18 Burst results for "Andrea Shea"

"andrea shea" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

05:49 min | Last week

"andrea shea" Discussed on WBUR

"That continued during the pandemic with two critical vaccines. There's this afternoon we signed the final contracts for 100 Million more Madonna and 100 Million more Fizer vaccines. So what should an innovation culture look like in the 21st century and reviving Boston's travel and hospitality industries? Post pandemic with inequity leads? There is a great line in this campaign that says Maybe you don't know Boston. This is about getting to explore and to nobody. Good bye. Experiencing it. That's all. Next on WB. You ours. Radio Boston. Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. In his first major effort since taking office and addressing gun policy president Bind today announced a Syriza of executive actions directed what he called a gun violence, public health epidemic. Mind announcing he's tightening restrictions for homemade weapons known his ghost guns. They're often made from parts assembled without serial numbers, making tracing difficult. The buyers aren't required to pass a background check to buy the kid. Make the gun. Consequently, anyone Anyone from a criminal to a terrorist. Goodbye. This kid, there's little list 30 minutes put together a weapon. The measure would also cracked down on pistols stabilizing braces like the one used by gunman to kill 10 people at a supermarket in Boulder, Colorado last month. Derrick Show van's murder trial today, a physician testified George Floyd died from lack of oxygen because the former Minneapolis officer knelt on his neck. Mats epic of Minnesota public radio reports. The doctor rejected defense arguments that Floyd died of drug use and health problems. Prosecutors questioned Dr Martin Tobin, Chicago pulmonologist who volunteered his time for the state. Tobin told jurors that Floyd could not get enough air into his lungs because he was handcuffed face down and Children was putting pressure on his neck and back for an extended period. Healthy person subjected to what Mr Floyd was subjected to would have died on autopsy found fentanyl and Floyd's blood. But Tobin said Floyd's respiratory rate was normal until he stopped breathing, indicating that the drug did not have the impact that the defense claims. For NPR News. I'm Matt Sepik in Minneapolis. Early results are in for the historic Amazon Union election and so far votes against unionizing have been living by a wide margin Workers and Amazons warehouse investment. Alabama had voted on whether to form Amazons first unionized warehouse in the country. NPR's Alina So yuk reports. The vote count will continue tomorrow. Almost 6000 people work in Amazon's warehouse and best summer and about 55% of them voted in this union election. The vote count is not quite halfway through. So far, More than two thirds of the tallied votes have been against unionizing. I know that Amazon is among NPR's recent financial supporters. Federal labor officials are tallying these ballots by hand, calling out each vote over Web stream and at the end of the first day of this count, Votes. No outnumbered yes, Votes 1100 to 463. Separately. Hundreds of ballots have been challenged mostly by Amazon. That's according to the union. That means they aren't included in the current tally, but may play a role if their number could sway the result. Alina CELL Yuk NPR news Mortgage by our Freddie Mac says the average rate on a 30 year mortgage dipped to 3.13% this week. It's down from 3.18% last week on Wall Street, the Dow was up 57 points. You're listening to NPR. This is 90.9. W bur. I'm Josie Glory No. In Boston. More than five million doses of covert 19 vaccines have been shipped to Massachusetts. The Department of Public Health reports. 83% of the doses have been administered. The data released today. Also show more than 87% of hospital beds in the state are occupied. The high number of hospitalizations, along with the spread of the new Corona virus variants are leading the Massachusetts Public Health Association to call on Governor Charlie Baker Toe limit indoor gatherings. The association sights the jump in the infection rate after the state allowed restaurants to increase capacity to 100% and reopen many other indoor venues. The police chief of New Bedford is calling it quits. Chief Joseph Cordero says he's retiring after being chief for five years and in the department for 35. Chief Cordero says he was proud to have been the first Portuguese immigrant to serve as New Bedford's chief of police. The Boston Symphony Orchestra is announcing the details on its return to Tanglewood in the Berkshires this summer. WB wars Andrew Shave reports and the changes that are being made after the pandemic forced the cancelation of last year season when the BSO opens its summer festival with Beethoven's Fifth Symphony on July 10th. It will be the first time it's musicians have played for a live audience. In 16 months. The programs in the shortened season were designed in accordance with safety protocols, including fewer musicians socially distanced on stage. We decided that we would present concerts without any intermission, roughly 80 minutes straight through Tony Fog is the Bs owes artistic administrator and director of Tanglewood was to just They're on the side of caution and trying discourage mingling or patch the need to use bathrooms and so on. And people with lawn tickets will be given disposable eight by eight FT. Tarps for 90.9 W bur. I'm Andrea Shea. It's 10, 06 and Sports Tonight Bruins beat the Washington caps for two Red Sox over the Baltimore Orioles.

Matt Sepik Jack Spear Andrew Shave George Floyd Andrea Shea Floyd 3.18% 100 Million Tobin 35 3.13% Amazon Tony Fog Red Sox 83% five years Massachusetts Public Health As 10 people 30 year Baltimore Orioles
"andrea shea" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

04:48 min | Last week

"andrea shea" Discussed on WBUR

"News. I'm Dwayne Brown in Minneapolis. Testimony in the trial of a former police officer charged in the death of George Floyd shifted to medical experts today, the prosecution called a critical care physician who specializes in respiratory medicine. Dr Martin Tobin says Floyd couldn't expand his lungs enough while being pinned to the ground with Derrick Show van's knee on his neck. If it had become totally occluded within seconds, you're going to drop the level of oxygen to a level that would be Produce oxygen deprivation in the body, resulting in either a seizure or heart attack. Dr. Tobin says Floyd died not from drugs but from a lack of oxygen, which damaged his brain and stopped his heart. He also testified. Lloyd's leg spasms show he was experiencing a seizure while showed and held him down for over nine minutes. Virginia governor Ralph Northam has endorsed former governor Terry McAuliffe to be his successor North and picked his predecessor or a large democratic field that included two black women. Member station BPM Roberto Rodin. Reports in Virginia Governor's can't serve consecutive terms but North and painted his time in office as an extension of McAuliffe's together, Northam says they made Virginia more equitable and brought the state under complete democratic control. He's endorsing McAuliffe to keep it that way. We need a leader that will bring us out of covert 19. Terry McAuliffe will do that. He was a great 72nd, governor of the Commonwealth. He'll be in even greater 74th. Nicola is a former DNC chairman and a prolific democratic fundraiser. Northam endorsed him over Jennifer Carroll Foy and Jennifer McLelland. We're looking to make history as the first black woman governor in the U. S. For NPR news. I'm Roberta Roll Dan in Richmond. Stocks finished higher on Wall Street. Today, the Dow gained a modest 57 points. This is NPR. And this is 90.9 W bur in Boston non Lisa Mullins. Boston Mayor Kim Janey says she expects the investigation into suspended Boston Police Commissioner Dennis White to wrap up by the end of the month. White's been on leave since February after domestic violence allegations from more than two decades ago surfaced against him. W Brewers Alley Jar Manning report. Already spent at least $18,000 on the outside investigation. Dennis White was only the police commissioner. Six days when he was put on leave by former mayor Marty Walsh. Walsh hired an outside firm Davis mom to investigate the past allegations of abuse against white. Those allegations were made in divorce records dating back to 1999. White denies them. Oversight of the investigation has been left to Janey since Walsh resigning to become U. S labor secretary. The city has refused to make public years old internal figures records involving white, saying it could compromise Is the ongoing investigation for 90.9 W bur. I'm Allie, Germany and indigenous advocacy group in Newton is calling on the Boston Athletic Association to change the date of the Boston Marathon. The race has been rescheduled for October 11th in Newton and some other communities that's recognized as indigenous Peoples Day. Darlene Flores is a Newton resident and tell, you know, indigenous woman, she says. The marathon will disrupt ceremonies in the city road closer. Maybe the allies that would have come to support us will not be able to get there or now gonna be tourney. Do I support the Boston Marathon or do I support indigenous people? NBA says it consulted with all the cities and towns on the route before this elected the date once the pandemic force it to be moved from this month. Last year's race was canceled. The Boston Symphony Orchestra is unveiling plans for its return to Tanglewood in the Berkshires this summer. WB yours, Andrea Shave reports on the changes being made after the pandemic forced the cancelation of last year's season. When the BSO opens its summer festival with Beethoven's Fifth Symphony on July 10th. It will be the first time it's musicians have played for a live audience in 16 months. Programs in the shortened season were designed in accordance with safety protocols, including fewer musicians socially distanced on stage, We decided that we would present concerts without an intermission, roughly 80 minutes straight through Tony Fog is the Bs owes artistic administrator and director of Tanglewood was to just there on the side of caution and trying discourage Mingling or perhaps the need to use bathrooms and so on. And people with lawn tickets will be given disposable eight by eight FT. Tarps for 90.9 W bur. I'm Andrea Shea. Red Sox are leading the Orioles in Baltimore this afternoon. 63. It's 1/7 inning Bruins here in Washington to take on the camps tonight. Seven o'clock start.

Dwayne Brown George Floyd Jennifer McLelland Andrea Shave Jennifer Carroll Foy Minneapolis Darlene Flores 1999 Richmond Andrea Shea Red Sox Boston Athletic Association NBA Today Lisa Mullins Tony Fog Floyd Nicola Roberta Roll Dan October 11th
"andrea shea" Discussed on The Light Inside

The Light Inside

06:29 min | Last month

"andrea shea" Discussed on The Light Inside

"Today is author spiritual guide speaker in course creator andrew. Eker who andrew. How're you today. While i'm doing well. I saw you doing your rachel setup. Their side was not gonna interrupt that. Let you find the space a nice geologist just getting a little one of the altar kind of going here. it's awesome yeah like to have that burning and just night. We have a little little sage today. It's actually a Bland that i make with cedar lavender tim sage how. It's got like the cedar for the masculine bowl. Lavender for the feminine. In the sage for the child. Uh or yeah. It's pretty nice. It's nice to get it going. So yeah i'm excited about today. I think this is gonna be really good likewise likewise we had a little time to kinda set with this last week. And i'm excited to diamond. Yeah i checked out your podcast. Duale on yeah so. When i get done i'll make sure and go over there. I don't have i tunes but I think i can. I get like i think seven or eight different platforms online. That i'll send you over direct link to the anchor as easiest one. Okay yeah i can do a review on a couple of them. Sure that'd be fantastic. I'd appreciate that. I'd be winning. We'll try to. We'll try to pump it out to on our sasha. Little basso be good. Yeah i've gotta let me know whenever you're ready we can start so will no hurry. We'll call ruling. Yeah isn't a pretty casual very easily. Just kind of opened the doors step through and see where the ah spirit force guide. This sounds great. Nice awesome so we talked a little bit earlier on a bout sharing your background. A little bit after history growing up you spent a little bit of time in prison behind bars for lack of better word owner. That's exactly what it extent that let's talk a little bit with your upbringing and your history You now are teaching sacred teaching called the sacred seven based on your native american heritage acting as a spiritual adviser of sorts. Now let's get into your history and your background that led you to the path of this discovery and lead you to evolve into who are now. Thank you And i loved introduce myself to the audience here. So i'll introduce myself in the best way i know how in my traditional language and then also in the contemporary so dogo day andrea shea. Dona initially gary indiana shea. Irish russia chain industrial german. Dushan nelly. a go thank A portland oregon a shah shemaya. Cathy lindsay will be h as i do. So i am andrew record my mother. Kathy lindsey my father dale hecker. My mother's elbow gaydos apache woman from new mexico. My father's mother. Evelyn eighty irishwoman from pennsylvania. My mother's father leroy lindsay apache man from arkansas. My father's father way. Necker german gun. Kim from pennsylvania daughter bailey son. Peyton beautiful beloved fiancee. Monica i was incarcerated into this body in the land of the multnomah in portland oregon although i reside here in the land of the autumn people schmear copa in day. People here in the valley of the sun in phoenix arizona. So i'm so grateful to be here. Jeff in a part of your podcasts to really ground into this really foundational idea of understanding self identity and the path that i guess chose spiritually to get here was one. That was a challenge for me. You know my earliest memory is With my mom were shoplifting to support her her drug habit. I remember being in the grocery card and looking either her shoulder making sure that there were no store employees or security guards watching her. She filled my diaper bag and You know her body basically with the alcohol and cigarettes and you know sometimes meet different items and clothing of course from other stores so that was Being a kid growing up around that kind of environment led me to a lot of different concepts of self identity. Yes you know. It was challenging my mom's substance abuse in her. You know mental illness in the struggles that she went through at the time there really was not on any resources like there are now and only was my mom addicted to drugs but my father is well. My father had a substance abuse issue. You know multiple incarceration in prison online with my mom being hospitalized and put in prison as well so this was during the eighties and You know the late seventies in the eighties was the reagan era which was eight years of real What i would say is war. You know on a they called it. The war on drugs said it was really a war on people in families and our family was definitely one of those sun listeners. That are old enough. Might remember the dare program which was the drug abuse resistance in education program. That was set up by on nancy reagan. This was a tactic that was used by the federal government To help you know the drug epidemic at the time and you know people don't realize this Some some may you know that. I spoke to this at conferences and different speaking.

Kathy lindsey Cathy lindsay pennsylvania leroy lindsay arkansas Evelyn andrew new mexico Kim Jeff Monica eight years last week today seven Today dale Peyton eighties andrea shea
"andrea shea" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

05:03 min | 2 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on Radio Boston

"Beauty of musical performances at the hatch. Shell that we haven't been having To this pandemic moment thanks to reporting from andrea shea of the artery. We know that it runs till february. Twenty first from five to nine pm. Restarts every twenty minutes in his free to see so. There's hubbub all right. We're gonna think former massachusetts governor jane swift and divall patrick. Our first time having the two of you together for we can review. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you thank you so much fun. No one can carry someone else's heart break that is part of the pain of loss but sometimes accompanying someone else in their grief is the best way to acknowledge that loss and to show solidarity henry tapia junior was killed on a street in belmont on january nineteenth. He was run over by another driver in an incident of road rage. The driver turned himself in and the death is being investigated as a hate crime. We didn't all know. Henry top junior aydin. No but i think at some level as a community loss is loss for all of us so today we want to invite you to join us in accompanying his friends and family as they gathered in jamaica plain to celebrate henry tapia juniors life and lay him to rest. Wbrc quincy walters was there henry. Toppy junior was remembered for being a good friend and a bad dancer for playing video games. Well in for singing a little out of tune. It goes.

january nineteenth belmont two today divall patrick nine pm five february first time andrea shea Henry Toppy jane swift Twenty first jamaica plain tapia junior Shell henry tapia juniors every twenty minutes
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:47 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's CMA Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registers and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sharing about something, we will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Pull out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Korir. Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Sandra Shave Kernaghan NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Sandra Shave member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals, They're still able to find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate and all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall. Managing. All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's Iemma Face, head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Cory ER, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level toe a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registers right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Go out that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding up and highlight that in your collection, The collection of Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to traveling again. And seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston got the latest trend in pandemic distraction..

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston Museum of Fine Arts Boston Jill Kennedy John Michel Basquiat Kernaghan Sandra Shave Korea NPR Lisbon Los Angeles Cory ER Colonel Hands Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum collections manager director
"andrea shea" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:21 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KCRW

"Aftershocks. A memoir by Nadia Wuss who opens with an earthquake. Hears about it over the radio and over pancakes when she's seven years old, growing up in Rome with her sister. Being cared for by her father, whom they love. After their mother has left their family but has returned to see them. Just for a day. Well, she's passing through town. The earthquake is in Armenia a long ways off, but not yet a wuss who says My mind has a seismometer inside it. Aftershocks is her memoir of a tough, interesting multinational, multi racial upbringing at adulthood that ranges around the world from Rome to Kampala to New York. Dozens of stops in between. It's the first book from Nadia Wu Shu, a writer, an urban planner who joins us from Brooklyn. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you so much for having me. You say early on. It's always been difficult for me to say the word home with any conviction. Moving on was what we did. Your father was a U N official. Where did you and your family live? How many places s O. I was born in Tanzania. My father was from Ghana. My mother is Armenian American. And because my father worked for the United Nations, we went back and forth between the headquarters of the agency he worked for which was in Rome, Italy. Two different countries in East Africa, mostly so I lived in Uganda, Ethiopia, Tanzania and then also went to boarding school for a while in the U. K. You loved your father and having read your book If I may. I love your father. I'm glad. Uh, Alas. He died when you were 14 and Oh, this is hard to bring up with you. But your stepmother told you something that sounds like it meant it was Like it was meant to cause another earthquake in your life. Yeah, So I have a very complicated relationship with my stepmother. It still is complicated. There was a lot of tension and sort of competitiveness for my father's attention. And she I moved to New York when I was 18 for college and you know she would come and visit occasionally, and we had kind of a petty argument. But through that petty argument, she sort of revealed to me that my father had not died of cancer as I had always believed, but that in fact he had died of AIDS. And I still to this day don't know whether that's true. But I kind of decided that it shouldn't matter. But at the time, I think for so many reasons, it really was an earthquake in my life because my love for my father and my story of him in which we had a very open, honest relationship that I could return to was so important to me and this revelation, sort of Made me question that story, and it really did sort of set me off on a tail spin to sort of try to understand what what I could believe in what I could hold onto. If I didn't have that story reading the book, I had the impression that you might have felt that way because age might suggest to promiscuity in your father as he traveled the globe, which just didn't fit up with the father. You knew. Without giving anything away. I mean, if that was true, A it's got nothing to do with his love for you and b. I. Yeah, I can see why your stepmother she can't hurt him any more. But I don't know. Somehow in her mind, she thought she had hurt you with that knowledge. Yeah, I mean, I think it's a very self centered thing that I thought I in my story of my father that I was the most important person in his whole world and that he couldn't possibly have had a life outside of the life that he had with me and looking back on it as a grown up, you know, that's ridiculous. Of course, he had a life outside of the life that he had with me. He did love you and your sister. Exactly, And he loved us so much and no revelation changes. And I think that that's that's ultimately where I where I came to, and realized that no story anyone can tell me can change that love and that experience in that connection that we had with him. Yeah. Uh ah. Lot of this memoir is written from the confines of a blue chair that you got out on the street. How did that happen? Yes. So after that revelation, and I was also going through a break up at the time and really just going through a period of depression and anxiety, and I would go on these really long walks around New York and on one of those walks on my way back to my apartment. I saw this blue chair and something drew me to it, and I dragged it home with me. And then ultimately, it ended up being sort of. Ah, ah, whole country for me that I retreated to for seven days while I went through this period of depression and anxiety but also sort of reckoning with this grief that I hadn't really dealt with. Um and yes, but much of that time sort of sitting in that blue chair. When you've sought professional help for what you even refer to his panic attacks. It strikes me that that's um, well, meaning people don't quite understand why it's not helpful to say it's not your heart. Don't worry. It's all in your head. Yes, Yes, I ended up going to the hospital because they didn't know what was happening to me. And I've actually learned since that This is very common for people who suffer from panic attacks the first time it feels like a heart attack. And you feel that something is definitely seriously physically wrong with you. But I do think that there often is that reaction like just calm down, you know, but it is very different from like I'm just having a little bit of worry. It's a very different kind of much more physical experience. Jazz helps, doesn't It was interested to read about that? I like jazz to Oh, nice. Yes. Oh, my father listened to a lot of jazz and always did when I was growing up, and he was always trying to get me to listen to jazz and teach me about jazz and particularly the more avant garde jazz. I always kind of rejected because it's so dissonant, and it didn't make any sense to me And my father would say hard to hum along with John Coltrane. You mean Yeah, exactly. And I would you know My father would always say you just have to listen differently. You know, It's like learning a new language, and I was like, I don't want to learn this language. But then later later in life, you know, particularly as I was going through this difficult period. Dissonance just made so much more sense to me in terms of how is experiencing the world and I found myself sort of drawn to my father's music and actually ended up marrying a jazz musician. So there's still that connection. My word. Your father must be endlessly delighted. I think you would love it. Yeah. Nadia Aru Shu her memoir. Aftershocks. Thanks so much for being with us. Thanks so much for having me She's lovely. When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Fabricating the crate..

earthquake New York Aftershocks Rome Tanzania Nadia Wuss Nadia Wu Shu Museum of Fine Arts Boston Ghana Nadia Aru Shu United Nations Armenia Brooklyn John Coltrane writer Los Angeles Lisbon Italy Andrea Shea
"andrea shea" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera can be quite different. If you're not sure about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue throughout the pandemic. Shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off now. Instead of borrowing. Cabrera sees more institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, truths of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I'm gonna say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Corriere, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful. I'm so looking forward to Traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston. The latest.

Jacqueline Cabrera Boston NPR Andrea Shea Matthew Teitelbaum Museum of Fine Arts director Corriere
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:41 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of.

Jacqueline Cabrera Korea John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Kernaghan Museum of Fine Arts Boston Boston's Museum of Andrea Shea Lisbon Los Angeles Colonel Hands collections manager Boston
Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:41 min | 3 months ago

Museums Get Virtual Help To Have Artwork Delivered During The Pandemic, Boston

"When the pandemic force museums around the world to go dark. A lot of people working in the mother lost their jobs or had toe suddenly work under very different circumstances. Exhibitions out of canceled or postponed the network of people who helped get artwork safely from their owners to museum walls. Suddenly left with nothing to do. Is Andrea Shea of member station W. Bur reports. Some are professionals. They're still able Find ways to do their job with a little virtual help. Contemporary art curator. Lisbon cell feels really lucky that most of the 120 borrowed works in her exhibition about painters John Michel Basquiat made it to the Museum of Fine Arts Boston before the museum shut down last March. When the pandemic began here in the U. S. It was Impossible to move anything. We didn't know about the future of the art shipping industry. That industry is huge, highly secure and completely invisible to museumgoers, says Los Angeles based collections manager Jacqueline Cabrera. They don't realize it took a year of legalese negotiations. Advocating the crate. You know all this stuff to just get that one painting onto that wall managing? All of that is Jill Kennedy. Colonel Hands job. She's the M, a face head registrar and the one who got all of those Basquiat's onto the M phase walls. Before the pandemic. Art was often escorted every step of the way by a Korea, which could be a hired expert curator or a registrar from another museum. Korea's used to ride on the trucks but not allowed in the trucks anymore. You know, we used to have follow cars in the Koreas would ride the follow car. They don't want to do that anymore. It's too close contact for too long, a period of time. Many of the flights that we would have normally used to get objects here have been canceled. These days When works arrive at the M F a Boston, Kernaghan and her colleagues rely on a virtual Korea during installation. It's kind of odd. It feels like having a robot or something in the room with us, but it's been working pretty well. The robot is actually an iPad attached it eye level to a tripod on wheels. Kernaghan rolls it around the galleries while talking on zoom with registrars and couriers. On the other end, they watch us unpack. They can Consult with the conservative about the condition report. And then they watch us as we put it up on the walls. It's a whole new world for registrars right now, while photographs and detailed reports on a pieces condition before and after its journey help Jacqueline Cabrera, who's also a contract, courier and registrar herself, says it's challenging to do such visual work from a distance. What you see with the naked eye versus a camera could be quite different. If you're not sharing about something. We will ask that person to kind of put that iPad right up to that painting. But that's the compromise that our people are doing right now. They understand the restrictions. Cabrera says the cost of transporting art have long been some of the highest in exhibition budgets. Those have been slashed because museums have lost millions and ticket revenue. Throughout the pandemic shows have been canceled or postponed. Staff members have been laid off. Now, instead of borrowing Cabrera, cesme or institutions looking inward, as she says they should. There's been plenty of Picasso exhibitions for the last decade, so Without that obscure artists who you might have a nice holding of and highlight that in your collection. The collection at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts includes more than 450,000 objects, troves of which visitors rarely see M F A director Matthew Teitelbaum acknowledges it's more cost effective and efficient. Develop and execute a show with what you already have. You don't have to go halfway around the world to select a work of art. On the other hand, I would say it over and over again. You still have to create a compelling narrative and you have to be convinced. Do you have the object to tell that story in ways that will attract much needed visitors to museums as they try to recover Boston's M F a hopes to reopen again later this month. Warrior, Jacqueline Cabrera predicts things will continue to be rough for her and the others involved in getting precious paintings from one place to another. But she's hopeful I'm so looking forward to traveling again and seeing my colleagues around the world for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea in Boston.

Jacqueline Cabrera Kernaghan Korea Andrea Shea W. Bur John Michel Basquiat Jill Kennedy Colonel Hands Museum Of Fine Arts Basquiat Lisbon Cabrera Boston Los Angeles Matthew Teitelbaum Picasso Npr News
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 5 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Artist here and made a living selling ink drawings on paper and beach rocks from the home gallery. She lost years ago. People would come in and they look around and see the cookbook and they go by you, the Alice. Everybody told me what they were doing in the sixties. It was great, so I said, Hey, This isn't bad. All you need to do is say my name and people start to smile Alice brought can't draw anymore because of the tremors in her hands. But she's still cooking for NPR news. I'm Andrea Shea. Not all started and this is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep. Happy Thanksgiving. And over to Joe McConnell on Thanksgiving morning with Bay Area traffic and transit news. Used to say traffic reporting on the holiday is like being the Maytag repairman that I guess that probably just shows my age on people who remember the Mick take repairman commercials is probably dwindling. But it's quiet out there. We're waiting for something that happened there. A couple of hazards Etienne Vaca Billy spotted five or five Something's in the road. That's not supposed to be And South Dade Idiot, Tennison and Hayward. It's a basketball sized rock in the left lane. Joe McConnell for KQED, not as lonely as the Maytag repairman. Hopefully, Joe Traffic support. I'm sorry. I know I'm not lonely at my dog traffic support comes to you from European Sleep works. We have the marketplace Morning report ahead on Thanksgiving morning this Thanksgiving, a virtual trip to London, where one American style dive bar is rolling out. The Thanksgiving must haves in one easy to eat Philadelphia style sandwich. That story and more coming up. On the next coming off the program. We take a look at America's diverse Latinos. Population Join us as journalists, Paolo drunkenness reveals the changing nature of Latino ex identity in this country. Tonight at 8 P.m. on KQED. Whether wise today sunshine for Thanksgiving in windy at times today, some gusty winds 35 to 40 MPH still possible out there. Parts of the Bay Area, and the Sacramento Valley is well along the coast today that high surf advisory still officially in effect until noon. So be careful if you're going for a walk along the water. Sacramento Valley Wind advisory Sunshine this afternoon High 60 to 67 Bay area highs in the sixties 7 51. So remember.

Joe McConnell Alice KQED NPR News Bay Area Sacramento Valley Etienne Vaca Billy Andrea Shea Steve Inskeep tremors Tennison Mick David Greene Paolo America Hayward Philadelphia London
"andrea shea" Discussed on Radio Boston

Radio Boston

06:21 min | 9 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on Radio Boston

"This goes way back way back. The nuclear freeze movement in the nineteen eighties more recently, he co sponsored Medicare for all in the green new deal with Alexandria causing cortes. He's pushed for net neutrality lgbtq rights, and his main case against Kennedy is that the congressman doesn't have a credible record. Record as a progressive that he's shifted positions over time for example, he points out that after Kennedy graduated from law school, he went to work for Cape and Islands District Attorney. Michael O'Keefe a tough law and order conservative, and there have been other policies that Kennedy is shifted his stance on and Markey asked the question last night in the debate is was this political convenience you know, or was it conviction, and obviously his suggestion is that it's political convenient so that he can you know the so that he can get into the Senate? I don't think that the stakes are low here, but as you talk about them, trying to distinguish themselves from each other think about when I was in academia, there was a saying that the battles are so fierce because the stakes are so low and I do find you talking about this battle over. Who's more progressive when they hold similar. Policies is one of the more progressive than the other. Well. It depends who you talk to, so it's interesting I mean if you say they're both progressives and I've said this in my reporting I got absolutely hammered on twitter by Marquis. Supporters who you know basically say it's just absolutely absurd to call Kennedy a progressive because of of of his past some of his past positions, and because Marquis. Does deserve this reputation as a solid consistent progressive advocate in Washington for decades. Now that said there are places that actually measure. There's a website and I'm I'm blanking on the name that actually scores per progressive votes in Congress and Markey got like a ninety eight percent score and Kennedy got a ninety seven percent score, so in terms of how they vote and the issues they support. They're very very similar but I think it is fair to say that you know. Mark He's been in office since before. Kennedy was even born. He's been in Washington since before he was even born. He has a much longer record as a progressive I think you can say that without without getting much debate so that that's where it is, but again on the issues there's there's not a dimes width between them. So then we've got to turn to the differentiation that we can see I'm asking thinking you know polling numbers fundraising numbers according to that stuff. Where does the race stand right now? Well? When Kennedy jumped into this race, he jumped out according to the polls with with a pretty sizable lead, and a lot of that had to do with just because how well Kennedy's name polls in this in this state. If, you're young. If you're handsome and your name Kennedy, you're GONNA. Pull better than just about anyone in the state, but as the race went on that. Difference tightened in the last poll. which is still months ago before the pandemic showed that it had tightened quite a bit. So, we don't have recent polling numbers. My guess is it's close. in terms of the fundraising numbers marquee might even have a slight edge the market people are very happy with the latest. Quarter that not only showed them raising a lot of money, but lots of donations and small amounts of donations, but they're basically tied in terms of their fundraising marquee had a slight edge. Now mark is out with his first ad in the race, and it's a clear response to Kennedy's attack because he really plays up his Maldon routes and service to the community. We can listen to a little bit of that if you want. This is where I'm from. My father was a Milkman. I drove an ice cream truck to pay for college lessons. I learned here still drive me today. Don't be scared the tough fights. That's why I was an original sponsor of Medicare for all. The why I wrote could renew deal to fight climate change. Remember where you come from. Stand up the People County on. Always be a leader in the fight for justice. Now DC on of course you can't see the ad, but among other things you see. Marquee walking through the streets of Maldon, his sleeves are rolled up. He's wearing his air. Jordans which is a very in kind of thing, and the ad makes the point that not only this is where he's from, but how different is blue collar background is from Kennedy's world of privilege, but but in a campaign between two people agree on most major issues Kennedy is hoping to convince voters that by spending so much time away from Massachusetts market, he's the son of a Milkman, but he's also become a creature of Washington. So we'll see if that sticks, but that's clearly. What Kennedy is hoping to do? Well we'll keep watching it with you. That's WBZ, our senior political reporter Anthony Brooks thanks a lot, anthony, my pleasure, t shown messages for social change come in all different forms over the past few months, students from Berkeley College of Music turn their into song for an annual contest wr's Andrea Shea spoke to three winners along with their professor about their submissions. Associate songwriting professor mark. Simoes has facilitated Berkeley's songs for social change contest for about a decade this year, he an eight judges from different departments assess ninety submissions. Students had to record and produce at home after the schools shift to remote learning view songs all submitted really before the pandemic hit in full, although there were some songs that dealt with that theme and Madison Song Quilt. Big The fold as about the AIDS epidemic winds up having some eerie significance. Now which I'm sure she can talk about. Hello. My name is Madison Simpson. I'm from Concord New Hampshire. When I was writing this song. The first line that came to me was the refrain line. Nancy..

Kennedy Washington Mark He Markey Medicare Michael O'Keefe Senate Marquis Alexandria congressman Islands District Attorney Concord New Hampshire Madison Simpson AIDS Maldon Congress People County
"andrea shea" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:45 min | 10 months ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KCRW

"The lawn at the Tanglewood Music Festival in Lennox to hear music in the open air. Tanglewood's buildings and stages sit on the grounds of a former estate wealthy patrons donated to the Boston Symphony Orchestra. In 1936 the town was home to an iron foundry and a glass factory. Now long closed and the symphony's CEO and president Mark will be says the Berkshires have a legacy of manufacturing and job loss back in the late forties fifties, even well into the sixties G E alone employed 11. 12,000 people They now employee a grand total of zero. Most of Tanglewood's 1000 part time and seasonal employees have been laid off, and a limited digital version of the festival is available online. Will be says the festival usually brings in more than 100 million tourist dollars each summer. We're not in a major market that has a diverse economy, you know, we are the economy. Tanglewood is part of a now shut down ecosystem of arts institutions that angers the region's economy, including the Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival, the Williamstown Theater Festival and a slew of museums. Mass MOCA is sort of a poster child for the creative economy. Joe Thompson directs Mass MOCA. Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art in North Adams, about 25 miles from Tanglewood. The sprawling museum occupies more than two dozen shuttered 19th century mill buildings, Thompson says the idea for the museum was born at a devastating time in the 19 eighties, North Adams found itself at the top of every wrong list. Teenage pregnancy, illiteracy, domestic violence. Unemployment also sword after the Component Cos. Sprague Electric left North Adams taking three 1000 jobs with it. That's when I started to realize that arts and culture that was economic development. Massachusetts state representative John Barrett was North Adams mayor. Back then, since it opened in 1999 Mass MOCA has grown to attract nearly 300,000 visitors to the region each year, adding $52 million to the Berkshires economy. Now the museum is closed and has laid off. Most of its staff would have ever thought it would be a pandemic that would come along and really deal the main part of our economy. This crushing blow their Ako filed to emergency bills in the state Legislature to help cultural organizations along with e interdependent food and hospitality sectors. My name is Stephen Lawrence. I'm owner office by sort of restaurant and my restaurant is running almost 18 years, Lawrence says this year is going to be rough without the actor stage cruise and hordes of fans who attend the Tony Award winning Williamstown Theater Festival near his restaurant. I didn't lay off anybody because we are just like a family, so we have to support each other, you know. Lawrence's restaurant is doing takeout, but his food stall at mass MOCA summer music events never got going. Alexander Oster Cohen's A okay Berkshire barbecue one of the year round retail businesses on the museum's campus, and she foresees a revenue drop of 30% without the visiting art and music fans. The day we got the email from mochas, saying they were closing I remember just walking into dry storage and just sitting on the ground and just I cried. I reside. It's over. Master says Takeout is keeping her afloat. But like many small businesses, the money made in summer gets her through the quieter seasons. Phased re opening is underway in Massachusetts. But Eric Kearns, who co owns tourists, a two year old hotel in North, Adams says while his team is getting ready, they're being cautious. We think about those rooms and meals, taxes that we collect on how they go into supporting the city. But we also feel on incredible obligation to be protective of this community that has spectacularly low infection rates. Current says he and his partners want to be on the right side of history rather than contributing to a Corona virus surge that takes North Adams and the Burkes years back to Phase zero for NPR News, hon Andrea Shea It's NPR news. And it is 6 29 here a case here. W Thanks so much for joining us. We, of course, have greater lay just moments away, along.

Tanglewood North Adams Stephen Lawrence Williamstown Theater Festival Massachusetts Massachusetts Museum of Contem Boston Symphony Orchestra Joe Thompson Adams NPR Lennox G E CEO Alexander Oster Cohen Tony Award Sprague Electric Mark Jacob
"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

"What effect do you think that has on other witnesses? His willingness to come forward and expose wrongdoing. Well it's very intimidating to dine designed intimidate is it not. I mean I can't speak to what the president is trying to do but I think the effect is to be intimidating. Okay well I want to let you know about aster that some of us here take witness intimidation varies very seriously some sound from today's impeachment hearings. Our next story involves a precious violin and a name that may be familiar to NPR listeners. Virtuoso Roman Totenberg. Rare rare stratovarius was stolen in nineteen eighty decades later. The Violin was recovered. And tonight it's returning to the scene of the crime in Cambridge Massachusetts for a homecoming performance Andrea Shea from member station W. B. U. R. has more on the violence journey back to where it disappeared for nearly eighty four decades Roman Totenberg in his stratovarius which was crafted in seventeen thirty four danced on major orchestra stages around the world.

Roman Totenberg Andrea Shea Cambridge Massachusetts NPR president W. B. U. R. nineteen eighty decades eighty four decades
"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

"Oh happily that's not the usually imperious georgia that one recalls and cool and calm and severe looking stieglitz who had married georgia and a few months but canterbury says he flirted relentlessly with ida in the fall of nineteen twenty four which georgia laughed off then the curator peter points to a photo with a very different vibe georgia's staring straight down the barrel of stiglitz's lens very hard looking and neither next tour is just looking to the side and looks a little bit unsure and almost just seems like the perfect symbol of what their relationship would become in a way a growing up. Ida and georgia took art lessons with the same teachers. Georgia studied painting with charles martinet columbia years later. I did too do but in one thousand nine hundred ninety three when ida wanted to exhibit in new york. Georgia told her she better not refuses. Stop exhibiting an even close. They became absolutely estranged after that canterbury thinks georgia felt her sister was riding on her coat tails. Some people thought the same about georgia reja and her influential husbands stieglitz he helped guide her and then he introduced her to the right critics collectors help increase the value of her art developed nella per brand into becoming the mother of american modernism canterbury plowed through biographies about georgia searching for leads about ida data. Eventually she asked the public for help. Through crowd sourcing people came forward with letters artwork and ida's professional scrapbook it stuffed left with reviews of her art and articles about her taking yet another faculty teaching job canterbury recalls a headline from san antonio where ida taught from nineteen thirty eight to thirty nine it says artist sister joins lady of like faculty everywhere she went it was always introduced adduced through the aura of her sister was never having this chance to stand on her own. Sometimes ida dropped the name. Oh keefer exhibitions she also so distinguished herself through her art experimenting with symmetry abstract form and mono types which can vary says helped make her money during the depression unlike her sister. I'd never married. She also never had a dealer. Women could not get that unless you were under the wing of a man like stiglitz piglets for instance and so georgia situation is one that is so exceptional. It was a situation that ninety nine point ninety nine percent of the woman. I didn't get this was not lost on. Georgia's sister live at one point saying well. I'd be famous too. If i'd had a stiglitz the o keefe sisters there's never reconciled before. Ida died in nineteen sixty. One canterbury hopes people who visit the exhibition will walk away thinking about all the unsung women artists out there and about how many are ripe for rediscovery for here and now i'm andrea shea and to see some of ida's artwork go to here and now dot org here in as a production of n._p._r. And w._b._z. in association with the b._b._c. world service. I'm jeremy hobson. I'm robin the young. This is here now uh.

ida georgia stiglitz canterbury stieglitz charles martinet jeremy hobson new york peter andrea shea keefer san antonio ninety nine percent
"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on Here & Now

"Decode Prevalence Handwritten manuscript. David knows on new Andrei shorthand and better than anyone and could decipher you know things on the page to me. Just look like squabbles. David feather all has been making sense of Previn scores for twenty two years when he read the Penelope manuscript feather off discovered discovered some omissions Mo- pige numbers and o'byrne numbers and they were certainly not in order but the editor did have the words that go with the music. The LIBRETTO was written by British playwright. Tom Stoppard hard. He and the composer have been friends. Since the nineteen seventies for years. Stop Art says President asked him to collaborate on a piece for his Muse Soprano Renee Fleming decades in getting to the starting line line because Andrei would call me about ONC- and say look like to do something like a Moment Rama for the nature sing and I kept saying I only know how to do that. A few years ago. stoppard adopted relented and Andre persuaded me to think of as a long speech in play and let him worry about how to make singable. Stop Arts words became something of a roadmap for feather off rather than call work unfinished feather off prefers not fully realized because the music was there it just needed honing from the page feather off heard the composer's Voice Mazari Andrei given the story of range of this incredibly from mood to mood this week that they're off stop ARD and Soprano Renee Fleming leming experienced penelope for the first time at rehearsal the emerson string quartet accompanies Fleming and she portrays Odysseus as wife who stayed behind fending off suitors while he was away at war. I was the crux of the story stories that she was faithful to him. <hes> and why and also <hes> courageous and clever Fleming says stoppard's Libretto for penelope was long when Previn was still alive. She suggested they split the text now when Penelope sings the audience will hear Fleming when she speaks actor MMA Thurman will be on stage. My God like husband took my face between his workman's hands and spoke these words for my comfort Fleming Things Previn would be pleased with his final work it would have been of course much better and he'd been able to control the final results that barring that this is an extra thing. The tanglewood premier was to be prevalence ninetieth birthday gift. Tom Stoppard says the fact that the team was able to shape the peace and performance planned is bittersweet. I suppose they celebration without the birthday boy but his friends believe Andre Previn Spirit will be present and say he'll be missed for here now. I'm Andrea Shea..

Tom Stoppard Renee Fleming Andre Previn Mazari Andrei penelope David Andrea Shea President editor Odysseus Thurman twenty two years
"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"andrea shea" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Story archives takes us back to the morning of august nineteenth two thousand four that is when npr's rene montaigne introduced a report about a website just a few months old that let students at harvard university learn a bit about each other thanks to the internet and some crafty underclassmen now you can get to know your roommate or mates without the inconvenience of actually meeting them later on in the all freshman dining hall or one of those super awkward ice cream socials it might be much easier start up a conversation that is chris hughes a junior at harvard he is co founder of getting to know you website the facebook dot com no mention of the other co founder of the facebook in that story and your listeners would have to wait two months more for that on october eleven two thousand four we aired a story by reporter andrea shea gone was the cheery mood from that i report harvard students had begun to point fingers at each other it's a classic he said she said scenario last winter when senior tyler winkle voss and his partners decided to get serious with their concept for connect you they asked mark zuckerberg a technically savvy sophomore to write code for the fledgling site he agreed this is where it starts to get hazy and ugly zuckerberg denied stealing the idea for what would become facebook from the twins tyler and cameron winkle voss a legal battle dragged out for years all of this is dramatized in the film the social network which was released in two thousand ten since those first mentions of mark zuckerberg and the facebook npr's found many occasions to talk about both the man and the company and with zuckerberg's testimony on capitol hill this week will be no exception carlos do carmo has a nickname the sinatra of fatto fatto is the national museum of portugal that's filled with so much emotion that people describe it as the portuguese blues carlos do carmo set the path for generations of singers yet until this past weekend he had never performed new york city berto arcos has this profile of the seventy eight year old singer carlos do carmo wants to set the record straight on fodder people things that father is connected with sadness only it's not true do carmo says there is sad fato notch that set can describe sets sight of life lawsuit.

mark zuckerberg national museum of portugal cameron winkle andrea shea chris hughes carlos york city berto arcos fatto fatto npr tyler winkle voss reporter facebook co founder harvard university rene montaigne seventy eight year two months