly <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> there's a little <Speech_Female> little part the very <Speech_Female> bottom it says I have a coupon <Speech_Female> code. So if they <Speech_Female> just put in the coupon <Speech_Female> code breakfast <Speech_Female> leadership, but all <Speech_Female> one word all caps, <Speech_Female> then they <Speech_Female> will have a free lifetime. <Speech_Female> Yep. Worship <Silence> to cancer <SpeakerChange> you <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Male> is awesome. And I highly <Speech_Male> encourage people <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> to take advantage of <Speech_Male> that because I know <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cancer impact <Speech_Male> is every family <Speech_Male> somewhere <Speech_Male> somewhere along the line. <Speech_Male> Someone is impacted <Speech_Male> by that. So <Speech_Male> having access <Speech_Male> to these awesome resources <Speech_Male> you have <Speech_Male> available <Speech_Male> is crucial and and thank <Speech_Male> you for <Speech_Male> for making that offer <Speech_Male> to our <Speech_Male> listeners because <Speech_Male> it makes the world <Speech_Male> to them and to me, <Speech_Male> so thank you so <Speech_Male> much for your time today <Speech_Male> Andre. I really appreciate <Speech_Male> this conversation <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> love the work that <Speech_Female> you do. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks for having me. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for listening to the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> breakfast leadership <Speech_Music_Male> show part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of the breakfast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> leadership Network <Speech_Music_Male> visit breakfast <Speech_Music_Male> leadership. <Speech_Music_Male> Com for tips <Speech_Music_Male> on and power off your <Speech_Music_Male> business <Speech_Music_Male> and your life. <Music>

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"I went to see my primary care physician about something and I have bad lungs. I'm not a smoker but I've always just had really bad lungs. I'm prone to bronchial some horse right now, and he didn't X-ray and he's he said my lungs are the best he's ever seen them because I'm not traveling because I usually get sick when I travel and Thursday are both kind of laughed about it, but you know, but I don't consider myself someone who's immune system is compromised, even though he would probably argue that I'm definitely susceptible, but I just know me I gave birth. Like when I travel if I'm not traveling I'm probably fine. And so I just most of us would be fine. We would yeah, even when you look at the numbers, even though the numbers said are presented with alarming when you look at the total global population of the planet, it's it's it's a loan number and I am definitely not trying to diminish the loss of life. I know personally a couple of people through family members that have have passed away from this and but you know, again, it's one of those things where it's I think it's getting cooler heads to Prevail and look at this from a practical matter instead of Sensational matter. I think would go a long way in easing the anxiety of you know, so many people that are just on edge right now and they're you know, they're anxious. They're worried. They're they're frustrated. They they sense loss because they haven't been able to do the things that they love to do wage. So in closing, when are we agree by the way, it's very politicized here very yeah. Yeah, it is across many places on the planet and off but I definitely know back home in the states. There is a lot of political discussion about it, which is unfortunate. But that's the reality we're in right now. So in closing in when someone and we lose this before, you know, there's no timetable for grief, but what are some things that people can do that can help them through the grieving process now with the timetable, but just some things that they can do to make it a bit easier for them to to go through the grief that we often face in a variety of different factors. I know for me that it helped to do things in my sister's memory. So my my non-profit aside just doing things in her memory. To mine suggested and this was not long after my sister died. Did you a book drive in my sister's memory and my sister loved to read and to do it actually the middle school. She attended all she she'd only been one year at the high school, but she went all three years at the same middle school. And and I did that book drive twice a year at Christmas and on her birthday and I did that for about five years and I forget I mean it was over a thousand books that ended up being donated and every book had a special photo on the inside, you know explaining where the donation came from and why and pray that which is really helpful for me that meant a lot because I just wanted people to remember her and her Legacy to live on but that may not work for everyone. I think maybe the most important thing is to make sure the people in your life are supportive. And what was very challenging for me was I placed this expectation on my Samsung? That I had to be a certain kind of person because I was at person in my group of friends who was the connector the leader, you.

middle school Samsung
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:38 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"We just had this very simple three-step sort of process sanitation process if you will, but very simple and you know, I allowed her friends to come see her as long as she thought. You know rested enough and my sister the entire time she was six. She got one cold. That was it. So again, you don't have to totally isolate yourself and and you should still connect with people. I mean, we're humans. We like spending time with other people. Yeah, one of the things we've seen in Toronto where I'm based at right now down with long-term care retirement homes is when the pandemic hit, you know, they went completely one hundred percent on lockdown. They would know about any visitors and one of the sad things we've seen and in many cases is some of these loved ones and cancer patients and people that were ill and hospice and other places, you know passing away without their loved ones being able to be there and that is it's such a and I'm torn by it. I understand the reasoning why they wanted to purchase. The other people in those facilities, but on the other side, it's it's a lost opportunity where people didn't get an opportunity to say goodbye or be with someone in their last moments when they were physically in the same area. I can get it. If you were another part of the world another part of the country and you couldn't get there in time to be with somebody but when you're literally in the same tone and would take you 5 minutes to get there and they wouldn't allow you to to come in especially those last moments. It's it's tragic. It's horrible. It's horrible and it's like they're it's like there's this thing called hazmat suits. They've been around a while. Yeah, you dress somebody up and has massive are completely enclosed. They there's nothing on if you want to spray them with something great. Let them go in, you know, they're wearing a glove they're holding a hand. They're not exposing a single individual in there and that was dead. Given an option and it just in and I have to give a lot of these entities and decision-makers some Grace because this is all a new thing for everybody. There was a whole lot of documentation on the last pandemic that we faced in the world..

Toronto
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:39 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"I was angry and felt horrible for those people in the first so like why am I I'm upset, you know, I tend to be somebody that's with empathy and I feel bad for people and struggles and all that but I was angry in a situation like why am I angry but it recognized me that it triggered a past situation in my life now on thankfully. I'm not in anywhere near those types of circumstances now that I was back in 2009, but it still was one of those things where like wow Why didn't it didn't deal with that. I thought I had dealt with that and realized that wage frankly I did and so it's very very ironic in a way that you you know were basically it brought back something, you know, just watching you know something on T. Yeah, I mean wage Had great griefs funny that way way right? I mean I I never tell anyone how to grieve I think everyone Grieves differently and it doesn't have a it doesn't have a timetable and you can have flashbacks like you did from something that happened that just triggered you. I mean, I miss my sister every day and I think about her every day. I say a prayer to her every night and then that's that's my way of accessing my grief. Yeah. It's it's one of those things where everybody Grieves differently and you know my lost my dad in March, you know, literally a couple of days before I make started and bought a whirlwind trip to get my mom out of you know, the sell the house that they had for over a quarter-century mover in with my brother and navigate move all her belongings and.

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"And ER doctor told us what he saw on her CAT scan and that was day one of her very short 107 day off cancer journey, and she died a few months after my 29th birthday and it just changed the course of my life because she she was everything to me and so about a year later after I turned Thirty. I started a non-profit dedicated to primary liver cancer and I like to tell people that when I took my advice on this, you know, I did not want to start a non-profit. It was not like in my dreams when I was a little girl. I wasn't stupid scared me. It's just at that time. There was not a single organization involved. Us doing anything about her particular type of cancer and that's the only reason I started one. I'm so grateful I did and I've been doing that over 17 years and then less than two years ago. I actually started a health Tech startup. It's a for-profit. It's for all cancer patients and caregivers. And then I also published a book last fall which is about raising and losing my sister to liver cancer and it's called better off bald. What's amazing work you do and and I agree when we're little kids. We don't tend to think long going to run a non-profit no choice firefighters police officers or or you know leaders of businesses or you know race car drivers or princesses or all options are on there. I don't recall wage are running a nonprofit is being on my original list. Oh I did I did run a few non-profit organizations for a little over a decade. So I now that I am Don't I can't say that I I miss some elements of it. I miss others of course, but there are some aspects of it. I don't miss it at all. But that's another story for another day. So I see you had all of those things happen in the in the you had thrust on you. Okay, you're going to be a caregiver now and then a very short window of time after that unfortunate bounce houses..

cancer
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

06:13 min | 3 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Welcome back. I've got Andrea Wilson Woods on the line Andrea. How are you? I'm good. Thank you. Great to have you here in the pre-show. We were talking about all kinds of different things we could talk about and we're in the middle of a pandemic at the time of this recording so we had talked about, you know loss in in grief, and I know that's something we want to dive in and your backstory a bit off beforehand, but ultimately, you know, when we will get to the point of with covid-19 and and some of the losses and and the grief that people are facing right now. So sure what the audience your backstory and in the world to do. I'm sure so when I was twenty-two years old, I was living in Los Angeles. I had graduated from college and I was trying to figure things out like most people I think and I ended up getting custody of my then eight-year-old sister Adrienne and I became her legal guardian and I was her only parent and I raised her. All through my 20s until a month after her fifteenth birthday. She was diagnosed with stage 4 liver cancer and it was really shocking. I mean she was a very active kid. She had no symptoms until the day she felt pain which was the day and ER doctor told us what he saw on her CAT scan and that was day one of her very short 107 day off cancer journey, and she died a few months after my 29th birthday and it just changed the course of my life because she she was everything to me and so about a year later after I turned Thirty. I started a non-profit dedicated to primary liver cancer and I like to tell people that when I took my advice on this, you know, I did not want to start a non-profit. It was not like in my dreams when I was a little girl. I wasn't stupid scared me. It's just at that time. There was not a single organization involved. Us doing anything about her particular type of cancer and that's the only reason I started one. I'm so grateful I did and I've been doing that over 17 years and then less than two years ago. I actually started a health Tech startup. It's a for-profit. It's for all cancer patients and caregivers. And then I also published a book last fall which is about raising and losing my sister to liver cancer and it's called better off bald. What's amazing work you do and and I agree when we're little kids. We don't tend to think long going to run a non-profit no choice firefighters police officers or or you know leaders of businesses or you know race car drivers or princesses or all options are on there. I don't recall wage are running a nonprofit is being on my original list. Oh I did I did run a few non-profit organizations for a little over a decade. So I now that I am Don't I can't say that I I miss some elements of it. I miss others of course, but there are some aspects of it. I don't miss it at all. But that's another story for another day. So I see you had all of those things happen in the in the you had thrust on you. Okay, you're going to be a caregiver now and then a very short window of time after that unfortunate bounce houses. And and when you go through something like that, you know, it it for me it wouldn't you know, I talked with people that have gone through something like this is with the shock of it. All is so intense that it you know for some it says just makes them Nam. It's like they're not, you know, they're still grieving they hurt or in pain and they're sad. It's just the shock of the the quickness of it. All is something that a lot of people, you know has a long-term effect on them just a shock of how in the world that that just home. What will you know any like what hippie it kind of thing. So I'm sure you've experienced something similar to that. Of course, you know with working with people that have to deal with that horrible horrible disease thought I lost many family members to cancer and a variety of different types too. And it's devastating for families and everything, but I'm sure they knew people that you work with and all of that that's gotta be one of the biggest thing I have to deal with is just the shock of of hearing that news and and trying to navigate through it. Yeah. Definitely. I mean I've in addition to my sister. I've lost five other family members to five different kinds of cancer and birth. I agree. I mean when you're in it cancer forces you to live very much in the present and you know, you're making decisions often on the Fly and you're just you're just ended and your office certainly adapting to changes the often you have no control over but then after whether it's after you survived cancer after your loved one dies, you know then off. Just sort of go through all those emotions and you know, there are the five stages of grief and what's interesting is, you know, people think that they go in a certain order know they don't, you know, anger depression a bargaining acceptance Cohen denial, right? I have accepted my sister's death for a long time, but the one stage of grief I had never experienced was anger because I didn't know who to be angry at and I was really, you know, I didn't know and there were plenty of other people who are angry might be half. So I didn't I didn't have to do that but a few years ago, I was watching this TV show TV show Netflix and the final episode was this girl walking across the stage in her high school graduation, and then it faded to walking across the stage in her college graduation and my sister loves school. She was an honor student 4.0 GPA. She already knew where she wanted to go to college. I mean, she she had all these plans and for some reason and that dog Moment that hit me and it was I was angry like I was just furious and and the anger just to hit me more than fifteen years later. I'm really shocked me, you

cancer
Interview with Andrea Wilson Woods

Breakfast Leadership

06:13 min | 3 months ago

Interview with Andrea Wilson Woods

"Welcome back. I've got Andrea Wilson Woods on the line Andrea. How are you? I'm good. Thank you. Great to have you here in the pre-show. We were talking about all kinds of different things we could talk about and we're in the middle of a pandemic at the time of this recording so we had talked about, you know loss in in grief, and I know that's something we want to dive in and your backstory a bit off beforehand, but ultimately, you know, when we will get to the point of with covid-19 and and some of the losses and and the grief that people are facing right now. So sure what the audience your backstory and in the world to do. I'm sure so when I was twenty-two years old, I was living in Los Angeles. I had graduated from college and I was trying to figure things out like most people I think and I ended up getting custody of my then eight-year-old sister Adrienne and I became her legal guardian and I was her only parent and I raised her. All through my 20s until a month after her fifteenth birthday. She was diagnosed with stage 4 liver cancer and it was really shocking. I mean she was a very active kid. She had no symptoms until the day she felt pain which was the day and ER doctor told us what he saw on her CAT scan and that was day one of her very short 107 day off cancer journey, and she died a few months after my 29th birthday and it just changed the course of my life because she she was everything to me and so about a year later after I turned Thirty. I started a non-profit dedicated to primary liver cancer and I like to tell people that when I took my advice on this, you know, I did not want to start a non-profit. It was not like in my dreams when I was a little girl. I wasn't stupid scared me. It's just at that time. There was not a single organization involved. Us doing anything about her particular type of cancer and that's the only reason I started one. I'm so grateful I did and I've been doing that over 17 years and then less than two years ago. I actually started a health Tech startup. It's a for-profit. It's for all cancer patients and caregivers. And then I also published a book last fall which is about raising and losing my sister to liver cancer and it's called better off bald. What's amazing work you do and and I agree when we're little kids. We don't tend to think long going to run a non-profit no choice firefighters police officers or or you know leaders of businesses or you know race car drivers or princesses or all options are on there. I don't recall wage are running a nonprofit is being on my original list. Oh I did I did run a few non-profit organizations for a little over a decade. So I now that I am Don't I can't say that I I miss some elements of it. I miss others of course, but there are some aspects of it. I don't miss it at all. But that's another story for another day. So I see you had all of those things happen in the in the you had thrust on you. Okay, you're going to be a caregiver now and then a very short window of time after that unfortunate bounce houses. And and when you go through something like that, you know, it it for me it wouldn't you know, I talked with people that have gone through something like this is with the shock of it. All is so intense that it you know for some it says just makes them Nam. It's like they're not, you know, they're still grieving they hurt or in pain and they're sad. It's just the shock of the the quickness of it. All is something that a lot of people, you know has a long-term effect on them just a shock of how in the world that that just home. What will you know any like what hippie it kind of thing. So I'm sure you've experienced something similar to that. Of course, you know with working with people that have to deal with that horrible horrible disease thought I lost many family members to cancer and a variety of different types too. And it's devastating for families and everything, but I'm sure they knew people that you work with and all of that that's gotta be one of the biggest thing I have to deal with is just the shock of of hearing that news and and trying to navigate through it. Yeah. Definitely. I mean I've in addition to my sister. I've lost five other family members to five different kinds of cancer and birth. I agree. I mean when you're in it cancer forces you to live very much in the present and you know, you're making decisions often on the Fly and you're just you're just ended and your office certainly adapting to changes the often you have no control over but then after whether it's after you survived cancer after your loved one dies, you know then off. Just sort of go through all those emotions and you know, there are the five stages of grief and what's interesting is, you know, people think that they go in a certain order know they don't, you know, anger depression a bargaining acceptance Cohen denial, right? I have accepted my sister's death for a long time, but the one stage of grief I had never experienced was anger because I didn't know who to be angry at and I was really, you know, I didn't know and there were plenty of other people who are angry might be half. So I didn't I didn't have to do that but a few years ago, I was watching this TV show TV show Netflix and the final episode was this girl walking across the stage in her high school graduation, and then it faded to walking across the stage in her college graduation and my sister loves school. She was an honor student 4.0 GPA. She already knew where she wanted to go to college. I mean, she she had all these plans and for some reason and that dog Moment that hit me and it was I was angry like I was just furious and and the anger just to hit me more than fifteen years later. I'm really shocked me, you

Cancer Andrea Wilson Woods Los Angeles Netflix Adrienne ER Cohen
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

03:35 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Of the pharmaceutical companies that manufacture drugs especially hip see and the big one and hip see is Gilead. They all have what they call. Paps patient assistant programs. But they don't like to advertise it ever but they have them and many times. It is not dependent on your income at all. You just have to apply for it so again you Google's pretty good now you go into Google. Gilead Hepatitis C. Patient Assistant Program. You will probably find it with hepatitis. C. Specifically my nonprofit doesn't handle it but I always refer people to an amazing nonprofit and hip see so they can feel free to email me at Andrea and dare Blue Ferry B. L. U. E. F. E. R. Y. DOT ORG or. Put it in the show notes or whatever and I will hook them up with the hip see issue again with scarcely with therapy drugs. Go straight to the manufacturer and make a big stink about it. I mean really. That's that's what you have to do. You have to make the companies accountable. Because I answer your question yeah thank. You heard a great advice. I think very very helpful to know so Andrea this topics like we were just talking about and a lot of your journey and the mention of it over a long course of tied. There's so much that changes in goes on you. Know How do you keep up with all this? What are you read their professionally personally? Maybe even a disconnect that had an impact on you my favorite recent book to recommend to cancer patients and caregivers is radical remission and I wrote it down by Dr Kelly Turner. It's based in research. And what she did was she wanted to find out why patients with devastating cancer diagnoses had these radical remissions. So she went around. The world look different types of cancer different types of people different stages of cancer and identified nine things that all of these people did and then she puts in Layman's terms. It's an easy read. It's not like this difficult technical nonfiction book and it's also very hopeful and I really highly recommended reading remission and then for me personally. I'm just a nonfiction junkie. And my latest book. I'm reading is by Dr Martin Macari and it's called an unaccountable it's not. His newest book has newest book. Is The price we pay. He's a surgeon at Johns Hopkins. But I wanted to go back and read on accountable and it's about how hospitals are not accountable for anything they do and the price issues and also just about doctors and the problems of medicine and his writing is very easy to consume. And of course I go to conferences as well. The main to I go to right now are lasko. The American Society for Clinical Oncology which is in Chicago every year in June and the American deliver meeting the American Association for the Study Liver Disease and that one is coming up in November in Boston. Those are the big two and then I go to lots of others as well. Thank you for all. I have got a growing list here with the world. We've got some really good but they share but it has been such a honestly it's been enjoy talking with you. Thank you very much taking the time. If people do want to follow you work with you get to know cancer you the blue fairy. We're GONNA include all the Information. Show notes that. Tell us where they can go sure if they want to.

Dr Kelly Turner cancer Andrea Google Dr Martin Macari American Society for Clinical Johns Hopkins Liver Disease L. U. E. F. E. R. Boston Chicago American Association
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

03:21 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Magically we get don't bring it the unit episodes in a row. I told any crowd them. The idea you could solve any problem with magic and not take into consideration budget time resources all of Technology. Any of it all of those problems. Go Away if he could you know with your not exactly which. What problem would you thought I would solve cancer? I would have all cancer of all types cured for anyone living anywhere and you know why it's really clear why but if I could have a superpower which is kind of similar it would be to time travel and I would go back to the minute before my sister is born and I would just look at the obstetrician and say I know it sounds crazy but you need test for hepatitis. B because if that had been done it might have saved her life because we would have been able to monitor her liber from the moment she was born. It really might have saved your life at right. They're perfectly reasonable. Wish and you said earlier that that's actually happening now that that is something that is common practice does. That is very standard of care to test mothers for Hippie and hip. When wonder digress for just a second there are some you know better than anyone all the different facets care through an episode of cancer and so I wanNA talk about one theme and naturally two things. I'm seeing this week. One we have a friend in Virginia very close family member. That new US her. You know that you're son and the chemo drug they use it having a scarcity issue and then on the hepatitis side. I think we would be remiss not to talk about the cost of treatment of some hepatitis and the barrier that at present. And so can you. Just be tha that before we move on. Turn third question because then carrying these problems. That's really the the magical utopic answer. But her the every day folks that are out there the people you deal with day in and day out or they're coming to your site you know especially when we talk about. You know the kind of diagnosis like your sister. Had when we talk about Chemo for cancer and scarcity of dragged the cost of treatment. Can you speak to those things a little bit in what say ensure it's very important to become persistent and do not worry about what people think of you? I found out later that one of our favorite nurses told me that no one liked me at children's hospital and everyone loved my sister and that is perfect and because I was a pain in the butt so for the Chemo. Drugs and scarcity. That one's a little bit tougher but you always want to find out who is the manufacturer of the drugs. You want to know who the company is an go directly to the company because the last thing they want as bad. Pr They get bad PR every single day. That's the last thing they want. So you WANNA go directly to the company and see what you start. There is far as the hepatitis. C drugs.

cancer Chemo US Virginia
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

03:05 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"I think that's such a lie. It doesn't get better it's different. It's not better. A friend of mine said it really well wants. It's sort of like having your arm cut off and you just get used to it what it really is. You just get used to it. One of the most difficult things for me was leading Los Angeles which I did almost five years ago because I felt like if I left. La I was leaving my sister. Because that's where I raised her and she's buried in L. A. And it was so tough but then I realized she's with me every single day everywhere all the time she's with me and I go back every year on or near Halloween because that was her favorite holiday and I always go the cemetery I when I lay on to go straight to the cemetery but it was hard. It was difficult. It turned out to be the best thing I could have possibly done for myself personally because I just needed gathered la. I'm not from California. I moved back to the southeast which were all my family lives. I'm actually in Birmingham. Which is where my sister was born but I felt like I was leaving her and it took a long time to get to that point. Because you know I know if Adrian were still alive is still be in Los Angeles at grief is. It's different for everyone. That's the other thing I you know. It's just different people handle it differently. Some people get angry. I was incredibly sad so sad. I didn't get angry until last year. Actually I had a moment of anger last year. I was watching a stupid television show. Really stupid and their daughter walked across the stage and a high school graduation. And then they flash forward to college graduation and Adrian had wanted to go to college since she was six years old and during her cancer journey. I found out she wanted to go to my Alma Mater. Usc and of course. I had all these dreams of her going to Stanford or Harvard or Princeton and she wanted to go to USC because she'd been going to that campus since she was very young and I saw this stupid TV show. And I was livid I got so mad for the first time ever because Adrian never got to graduate from high school. Adrian never got to go to college and it shook me up like my own anger really surprised me in it overcame me and I was just bad for a good five to ten minutes and that was sixteen years later. Harry our second question. I think you may have already sort of answered it in because you are leaving your life through meaning you know something that is very meaningful and so I can tell already based on what you're doing with your life that you kind of are like I'm tackling the problem that I see out there. We do ask our guests but if they lately we've been asking if they could choose their magical weapon of choice so that would be a weapon of Pete it would be more like a magic wand snap of your fingers and a bottle that sort of thing we he's recall. Unicorn there's.

Adrian Los Angeles Usc California Alma Mater Pete Harry Birmingham Princeton Stanford Harvard
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

05:21 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Paul and obviously after the loss of our son the thing. I wish I'd had more bacause is time and I think when you're faced with something especially stage for diagnosis that is I mean. Time on the daily is just finite right and so I think what you're talking about that it's ubiquitous that it comes out of the doctors mouthed second nature. There is no reason that if someone has cancer has a loved one has a friend has a family. Member should not have the level of access so I applaud you for bringing it all to a central point and really a platform and a repository where people can have access to those resources. Because when I go to the doctor go to the hospital and all they keep to. Who Handing me print out. I don't know what to do beyond that in brain it's an. Oh here's here's you're gonNA want this here. It's all written down or going back and translating the medical terminology through grey's anatomy through my own brain. What I nail napping question. It was her one. It's absolutely horrendous. And I think what should have done so beautifully unique? There is no horry's and that your mission should not be filled. It should be second nature like you said and I just think it is so remarkable that you've been able to bring that to patients and caregivers thank you robin so much. I really appreciate that it some. I vetted this idea for quite some time because I knew how noisy the cancer space was when it hit me when it just came to me like a lightning bolt. My Dr Been Meditating and praying for months and my his trying to figure this out and I was like man. It's like you've got to go back to school because you get hit with all these acronyms you gotta make intelligent rational decisions very quickly and you gotta go back to school and what I did was. I actually entered the Estrellas C. Three prize. It's called changing cancer. Care is an annual international entrepreneurial competition and.

cancer horry Estrellas C. Three prize Paul robin
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

05:42 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Make something amazing together. I got say I think anyone listening that you know? Cancer is so pervasive. I gotta imagine that everyone either knows someone has a loved one a friend or knows someone that knows someone that there are so many people out there that are going to benefit from this so if the pilot is all the things you dream it to be you tweak what Whitney to be tweaked what is cancer. You'll look like like three or five years from now by big day. Shis goal along with all these other programs. I won't go into but just generally speaking is when a cancer patient or caregiver. Here's that C word that moment. The next words are the doctors mouth will be but our hospital has a partnership with cancer you. Let's get you enrolled today or you know what cancer you has scholarships for your particular type of cancer. Let's get you enroll today or you know what? Your health insurance covers a membership to cancer you. Let's get you enroll today. So they immediately have access to a community because we have an online form. That's private hip compliant. It's not a facebook group. You should not be discussing your health on facebook in my personal opinion but you have access to community you have access to content that has been curated and appropriate but it's also not in medical terms as it's down in Layman's terms. You can also go through that content the way you want you know if you like video there's video if you like audio there's audio if you're a worksheet person like me. There are worksheets right now. Everything's still an English. One of the things we're working on with. Our new tech partner is to get everything in Spanish and to make that transition really easy for people. I want it to be ubiquitous. I want cancer you to be everywhere. This is gonNA sound a little crazy. I was a kid. My co-founder thinks this is crazy. But when I was a kid I didn't know Jello was a brand and so I had no idea. That's what I want. Cancer you to be for.

Cancer facebook Whitney co-founder partner
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

02:33 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Is a little bit different. Cancer is for all cancer patients and caregivers. We completed our Beta test late fall. We are now about to start a pilot and as I mentioned before it's an all I membership platform are actual. Customers are hospitals insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies but our end users are patients and caregivers. And I do have something for your listeners. Would you like me to tell you? Now we've never heard please okay so my co founder and I were talking about it and we would like to offer your listeners. Those people who are either diagnosed with cancer or caregivers of Cancer Patients Free Lifetime membership to cancer. You so all they have to do is go to cancer. University no dot Com just cancer dot university. Look for the apply. Here apply now button. It will actually forward you to the membership site..

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

04:29 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"No as we nicknamed him for no bedside manner and also anything we asked. Can we do this this or that? Know and so guys so awful. We fired him. So that's when we find out what it is. And what kind of Chemo? She's going to do but I will share this. Because it was just so he could not really tell us just how bad it was. He could not tell us that. There are no drugs at that time that worked on stage for none none. He should have told us that we needed to see someone who dealt with this disease every day. He did not because it actually wasn't a pediatric cancer. He should've told us to go straight to clinical trial which would have been incredibly difficult given her age but it could have been done. He didn't do any of those things he told us. I kid you not. This would be a good time to go to Hawaii while she still feels good. That was his way of telling us how sick she really was. And if I hadn't been sown upset I probably would have punched him. It was terrible. It was really horrible experience and we actually did end up transferring her care to ucla to a doctor who saw three hundred cases a year so one almost every single day of her type of cancer and in a really strange tournament events. I tried to track him down when I start by nonprofit and he just sort of fell off the radar and Google was not really good at being Google at that time so I couldn't find him. I saw him for the first time since my sister died at Lasko last year which is the largest medical conference in the. Us are actually sorry this year just months ago. He remembered my sister because he really didn't have any PIATRA patients and I almost burst into tears when I saw him and he said Oh she was such an angel and of course the name of the organizations blue fairy so one question..

Google Lasko Chemo ucla Hawaii
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

04:28 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"She was just a real amazing creative wicked smart kid and like I said things seem to be kind of calming down and that day before she had been fine the only sign that she had that we were able to link back. Were actually two signs one. She was getting a lot of acid reflux. I mean she was chewing gums like they were candy and of course. I could control what she ate at home but I couldn't control what shade at school and I was a cool. Stop Eating Tacos at school right. Just stop but we weren't too worried about it. She had a physical coming up. We're like okay. We'll check out the physical and the other thing. She had exactly two weeks to the day two weeks before was right shoulder pain and we went to see her pediatrician and he thought she had pulled her shoulder during dance class. Garrison Ibuprofen sent her home. We didn't think anything of it and so I come home from teaching may sixteenth. Two thousand one. I will never forget it. And she was already home from school. She went to school from seven to seven to actually taught from eight to three and she was curled up in a fetal position on the living room floor crying. This was a kid who never cried and she kept saying. I can't breathe sissy. That's what she called me. I can't breathe and she's clutching her right side so we go straight to her pediatrician. He thinks we're there for the shoulder and she's like. Oh no no no. That's fine but this I can't breathe ends tears. You know. She still crying and he looks at her stomach and says well. How long has this been going on? And it was very bloated and I was very fortunate parent because she was very modest and so she didn't show me her stomach and she says two days or so and he didn't like what he saw he sinister the yard to get a cat scan. Oh the are and the of course they ask..

Garrison Ibuprofen
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

05:15 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"More doctors and more specialties started paying attention because it's a very complex disease and it's really been in the last five or six years that we've grown tremendously and I've spoken in many places now and we attend to major conferences every year and other conferences. And it's been incredible. I mean I hate to say that because it's more prevalent now. We have a bigger voice but at least more patients find us now able to help them things. Come up for me and thinking. Did anybody ever tell you why they weren't paying attention vis? It's the or cancer back when you had first started. Did they have a reason? A reason for saying yeah which is not interested in paying attention to this and then following up from that other than frequency when L. could change a desert very. Get questions if you take the mercenary point of view in the US. When my sister was diagnosed there are only about fourteen thousand cases. There wasn't money to be made. I'm not saying the doctors didn't care they did but there was not money to be made. And that's why I think people weren't paying attention even though it is so prevalent in Asia and Africa. And the reason it's become worse in this country because the main causes a primary liver. Cancer are due to hepatitis. B Or Hepatitis C. and in the US it's Hepatitis C. and Africa and Asia. It's actually hepatitis B. in both viruses and hepatitis B. you can get through bodily fluid hepatitis. C. You get through blood. Typically and in fact. They were so stunned by my sister. This otherwise healthy fifteen year old Caucasian female who had never been outside the US. They tested her for hepatitis. B. and Hepatitis C and she had both and due to her age the year. She was born our mothers drug history. They determined that she got it from our mother during childbirth. Because when my sister was born hypnotize -I had not even been identified or taken out the blood supply and hepatitis. B. Was not necessarily tested. It was not standard of care for prenatal mothers and I actually confirmed that for the book. I track down my mother's Obgyn from nineteen eighty six. I have asked him point blank and he said no. It wasn't standard of care now in the US if any woman walks in and gets any kind of prenatal testing they will automatically just test for hepatitis. B and C. They won't even tell her necessarily in this country. It's the baby. Boomer population born between nineteen forty five and nineteen sixty five who are at risk for hip see and in fact the CDC recommended every baby boomers get a one time. Hip See test. It's not a difficult tested to get necessarily but you have to ask for it and slowly with a curative hip. See Drugs there on the market. That is changing which is great to see all these keurigs hip see drugs on the market and the last couple of years and so hip see is getting cured but I can think of a patient right now. I'm actually meeting his wife tomorrow. In San Francisco. He was cured of his HIP C. And it was too late because his liver had already developed into cellular carcinoma. Which is the technical term for primary liver cancer so it was too late. The tricky thing about hip see and liver cancer as well as they're called the silent killer because our liver doesn't really have any pain receptors. And if you don't feel pain well in how. How do you know a lot of sense? Can you take us back that day? In the emergency room Intel us more about what was going on in your alive for you and your sister..

US Cancer Asia Africa Intel pain San Francisco L. CDC
"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

HIT Like a Girl

03:22 min | 10 months ago

"andrea wilson woods" Discussed on HIT Like a Girl

"Different women experts in the health. It industry we like to hear about what makes them tick how they overcome challenges work. They're proud breath advice they would give to other women health. It and much more. I'm Joey Rios and I'm Robin Roberts. Today we're talking with Andrea Wilson Woods. Who is an author and patient advocate? Who founded the nonprofit blue fairy the Adrian Wilson Liver Cancer Association to honor her sister? We really enjoyed our conversation and know that you will too. So let's jump right in when I was twenty two years old. I got custody out my eight year old sister. We have different fathers. Father Actually died in a car accident before she was born. We have the same mother and our mother was not able to take care of her and actually soothe my mother for custody one and so I raised my sister all through my twenties until she was diagnosed with stage. Four liver cancer. A month after her fifteenth birthday and it was absolutely devastating. It happened extremely fast the day before she had been fine active. You know doing well back to finish first year of high school and then the next day were in an Er and the Er doctor says she has tumors in her liver and lungs were not equipped to handle the situation..

Adrian Wilson Liver Cancer Ass liver cancer Andrea Wilson Woods Joey Rios Robin Roberts