18 Burst results for "Andrea Hsu"

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

08:39 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

"With us. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. President Trump has issued a pardon to his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and then recanted. This ends a years long saga, which NPR's Ryan Lucas has been long following and he joins us now. Hey, Ryan, either Right. So the president's partner for Flynn just happened this afternoon. What do we know at this point? Well, the president announced this on Twitter as he is want to do. Hey says in the tweet that it is a great honor to announce that he has granted a full pardon. To Flynn. He sends his congratulations to Flint and his family and says, quote. I know you will now have a truly fantastic Thanksgiving. I will say this pardon is not a surprise. This is something that was widely expected in Flynn's lawyer actually had even acknowledged in court this fall that she had, actually, indeed. Spoken with the president about a possible pardon. Okay, Can you just give us a mini refresher course For a moment? It feels like this Flynn case has been going on and on forever remind us what Flynn was originally prosecuted for. This has been a bit of illegal Soviet. No doubt Flynn Flynn was the only member of the Trump administration actually, who was charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. He pleaded guilty in 2017 tow line to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador at the time, Sergei Kislyak. Those were conversations that took place during the transition period. So after Trump had been elected, but before he took office, Flynn pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with investigators with investigators and he did so extensively. Right. Okay. So he cooperated with Mueller's team but has now been pardoned. But Ah, federal judge in D. C is still weighing his case. Right? Did I get that right? That's right. This has been a long and when he wrote to get to this point, Flynn was actually in court almost two years ago, now 47 scene but that was abruptly put off to allow Flynn to complete his cooperation. On on a couple of other cases. Ah, few months. After that, Flynn changed. His lawyers dumped his previous legal team brought on a new legal team, and he completely changed his tune. After that, he proclaimed his innocents on said that he was set up by the FBI that he was in trapped. He even went so far as to try to withdraw his guilty plea. Before all of that could play out. Attorney General William Barr moved to drop the department's case against Flynn Bar said that Flynn never should have been prosecuted in the first place. The presiding judge, as you mentioned before, refused to drop this case immediately. He said that he wanted to take a closer look at the department stated reasons for this. Ultimately, as of today, the judge still has not granted that motion to dismiss. He is still weighing what to do. In that case now, naturally, it's a it's a moot point. The president has acted. He's taken political responsibility for this. And Clayton Flynn, of course, now has his pardon in hand, right? Well, overall, How would you say this case has been handled by the Department of Justice? This has been a difficult case for the Justice Department. It has been caught up from the beginning. Essentially in in bitter political battle that we've seen take place in Washington. Flynn, the president and his allies portray Flynn here as a victim of the Justice Department of the FBI of what the president would call a witch hunt a hoax. Meanwhile, the attorney general's decision, which was highly unusual to intervene in this case, and to try to drop it after Flynn had pleaded guilty caused an uproar in critics said This looks a lot like a political favor to a friend of the president. Well, this is of course, the first part in that we have seen from President Trump's since the election. Should we be anticipating many more? This is the first of what we expect to be a number of pardons. Yes, there are a number of people who the president is friends with who could expect to pardon some top names were looking at former Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort. The president's former political adviser, Steve Bannon, who is facing federal charges in New York. There is also of course, the possibility that the president could pardon his family preemptively and the possibility for the president to try to pardon himself before he leaves office. That is NPR. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thank you, Ryan. Thank you. Encourage or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland. Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's already told her staff you are going to get vaccinated. Some of my young millennials are like, so I'm taking this is a directive like as a mandate. Is that how you mean it? And it's that's a scary thing. You know, like Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness, I believe in civil liberties and all those different things. But you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has died. It is the staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says. You know, for vaccinated. I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes. But her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management. He says Each requests must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this. Andrea Hsu NPR news In a surprise announcement today, the Trump Administration has denied a permit for the Pebble Mine in Alaska. The proposed open pit gold mine would have been one of the largest in North America..

Michael Flynn president President Trump FBI NPR Ryan Lucas Washington Flynn Bar Trump Administration Robert Mueller Holly Smith illness Andrea Hsu Taylor Mary Louise Kelly flu vaccine Department of Justice Twitter
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:14 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

"People who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes. But her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management. He says Each requests must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this. Andrea Hsu NPR news In a surprise announcement today, the Trump Administration has denied a permit for the Pebble Mine in Alaska. The proposed open pit gold mine would have been one of the largest in North America. Alaska Public Media's Liz Ruskin reports at many points during the Trump presidency, It has appeared that the permit was certain to be granted. But the Army Corps of Engineers determined the mind plan would not comply with the Clean Water Act and that the project is not in the public interest. Fishermen and tribes in Bristol Bay have been fighting the mind for more than a decade, fearing it would degrade the rich salmon runs that are at the heart of the area's economy and indigenous culture. Sport fishermen come from all over the world to stay at lodges in the area for a chance at landing a record Cojo or rainbow trout. Nancy Morris Lion at Bear Trail Lodging King Salmon Got the news by text. It is an incredible relief. I felt like sitting down and just crying. What lion says the prospect of the mine has held the whole region hostage for years. Lodge owners like her didn't know if they could invest in their businesses. The president's oldest son and avid hunter and fisherman is credited with galvanizing the Trump administration against the project, Lion, says Donald Trump Jr and his brother, Eric stayed with her about eight years ago. I always said that I had faith, but after they had visited here, and they spent time here This day, understood that this place didn't need something like that. Moring it starring at rooting it forever. Pebble Limited partnership says it's not giving up and is focusing on a possible appeal of the Army cores decision. The company says the project would provide hundreds of good jobs. But they were more questions about the lasting impact of the mine. When secret recordings emerged this fall, Pebble executives were caught saying that they ultimately planned a much larger mind than they had requested A permit for For now, the Army course decision appears to be a death blow for the pebble mine. The incoming Biden administration is likely to oppose the project, as the Obama administration did. For NPR News. I'm Liz Ruskin in Washington. Many international students know what it is like to spend long periods of time away from their families. And so this year as people stay away from home for the holidays, that lessons on how to manage from those who've done it before that story tomorrow on all things considered, you're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Hey, I'm Anthony Valadez. I'm here to tell you you've got this. There's gonna be light at the end of the tunnel, No doubt. But for now we have to double down to keep people safe whenever possible. Just stay home. Cuddled up with your pets Snuggle with your boo. Why do your plants be creative? Read a book.

NPR News Trump Administration Taylor Liz Ruskin flu vaccine president Army diabetes Johnnie Taylor Jr Johnny Taylor Jr Covad Army Corps of Engineers Society for Human Resource Man Donald Trump Jr Pebble Limited NPR Bristol Bay Pebble Alaska Public Media
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's She's already already told told her her staff staff you you are are going going to to get get vaccinated. vaccinated. Some Some of of my my young young millennials millennials are are like like Saran Saran taking. taking. This This is is a a directive directive like like as as a a mandate. mandate. Is Is that that how how you you mean mean it? it? And And that's that's that's that's a scary thing. You know, like Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness. I believe in civil liberties and all those different things, but you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in. Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes, but her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management, He says Each request must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this.

Trump Administration Liz Ruskin Taylor Smith president flu vaccine Army Johnnie Taylor Jr NPR Pebble Limited Johnny Taylor Jr Pebble diabetes Donald Trump Jr Army Corps of Engineers Covad Society for Human Resource Man Bristol Bay Alaska Public Media North America
As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

All Things Considered

04:01 min | 3 months ago

As COVID-19 Vaccine Nears, Employers Consider Making It Mandatory

"Or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's She's already already told told her her staff staff you you are are going going to to get get vaccinated. vaccinated. Some Some of of my my young young millennials millennials are are like like Saran Saran taking. taking. This This is is a a directive directive like like as as a a mandate. mandate. Is Is that that how how you you mean mean it? it? And And that's that's that's that's a scary thing. You know, like Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness. I believe in civil liberties and all those different things, but you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in. Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes, but her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal law. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management, He says Each request must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine, most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this.

Andrea Hsu Holly Smith Cafe Juanita Saran Saran NPR Johnnie Taylor Jr Smith Kirkland U. Headaches Society For Human Resource Man Dr. James Mcdevitt Washington LEE Diabetes Smithfield Mcdivitt Baylor College Of Medicine Johnny Taylor Jr Taylor
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:35 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"52 degrees tonight and Thanksgiving. It's gonna be a rainy one. We could even see some thunderstorms in the afternoon. Otherwise it'll be pretty warm high near 62 degrees. The range should taper off late in the evening. Tomorrow we'll have a love about 53. It's W in my sea at 706. Support for NPR comes from it. Lassie in makers of collaboration software like Jiro and Trillo, 83% of Fortune, 500 Companies use it, Lassie in to help team stay agile, aligned and connected. Learn more at it. Lassie in dot com. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Mary Louise Kelly in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles. President Trump has issued a pardon to his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn. Flynn had pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and then recanted. This ends a years long saga, which NPR's Ryan Lucas has been long following and he joins us now he Ryan either Right. So the president's partner for Flynn just happened this afternoon. What do we know at this point? Well, the president announced this on Twitter as he is want to do, he says in the tweet that it is a great honor to announce that he has granted a full pardon. To Flynn. He sends his congratulations to Flint and his family and says, quote. I know you will now have a truly fantastic Thanksgiving. I will say this pardon is not a surprise. This is something that was widely expected in Flynn's lawyer actually had even acknowledged in court this fall that she had, actually, indeed. Spoken with the president about a possible partner. Okay? Can you just give us a mini refresher course For a moment? It feels like this Flynn case has been going on and on forever remind us what Flynn was originally prosecuted for. This has been a bit of illegal cellular. Flynn Flynn was the only member of the Trump administration actually, who was charged as part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation. He pleaded guilty in 2017 tow line to the FBI about his contacts with the Russian ambassador at the time, Sergei Kislyak. Those were conversations that took place during the transition period. So after Trump had been elected, But before he took office, Flynn pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with investigators with investigators. And he did so extensively right? Okay. So he cooperated with Mueller's team but has now been pardoned. But Ah, federal judge in D. C is still weighing his case. Right? Did I get that right? That's right. This has been a long and one he wrote. To get to this point. Flynn was actually in court almost two years ago now for sentencing. But that was abruptly put off to allow Flynn to complete his cooperation on on a couple of other cases. Ah, few months After that, Flynn changed, his lawyers dumped his previous legal team brought on a new legal team. And he completely changed his tune. After that, he proclaimed his innocents on said that he was set up by the FBI that he was entrapped. He even went so far as to try to withdraw his guilty plea. Before all of that could play out. Attorney General William Barr moved to drop the department's case against Flynn Bar said that Flynn never should have been prosecuted in the first place. The presiding judge, as you mentioned before, refused to drop this case immediately. He said that he wanted to take a closer look at the department stated reasons for this. Ultimately, as of today, the judge still has not granted that motion to dismiss. He is still weighing what to do. In that case now, naturally, it's a it's a moot point. The president has acted. He's taken political responsibility for this. And Clayton Flynn, of course, now has his pardon in hand, right? Well, overall, How would you say this case has been handled by the Department of Justice? This has been a difficult case for the Justice Department. It has been caught up from The beginning, Essentially in in bitter political battle that we've seen take place in Washington. Flynn, the president and his allies portray Flynn here as a victim of the Justice Department of the FBI of what the president would call a witch hunt a hoax. Meanwhile, the attorney general's decision, which was highly unusual to intervene in this case, and to try to drop it after Flynn had pleaded guilty caused an uproar in critics said This looks a lot like a political favor to a friend of the president. Well, this is of course, the first part in that we have seen from President Trump's since the election. Should we be anticipating many more? This is the first of what we expect to be a number of partners. Yes, there are a number of people who the president is friends with who could expect to pardon some top names were looking at former Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort. The president's former political adviser, Steve Bannon, who is facing federal charges in New York. There is also of course, the possibility that the president could pardon his family preemptively and the possibility for the president to try to pardon himself before he leaves office. That is NPR. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thank you, Ryan. Thank you. Encourage or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's already told her staff you are going to get vaccinated. Some of my young millennials are like Saran taking. This is a directive like as a mandate. Is that how you mean it? And that's that's.

Michael Flynn president President Trump NPR FBI Flynn Bar Ryan Lucas partner Robert Mueller Lassie Washington Department of Justice Justice Department Attorney Mary Louise Kelly Jiro Twitter illness
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:40 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Meanwhile, the attorney general's decision, which was highly unusual to intervene in this case, and to try to drop it after Flynn had pleaded guilty caused an uproar in critics said This looks a lot like a political favor to a friend of the president. Well, this is of course, the first part in that we have seen from President Trump's since the election. Should we be anticipating many more? This is the first of what we expect to be a number of partners. Yes, there are a number of people who the president is friends with who could expect to pardon some top names were looking at former Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort. The president's former political adviser, Steve Bannon, who is facing federal charges in New York. There is also of course, the possibility that the president could pardon his family preemptively and the possibility for the president to try to pardon himself before he leaves office. That is NPR. Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Thank you, Ryan. Thank you. Encourage or require. That is a dilemma Many employers are facing as a covert 19 vaccine comes closer to reality. Ah, quarter million people in the U. S have died from Cove it once there's a shot can that can prevent illness Should it be mandatory in the workplace? NPR's Andrea Hsu has more Only a couple of months into the pandemic. Holly Smith had made up her mind. Her restaurant Cafe Juanita in Kirkland, Washington, would not reopen the diners until there was a covert 19 vaccine. She's already told her staff you are going to get vaccinated. Some of my young millennials are like, so I'm taking this is a directive like as a mandate. Is that how you mean it? And it's that's a scary thing. You know, like, Yeah. Yes, yes, Smith had 28 employees before the pandemic. She's had to lay off all but five. Her fine dining spot has become a take out on Lee business. Even with a much smaller staff, Smith is serious about safety. She requires her workers to get tested. If they go on vacation with people outside their bubble, or if they're showing any sign of illness. I believe in civil liberties and all those different things, but you know, we have people who live with their parents. We have people who lived with her husband, who has diabetes. The staff have to be healthy and safe before you could move forward, she says, you know for vaccinated I think I can move out in the world and be responsible for these 28 or 30 people. Plus all the people coming in Now, if you're wondering, Can she actually do this? Can she require her workers to get vaccinated? The answer appears to be yes. But her workers also have the right to request exemptions. Under federal laws. Someone could say I have a medical or religious reason I can't be vaccinated and companies must try to provide accommodations. It's incredibly hard to manage a mandate. Johnnie Taylor Jr is president of the Society for Human Resource Management. He says Each requests must be evaluated on its own merits. Now imagine if there were hundreds of them. A recent poll found four in 10. Americans don't want the vaccine, though that polling was done before anyone knew how well the vaccines would work. So this is a true headache for HR professionals. That's why you're likely to see many companies strongly encourage the vaccine, but stopped short of mandating it. Take, for example, the pork producers Smithfield, the company told NPR. They're not anticipating a firm mandate, but they want to offer the vaccine on site. Even with all the headaches, Taylor things many employers will go for the mandate. After all, they have an obligation to get rid of any known hazards in the workplace like Covad. It's real and it's devastating. So I think the dynamic changes. Employers are actually going to position this as I need to do this full stop. Now. There are some workplaces that already mandate the flu vaccine most commonly hospitals. Dr. James McDevitt is dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He says the annual flu shot is required for some 14,000 people, doctors, nurses, med students, even the clerks. They're sitting in a computer that don't see live patients. It's the right thing to do for society, he says. If you claim an exemption, you have to wear a mask. Now with the covert vaccine. Baylor is not going to make it mandatory until they can actually get enough supply to cover everyone and until it's been deemed safe, not just by the FDA, McDivitt says, but by his own colleagues. Johnny Taylor Jr says. Whatever companies decide there are likely to be challenges. And so Congress and state legislators are going to have to think about how to offer some protection on both sides. Legal protection for companies that mandate the vaccine in case someone has a bad reaction. Even though you will have to sign a waiver before you get the shot. They've also gotta protect the employers who decide not to make it. Mandate and then who are sued by employees who contracted Taylor has been meeting with federal employment officials telling them employers want to do the right thing, but they're in a tough spot, and they're going to need help getting through this. Andrea Hsu NPR news In a surprise announcement today, the Trump Administration has denied a permit for the Pebble Mine in Alaska. The proposed open pit gold mine would have been one of the largest in North America. Alaska Public Media's Liz Ruskin reports at many points during the Trump presidency, It has appeared that the permit was certain to be granted. But the Army Corps of Engineers determined the mind plan would not comply with the Clean Water Act and that the project is not in the public interest. Fishermen and tribes in Bristol Bay have been fighting the mind for more than a decade, fearing it would degrade the rich salmon runs that are at the heart of the area's economy and indigenous culture. Sport fishermen come from all over the world to stay at lodges in the area for a chance at landing a record Cojo or rainbow trout, Nancy Morris Lion and Bear Trail Lodging. King Salmon Got the news by text. It is an incredible relief. I felt like sitting down and just crying Well, lion says The prospect of the mine has held the whole region hostage for years. Lodge owners like her didn't know if they could invest in their businesses. The president's oldest son and avid hunter and fisherman is credited with galvanizing the Trump administration against the project, Lion, says Donald Trump Jr and his brother, Eric stayed with her about eight years ago. I always said that I had faith that after they had visited here, and they spent time here The state. He understood that this place didn't need something like that. Marring it, starring at ruining it forever. Pebble Limited partnership says it's not giving up and is focusing on a possible appeal of the Army cores decision. The company says the project would provide hundreds of good jobs. But they were more questions about the lasting impact of the mine. When secret recordings emerged this fall, Pebble executives were caught saying that they ultimately planned a much larger mind than they had requested A permit for For now, the Army course decision appears to be a death blow for the pebble mine. The incoming Biden administration is likely to oppose the project, as the Obama administration did. For NPR news. I'm Liz Ruskin in Washington..

president NPR Holly Smith Donald Trump Jr Trump Administration flu vaccine Andrea Hsu illness Taylor Liz Ruskin Ryan Lucas Paul Manafort Johnnie Taylor Jr Pebble Limited Pebble attorney Johnny Taylor Jr Steve Bannon diabetes
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:00 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's been eight years since fast food workers started calling for a $15 minimum wage and this fall in the midst of the pandemic, the movement scored one of its biggest victories yet. Florida became the eighth state in the country to approve it $15 an hour minimum wage they're gonna have to do so by 2026. What does that mean for the rest of the country? NPR's Andrea Hsu takes a look. In the days before the election. Terrence Wise was busy sending text messages. Lots of them. We texted thousands of folks down in Florida from here in Kansas City, where he's a longtime activist with the fight for 15, the union back campaign that started in 2012. If we can get in the deep South, you know down there in Florida it's bringing all workers closer. $15 hour minimum wage on a national level. The pandemic has also brought the cause momentum. Low wage workers, staffing grocery stores and fast food joints and nursing homes have been hailed as heroes. Why's has worked at McDonald's for nine years, and he's been in the spotlight before. Including at a White House summit on workers when he got to introduce President Obama is that for me or him five years later, he's now a manager. But his pay is still less than $15 an hour and he is still having trouble getting by. He says his family was evicted from their home earlier this year. Even in Florida. The minimum wage won't reach $15 until 2026. But for now, it remains the goal. We needed to be the floor, not the ceiling, but the floor for all workers, you know, get the ball rolling. Yeah. Does he hope we're encouraged? Ashley Shelton is with the Power Coalition for Equity and Justice in Louisiana, where the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour stands. And here is where hope crashes up against reality. So we've tried $15. We've tried a graduated increase, you know, starting with, like $8 or 8 15 to no avail. Louisiana also bans local governments from setting their own minimum wage. Now as much as low wage workers are struggling, so to our small businesses. Many of them say a $15 minimum wage would be devastating. We have run the numbers, and it would potentially put us out of business. Tina Miller and her husband on walkabout outfitter and outdoor equipment and clothing store with six locations across central and Southern Virginia, and especially after this cove, it I mean, we have been hit so hard at one point business was down 90%. To stay afloat. They took out a bunch of loans and laid off a lot of their staff. They haven't paid themselves since March. We're still trying to dig ourselves out of a hole now is the time to support small businesses, she says. Why not let the market decide the wages? Her lowest paid employees are often students working part time they make $10 an hour. But Virginia's minimum wage will rise to $12 an hour over the next two years and pushing those bottom wages up, Miller says will push all of her wages up. In big city, she says. Yeah, a $15 starting salary might make sense. But here in our area, you can buy a house for 60 $70,000. So it's a very different area, so mandating it across the board is frightening. President elect Biden does support a $15 federal minimum wage. But getting it through the Senate. That's the hurdle. So for now, the fight remains at the state and local level and with workers and employers themselves. Andrea Hsu NPR news This is NPR news. 19 minutes.

Florida Terrence Wise Andrea Hsu Tina Miller Louisiana NPR Southern Virginia White House Senate President Power Coalition for Equity and Ashley Shelton Kansas City McDonald Biden President Obama
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:45 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

"Easier and to save lives. What would those one or two things be? What does the local government need to do? We want a shutdown. We want people to stay home and abide by the rules and listen to the warning signs where we're no longer the front liners anymore. It is the people we we are the last line of defense now for the community, and we wish people could take the percussions more seriously. And we know that Texas is governor. As we said his wrist has he's he's resisted strict statewide measures. We heard doctor right on in Houston, say he is preparing for what he calls the darkest weeks that Houston has ever had. Do you anticipate the same in El Paso? I do. I do. Okay, Um Way needed more people. We need more people. We need the people to care about the public the public health and and join us and protecting each other. Okay? Was that tourist is a registered nurse in El Paso, Texas. Nurse tourist Thank you so much for your time. We really appreciate it. Thank you. It's been eight years since fast food workers started calling for a $15 minimum wage and this fall in the midst of the pandemic, the movement scored one of its biggest victories. Yet Florida became the eighth state in the country to approve it. $15 an hour minimum wage. I'm gonna have to do so by 2026. What does that mean for the rest of the country? NPR's Andrea Hsu takes a look. In the days before the election. Terrence Wise was busy sending text messages. Lots of them. We texted thousands of folks down in Florida from here in Kansas City, where he's a longtime activist with the fight for 15, the union back campaign that started in 2012. If we can get in the deep South, you know, down there in Florida. It's bringing all workers closer to $15 hour minimum wage on a national level. The pandemic has also brought the cause momentum. Low wage workers, staffing grocery stores and fast food joints and nursing homes have been hailed as heroes. Wise has worked at McDonald's for nine years, and he's been in the spotlight before. Including at a White House summit on workers when he got to introduce President Obama that for me or him five years later, he's now a manager. But his pay is still less than $15 an hour and he is still having trouble getting by. He says his family was evicted from their home earlier this year. Even in Florida. The minimum wage won't reach $15 until 2026. But for now, it remains the goal. We need it to be the floor, not the ceiling, but the floor for all workers, you know, get the ball rolling. Yeah, gives me hope. We're encouraged. Ashley Shelton is with the Power Coalition for Equity and Justice in Louisiana, where the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour stands. And here is where hope crashes up against reality. So we've tried $15. We've tried a graduated increase, you know, starting with, like $8 or 8 15 to no avail. Louisiana also bans local governments from setting their own minimum wage. Now as much as low wage workers are struggling, so to our small businesses. Many of them say a $15 minimum wage would be devastating. We have run the numbers, and it would potentially put us out of business. Tina Miller and her husband own walkabout, outfitter and outdoor equipment and clothing store with six locations across central and Southern Virginia. And especially after this cove, it I mean, we have been hit so hard at one point business was down 90%. To stay afloat. They took out a bunch of loans and laid off a lot of their staff. They haven't paid themselves since March. We're still trying to dig ourselves out of a hole now is the time to support small businesses, she says. Why not let the market decide the wages? Her lowest paid employees are often students working part time they make $10 an hour. But Virginia's minimum wage will rise to $12 an hour over the next two years and pushing those bottom wages up, Miller says will push all of her wages up. In big city, she says. Yeah, a $15 starting salary might make sense. But here in our area, you can buy a house for 60 $70,000. So it's a very different area, so mandating it across the board is frightening. President elect Biden does support a $15 federal minimum wage. But getting it through the Senate. That's the hurdle. So for now, the fight remains at the state and local level and with workers and employers themselves. Andrea Hsu NPR.

Terrence Wise Florida El Paso Texas Andrea Hsu Tina Miller Louisiana Southern Virginia Houston Senate White House President Power Coalition for Equity and NPR Ashley Shelton Biden Kansas City
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:19 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"We mainly need our community to support us and keeping each other safe. Um We're frustrated and we we see no end. There's a long way to go for us. And we're just trying to see the light at the end of the tunnel, But without the community and the city leaders supporting us with Was shutdowns or slowing down the cases and putting bigger measures. Then it's hard to see that light. Let's talk about what support would look like you're saying you're frustrated. You sound as though you're frustrated with local officials. If you could tell them there are one or two things that really need to happen here to make my job easier and to save lives. What would those one or two things be? What does the local government need to do? We want a shutdown. We want people to stay home and abide by the rules and listen to the warning signs where we're no longer the front liners anymore. It is the people we we are the last line of defense now for the community, and we wish people could take the percussions more seriously. And we know that Texas is governor. As we said his wrist has. He's resisted strict statewide measures. We heard doctor right on in Houston say he is preparing for what he calls the darkest weeks that Houston has ever had. Do you anticipate the same in El Paso? I do. I do. Okay, Um Re We needed more people. We need more people be. We need the people to care about the public The public health and and join us in protecting each other. Okay? Was that tourist is a registered nurse in El Paso, Texas. Nurse tourist Thank you so much for your time. We really appreciate it. Thank you. It's been eight years since fast food workers started calling for a $15 minimum wage and this fall in the midst of the pandemic, the movement scored one of its biggest victories. Yet Florida became the eighth state in the country to approve a $15 an hour minimum wage They're gonna have to do so by 2026. What does that mean for the rest of the country? NPR's Andrea Hsu takes a look. In the days before the election. Terrence Wise was busy sending text messages. Lots of them. We texted thousands of folks down in Florida from here in Kansas City, where he's a longtime activist with the fight for 15, the union back campaign that started in 2012. If we can get in the deep South, you know down there in Florida it's bringing all workers closer. $15 an hour minimum wage on a national level. The pandemic has also brought the cause momentum. Low wage workers, staffing grocery stores and fast food joints and nursing homes have been hailed as heroes. Why's has worked at McDonald's for nine years, and he's been in the spotlight before. Including at a White House summit on workers when he got to introduce President Obama that for me or him five years later, he's now a manager. But his pay is still less than $15 an hour and he is still having trouble getting by. He says his family was a victim from their home earlier this year. Even in Florida. The minimum wage won't reach $15 until 2026. But for now, it remains the goal. We needed to be the floor, not the ceiling, but the floor for all workers, you know, get the ball rolling. Yeah, gives me hope. We're encouraged. Ashley Shelton is with the Power Coalition for Equity and Justice in Louisiana, where the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour stands. And here is where hope crashes up against reality. So we've tried $15. We've tried a graduated increase, you know, starting with, like $8 or 8 15 to no avail. Louisiana also bans local governments from setting their own minimum wage. Now as much as low wage workers are struggling, so to our small businesses. Many of them say a $15 minimum wage would be devastating. We've run the numbers, and it would potentially put us out of business. Tina Miller and her husband on walkabout outfitter and outdoor equipment and clothing store with six locations across central and Southern Virginia, and especially after this cove, it I mean, we have been hit so hard at one point business was down 90%. To stay afloat. They took out a bunch of loans and laid off a lot of their staff. They haven't paid themselves since March. We're still trying to dig ourselves out of a hole now is the time to support small businesses, she says. Why not let the market decide the wages? Her lowest paid employees are often students working part time they make $10 an hour. But Virginia's minimum wage will rise to $12 an hour over the next two years and pushing those bottom wages up, Miller says will push all of her wages up. In big cities, she says. Yeah, a $15 starting salary might make sense. But here in our area, you can buy a house for 60 $70,000. So it's a very different area, so mandating it across the board is frightening. President elect Biden does support a $15 federal minimum wage. But getting it through the Senate. That's the hurdle. So for now, the fight remains at the state and local level and with workers and employers themselves. Andrea Hsu NPR news This'll is NPR news. You're listening to morning edition here on W. N. Y C. I'm David first coming up. South Dakota and Vermont are small rural states with Republican governors and two starkly different pandemic responses. I'm asking you to look at the data. Not just something you see on Facebook and realize that the science is real. One state has suffered far less illness and death will look at why coming up in about 15 minutes. Support.

Florida El Paso Andrea Hsu Texas Tina Miller us Louisiana Houston NPR White House Facebook Terrence Wise South Dakota Power Coalition for Equity and Senate Virginia McDonald
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:08 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KCRW

"Up to Atlantic full of arms. Add in Riverside. This one is the 91 west at Van Buren. Gotta crash block in the carpool and left Lane. It's slow from Central Avenue. It's all things considered from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly. It's like adding insult to injury working parents who set aside part of their pay pretax to cover child care expenses. Well, a number of them now stand to lose some of it unless the government acts, NPR's Andrea Hsu explains. Nora Paris's Children had been going to day care since they were four months old. Until the coronavirus shut everything down this spring. We had expected it to be for a few weeks. I think that a lot of parents around the country we're in the same position just waiting and seeing what was gonna happen with the pandemic at first, Paris didn't worry too much. She figured the kids wouldn't be home for that long. Of course, things only got worse. And in late May, the kid's daycare announced it was closing permanently. By that point, Paris had already contributed a lot of money to what's called a dependent care, flexible spending account. I have over $2200 stuck in the account and that money is use it or lose it, meaning she has to spend it this year or it's gone. This is a tax benefit offered by many employers. You can set aside up to $5000 a year before taxes for child care expenses like daycare after care or summer camps this year because of the pandemic, Paris had the opportunity to stop the contributions. But she waited a few months because she kept thinking the kids would be going back to day care. Now she's pretty sure they won't right now. I'm just looking at different options and trying to figure out what I can do on Capitol Hill, representative Cindy Axed Me, a Democrat from Iowa has been hearing the same thing from constituents. Families are struggling to begin with. We don't need to have an added burden of losing money during this time frame. In May, she introduced a measure that would allow the dependent care funds to be carried over into next year. She's gotten the measure into a couple of pandemic relief bills, but those have been stuck in the Senate. And now time is running out even in a year when there are so many competing priorities so many people in economic straits Actually thinks this is a no brainer. This should get done to me. This is this a common sense piece of legislation that allows for folks to use the hard earned money that they've earned. Now there is another option. The I. R s could extend the grace period for these funds until December 31st of next year. In fact, they did this for some of last year's funds. But the Iris told NPR For now, the normal rules apply. So Cindy Acne is still pushing on the legislative front. And she's also pushing for another change too dependent care accounts. She wants to double the annual limit on how much you can set aside tax free. It's been $5000 since the 19 eighties. There is no place in this country where someone could make sure that their child is in a good child care setting for $5000 multiple attempts to raise the cap over the years have failed. But actually says we're at a moment when we're going to see childcare become a major issue. We have to start helping our parents out more. After all, she says. It's working parents who keep the economy running. Andrea Hsu NPR news More than a quarter million people in the U. S. Have now died of covert 19 each one Someone's family member were going to remember two of those 250,000 people now. Father and daughter, who both died of the disease. Last month in Utah. Bert Porter was 80 years old Tracy Larson. His daughter was 56. Tracy's adult daughter, Lindsay Wooten is with us now from Logan, Utah. Thank you for being here and I'm sorry for your loss. Thank you for having me and for the condolences. Would you begin by telling us about your mother and what she was like I would love to. My mom was the life of the party. She was bouncy and energetic and loving. And my mom for 28 years she was a pair of professional for the special needs Children. She dedicated everything that she did to helping others. And your grandfather. Her father, Bert, My grandpa was such a sweet, sweet man. He was the hardest worker of anyone I've ever met. Up until the day he was put in the hospital. He was outside. Building new things or welding something. My grandpa was very much a hands on handyman. Your father was also hospitalized with the disease and spent a month and a half in the same hospital as your mother and I understand. They celebrated their 34th wedding anniversary there in the hospital, Will you? Will you tell us about that? My dad had just been released on October 1st from the hospital, and my mom unfortunately, was still in the hospital. Um, that morning. My mom's nurse and I were able to wash your hair and get it calmed and braided and my sister went over and helped my dad get ready, and they made the hour drive from their home up to the hospital. And my sister and I both knew that my mom and dad were able to give each other special gifts this year, and that was something that they had always treasured is giving each other a memorable guest. I went and bought this beautiful would flower arrangement because the ICUs air really sticklers about what can be brought in and that was my dad's gift to my mom. And for my mom to give to my dad. I ran to the store. I got an old photo of them dating blown up in print it and I picked a really special Photo frame that said, Love you. And I got a card. And it was the last time that my mom ever got to write a love note to my dad. And Little did we know that four days later? My mom would pass away. The fact that they could spend that time.

NPR Andrea Hsu Cindy Acne Bert Porter Nora Paris Paris NPR News Utah Tracy Larson Van Buren Ari Shapiro Riverside Mary Louise Kelly Senate Iris representative Logan Lindsay Wooten Iowa
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Well, a number of them now stand to lose some of it unless the government acts, NPR's Andrea Hsu explains. Nora Paris's Children had been going to day care since they were four months old. Until the coronavirus shut everything down this spring. We had expected it to be for a few weeks. I think that a lot of parents around the country we're in the same Position, just waiting and seeing what was gonna happen with the pandemic. At first. Paris didn't worry too much. She figured the kids wouldn't be home for that long. Of course, things only got worse, And in late May, the kid's daycare announced it was closing permanently. By that point, Paris had already contributed a lot of money to what's called a dependent care, flexible spending account. I have over $2200 stuck in the account and that money is use it or lose it, meaning she has to spend it this year or it's gone. This is a tax benefit offered by many employers. You can set aside up to $5000 a year before taxes for child care expenses like daycare after care or summer camps. This year because of the pandemic. Paris had the opportunity to stop the contributions, but she waited a few months because she kept thinking the kids would be going back to day care. Now she's pretty sure they won't right now. I'm just looking at different options and trying to figure out what I can do. On Capitol Hill, representative Cindy Axed Me a Democrat from Iowa. Has been hearing the same thing from constituents. Families are struggling to begin with. We don't need to have an added burden of losing money during this time frame. In May, she introduced a measure that would allow the dependent care funds to be carried over into next year. She's gotten the measure into a couple of pandemic relief bills, but those have been stuck in the Senate. And now time is running out even in a year when there are so many competing priorities. So many people in economic straits actually thinks this is a no brainer. This should get done to me. This is this a common sense piece of legislation that allows for folks to use the hard earned money that they've earned. Now there is another option. The I. R s could extend the grace period for these funds until December 31st of next year. In fact, they did this for some of last year's funds. But the Iris told NPR For now, the normal rules apply. So Cindy Acne is still pushing on the legislative front. And she's also pushing for another change too dependent care accounts. She wants to double the annual limit on how much you can set aside tax free. It's been $5000 since the 19 eighties. There is no place in this country where someone could make sure that their child is in a good child care setting for $5000 multiple attempts to raise the cap over the years have failed. But actually says we're at a moment when we're going to see childcare become a major issue. We have to start helping our parents out more. After all, she says. It's working parents who keep the economy running. Andrea Hsu NPR news More than a quarter million people in the U. S. Have now died of covert 19 each one Someone's family member were going to remember two of those 250,000 people now. Father and daughter, who both died of the disease. Last month in Utah. Bert Porter was 80 years old Tracy Larson. His daughter was 56. Tracy's adult daughter, Lindsay Wooten is with us now from Logan, Utah. Thank you for being here and I'm sorry for your loss. Thank you for having me and For the condolences. Would you begin by telling us about your mother and what she was like I would love to. My mom was the life of the party. She was bouncy and energetic and loving. And my mom for 28 years she was a pair of professional for the special needs Children. She dedicated everything that she did to helping others. And your grandfather. Her father, Bert, My grandpa was such a sweet, sweet man. He was the hardest worker of anyone I've ever met. Up until the day he was put in the hospital. He was outside. Building new things or welding something. My grandpa was very much a hands on handyman. Your father was also hospitalized with the disease and spent a month and a half in the same hospital as your mother and I understand. They celebrated their 34th wedding anniversary bear in the hospital, Will you? Will you tell us about that? My dad had just been released on October 1st from the hospital, and my mom unfortunately, was still in the hospital. And that morning my mom's nurse and I were able to wash your hair and get it calmed and braided and my sister went over and helped my dad get ready and They made the hour drive from their home up to the hospital. And my sister and I both knew that my mom and dad weren't able to give each other special gifts this year, and that was something that they had always treasured is giving each other a memorable guest. Went in. But this beautiful would flower arrangement because the ice is air really sticklers about what can be brought in and that was my dad's gift to my mom. And for my mom to give to my dad. I ran to the store. I got an old photo of them dating blown up in print it and I picked a really special Photo frame that said, Love you. And I got a card. And it was the last time that my mom ever got to write a love note to my dad. And Little did we know that four.

Paris NPR Andrea Hsu Cindy Acne Bert Porter Nora Paris Utah Tracy Larson Senate Iris representative Logan Lindsay Wooten Iowa
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:56 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Boy she takes in now available on Netflix. It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and I'm Mary Louise Kelly. It's like adding insult to injury working parents who set aside part of their pay pretax to cover child care expenses, well, a number of them now stand to lose some of it unless the government acts, NPR's Andrea Hsu explains. Nora Paris. His Children had been going to day care since they were four months old. Until the coronavirus shut everything down this spring. We had expected it to be for a few weeks. I think that a lot of parents around the country we're in the same position just waiting and seeing what was gonna happen with the pandemic at first. Paris didn't worry too much. She figured the kids wouldn't be home for that long. Of course, things only got worse, And in late May, the kid's daycare announced it was closing permanently. By that point, Paris had already contributed a lot of money to what's called a dependent care, flexible spending account. I have over $2200 stuck in the account and that money is use it or lose it, meaning she has to spend it this year or it's gone. This is a tax benefit offered by many employers. You can set aside up to $5000 a year before taxes for child care expenses like daycare after care or summer camps. This year because of the pandemic. Paris had the opportunity to stop the contributions, but she waited a few months because she kept thinking the kids would be going back to day care. Now she's pretty sure they won't right now. I'm just looking at different options and trying to figure out what I can do. On Capitol Hill, representative Cindy Axed Me a Democrat from Iowa. Has been hearing the same thing from constituents. Families are struggling to begin with. We don't need to have an added burden of losing money during this time frame. In May, she introduced a measure that would allow the dependent care funds to be carried over into next year. She's gotten the measure into a couple of pandemic relief bills, but those have been stuck in the Senate. And now time is running out even in a year when there are so many competing priorities. So many people in economic straits actually thinks this is a no brainer. This should get done to me. This just is a common sense piece of legislation that allows for folks to use the hard earned money that they've earned. Now there is another option. The I. R. S could extend the grace period for these funds until December 31st of next year. In fact, they did this for some of last year's funds. But the Iris told NPR For now, the normal rules apply. So Cindy Acne is still pushing on the legislative front. And she's also pushing for another change too dependent care accounts. She wants to double the annual limit on how much you can set aside tax free. It's been $5000 since the 19 eighties. There is no place in this country where someone could make sure that their child is in a good child care setting for $5000 multiple attempts to raise the cap over the years have failed. But actually says we're at a moment when we're going to see childcare become a major issue. We have to start helping our parents out more. After all, she says. It's working parents who keep the economy running. Andrea Hsu NPR news More than a quarter million people in the U. S. Have now died of covert 19 each one Someone's family member were going to remember two of those 250,000 people now. Father and daughter, who both died of the disease. Last month in Utah. Bert Porter was 80 years old Tracy Larson. His daughter was 56. Tracy's adult daughter, Lindsay Wooten is with us now from Logan, Utah. Thank you for being here and I'm sorry for your loss. Thank you for having me and For the condolences. Would you begin by telling us about your mother and what she was like I would love to. My mom was the life of the party. She was bouncy and energetic and loving. And my mom for 28 years she was a pair of professional for the special needs Children. She dedicated everything that she did to helping others. And your grandfather. Her father, Bert, My grandpa was such a sweet, sweet man. He was the hardest worker of anyone I've ever met. Up until the day he was put in the hospital. He was outside. Building new things or welding something. My grandpa was very much a hands on handyman. Your father was also hospitalized with the disease and spent a month and a half in the same hospital as your mother and I understand. They celebrated their 34th wedding anniversary there in the hospital, Will you? Will you tell us about that? My dad had just been released on October 1st from the hospital, and my mom unfortunately, was still in the hospital. Um, that morning. My mom's nurse and I were able to wash your hair and get it calmed and berated and my sister went over and helped my dad get ready, and they made the hour drive from their home up to the hospital. And my sister and I both knew that my mom and dad were able to give each other special gifts this year, and that was something that they had always treasured is giving each other a memorable guest. I went and bought this beautiful would flower arrangement because the ice is air really sticklers about what can be brought in and that was my dad's gift to my mom. And for my mom to give to my dad. I ran to the store. I got an old photo of them dating blown up in print it and I picked a really special Photo frame that said, Love you. And I got a card. Well, and it was the last time that my mom ever got to write a love note to my dad. And Little did we know that four days later? My mom would.

Paris NPR Andrea Hsu Cindy Acne Bert Porter Nora Paris Netflix Ari Shapiro Utah Tracy Larson Mary Louise Kelly Senate Iris representative Logan Lindsay Wooten Iowa
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:41 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I spoke, too. It was really the news this summer that their kid's school was not Going to open as usual. That drove them to, you know, take a leave of absence or quit their jobs This Frieda has done And you know, for some of these mothers like my spoke to Jessica meant in Los Angeles. She was in marketing. She had this really Great career. She had an MBA at the beginning, she said, You know, maybe I'll be 23 weeks I she went to the craft store. She bought a bunch of art supplies, but then it sort of came crashing down on her when she realized like No, this is not to three weeks. Andre Like Frieda. She just She just was so tourney and so many different directions that she ended up quitting her job and she worries about calling. You know, she said. I worry about clawing my way back after this, but she needed to be there for her kids. Catherine Ann, Can I ask you this, though? Is there any indication in the data? About. I know that you were saying that you know a lot of women because their industries their work was the work that was hard hit, but a lot of men working these fields as well. Is there anything in the data that suggests that More women than men are taking are leaving the work first, because they have to or because they just feel they because they feel they have to, or because they actually economic for economic reasons have to does that make sense. Yeah, And, you know, I'll say a couple things. Men and women in a partnership in a household specialize. You know, even when they split things, they don't split them. 50 50 like I do the first half of the dishes and then I stop. And I get my husband. I say. All right now it's your turn. You know, we just you tend to specialize in certain task. And then in in your jobs, you know, it tends to be that one person has the Less flexible job, and one person has the more flexible job and one person has the higher paying job. And one person is the lower paying job, and it happens for so many reasons that women end up and the more flexible Sometimes lower pain positions. And so when something like this happens there they have the room to maneuver where the male worker might not. And I think this is what really bothers me about this time period is that we put so much pressure on women in their marriage. Right. I read a time magazine article last year about how women can make their husbands do more. Right. We were going into people's households and we're looking at and saying, Does he do enough? You know you're having a hard time at work, You know? Does he do the dishes? Does he do the laundry? And to me as as a labor economist and someone who Who looks a lot of public policy. I read that as a public policy failure. We have this huge burden of care, giving that you have when you're a parent and the federal response to that has been Women try to do more, and we have never made an investment in working women in this country. We don't have child care that subsidized, affordable, free and accessible in the US. We don't have universal preschool. We don't have longer school days and we don't have universal family leaf. There's there's only so much that we can put on women to say will change your identity, work more, get more education, but also make your husband's doom or and make your marriage look different. I mean, it's time for public policy to step in. It was time 40 years ago, and now that we're at the precipice of a crisis, and so much is resting on what women do with the next four years, it's time to give them the support. They should have had ages ago. No. We only just scratched the surface with this conversation. I do hope we'll talk again soon. So thank you so much. That was Catherine and Edwards, a labor economist with the Rand Corporation. We also heard from Farida Mercedes recently left her corporate job to become a stay at home, Mom and from NPR's Andrea Hsu. Thank you all so much. Hang in there. Thank you. Take care. Thank you. Earlier in the program. We heard tips from the surgeon general on how to minimize your covert risk in the weeks and months ahead. Tomorrow on weekend edition, you can hear how an epidemiologist at Harvard Medical School is planning to spend her winter. My plans are to statistic with my household as much as possible, But I could see at some point creating a bubble, Let's say with one other family. Listen for more tomorrow by asking your speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. You're listening to NPR news. Thousands of President Trump's supporters rallied in Washington, D. C. Today at an event known as the Million Marga March turned out estimates were all over the place, The White House said. A million president Trump tweeted about hundreds of thousands. Authorities in Washington, D. C. Say it was more like 10,000. Whatever the figure, it was a bigger than expected public showing for Trump supporters who believe without evidence. That he was robbed of a second term. NPR's Hannah Elam was at the rally. She's actually still in the field near the White House, and she's with us now from their high Hannah. Hi there, So tell us a bit more about who showed up Well, it was a broad cross section of Trump supporters. There were Republican families that their Children probably more racial diversity than I've seen it many other right wing events and a Z expected there was a real mix of friends and extremist groups there. I thought the proud boys the blue boys, followers of the mass delusion of Q and on. There were a few scuffles but no major violence. And for the most part, all these groups are coalescing under the stock this steel slogan again, a reference to the baseless claims that the election was fraudulent. The Trump supporters at the rally. Needless that they do not consider their views conspiratorial. I talked with one couple from eastern Tennessee, Julie and David North, and this was their response to that characterization. Look, look around is this fringe? This tells the whole story. This is the real story. This isn't the range Well, and I heard a great definition. The other day. Someone said that the conspiracy theory that you will keep getting, you know, hear that term being tossed around Really? What That means is it's a way to try to put people in a category who are smart enough to look and connect the dots. So they can call it whatever they want to call it, But it's truth. What was there a goal for the day? If so, what was it? Yeah, kind of depended on who you ask, But this I mean, overall, it was a show of support for President Trump of vocal rejection of the election results and an effort to kind of rally trump various constituencies under one banner, And they did this under the You know, during the lockdown protests over the summer, and it seems like they're building on those connections, Maybe extending those to some kind of forming of an opposition block under a Biden administration and President Trump had tweeted that he might show up at the rally, and he did what exactly happened. Yeah, That's right. I was I was around the corner with another crowd when it happened, But yes, the president's motorcade came to Freedom Plaza. It did a ring around the site on Dove course. This is thrilling to his supporters who were there. I spoke with one of them who got to glimpse the motorcade. It was That's Patty Timmons. She was actually an immigrant from the Philippines who came to the U. S when she was a child. And she says she's living the American dream that she believes Trump is protecting. And this is her thought on seeing his motorcade today. We just exited the elevators. And then there was this ruckus and we ran out was like, Oh, my God, this President Trump and we've tried to rent it to see him. But we saw, you know all of the the whole parade of security and everything else that follows him. Then he did a U turn. And he started coming around the other way. And everybody was so excited because, really, they just love they love him. They do They genuinely love this president. So So, yes, I mean, she's she would say, I say, would be among the supporters who are still coming to terms with the fact that the president's leaving office and went to thank him. Say goodbye. Perhaps, But others say no, they're not ready to get up. Give up the fight. That is NPR's Hannah Elam. Hannah, Thanks so much for your reporting. Thank you. Mm hmm..

President Trump NPR president Hannah Elam Andre Like Frieda Catherine Ann Trump time magazine Los Angeles US Harvard Medical School Jessica White House Washington Dove Rand Corporation Farida Mercedes Tennessee Patty Timmons
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:26 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He made his Children go outside with their backpacks and come back in through their own front door first, But that's not all. Each kid had to complete some fancy footwork with their dad before he let them pass. Their new ritual made the local news Maybe because of those dance moves, but also because, well, here's this dad making the most of virtual school students will station never could have imagined he'd be doing this before the pandemic. His wife was mostly the one looking after the kids education. I'm usually gone. You know, a couple of times a month. I'm on some type of travel station is a vice president of Boeing. He travels up to 200,000 miles a year. And as a result routinely, I wouldn't know my kids teachers names. You know, my wife would tell me obviously, And if I had time, maybe I'll meet him. You know, once or twice a year this year, he hasn't taken any work trip since February. He's still working, but he's home a lot. Now he sees the teachers on a daily basis on the screen, of course, and he sees them connecting with his kids. I got to see my kids and see their world in a way that I've never experienced before. It's overwhelming, he says, thinking about how much he's missed, and how much this hard year has brought him. The pandemic is taking father's on journeys they may never have chosen otherwise. For Nathan Beak. Losing his job has meant gaining time with his nine year old Maddie. I am teacher that I get up every morning and I wake her up, Get her breakfast, Freddy. We get her online. And then he goes online himself to job search, which at 45, he says, can feel humiliating. Big had a great sales job with a big new convention hotel in downtown Kansas City. It was supposed to open in April. We had giant media events planned people flying in from all over to cut ribbons to do all this kind of thing. Instead, beak was furloughed. Meanwhile, his wife was going bonkers at her job. She's in health care and was working 16 hour days dealing with issues around covert payments and reimbursements. So on the home front, it was a complete role reversal from the laundry tow the food. I'm a much better cook than I was six months ago and turns out he's a pretty good teacher. To this year. Maddie's reading and math scores have gone up way up a real bright spot in a pretty disastrous year when you said at home all day and aren't bringing in a bunch of money for the Family. And what is your worth? And you know you question yourself. I was like this one. I could say, Hey, maybe this is working now in the pandemic, more women than men have left the workforce. Take Zachary Austria's family. His project management job was deemed essential. So his wife quit her job in marketing to care for the kids. Now he's still trying to come to terms with being the sole breadwinner for his family were not that family where I go to work and she stays home and cleans the house and I expect dinner when I returned. That's just That's not how we operate. He actually felt guilty for a while. He tried working at night until two or three in the morning so he could be with the kids during the day. His wife still freelance rights when she can they need the little bit of income. And he's actually had new opportunities come up at work things he might have gone for a normal times. Instead, he's playing it safe. Now is not the time to rock the boat. There are so many other stressors in our life right now. I don't want my career to be one. He feels he owes that to his family, especially to his wife. She Made the decision to put her career on hold for a little bit, and she didn't We didn't do that lightly. And I One day I hope to make it up to her. After the pandemic, he says he'll support her any way he can. Andrea Hsu NPR news India's capital has some of the dirtiest air in the world. During the coronavirus lockdown this year, skies turned blue. But with the lockdown now lifted, the smog has returned and its complicating covert cases. And as NPR's India producers such meet the Patek reports holiday celebration this weekend will likely make things worse. These days. The pollution is so bad that Sherry Frost doesn't let her Children play out. Those the 42 year old lives in a suburb of New Delhi, and it's part of a group of moms fighting for clean air. I haven't want to do at home and you just see the PM 2.5 shoot up PM 2.5 is fine particulate matter in the air, which enters the lungs and blood stream and causes harm. In recent days, the concentration off PM 2.5 in Delhi's air has reached 14 times the safe level. Biking to work has become a struggle for fresh. You have to cycle very slowly to be able to, you know, keep the mask on. And, of course, the must, You know, get clogged up so quickly because you're in unprecedented kind of pollution. Every winter Gracia Low small descends on Delhi. It's a mix of exhaust from coal fired power plants and vehicles. Dust from construction sites and smoke from farmers burning crop. Waste winds drop so pollutants linger in the air, and this year's pollution has coincided with covert 19, so it doesnt doubled your party on your lungs, a double jeopardy of covert and pollution, says Dr Pratt Evil Goga, a restaurant three specialist in Delhi. She says. Even without Cupid, I see you beds at her hospital fill up every window. So this year the crisis will deepen because half of of arise user perfect Corona and best off the half of the rise, you will not be sufficient for routine respiratory problems. Ah Harvard study indicated that long term exposure to air polluted with fine particulate matter. Increases the chances of serious illness or death from covert 19. The capital has been seen great card numbers of infections this month. It's a very, very critical and dangerous week ahead off US environmental activist Emmeline The charge is sounding the alarm about the upcoming holiday of the Valley. This is what the Valley sounds like. In a typical year firecrackers or set off to celebrate the festival of lights, government bands and firecrackers are rarely enforced. Even the focal with the government would send trucks around the capital Spring, Mr Try to clean the air. But Charles says these are band aid solutions. So there's Corbett in the air, and there's dust and PM 2.5 in the air, and therefore we don't know whether to stay indoors or whether to go outdoors. Fresh from the moms group faces that dilemma, too. But she also has some hope. More people are wearing masks because of the pandemic, and that might end up protecting them from the pollution do, she says, And for a few precious months this spring, Delhi ites gotta taste under lockdown off what they're skies could look like the people. We're talking about seeing mountains in the distance and great with ability all around. They got used to, but singing and smelling flowers and believing in and so this winter instead of resigning themselves.

Delhi New Delhi India vice president Delhi ites Nathan Beak Kansas City Boeing Maddie Charles Biking NPR Zachary Austria Corbett Dr Pratt Evil Goga Sherry Frost Andrea Hsu US Harvard
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:12 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Their dad before he let them pass. Their new ritual made the local news. Maybe because of those dance moves, but also because, well, here's this dad making the most of virtual school students. Will station never could have imagined he'd be doing this before the pandemic. His wife was mostly the one looking after the kids education. I'm usually gone. You know, a couple of times a month. I'm on some type of travel station is a vice president of Boeing. He travels up to 200,000 miles a year and as a result routinely, I wouldn't know my kids teachers names. You know, my wife would tell me obviously, and If I had time, Maybe I'll meet him. You know, once or twice a year this year, he hasn't taken any work trips since February. He's still working, but he's home a lot. Now he sees the teachers on a daily basis on a screen, of course, and he sees them connecting with his kids. I got to see my kids and See their world in a way that I've never experienced before. It's overwhelming, he says, thinking about how much he's missed, and how much this hard year has brought him. The pandemic is taking father's on journeys they may never have chosen otherwise. For Nathan Beak. Losing his job has meant gaining time with his nine year old Maddie. I am teacher that I get up every morning and I wake her up, Get her breakfast, Freddy. We get her online. And then he goes online himself to job search, which at 45, he says, can feel humiliating. Big had a great sales job with a big new convention hotel in downtown Kansas City. It was supposed to open in April. We had giant media events planned people flying in from all over to cut ribbons to do all this kind of thing. Instead, beak with furloughed. Meanwhile, his wife was going bonkers at her job. She's in health care and was working 16 hour days dealing with issues around covert payments in reimbursements. So on the home front. It was a complete role reversal from the laundry tow the food. I'm a much better cook than I was six months ago and turns out he's a pretty good teacher, too. This year. Maddie's reading and math scores have gone up way up a real bright spot in a pretty disastrous year when you said at home all day and aren't bringing in a bunch of money for the family, And what is your worth? And you know you question yourself. I was like this one. I could say, Hey, maybe this is working now in the pandemic, more women than men have left the workforce. Take Zachary Austria's family. His project management job was deemed essential. So his wife quit her job in marketing to care for the kids. Now he's still trying to come to terms with being the sole breadwinner for his family were not that family where I go to work and she stays home and cleans the house and I expect dinner when I returned. That's just That's not how we operate. He actually felt guilty for a while. He tried working at night until two or three in the morning so he could be with the kids during the day. His wife still freelance rights when she can they need the little bit of income. And he's actually had new opportunities come up at work things he might have gone for a normal times. Instead, he's playing it safe. Now is not the time to rock the boat. There are so many other stressors in our life right now. I don't want my career to be one. He feels he owes that to his family, especially to his wife. She made the decision to put her career on hold for a little bit and She didn't We didn't do that lightly. And I One day I hope to make it up to her. After the pandemic, he says he'll support her any way he can. Andrea Hsu NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. India's capital has some of the dirtiest air in the world. During the coronavirus.

Zachary Austria Maddie Nathan Beak Kansas City vice president NPR India Boeing Andrea Hsu
"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:39 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on KQED Radio

"San Francisco and Qet QE II F M 89.3 North Highland Sacramento. It's 4 36. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro in Washington and I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles with an update on a case that has ramifications for college admissions across the country. A federal appeals court has found that Harvard University's admission policy does not discriminate against Asian Americans. The lawsuit against the university had been filed six years ago by a group that opposes race conscious admissions policies designed to increase racial diversity on college campuses. Kirk Cara Pensa covers higher education for member station GBH in Boston, and he joins us now welcome. Elsa remind us Kirk who exactly were the plaintiffs in this case, And what did they claim that Harvard was doing wrong? Sure that the group students repair admissions are S F f A has argued Harvard systematically rates Asian Americans lower on certain personality traits like courage and leadership in last year at this is Judge waited on this and said no, Harvard does not discriminate. In her decision, The judge cited 42 years of Supreme Court precedent that allows admissions officials to consider race as one of many factors. I spoke with U. C. L. A law professor Rick Zander. He's a longtime critic of considering race in admissions, and he supports the plaintiffs. In this case, he says, the district judge never confronted statistics and analysis. Revealing what he sees as Harvard's intentional discrimination against Asian Americans. The few took roughly the median student who gets admitted by Herbert, if that's true, that's African American. I am about 92 95% chance of the mission. If they're Asian American, they have about 25% chance of admission. This is not just one of many factors right? This is a very heavy weight being put on race. Elsa, Of course. Harvard flatly denies that allegation. And in court, it presented its own statistical analysis. The college points out that the percentage of admitted Asian American students is now spike to its highest level ever. It's a 25%. It's up 7% points from a decade ago, and the population of Asian Americans in the U. S is just 6%. Okay, well, what did the appeals court today have to say about why the plaintiff's claims should fail? The court unanimously upheld the district court's decision, saying it didn't care and finding Harvard does not intentionally discriminate against Asian American applicants. By holding up the higher personality standards. The court says Harvard values all types of diversity, not just racial diversity, and his consideration of race in admissions is constitutional. And how we heard from Harvard or from the plaintiffs in response to all of this, yes, Harvard says the court's decision quote once again finds that Harvard's admissions policies are consistent with Supreme Court president and now is not the time to turn back the clock on diversity and opportunity. Conservative political strategist Edward Bloom, who's the president of students repaired missions, he says while his group is disappointed with the decision there hope is not lost. And the lawsuit is now on track to go to the Supreme Court. Yeah, I want to ask you about that. I mean, how likely do you think it is that this case really will be considered by the Supreme Court and tell us what would be at stake there? I think it seems increasingly likely. I spoke with Attorney Ted shot he directs the Center for Civil Rights at University of North Carolina Shut says the appeals court has recognized this lawsuit for what it really is. It's a frontal attack on race conscious admissions. You know, I think it's pretty much an attack through the front door. On the ways consciousness. I think what they're doing is Going in for a the kill shot and else. In fact, the group's president Edward Bloom says their goal is to get this in front of one of the most conservative leaning courts in our lifetime and to end the consideration of race it emissions at Harvard. And all other colleges. Kirk Cara Pezzo with member station GBH. Thank you, Kirk. Thank you. For families with kids. Pandemic life is still a hot mess. Many moms are just drowning and dance lives have also been up ended, NPR's Andrea Hsu talked with a few dads were finding themselves in unfamiliar territory. Will station knew his kids were bummed about remote school this fall, so he decided to shake things up. He made his Children go outside with their backpacks and come back in through their own front door. But that's not all. Each kid had to complete some fancy footwork with their dad before he let them pass. Their new ritual made the local news. Maybe because of those dance moves, but also because, well, here's this dad making the most of virtual.

Harvard Supreme Court Harvard University Elsa Chang Kirk Cara Pensa NPR Rick Zander Edward Bloom Kirk president Ari Shapiro Kirk Cara Pezzo San Francisco Sacramento Andrea Hsu Los Angeles Washington Boston
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:14 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Your first name? But that's not all. Each kid had to complete some fancy footwork with their dad before he let them pass. Their new ritual made the local news. Maybe because of those dance moves, but also because, well, here's this dad making the most of virtual school students will station never could have imagined he'd be doing this before the pandemic. His wife was mostly the one looking after The kid's education. I'm usually gone. You know, a couple of times a month. I'm on some type of travel station is a vice president of Boeing. He travels up to 200,000 miles a year and as a result routinely, I wouldn't know my kids teachers names. You know, my wife would tell me obviously, and If I had time, Maybe I'll meet him. You know, once or twice a year this year, he hasn't taken any work trip since February. He's still working, but he's home a lot. Now he sees the teachers on a daily basis on a screen, of course, and he sees them connecting with his kids. I got to see my kids and See their world in a way that I've never experienced before. It's overwhelming, he says, thinking about how much he's missed, and how much this hard year has brought him. The pandemic is taking father's on journeys they may never have chosen otherwise. For Nathan Beak. Losing his job has meant gaining time with his nine year old Maddie. I am teacher Dad. I get up every morning and I wake her up, Get her breakfast, Freddy. We get her online. And then he goes online himself to job search, which at 45, he says, can feel humiliating. Big had a great sales job with a big new convention hotel in downtown Kansas City. It was supposed to open in April. We had giant media events planned people flying in from all over to cut ribbons to do all this kind of thing. Instead, beak was furloughed. Meanwhile, his wife is going bonkers at her job. She's in health care and was working 16 hour days dealing with issues around covert payments and reimbursements. So on the home front, it was a complete role reversal from the laundry tow the food. I'm a much better cook than I was six months ago and turns out he's a pretty good teacher. To this year. Maddie's reading and math scores have gone up way up a real bright spot in a pretty disastrous year when you said at home all day and aren't bringing in a bunch of money for the Family. And what is your worth? And you know you question yourself. I was like this one. I could say, Hey, maybe this is working now in the pandemic, more women than men have left the workforce. Take Zachary Austria's family. His project management job was deemed essential. So his wife quit her job in marketing to care for the kids. Now he's still trying to come to terms with being the sole breadwinner for his family were not that family where I go to work and she stays home and cleans the house and I expect dinner when I returned. That's just That's not how we operate. He actually felt guilty for a while. He tried working at night until two or three in the morning so he could be with the kids during the day. His wife still freelance rights when she can they need the little bit of income. And he's actually had new opportunities come up at work, thinks he might have gone for a normal times. Instead, he's playing it safe. Now is not the time to rock the boat. There are so many other stressors in our life right now. I don't want my career to be one. He feels he owes that to his family, especially to his wife. She Made the decision to put her career on hold for a little bit, and she didn't We didn't do that lightly. And I One day I hope to make it up to her. After the pandemic, he says he'll support her any way he can. Andrea Hsu NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. India's capital has some of the.

Nathan Beak Zachary Austria Maddie Kansas City vice president NPR India Boeing Andrea Hsu
"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:50 min | 3 months ago

"andrea hsu" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Race conscious admissions policies designed to increase racial diversity on college campuses. Kirk Cara Peasant covers higher education for member station GBH in Boston, and he joins us now welcome. They also remind us Kirk who exactly were the plaintiffs in this case, and what did they claim that Harvard was doing wrong? Sure that the group students repair admissions or S F F. A has argued Harvard systematically rates Asian Americans lower on certain personality traits like courage and leadership. In last year, a district judge waited on this and said no, Harvard does not discriminate. In her decision. The judge cited 42 years of Supreme Court precedent that allows admissions officials to consider race as one of many factors that we spoke with U. C. L. A law professor Rick Zander. He's a longtime critic of considering race in admissions, and he supports the plaintiffs. In this case, he says, the district judge never confronted statistics and analysis. Revealing what he sees as Harvard's intentional discrimination against Asian Americans. If you took roughly the median student who gets submitted by harbor if that's jeunesse, African American They have about a 92 95% chance of the mission. If they're Asian American, they have about 25% chance of admission. This is not just one of many factors right? This is a very heavy weight being put on race. Elsa, Of course. Harvard flatly denies that allegation. And in court, it presented its own statistical analysis. The college points out that the percentage of admitted Asian American students has now spike to its highest level ever. It's at 25%. It's up 7% points from a decade ago, and the population of Asian Americans in the U. S is just 6%. Okay, well, what did the appeals court today have to say about why the plaintiff's claims should fail. The court unanimously upheld the District court's decision, saying it didn't care and finding Harvard does not intentionally discriminate against Asian American applicants. Hold them to higher personality standards. The court says. Harvard values all types of diversity, not just racial diversity, and its consideration of race in admissions is constitutional and how we heard from Harvard or from the plaintiffs. In response to all of this, yes, Harvard says the court's decision quote once again finds that Harvard's admissions policies are consistent with Supreme Court president And now is not the time to turn back the clock on diversity and opportunity. Conservative political strategist Edward Bloom, who's the president of students repaired missions, he says while his group is disappointed with the decision there hope is not lost. And the lawsuit is now on track to go to the Supreme Court. Yeah, I want to ask you about that. I mean, how likely do you think it is that this case really will be considered by the Supreme Court and tell us what would be at stake there? I think it seems increasingly likely. I spoke with Attorney Ted shot he directs the Center for Civil Rights at University of North Carolina Shut says the appeals court has recognized this lawsuit for what it really is. It's a frontal attack on race conscious admissions. You know, I think it's pretty much an attack through the front door. On ways consciousness. I think what they're doing is Going in boy, the kill shot and else. In fact, the group's president Edward Bloom says their goal is to get this in front of one of the most conservative leaning court in our lifetime and to end the consideration of race and emissions at Harvard. And that all other colleges Kirk Cara Pezzo with member station GBH. Thank you, Kirk. Thank you. For families with kids. Pandemic life is still a hot mess. Many moms are just drowning and Dad's lives have also been up ended. NPR's Andrea Hsu talked with a few dads who are finding themselves in unfamiliar territory. Will station knew his kids were bummed about remote school this fall, so he decided to shake things up. He made his Children go outside with their backpacks and come back in through their own front door. What's.

Harvard Supreme Court District court Kirk Cara Peasant Rick Zander Kirk Edward Bloom president Kirk Cara Pezzo Boston Andrea Hsu Elsa NPR professor Ted shot Attorney Center for Civil Rights University of North Carolina