35 Burst results for "Andes"

The Domestication of the Potato

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:12 min | 2 weeks ago

The Domestication of the Potato

"How many foods that we eat today. All around the world simply didn't exist in the old world of africa asia and europe corn chocolate vanilla peppers green beans pumpkins. Tomatoes and squash are all foods that were completely unknown to the peoples of the old world. Perhaps the most important neural food. However was the humble potato. The potato was originally native to south. America it was first domesticated impro- anywheres from five thousand ten thousand years ago. It's really hard to tell because potatoes aren't very well preserved in the archaeological record. But we know that they were being grown. Probably when studies were first being built in mesopotamia specifically they were probably first domesticated around the area of lake titicaca high in the andes mountains. The first confirmed evidence in the archaeological record comes from the year. Thousand five hundred. You're the coastal city of n con just north of lima peru. The potato was the primary food stuff for the incan empire. Potatoes cooked by ancient peruvians. We're not too dissimilar to how they're cook today. They were baked or boiled and might have been mashed. Potato is pretty much have to be cooked in order for the starches in them to be digestible by humans. Some potato varieties had toxic compounds that required soaking and clay and water to leach out the toxic substances one popular way of processing potatoes in the andes was to make this involved repeatedly leaving them outside to freeze and then thawing them. The next day this freeze drying would go on for three to five nights then they would be laid out and stomped on to remove any remaining water. The result would be white. Rock looking thing not too dissimilar from appealed potato but because it was dehydrated it could last for years. Potatoes had been domesticated all the way down the andes mountains to southern patagonia. In what is today chile prior to the arrival of europeans. The first spanish explorers to the region led by pizarro in fifteen thirty to recognize the value of the potato but when they brought them back to europe it was mostly for consumption by the south american people they brought back with them supposedly and i know this because i actually paid a visit. The first place in europe to grow potatoes was the garden at the monastery in guadalupe spain. It was a place that queen isabella frequently visited.

Andes Mountains Lake Titicaca Squash Mesopotamia Europe Asia Africa Lima Peru America Southern Patagonia Pizarro Chile Guadalupe Spain Queen Isabella
The Cult of Synanon

Ghost Town

02:12 min | Last month

The Cult of Synanon

"We're going to be talking about something that even if you don't recognize the name you'll recognize the stories. Certainly the tactics. Some of the habits themes at the very least it will touch on rehabilitation and wellness culture. That i feel like we're immersed in every day you'll recognize the story because we hear it over and over through lots of fringe. Religions gone mainstream and wellness initiatives turned oppressive. We're talking about the original west coast. Insane fucking kalt posing as sober wellness cinnamon and i hope i'm saying that right. Some people say sign on some people say and on. I'm gonna go with sin and on addiction has always been a really complicated diagnosis and nobody surprise has been around since humans have been making mind altering substances the bible references. Noah's drinking habits and intoxication abuse of opium in syria and the century. Bc coca leaves in the andes to chinese cannabis to on and on and on and it was always this mysterious thing to be an addict even up until the nineteen fifties. The general idea of most addiction was in medical communities that it could not be cured if it was treated at all it was by doctors in hospitals and more often than not those suffering from addiction. Eventually were sent to jail until cinnamon though it was not the first rehab or structure around wellness. Synonym did a ton to convince the american public that addicts could be saved. It really started the idea of sponsorship that recovery could happen and that those in recovery could help other people in recovery and while there were good things about sin and on it was founded on the shoulders of charles dietrich and became a cult. Unlike anything else. I had ever seen so it all started with this guy charles dietrich a sales exempt from ohio who moved to so cal after his first divorce after spending almost twenty years as a pneumatic alcoholic he remarried in nineteen fifty six and again at the bequest of his probably very frustrated wife gave a try. Second marriage didn't last but the program did and he quickly became a huge promoter of the alcoholics anonymous lifestyle. The one thing dietrich didn't like was that a didn't accept other substance

Charles Dietrich West Coast Noah Syria CAL Ohio Dietrich
What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | Last month

What Separates Peru From the Rest of South America?

"With rick steves with an insider look at how peru stands out from the rest of south america. It's where author and journalist. Marie arana grew up before her bicultural family moved to the us. She writes about her identity in her book. American teacup read. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much. Rik good to be here. I'm just really excited for you to be my tour guide because is country. I know very little about before we get into this discussion about the people of peru. Just give us a quick one paragraph description of your homeland you know for a country that's the size of roughly the size of california not much bigger. It's an astonishing place because it has just every kind of land form you can imagine. Rick it has the coast it has the desert it has the jungle it has the mountain has the planes. It has all of that and if you fly over peru this is amazing to me you go from one land form to another land form just in the course of a few seconds. It's it's really astonishing place geographically when you compare peru to the other south american countries. How would the people of peru see themselves Compared to the countries that surround them. Well you know we are an andean nation and the andean nations are of course colombia and ecuador and bolivia these are the the spine of the andes of course runs through the whole continent. But we are. We call ourselves and ian people because we are a mix honesty so mix of indigenous and white and black in a very different proportion. Shall we say to. The people of venezuela which are are less india less indigenous more more black and the colombians as well which has a much larger population of blacks than we do improve we do have afro peruvian along the coast who have been there for hundreds and hundreds of years but we are distinguished. I think by our indian ness. And i think that you know the people of argentina. The people of that people are why they come. They come up to peru and they're they're struck by the truly indian culture that we have okay so when you say

Peru Marie Arana Rick Steves RIK South America Rick California Bolivia Ecuador Colombia United States IAN Venezuela India Argentina
"andes" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

Breakfast Leadership

05:32 min | Last month

"andes" Discussed on Breakfast Leadership

"Virtually like this making sure we knew how to check on each other and have consistent one on ones then when we moved home really. Nothing changed other that we weren't going to the same physical office space together. So that's where. I saw a lot of people get tripped up. So really the the the flip of that is if you haven't committed as a leader to have weekly one on ones with your direct reports with your people closest to you you need to and that doesn't mean you're coming into a connection point where you're going through a bunch of tasks or you're talking about. Where are we at our strategic priorities are. What are we doing here. This is actually just fifteen minutes to connect with each of your people. And just say how're you doing. And i will say this coupled with that element of people just getting the attention that they so desperately seek to have even though you may have the most senior leaders you may be the ceo company and now your direct reports are the most senior leaders. You might think to yourself well. They don't need that kind of connection they do or all human beings and we're all dealing with very different ways and quite frankly we're all dealing with the stressors of work in very different ways so having that connection point where we see each other as human beings is incredibly important and for the leaders that i have seen invest that kind of time consistently they see way more benefits coming from their team work balance and people being engaged in the organization and people being happy and people staying with the organization. And if you flip it and say to yourself. Maybe if. I'm not doing that. I'm looking at myself first and foremost to see. Why are people leaving the team. And i know to your point. You talk about. Burn out all the time. I believe that if we stay connected to our people we don't have to find out that they're actually burnt out. We start to hear where they're starting to have the fire borough and we're starting to see that and if we connect with them consistently we can have a way to say. Hey you know. Maybe it's just empathy. I get it. i've been there too. I understand where you're coming from here. Maybe we can do together. Or what ideas do you have and really just sort of round at the last part of it which is what do we do now. That people are some organizations. Are saying i get back into the office. I will tell you that the organization. I came from the new organization. I just started with about a month ago. We are really thinking about being forward thinking which is were in a different world. Potentially we have been for some time but the pandemic certainly put it front and center for us. We need to be flexible for some more foremost. We need to meet people where they're at people. Were performing really well. We're having the support that they needed from a home office environment and their thriving you know. Can we meet those teammates. Those employees where. They're at a do that really well. So we're we're really launching out a hybrid model helping our senior leaders think through. Maybe you do have roles that potentially have a better engagement or better connection to things if they're in the office but where can we actually meet our teammates as well who want to have more of a work from home environment. And i'll tell you what by us just doing that. The conversations i hear michael aren't oh gosh. I can't believe we're going back to the office. I really liked working from home..

michael
How I Made It: Fluxus Foto

Latino USA

01:52 min | 3 months ago

How I Made It: Fluxus Foto

"Today for a how i made it. Series fluke sues photo a group of ecuador photo journalists telling their own stories in october two thousand nineteen ecuador went through a violent large scale. Uprising demonstrations paralyzed the country for twelve days straight. After former president lenin moreno cut decades old fuel. Subsidies and implemented tax labor reforms indigenous communities were hit especially hard by the changes. Tens of thousands marched from the andes mountains into ecuador's capital city hito to protest the motive demos at keep barrett defended lose their ages. Calicut meant that. The of competitors indiana's alachua protesters declared. They were defending their rights. As indigenous people from ecuador for decades indigenous communities have demanded the government support to protect their land from exploitation by domestic oil companies and to be included in national political dialogues during the twenty nineteen demonstrations ghetto streets were covered in debris and government buildings burned. Police threw molotov cocktails and tear gas at protesters who lobbed them right back amid the turmoil. One photograph from the ground became instantly iconic in it. A woman from the andes dressed in a traditional garment and face mask stands in the middle of a street with her back towards a cloud of smoke. People stand behind her wearing face masks to prevent breathing in the gases.

Ecuador Lenin Moreno Andes Mountains Alachua Barrett Indiana
What is a "Cholo"

Latino USA

02:48 min | 3 months ago

What is a "Cholo"

"You may remember this early. Two thousands hit song. Lean like a chill low by down aka or watch movies about trouble culture like blood and blood out three bottles dot goes full of garnell or american me to state is so lame paid for the game but you know where the we're solo really comes from and did you know that a solo and south america is not the same chiloe from the united states. I only recently learned that. There were charles in south america during a conversation with my partner who is peruvian american so i feel like proving really proud right and it's like even if you're a channel like at least for me and my failure. What do you mean like a lake. My dad was always like listening to wine. No or like speaking wa. Which i literally didn't but like gangster. No he wasn't a kinks turkey like Like barry indigenous were that poncho and like wanting a toll and indigenous people in peru johnson indigenous person for you yet. This was the first time i ever heard the word used to describe someone in a way that didn't mean hood or gangster immediately wanted to know if the from southern california and if the from south america had the same meaning and if so how did they come to mean such vastly different things. Where did the word originate. Who was first of california or the role of the andes in my search for answers a researcher. Dr couching rodriguez a professor in colonial literature. At the city university of new york its origins are uncertain. Some scholars of belief that it comes from the now our show logged. Which was the word for dog. Now it is a language of the. Sx bob one of the earliest mentioned of the word appears in common darius realities royal commentaries by the peruvian mystique so Inc other see lasso. La vega dot work day back to sixteen owned nine. He indicates their dad d. Word means dog and it was used in a figurative eurodif way by the spaniards to refer to this individuals of makes origins african and indian. But now he's apply differently is applied to almost any one that could be off mix

South America Peru Johnson Dr Couching Rodriguez Poncho Charles United States Southern California City University Of New York Peruvian Mystique So Inc California
"andes" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"andes" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"K don look hard after window in D C and you can see the snow covered peaks of the Andes. Stand on a corner in l A and feel the hot wind of this the Hera brush across your face. World is that small way Are that connected? Please visit Earth shared out organ learn how the world's leading environmental groups are working together, making it so simple for you to make a difference because we are many and we are one Please visit about it. I'm sure it up or toe learn more first share one environment. One simple way to care for it all. A public service message from birth share and the ad council. Storm beaches and freed countries. Protected the weak on defeated the strong shown courage. And compassion. They've raised our flag. And don't go home. In cold weather. Next they've been called Devil Gods. Above all their gold Marines. I've never thought my daughter and I would ever think the same thing is cool and home. My boys are like a wrecking ball. But when they volunteer their actually shaping things up, they planted trees..

Andes Earth first One simple way D C one ad Hera
Investigations Continue as Questions About the Capitol Riot Remain Unanswered

All In with Chris Hayes

03:58 min | 7 months ago

Investigations Continue as Questions About the Capitol Riot Remain Unanswered

"There are still a lot of questions about other individuals involved in the attack on the as well as the organization and planning behind it fbi's investigating whether foreign governments groups are individuals may have funded extremists who helped plan and execute the january six attack fbi sources telling nbc news that the bureau is examining payments of five hundred thousand dollars in bitcoin apparently by french national two key figures and groups in the alt-right before the riot kind of weird also know the fbi collected thousands of phone and electronic records connected to people at the scene of the rioting including many records from the members of congress and staff members. Who were there. That day. Senator sheldon whitehouse and several fellow. Democrats have called for senate ethics committee. Look into the behavior of the republican colleagues. Tech josh hawley. In relation to the events of january six and today democratic congressman. Eric swallow of california actually filed a lawsuit. And it's the second lawsuit on this on these actions. This lawsuit accuses former president. Donald trump his son. Donald trump junior republic rudy giuliani republican congressman mo brooks of alabama of violating federal civil rights law and local incitement laws with their speeches at that rally near the white house in the morning of january six lawsuit. Alleges the capital attack was quote a direct and foreseeable consequence the defendants false incendiary allegations of fraud and theft and indirect presponse. The defendants calls for violence. Gerstein is a senior legal affairs reporter at politico where he has been covering the arrest of trump appointing federico klein and he joins me now. Josh i saw this story and obviously this guy was like particularly high up the state department but it i read the story. I thought he had left. He was working there right like until the end of the trump term. That's right chris. I was told. He tendered his resignation on january nineteenth. So that's two weeks after the storming of the capital and it became effective a couple of days later. So i guess he was wandering around at foggy bottom knowing full well that he had taken part as the video appears to depict in this assault on the nation's capital on the congress. Tell us a little more about this individual. So he's forty two years old He served in the marine corps in iraq. According to his mother. I haven't been able to determine much in terms of a work history. He had a couple jobs on capitol hill about fifteen twenty years ago as an intern briefly working for the house. Small business committee but he seems to have sort of potted around to different Different kinds of posts before fetching up at the trump campaign in twenty sixteen. There are pictures on his facebook page showing him a working at trump tower. I believe on election night in two thousand sixteen with a couple of other young men there and then he managed to turn that into a political appointee job at the state department in this special assistant a position. Exactly what he did. There is also a little murky. I have to say. I spoke to a number of people last night. Who worked in this department at the state department office at the state department and a lot of them didn't know him or said they'd only met him briefly he seems to have ended up an office that handled brazilian and what they call the southern cone affairs. I think those are the andes countries and somebody told me he was eventually transferred a believe it or not chris to the freedom of information act office which is not usually the career trajectory. Most people in government are looking for this quote from his mother. Cecelia klein saying that fred's politics burn a little hot. She said i've never known him to violate the law. I believe is. He said he was on the mall that day. I don't have any neural. Ever ask him unless he tells me where where he was after he was on the mall.

FBI Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Senate Ethics Committee Josh Hawley Eric Swallow Donald Trump Mo Brooks Federico Klein Nbc News Congress Rudy Giuliani Gerstein Small Business Committee Politico Alabama White House Josh California Chris
"andes" Discussed on Ghost Town

Ghost Town

05:36 min | 8 months ago

"andes" Discussed on Ghost Town

"Jason horton. I'm rebecca leave and this is ghost town. This is the story of the crash of the uruguayan air force flight. Five seven one and the seventy two day nightmare of the surviving passengers that included avalanches blindness and cannibalism. I initially was researching something that i want to do for this episode. And i just want to say this has got to be the most graphic and horrifying episode. I've ever researched. So i just want to put a disclaimer out there. The story's pretty well known but it was really tough to get through. So if you're feeling sensitive right now or you don't and i probably am one of those people i'm saying this to myself. Yeah just either brace yourself or maybe skip this one or wait for another time where you're more prepared. Yeah for it. And when i think about the ones that we've done that are really graphic. They are hard and they include a lot of victims. But this is this is like there's no evil person. The evil person is the mountains. It's all victims stories. It's all survived circumstantial. Yeah i mean it's just like the hits keep coming so i just want to say that. Put that out there. It's a really compelling story against a story of human triumph. All of that on october thirteenth nineteen seventy-two members of the amateur old christians club rugby union team from montevideo. Uruguay were scheduled to plan match against the english rugby team. Old boys club in santiago chile. The english team club. President chartered an air force plane to fly the team over the andes. To santiago. the plane carry forty passengers and five crew members. While this type of aircraft was considered by some to be underpowered. it was nicknamed the lead sled. What it lacked in power made up for an operation experience. The pilot colonel. Julio cesar ferrara's i want to say too. I'm sorry if i get names wrong. Wanted to my best. But i think. I'm going to mess it up but i'm trying to be as respectful and as lil pronunciations as i can for us was inexperienced air force veterans. Who had a total of five thousand one hundred seventeen flying hours to put this into context. According to the new york times the average just general aviation pilot logs fewer than one hundred hours a year. Some people consider a pilot a novice until they reach five hundred hours. Also fraud has had flown across the andes twenty nine times before he was a pro. He knew what he was doing. He was accompanied by co-pilot. Lieutenant colonel dante hector guerra. They were ten extra seats in the plane..

Jason horton five thousand five hundred hours forty passengers october thirteenth ten extra seats Julio cesar ferrara five crew members santiago new york Five twenty nine times uruguayan montevideo santiago chile one hundred seventeen flying h seventy two day dante hector guerra one hundred hours a year one
Travel to Bogota, Colombia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:50 min | 1 year ago

Travel to Bogota, Colombia

"I would like to welcome to show a Lauren Pesky from wonder Lulu Dot com, which has way more use in. Lulu than you would expect, check the show notes for how to spell that. Lauren welcome to the show. Hi. Chris thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be chatting with you today and were chatting about Bogota Colombia and Lauren. What is your connection to Bogut all? The Age old question I truthfully never had Columbia on my list was really on my radar but love brought me here. My boyfriend moved here five years ago, and so for the past five years I have been visiting on and off and finally kind of made the move down here this year. And you picked a good year to move internationally. I know talk about crazy timing. I finally five years in Ra do this I'm going to get the visa all of that, and then I got here in February and. March the whole country shutdown. Excellent. So we're GonNa talk about the things that you're going to be able to do win it opens backup starting to do now but why should someone go to Columbia specifically Bogota? While let's start with Columbia as a whole is one of my favorite countries I've ever been to and the reason for that many many reasons but I just love how diverse the country as from region to region. So in one country you have the Amazon rainforest, you have the Andes mountains you have desert you have the Pacific Ocean you have the Caribbean it's really just in terms of bio-diversity. It's pretty incredible how many landscapes you can see in One place and beyond that region to region the cultures are so different that people in the language event. I have a friend in get Mungo, which is another major city here who says when she talks to her family on the coast in Bonn Akhir Carthagena sometimes, she doesn't even know they're using a phrase that she's never heard before i. know that's in a lot of places that it's just it makes it a really really interesting place to visit. And what kind of tenor are going to recommend for us? So today, I'm going to be specifically talking about Bogota. I feel like Bogota is the capital city. I know a lot of people fly through here but often I feel like it's an overlooked major major city most people when they think of Columbia, Colombia's really gaining popularity in recent years. The first thing they think of Karma Hannah are medigene and so now that I live year and I've been visiting for so long feel like so many things are overlooked here. So I really kind of want to dive into that and talk about kind of what makes this place special. And we should say up front that Lauren doesn't claim to be native Spanish speaker. Hearsay medigene and you think it should be many Yien or something else. She's still knows better than I knew it. So what do in Boca? I if you don't mind just talking a little bit of language and so far from ever Oh you must be fluent you're visiting so much. But the reality is I'm not in so I kind of have a perspective on what it's like to be here in traveling around when I know very little. Of course, I've gotten better over time but still learning you can I assume you know the essentials like survey support for? That's the first phrase you learn the clerk. Learned one beer please. Exactly exactly. Go back to your your question about, but was how I always to me. It's an eclectic mix of traditional and modern Colombian culture, and I just love how you can kind of go from playing Tejo and eating a maybe another EPA bay case on the street to dancing salsa, and then the next day you're at a fine dining Peruvian fusion restaurant in high in cocktails at a jazz bar and it's Kinda got it. All excellent as long as you're going to promise to explain to me what you were just talking about with. The two things that you're eating and going to somewhere in the course of the conversation. I will. Definitely. To that. So don't don't even worry. What are we going to see in Bogota? Where are we GONNA START? Okay. So I kind of want to break this down is a massive city. It's eight million people. It's a sprawling city. There's so much to do so much to see. So I, kind of want to break it down by by neighborhood because it's so big I feel like it's less of A. Hit these top ten things? Would you see a lot of those lists just great which is fine. But a lot of those lists stay in only one neighborhood. Probably. Heard of it I'm pretty sure you've talked about it before in Candelaria in. So I kind of want to talk about each little neighborhood and kind of what each place bring. So the first place like I was saying is the most popular I would say it's the most heuristic part of the city which you know sometimes I think you hear its touristic which equals bad to some to some but to me candelaria, it's a beautiful part of the city. It's the Old City it's the cobblestone streets and the colonial Spanish architecture, and so I'm going to start there with kind of like day one, right so the reason I start. There is because there is this place in that area of the city that's in the more southern part of the city, not all the way south almost like mid south is monster at day, which is this big beautiful mountain that overlooks the entire city. It's a really great like first thing to do because you really get the lay of the land and see just how massive the city is. You can get up there three ways you can hike up, you can take the there's like a dealer kind of train that goes up and then there's the cable car and the cable car ride up if you're not afraid of heights. Is Beautiful. When you get to the top I mean like I said, you have this beautiful sprawling view of the city and just kind of a little tip even though I do recommend going early on and during the day the careful because on the weekends it is mental. I've seen lines that are probably three maybe more hours. Okay Yes I really recommend if you can go during the week. That's great and then if you kinda wanted using a little different if you go right before the sun is setting, it's like a beautiful beautiful view bogus some pretty gorgeous city sunset. So that's kind of something to keep in ninety.

Bogota Lauren Pesky Columbia Colombia Candelaria Bogut Chris Andes Pacific Ocean Boca Bonn Akhir Carthagena Amazon Mungo Tejo EPA A. Hit
How To Teach Geography

Layers of Learning Podcast

05:26 min | 1 year ago

How To Teach Geography

"Michelle how do you approach geography first of all I teach as a separate subject in the United States at least geography is taught as part of social studies. So it's lumped together with history mostly social studies, history geography and government, and a little bit of economics. That's what social studies is, and it's taught is one subject but I like to separate those things out because I think that geography deserves a lot more time than it is given. Okay. So Michelle explained this. If you're studying. Ancient Egypt for example. How is that different in your mind than studying? Egypt. In geography what's the differentiation? Well, the difference is that history is the study of everything that's come before it's the hugh story of humanity but geography is the story of what is happening. Now, at this moment, what is going on in the world today it is the study of the world that we live in the people we live around the different countries and cultures that we interact with, and is also the study of ourselves today because when you study someone else, it helps you to see yourself more clearly. And you can make comparisons yes between the two. So yeah. Geography is really the now of history and a lot of ways in that it includes you know the physical geography land forms and landscapes and by oems and all that stuff. But I actually think we spend more time focusing on the people of the world and countries and cultures than we do the physical stuff but both are important. Well, often the physical helps shape. The borders, the boundaries exactly, and so they are really interrelated but. It is pretty fascinating when you start to study the people's that currently live in the world around you and you really begin to understand the cultures and the things that make people who they are. So? I think there are four. Big Aspects of geography and lots of I mean. Different people defined geography different ways and the different focuses. But there are four that that I like to focus on in my home school and the first is physical geography. The shapes of coastlines, the the continents, the ocean landforms, Selanne forms, the mountains, the desserts, all that kind of stuff. And climate, and the second thing is a map making Howard maps made and how do you make map and then how do you navigate with the map? Those are all. Part of geography, and then the third one is political geography, which means countries and capitals, roads, populations that kind of stuff, and then the final one is culture. So what is the religion of people? What is what are their holidays like what language do they speak? What kind of clothing do they wear? You know? What is what are their attitudes about family or? Different things like that. That's that's culture. So all those are the four things that really to mirror different of geography that I like to make sure we hit on. When I'm doing our home schooling with the kids. So by the time, your kids graduate. Ideally, what would they know in an overall way? I want them to have a map of the world in their head first of all, and that doesn't mean that they have to know exactly where every single country and capitalists, but they should be very familiar with the whole world. If they hear Judy mentioned in a news article, they shouldn't be wondering where in the heck is that I've never heard of it they should know, oh, that's an Africa, and hopefully they know, oh, that's over on the east coast of Africa. It's interesting as I've traveled a lot. I'll hear people talk about how. Many other people in the world. Know about the United States of America. But Americans. Know very little about most of the other countries in the world it's because our schools do not teach geography and and it's really kind of sad but it's very true but the other countries in the world have so much to offer. Then that's the second thing that I really want my kids to know the map in their head I think is important for context for understanding the world we live in but to understand the people who were in the world is even more important to have this concept of. This person who is from Africa is going to have a completely different world view than I do but that's not bad. It's just different and if I understand that their world worldview is different, I can probably have a better conversation with that person. We can understand each other a lot more clearly than if I'm assuming that they're just like me because people are the same everywhere in the world, but we're also different everywhere in the world. Yeah. Beyond just the country borders and you know that map in their head concept I also want my kids to know other specific parts of the map I want them to know the major desert, the major mountain ranges. Just it feels like part of being educated, right? Wing those here Andes Mountains and not be wondering wait wait Andes Mountains. Is that in Maine. Not Be thinking that you should know it's in south. America. You know I want my kids to be able to picture the world to be familiar with the places of the world, and then also to appreciate the places and people in this world and so that's kind of my goal you know before they graduate they don't have to know every single fact

Andes Mountains Michelle United States Africa America Egypt Maine Howard Judy
The history of potatoes

Gastropod

05:19 min | 1 year ago

The history of potatoes

"Like corn and tomatoes, the potato was born in the Americas before it conquered the world, they come from the spine of mountains that run all the way down from from Chile all the way up through the Andes and really into the Rocky Mountains Rebecca Earl is a historian at the University of Warwick where she focuses on the history of food and on the history of Spanish America and potatoes are bang in the middle of her ven diagram potatoes are from the. Andes that much is clear. The earliest wild potato ancestor that's been identified is from the shores of Lake. TITICACA on the Peruvian side but there are a lot of potato varieties claimed by a lot of folks in the region. In fact, there have been some recent disputes between Chile and Peru over attempts by Peru to patent whole variety number of potatoes as being Peruvian and of it and part of our national patrimony. So where they originate doesn't sit so neatly. Onto national frontiers, wild potatoes bread, and down the America's they've even been found in Utah but it wasn't until about eight thousand years ago. The people in the Andes started to domesticate these kind of unpromising marble sized super bitter tubers. Potatoes came to form a really important part of life in the Andes because they can grow an incredibly inhospitable conditions I've traveled in the Andes. In Peru and not only did I get intense altitude sickness but people farming there look like. They're hanging off the side of the mountains the Andes. Are Super Tall and super steep. It's just rough terrain for growing things in the whole of Peru only something like three percent of the land is classified suitable for growing crops compared to twenty one percent of the US but for the potato, no problem at flourishes in those conditions. So yeah, the potato was a big deal in the region, but it was still the food of the people it was essential not special. Unlike the other big American staple corn planting of the maize crop was something that the Inca himself oversaw of the ruler himself planted symbolic wro of as as part of a big ceremony and there was a team priests who would prey over the course of the year to ensure good maize harvest and it was a whole lot of ritual associated with with maize the empire. was not very interested in potatoes. They saw potatoes kind of lowly everyday food that didn't have great spiritual resonance Mrs Going to be a theme with the potato that said on that lowly local level. The potato did have spiritual resonance. It was a day. T called the potato mother who looked over the potato harvest and ensured that it grew well. So it was very important not. Just in terms of Diet. But in terms of kind of ritual spiritual life on village, this was something the Spanish conquistadors picked up on right away when they showed up in the fifteen hundreds. So they said Oh these the people here eat a kind of route, which is the bread of the Indians as they put it they were always comparing it back and forth to. European. Bread they said it is their bread which meant it was the staple. It was the backbone of the Diet that said the Spaniards knew it didn't taste like bread. This is how a Spaniard described the potato. It's the very first written description that survives potatoes are something like Spanish truffles aside from being a bit bigger and not as tasty. They said potatoes, they are a thing. Like chestnut or a bit like a truffle oil parsnips they grow underground there were route and they eat them the way that we parsnips of the way that we eat chestnuts. So they quickly drew connections between. A variety of different things? Some root vegetables like Parsnips, turnips, and somethings like chestnuts that we might not think a potato is exactly like the texture is not on similar. If you bake a chestnut, you end up with something a bit mealy but like a potato Europeans brought this new truffle chestnut food back to Europe with them although we don't know exactly when like many crops that have spread around the world people didn't always record when they first saw it. It seems like the potato landed on the shores of Europe somewhere in. The second half of the fifteen hundreds I to the Canary Islands and then to mainland Spain and from there they spread across Europe and around the world. But in terms of how potatoes caught on, there's an old story that has stuck around for a long time. It's almost become conventional wisdom and it's that the peasants in Europe were pretty reluctant to give potatoes a try the old story is that peasants are inherently conservative and will not do anything new. They will not try unfamiliar cultivation techniques they won't eat new food they're they're basically backward-looking and highly superstitious and regard the novel with skepticism. So there's an old story that says peasants looked at potatoes and they said this food is not in the Bible we will not eat it and they said our grandparents didn't grow this food and we will not grow it added to that. There was the unfortunate fact that the potato is part of. The. Same Botanical family of the deadly nightshade. So that's kind of suspect and the potato doesn't grow from seed like a normal crop instead you so little bits of the potato the ground I mean, why would you trust plant like that? Europeans didn't understand this. They thought it was the food of the devil. There's a whole lot of old writing from decades. By historians who say that, Europeans looked potatoes and when they saw them, they saw something freaky on weird.

Potatoes Andes Peru Europe Chile Rocky Mountains University Of Warwick Titicaca Lake Spanish America Utah Americas Rebecca Earl United States America Spain Canary Islands
High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick

60-Second Science

01:52 min | 1 year ago

High-Elevation Hummingbirds Evolved a Temperature Trick

"A humming birds of your garden, you've no doubt seen it flipped from flower to flower hovering midair as it sips on nectar that activity requires plenty of energy. So hummingbirds need a lot of nectar to feed their hungry metabolism's some of them probably drink two or three times. The Body Mass Index Everyday Andrew McCartney an ornithologist at the University of Pretoria in south. Africa. mckanie and his colleagues have studied hummingbirds extreme. In the Peruvian Andes to survive, they're the tiny birds have developed a few tricks for one their blood cells are unusually efficient at transporting oxygen. It's more difficult to hover in the high altitude thin air, and so the humming birds at the higher elevations much prone to pushing while they feed. So that does seem to be one way in which try and reduce the energy expenditure. Now, Macaque Nana's colleagues have found another energy-saving adaptation. The High Mountain hummingbirds can lower their body temperature by extreme amounts of night going into a state called torpor. tencent appearances, they essentially did they. That's unresponsive. The scientists caught six species of Andy and hummingbirds and monitor their temperatures throughout night and day, and they found that all six species could enter some type torpor. They lower their body temperatures from about one hundred degrees Fahrenheit by day to as low as thirty eight degrees Fahrenheit at night and being essentially conserves energy. The details are in the journal biology letters although some of the birds low body temperatures are on par with those of hibernating mammals. It's important to note that this is not fully fledged hibernation, which is a longer term response. True hibernation has only been documented in one bird so far at least common poor will in the US south. West one of my career goals is to find second harmonizing but in the Andes, he says, it's going to be the first place he looks.

Peruvian Andes Andes Biology Letters Andrew Mccartney University Of Pretoria United States Nana High Mountain Tencent Andy Africa.
Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

My Seven Chakras

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

"If you're on the part of spirituality, you've probably come across the Book Autobiography for Yogi and Other Yogurt books. They talk about these mystical Himalayan yogis would live for a hundred and ten honored and twenty, one, hundred, thirty years or even beyond that what are the secrets? How are they able to live deal such an ordeal and more importantly power they were retain their youthful glow in the air vigour and energy. Even at such an orphanage are all those stories just mitts and rumors are is there some truth to what they're saying today I'm going to attempt to tell you at least one secret that might be key to living longer and I'm going to tell you how you can apply these secrets. Into your life to live longer once I've action tribe Asia here, host and founder of my seven chuckers my seven chuck dot com the place where we help you expedience healing awakening and abundance. While what are you? It has been right. So many changes corona wireless masks, social distancing staying at home, and of course, the implications of all of this on our mental health, our jobs, our relationships, and the entire word and this phase. Has Allowed a lot of us to really go inwards and find out what we're truly passionate about and how we can align with our life's book, and for me this is really affirm to me that Mike Calling lies in helping you heal yourself Gombe yo mind and relax your diabetes and I've been meaning to do more of these solo episodes but you know what? I just don't WanNA create episodes for the sake of it. Which is why I took the time to go inwards, get more clarity and alignment on exactly. I'm here to do and be a sponge and really dive into the stories into the practices dealt out experimented on myself and research all of the stuff that will help you my friend lead a better quality life and I feel that I'm ready to share because I have honestly missed connecting one with you. I do the interviews but this thing that we have here. That especial so I appreciate you listening and I want to do more of this but the question for today's what is the longevity secret of the Himalayan. Yoga. So to attempt to answer this question, let's I stand the a lifestyle. Most of these Yogis were live high up in the mountains inside kids where there was record and with less oxygen at that elevation what would they eat? They would mostly various and fruits and food available out in nature, and they would have bath in the cool cool waters of the rivers Gord explosion, and of course, they will also do. Yoga. And they would also do. Dancing practices to align themselves to purify their energy and to connect with the universe. But have you noticed something about people living high up in the mountains whether it's mountains in Tibet or Himalayas are Switzerland or the Andes? These people they seem happy. This seem youthful they seem radiant. They seem fit. So can there be something about the oxygen. Our lack of oxygen there might be factor in this three words action tribe brief. Intermittent hype boxer I'm going to explain more but hold onto these words. Brief intermittent hypoc show you somewhere in the nineteen thirties. Russian scientists discovered that when you reduce the desired level of oxygen in your blood for a brief period of time that are many positive outcomes outcome such as increased level of haemoglobin production. Production of nitric oxide, which defends the body and especially the tissues against oxidative damage and prevents erectile dysfunction in men, and also another benefit is the increase assocation of stem cells which have the unique capacity to differentiate into worship. Any kind of cell in your body, which has major implications for healing and longevity. So these Russian scientists discover amazing benefits of brief intimate hype box. Here I know it's a lawful, but they were busy trying to replicate this in their elite athletes and perform us, and they will literally Dick these high-performance athletes on helicopters to high altitudes where there is less oxygen they created these hypo Barak. Chambers to systematically reduce oxygen levels and gas mixtures that contained ten percent oxygen, even less than that to induce intimated HYPOC boxy conditions in the body.

Mike Calling Yogi Gord Explosion Hypoc Founder Asia Andes Chambers Switzerland Himalayas
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 1 year ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

"Hi. I'm scientific. American Assistant News. Editor Sarah Lou in Frazier and here's a short piece from July twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits In it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From, Turks and Caicos Islands analysis of Ano- lizards collected before and after hurricanes, Irma and Maria in twenty seventeen and eighteen months later revealed that the surviving lizards and their descendants had larger and therefore grippier Topaz. The team examined Lizard photographs from natural history collections and seventy years of hurricane data to confirm the trend. From Italy sediment samples drawn from the tree and see revealed hotspots with up to one point nine million micro plastic particles per square meter, the highest concentration ever recorded on the sea floor. Most of pollution comes from wastewater and sewage systems. Researchers say. From Antarctica, paleontologists found a fossilized forty million year old frog on Seymour. Near the tip of the peninsula, The FROG is related to modern ones living in temperate humid conditions in the Chilean Andes. From Iraq researchers probing the Turkish State Archives found the earliest known record of a meteorite causing a death. The object struck a hilltop in neighboring Iraq in eighteen, eighty, eight, killing one man and paralyzing another. From Japan results gathered from the KAMIOKA. Observatory which includes an underground detector tank filled with fifty five thousand tons of water, suggested intriguing discrepancy in how neutrinos, an anti neutrinos oscillate potentially violating symmetry between matter and antimatter. From Kenya scientists identified a malaria blocking microbe in mosquitoes on the shores of Lake Victoria. Every mosquito catalog with this apparently benign fungus was free of the disease, carrying parasite and experiments showed the fungus prevented its transmission. That was quick hits. I'm Sarah Lou Frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Iraq Sarah Lou Chilean Andes Caicos Islands Editor Antarctica Turkish State Archives Kamioka Malaria Kenya Japan Turks Italy Lake Victoria Irma Maria
Marcela Lobos | Healing with the Medicine Wheel

Hay House Meditations

05:53 min | 1 year ago

Marcela Lobos | Healing with the Medicine Wheel

"In all spiritual and meditation traditions maps provided for seekers for the journey, irs who are moving across the landscape of their soul. These maps can be found in secret texts, holy images, prayers and poems from saints, and Yogis who have traversed the rocky train of spiritual people and transformation. The maps point us in the direction of our own spiritual truths for tumors bathed in clarity, strength and empathy. I'm Matteo donal hosted they. Hey, how's meditations? PODCAST and I'm happy to welcome on today's show Marcel Lobos to discuss one of these ancient maps procedures like you and me and that map is the medicine wheel? Marcel has been initiated in the healing and spiritual traditions of the Amazon and the Andes. For many decades I spoke to her while I was visiting her retreat center in the mountains of Chile just before the pandemic his around the world. Martinez senior teacher, the four win society, and is married to its founder Dr L. Deauville do. On today, show Marcella speaks about her own healing journey, and how she's applied the ancient methods of healing found in the medicine wheel. She then takes us on a journey in the podcast around the four directions of the medicine wheel where we talk about the healing archetypes that we work with including the serpent, Jaguar hummingbird and condor. The result of the journey through the medicine wheel is to emerge a luminous warrior with clear discernment, an unbound energy to be of service to others. Let's get right to my conversation with Marcella. So. It's great to welcome Marcella logos onto the house meditation podcast today we're recording down here. In the amazing sort of Sacred Valley of in Los Lobos in Chile so welcome on the PODCAST Marcella tank, Kim materials and honor to be with you, and to be with all our listeners on very excited to share anything that can be of help. Today I have a feeling. It's going to be a good journey. Loved tourneys. Before. We Speak About meditation practice and your meditation practice in about this. Your unique as I understand it contemporary practice that derives out of Shamanism I just wanted to ask you about how your spiritual practice started in your life. I feel it started with being raised by parents that gave me a lot of space to daydream. My House My parents were atheist. So, nothing was imposed to me. Though I grew up in a Catholic Very Catholic county went to Catholic school, but my parents really understood my inner freedom, and they let me not go to. My religious classes day they gave me they spoke with the teachers and say they. Want to do it. They led me to really explore my own. Spirituality my own connection to nature to dreams, because since I was a little girl, had a lot of vivid, dreaming on my parents recognized that today they were really free spirited in that way, and I think that's foundation, and it was here that you grew up in Chile yes. I grew up in China and funny enough I did explore a lot of religious settings because. I didn't go to religious class I. Dig grew up among Catholics season so I ended up learning. Then my aunt, one of my aunts was one of the heads of the witnesses of Jehovah. Jehovah witnesses. Okay, thank you and so I learn a lot of The Bible stories with her. Though whenever I went to my grandmother, she would say no. No, my darling, she says telling you stories that. That people believe but really what happened the UFO's game and gave the tablets to Moses and everything. My. Grandma everything she. That her little sister. Explain to me from the Bible. My grandmother would turn it into a UFO story. And why was that with the UFO story? Sorry, because my grandma was said to rebel on her husband was a doctor and she wouldn't go to. Hospital or medical setting, she only took homeopathy. My best friend was Mormon. Say went to more among tour too many times. You haven't many different kinds of influences. Was More to be outside and if you will communing with nature, yeah, I, I had an early. On. Drive to to just lay on the grass and count the pedals of the grass, and trying to find for for lack and just spend a lot of time with not be known to tame, and whatsoever saw I learned to be with myself. And people nowadays feel like they have to entertain their children non stop and they they cannot stand seeing their kids who, in nothing by my mother also led me to be, and and wouldn't finance attention, so I got bored a lot of many times and I would think even depressed. Point. But that helped me. Be With myself a nobody rescue with nobody rescuing me.

Marcella Chile Marcel Lobos Matteo Donal IRS Andes Sacred Valley Los Lobos Moses Dr L. Deauville Catholic School Martinez Founder Amazon China Kim Materials
Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

Science Friction

05:49 min | 1 year ago

Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

"So. You're bad to make a Peruvian Pharma. WHO's suing Germany's largest power company W? A this is a heist could radically disrupt debate over climate action and week you'll also hear from our wwl representatives in a rare interview about the controversial case. Germany's shutting down all power stations over the next twenty years, so it does that mean for the transition of business. And he gone to meet the man who has become a thorn in the side of fossil fuel companies because he's dredging up their own data to challenge them. This is climate in the courtroom pot one. Murder. Looking. I am suing so that the big companies need to take into account that they should not pollute. Way of saying enough is not. He's not paid by anybody to do this. He knew that it would take years. He knew that could be lost. It could be one. He knew that he would probably be facing some animosity on the ground in his village. But. He decided to do this to just show himself and his children that if there is an injustice you can act upon. or It is like a coal. Companies surely won't even feel since they are so wealthy. We need to start from somewhere. The fend ourselves. Another goal. Record. No nobody's asking to shut up shop. We know that this transformation will take decades on the corporations can lead that effort transforming companies from simply providing liquid fuels for example. To invest in carbon capture sequestration to invest in offshore wind, for example particularly in the rich, western, world, concluding Australia where the preponderance of historic emissions have enabled our economies to grow wealthy. We need to decarbonised faster than the developing world so that they can have a chance. Proper development as well. What is the concern of people who live on islands where the water level rises? What is the concern of people who suffer from hurricanes that haven't been there before? Their concern is that greenhouse gases must be reduced greatly of course, our responsibility as a power generator through reduce your to emissions, and that's what we're doing. Closing down power stations, investing into renewable supporting co two targets, also the embiid ones porting energy transition. Third episode where taking you to the Philippines for human rights showdown over climate change that's commanding attention, even in the face of president deterred has discords for drug uses and jailing of journalists, but first. Why is a Peruvian Pharma and Mountain God in the central Andes, attracting such international attention? My Name is Dr Road of. I'm a lawyer in private practice on my practices located in Hamburg. Germany and I represent so Luciano you in his quest and case against. With just German Energy Utility look the road of a high and is regular attorney in private practice, but before that she co founded the pioneering Ngo, the Climate Justice Program in two thousand and three ended her PhD on international climate, protection law, after years working in climate policy. What I find is that people have been coming to me increasingly in the last ten years. Asking for advice on what you know what you could do with respect to the increasing inadequacy of action with regard to what the science tells us. And then in two thousand, fourteen I decided to take on the first case with just this RWE case since they've multiplied and the man at the heart of bet, landmark case was half a world away at the end of a correctly online. My name is sold. Luciano you year I am and guide. From family of a small apartments, daughter I am a forty years of age or the. So who lives in the bustling town of us and in the mountains, above what else is a gateway for tourists heading off on hogging adventures in the stunning coordinator Blanca Mountain range of the central, Andes. But for locals, those mountains are life. Komo From clouds he goes to the moments and these hills with our culture in the area. There is a great dependency on the fence in agriculture in what us. The Mon I are everything for a farmer in a month and guide. It is like an office that gives you subsistence cool more fifteen. About two. Hundred. And my client is assistance the with his family in the Small Village Code Yuba. I'm he plans potatoes and vegetables, and I'm raises Guinea pigs to then have food. He has children and his own old parents. So in the season he will take tourists up to the glaciers and Laguna. And so did his father when he was little bit younger,

Germany Peruvian Pharma Luciano Private Practice Small Village Code Yuba Climate Justice Program Murder RWE Laguna Andes Hamburg Blanca Mountain German Energy Utility Philippines Australia Coordinator
Amazon Fires Contribute to Andean Glacier Melting

60-Second Science

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon Fires Contribute to Andean Glacier Melting

"From Bolivia a new study traces. How smoke plumes from heavy Amazon burning in two thousand seven and twenty ten deposited black carbon and dust in the Andes speeding up melting of the Zongo Glacier by boosting heat. Absorption

Bolivia Zongo Glacier Andes Amazon
"andes" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"The tenants of his and we go deep. We go in-depth on Andy laster. Ellen's backyard. Ooh Both. I'm I'm married everybody in the second. Everybody hey everyone well. This is really changed. Me because microphones in our face when we do them at work but now we have these like desk. Podcast special microphones like the olden days of radio and it really has changed my whole voice own for those who can't see him. He's now in a high leatherback share with Lily. Throw behind him yes. He's actually sitting upright for the first time in months today and he has some kind of polar bear skin on top of that share. Are you coming from Saddle Peak Lodge am concert of Fo- situation that Lori likes to put? The dog is just the Buffalo tenderloin. I'm just curious I did not kill visit. A little gamy. I know this is off topic with game. Did you see Sarah Palin unmasked singer now you have to watch the clip. Okay let me know watch it. Why well it all? It was so unfortunate timing because all happened at the same time like for home all starts was quarantining in that became the news. But you have to see. I didn't watch it. Oh my gosh I will absolutely watch it. Seems like a logical step from vice presidential candidate to. Oh Yeah maxine brings going to be there next season things don't seem upside-down at all. They seem totally fine. You can host the apprentice and then become president of the United States kids. Anything is possible. Chef Jose Andres my God. Is that true? These little amazing. I love having him on our show. I loved did NBC profile last night on sixty minutes. Now Yeah he was growing that his oldest you. Wow Eddie. Why don't you talk a little bit about? Tell us about the first episode of. Tell us about the first episode of sixty minutes pilot was it like cruiser was Don Hewitt Ed. Can you please tell everyone about chef? Jose how amazing so chef. Jose Andres is A. He's a he's a chef right. He's a highly successful shift. He is Spanish. She is from Spain and he had a restaurant is a lot of restaurants but he had. I came to know of him because he had a restaurant in Los Angeles called bizarre and bizarre. It was just like the M- the world's most exotic experimental Thomas. That's that's really. What a good description and it was. Incr- like you leave going. Oh my gosh has the best noodle I ever had. I went there two or three times each time when I can't it's overwhelming. How amazing it is right. But now he has a much with. The first event was that moved him but he started showing up at natural disasters for the sole purpose of feeding people who were able to get food for themselves providing meals for people who were stranded in hurricanes in the wreckage after tornadoes. You know he was in Puerto Rico after the hurricane hit Puerto Rico. He was in the Bahamas after the Bahamas got shredded by a hurricane. He's incredible and now when the corona virus started you may remember the biggest stories when it first started where people trapped on cruise ships right these cruises and they not only weren't allowed off countries and states and cities wouldn't allow them to dock. Yeah they were just didn't want him or they didn't know what to do and he got a there was a princess cruise ship. That was not. I WANNA say it was by San Francisco. I may be wrong with I. Think up in northern California. He went up there with his team and he was feeding passengers on this ship. Most of whom were really sick and since then. He's just been everywhere. He has dedicated his life in the last two months to getting to keeping his his staff working and to getting food to people who need it. He's he's just like an angel. I don't know what exactly when he began taking on these missions of feeding people who were under served during a real times of crisis. But he's been doing it for the last couple years and it seems like he has figured out the math of how to make it happen. I if I look at the problem and go oh my Gosh. I know they need to eat and I can't think of how to make that happen on such a scale and he seems to have figured it out and he's he's just a blessing like he's a godsend to people it's like it takes the thinking out of it and he goes. I'm just GONNA make food like I'm GONNA make meals. I love cooking. I love food and there is a way you know. He specifically said on sixty minutes and there is no food shortage. What we need is to get the food to the people who need it. And that's what he's doing and he's he's brilliant at it like in addition to that. If you're GONNA be that kind of like an angel on earth you should. It also doesn't hurt if you're if you happen to be in addition to that a phenomenal show guest. He's just like funny and fun and energetic and loves to drink and drinks and it just warms. Ls assistant says. He was as he was doing this and started his daughter to open a bottle of champagne. And he he he's just lovely. And here's a little bit of Jose Ellen on the show I love you so much. What is art? And that's Andy in the background. I'm not letting him in the House. Because we're we're you know so..

Andy laster Chef Jose Andres Jose Ellen Jose Andres Sarah Palin Puerto Rico NBC Don Hewitt Saddle Peak Lodge Bahamas Los Angeles Spain California maxine United States president Eddie San Francisco Fo
"andes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of Los Andes restaurant now agreeing to pay over seven hundred eighty thousand dollars for allegedly failing to pay their employees overtime carries didn't have to admit to any wrongdoing as part of this agreement a spokesperson for the family says they acknowledge they were aware that they weren't calculating employee overtime correctly labor department pro focusing on payroll between October twenty thirteen and October twenty sixteen investigators say one hundred twenty eight employees were not paid the overtime rate of time and a half whenever they worked more than forty hours in a week as back payments will be made in monthly installments and they'll run through June of twenty twenty four times a day you might not want to go outside pretty cold out there go out for dinner at night on the town wouldn't blame you for staying in if you do there's a movie for you whether you're single are partnered up depending whether your head store single enjoying a romantic comedy can be a curse or a blessing Robert Thompson is a professor of medium pop culture at Syracuse University if your happy and love the romantic comedy and Valentine's day can be the most wonderful thing in the world if you happen to be between happiness both of them can be absolute curses and what you choose a binge on may depend on where you live in love according to Google trends the most watched rom com in New York I'll have what she's having is when Harry met Sally Californians love clueless sixteen candles is tops in Chicago mayor Ruben CBS news New York and this portion of the news brought to us by window world of Boston word six fifty one traffic still tough out there we'll check.

Robert Thompson professor Syracuse University Valentine Google New York Harry Los Andes Chicago Ruben CBS Boston
"andes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Know them or even deal with them and then there are stories of how police and government easily gained access to these DNA samples in short the Andes to many of these delays stores are not always happy or very positive and the market for DNA testing is not as bright as it used to be I'm Kim commando was in for him commandos Sunday afternoons at foreign K. T. A. R. news right now we're gonna listen for the latest in traffic from the valley Chevy dealers traffic center detour Dan always make it a little bit of a move on as the freeways are Jeff but no big moves I'm seeing a little bit at a slowing out here and there and even some better news the I ten was about rollover has cleared so we're good to go there there are brake lights in both directions dieser road for that little construction patch they have out there outside of that bill the ease bartender the ways are definitely user friendly most of this light to moderate slowing from fifty nine sixty Seventh Avenue area all the way into the deck park tunnel we do have a bunch of service street Rexall forty Third Avenue and Grand Avenue Seventh Avenue and Dunlap eighty Third Avenue in camelback also Dobson north of rocket geo and we got a big crash involving a cement mixer truck it rolled over on its side and that's why dieser road is closed at Glendale until further notice you might want to get with the dice are rolled instead but let's real road closed lips real road at Glendale for that role over this traffic report is brought to you by no cure sciatic like pain is often the result of spinal disc herniation call the sciatic experts in over here today for eight OO eight five five sixty six eighty six or it'll be so you are not calm teacher to engage your is partly cloudy skies today with a high of seventy two tonight clear the low forty eight right now in Glendale mostly clear skies forty seven degrees why others brought to you by Howard air.

Andes Kim commando Dan Jeff dieser road Glendale spinal disc herniation K. T. A. Chevy Howard
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"A new study finds that fires in the Amazon rainforest are speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes Mountains mountains that provide water to millions of people. NPR's Richard Harris reports scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers. Now our research team has identified another threat to these important water. Sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles net smoke sometimes settle settled on mountain glaciers. Those dark particles capture energy from the sun. Like a patch of blacktop that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo Glacier these black particles along with dust increased meltwater runoff runoff during the peak fire season the study is published in the Journal scientific

Amazon Andes Mountains Richard Harris NPR Zongo Glacier Bolivia Brazil Journal Scientific France
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"Fires in the Amazon rain forest to speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes mountains according to a new study NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports the tropical glaciers like those in the Andes provide water for millions of people scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers now a research team is identified another threat to these important water sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles in that smoke sometimes settle on mountain glaciers those dark particles capture energy from the sun like a patch of black top that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo glacier these black particles along with dust increased melt water run off during the peak fire season the studies published in the journal scientific

Richard Harris Andes Amazon Brazil France Bolivia NPR Zongo Glacier
"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

Monstruo

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

"And the end he sells everything she owns right in front of her face takes her money disappears into the Andes. Giddy with excitement from the chase almost to the point of breaking into manic laughter. He lost the peasants in the edge of the field. And they had been so close to catching him he had felt their fingers brushing his neck. But in the end he had gotten away as he always did. Now, he was doubling back to the small rented apartment paid for with the last of his mother's stolen property where he would shower and change he had left his shoes in the cabin. And he thought glumly of his little nut Brown, girl and all the plans he'd had for her as he trudged through the ankle. Deep alley mud. He ruminated idly on how badly he do her. If he got a second chance the little scam. She's really embarrassed him after all. Then he thought of the little fat girl in the next market over and how they may be not be looking for him there yet. He could get her and get on the road, maybe break with tradition bit and just do her in a ditch on the side of the highway are even right there in the market in a public bathroom or an empty stall in nearly breaks into a whistle as he strolls along free and uncovered by guilt or reason on animal living meal to meal on instincts alone. But as he walks he doesn't notice the red light of the sun doesn't seem to fall so brightly onto those rain soaked dallies, those muddy byways, and as he dreams of murder and mischief anoth-. Set of footprints Mark the mud beside his growing closer and closer with every step. <music>? Monstrum is an incongruity media production.

Andes Monstrum murder
"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

Monstruo

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

"He is released in just fourteen having served about less than seventeen days in jail per murder in some half hearted attempt at making his stay as hard as possible on him. The authorities keep him in solitary confinement for the fourteen years. He actually serves by Ecuadoran law. He's released two years early on good behavior. They tell him that time in solitary is to protect them from the survivors of his victims. Some of whom chipped into put a price on this head twenty five thousand dollars American. He spends these years watching the newspaper clippings of his crimes yellow on the walls of his cell. They cover every inch from the floor to the ceiling. He's rearrested less than an hour after his release and taken to Columbia to face, stricter Justice of the Colombian authorities the Colombian still execute murderers, and many of the families who still follow the case think this will finally be their chance to see Justice done, but they are mistaken. Pedro spends the day long rides for the Andes to Columbia staring at the window watching the sun dance between the mountain tops. It has come to visit him every day in prison. Never pouring over his face. The way did is a free man warming is naked body in the steaming dawn, but it has always remained a stain on the walls of the prison that could always worm its way through this crack that thing that could find wherever he go. The Colombians fine Pedro on fit to stand trial. And he's taken to the psychiatric ward instead of the electric chair in just three years. He's found sane by state. Psychiatrist papers drafted for his release the thirties have no recourse to change. This band is the are by the system a system, they think they are the administrators of that they have made together with the other decent law-abiding citizens of their country. But Pedro noses system was woven by darker more mysterious hand thing beyond things who sees the world by bleeding. It's red light Dan upon the land upon peyser Lopez who took that profane sacrament and by his great massive hands worked as its highest priest ashamed of their iniquities, their incompetence, the Colombian authorities pack pager Lopez into a car in the middle of the night and drive them to the outskirts of Boghetta. Rumors abound already of his early release. And I don't wanna. Shot to death on their own front. Stairs by one of the Esino hired by the families of his victims. He watches them drive away down the road, the Knight's still deep and quite cold on his shoulders and face. He doesn't curl up. Shiver though, the young Pedro who might have more severely felt a loneliness aching cold of the night have been scrubbed away through rape violence years ago. There was only Pedro Lopez. Now, the living bogeyman of South America with all the world before him. Pedro finds it can only think of his mother, and so he begins to walk the night lingers forever and possibly long as he travels from Bogota to Lima thinking of all the things a man, not not think of the bloody path led a little boy through the night into the bloody knowledge of the son. And in time he finds himself standing before his mother's front door. He spends the night terrorizing her. Making threats reminding her of old times of her betrayal and her own couple -bility and his crimes the red light of dawn finally breaks, and he goes to kill her, but finds can't know deep wellspring familial affection stops him, no sense of guilt. She's merely old and inconsequential now anybody on earth could murder this old used up hor for any reason, she is not worthy of the sun. She is not worthy of Pedro Lopez..

Pedro peyser Lopez murder Columbia Andes Justice South America Dan rape Boghetta Bogota Lima twenty five thousand dollars fourteen years seventeen days three years two years
"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

Monstruo

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

"Like some more tea asks Julius empty Izhak its gaze at him from the far end of the whole. That's not something. He did. You just can't seem to keep the crows away for too long. He rolls his eyes and takes a sip of the imaginary Cup turning to Andrea. She is laid out on her stomach, but with her neck craned painfully backwards. So that her chin will rest on the ground. Her lips are rotted and green and only one of her eyes remains in her skull. It's milky blue and occasionally pulses with the motion of something that's decided to start growing inside it. Andrea, can you believe her he asks the corpse, she says something to him something only he can hair and he sets down the imaginary saucer. He keeps the invisible Cup perched and his fingers gently sniffing at the strange brew around him. The Andes are stolid and quiet. The mountain faces here are dark almost black and covered in tumbledown. Rocks. And weeds the thin stream cuts through the sparse grass beside him growing thicker and deeper the closer at gets to the village down the hill. He turns his face in that direction is blank, you know, you're really ungrateful. Julia he says under his breath. These girls probably had all sorts of stuff..

Andrea Andes tumbledown Julia
"andes" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:21 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"It's hard to imagine a worst human being then federal Alonzo Lopez tardy even think of him as being a human being the monster of the Andes is one of the most prolific serial killers child, rapists and child murderers in history. The worst of the worst when he was captured for trying to lure a local street vendors young daughter away from her family in Ecuador in one thousand nine hundred local authorities suspected him for the murder of four other girls whose bodies they just recently uncovered police were blown away we confess not only those murders. But the murders of a total of a hundred and ten little girls in Ecuador loan. He'd also been busy and Peru and Colombia the number was so outrageous authorities thought he was lying. But when Pedro lead them to the bodies of fifty three girls, they certainly believed him then and the one hundred ten victims may just be the tip of the iceberg. All in all thirty suspect. Pedro Lopez of killing over three hundred and fifty girls between his native Colombia, Peru and Ecuador in the mid to late seventies. After he was convicted. Of the murder of fifty seven girls in Ecuador in nineteen Eighty-three. He was given the maximum sentence allowed for any crime in that country sixteen years in prison. Yep. Confessed to one hundred and ten murders. Led police to fifty three gravesites found guilty in court, a fifty seven murders all the killings aid recovered bodies for and he was sentenced to only sixteen years, and then he'd be released two years early for good behavior. And after he's released who be immediately detained again deported to Colombia and imprisoned in a psychiatric hospital for additional crimes. They're only to again, be set free after just a few years. This time set free for good Petra Alonzo Lopez whereabouts have been unknown since nineteen ninety eight he may still be alive. He may still be killing Colombian. Authorities have suspected him of additional murders since two thousand two who is this monster. Why does he do what he does? How does someone becomes so cold so vicious house able to kill so many children before getting caught? Why was he ever allowed to be freed and sixteen years? That's it. What's the story behind Ecuador's? Criminal Justice system. We traveled to South America today. Revisit Columbia for the first time since we talked about Pablo Escobar Pablo and petro were born a year apart actually and both grew up in extreme poverty in Colombia and both chose to exploit the broken criminal Justice system of Colombia and northwestern South America in general in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies for their own selfish ends, but in very very different ways as bad as Pablo Escobar was and he was a very bad, dude. Petra was in my opinion, so much worse. If I had to pick either him or Pedro to babysit my kids. I'm sure as hell gonna go with Escobar. You could argue the Pablo at least tried to help the four tried to help some people even if he it cocaine epidemic led to cows deaths and destroyed lives petro caused only pain. It's a bummer Escobar. Never met Petra Lopez in the nineteen seventies. I'd like to think he would have had him tortured. And killed federal murdered little girls from the same impoverished neighborhoods Pablo at least tried to help in his own misguided ways. So get ready for a dark true crime suck today. Another example of why certain sexually violent people may need to be put on an island. We talked about last week or perhaps just from moved from the planet entirely work can wait. It's time for time sec. Happy Monday time suckers who Ray for Monday hip, hooray hooray, but time such a jolly good for time to the good times. When we talk about super talk show like we do today. I don't know something like that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Thanks to our space lizard, supporting the show via patriot for allowing this show to continue for coming out to support the happy murder tour stand up shows as well. Meet more and more spaces on the road had a blast and Philly got some more cool gifts to adorn the walls of the suck dungeon as well. And thanks for all the brave courageous messages from the victims of sexual abuse past week. Holy shit. Glad the episode helped reinforce the message that it is not your fault when you are victimized..

Pablo Escobar Pablo Pedro Lopez Ecuador Colombia Pablo Escobar Petra Alonzo Lopez murder Alonzo Lopez Escobar Peru Andes South America Philly petro cocaine Ray Columbia sixteen years two years
"andes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"It was largely in the Andes up in the Andes, which is not a hospitable place to form a civilization in the first place now man, but they did they thrived where it was dry and harsh and steep, and they were able to engineer like the kind of farmland at the L toots, these altitudes that you would never think would be possible, right? Like, millions of acres of really high altitude terraced farms and the way that I saw that the the whole thing worked was there were clans and villages and groups that all kind of they did their own thing. And they paid tribute to the what you call kind of the federal government the Inca chiefs, the people who were who had. The whole empire together. And then the Inca who were running the show would in turn provide these these people like the farmers in the villages in the clans with stuff they needed Borey striking resemblance to like Soviet communism. L interesting. Yeah. And they kept going for about one hundred and fifty years again until the spans showed up. They were they were very powerful empire. But the weird thing about the Inca is that they were able to do all this included math in abstract thought and major like socio political administration. Yeah, they appeared to have done it without any written language whatsoever. That's been basically the way that people viewed the Inca for a very long time. Yeah. Which is is remarkable. Because it's not like, oh, well, this was back during the bronze age like the Maya had written languages, they as texted mess mess. Petya means did Egyptians, of course, did Chinese did. So a lot of people were writing things down. And it appeared in we're still not super sure. But are we can we say definitively? We're almost been now we can definitively say it is sure starting to look that way. All right. So let's get to the the sort of the heart of the story. Then is is a believe it's pronounce Kieu K H I P U or key Q U P you right? Which would also be pronounced Kiu. Right. But if you look this up on the internet, if you pull your car over whatever don't dangerous day are these really kinda cool like Maccarone almost these nodded, which I know you like, oh, yes. These nodded links of cord made from cotton. Sometimes sometimes it's a lotta or Paca will. And you would see them hung up in rows that looks like like from a curtain rod or something from but that that curtain rod is really like a thicker central rope. And these things would just hang down and for many many years among were color coded. But for many years people thought that these were. Were just like art right arts crafts that kind of thing. Like, something somebody do they were bored. You know, and a lot of them were lost because the Spanish when they showed up fan everywhere. And they were like, well, I don't know what this is. So I'm just going to burn them. Yeah. I'm gonna kill everybody in Bern everything. And so for a long time people. Yeah. They just had them in museums. They were they were inking relics of an empire that had crumbled and gone away. So people are like we got to preserve these, and they took them to museums. But it wasn't until the nineteen twenties that a guy named leeland lock who was studying them at the museum of natural history in New York who said, you know, what I think these actually are symbolic. I think they encode information. And I think that they probably are used to kind of tabulate things. And he he was right boy that sounds like a good cliffhanger, my friend. Okay. I should take out the he was right part. Then. But was he will find out right after this? He was..

Andes engineer Petya Paca Bern leeland museum of natural New York fifty years
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"What we eat dictates a lot of how we use the land. And there's a lot of data. Lot of people have shown that meat is very costly and inefficient, and especially beef is very costly inefficient. So it takes a lot of land a lot of resources to create a nice steak. And so I say change your eating habits because you know, if we can cut beef out of the diet that can have a measurable impact on our use of the land. And I say it's easy because it's something that is an individual choice. Right. So if you're going to change to an electric car, you need there to be some sort of infrastructure that's out there, you need the charging stations you need this you need that. But you can change your diet. The next time you go to the grocery store. Just choose not to buy a certain type of food. Don't rely on anybody else for that decision. You choose what you put in your own mouth. And so it's a very personal decision. And it's. A very powerful decision. And so I think as an individual that's the first place to start is to think about you know, what you're putting in your mouth, and how that impacts the world around you, obviously, if we start then thinking about other sorts of solutions, we we can think about larger scale solutions, which we eventually need to get to that are gonna come through the actions of corporations and from governments. And so obviously being responsible voter is something that every individual needs to be right. And yeah, I mean, this is you hit the nail on the head. And it's always food for thought in you know, it's not an overnight step. It can be for some it may not be for others. But we have to do better, or it's things are gonna get way worse. Yeah. And so and as you brought up earlier this stuff is already happening. The impacts are already being felt even in these forests in the middle of nowhere in the Andes. I mean, we're working in some of the most remote places left on the planet. And we. We can measure the effects of climate change in. So it is everywhere now in so we need to realize that that our actions have repercussions and those repercussions extend to everybody everything everywhere, and it's incredibly selfish of us continue on the same track that we're doing now and forget about those repercussions for the rest of the world. Certainly true. I couldn't agree with you more. But Dr feeli-, I think you've given us a lot of food for thought to walk away with this week. But I appreciate all of the work. You are doing all the work. Your colleagues are doing please keep it up in please stay in touch. We'd like to know as things develop what you're finding. Well, thank you very much. Thanks for having me on the on the program here. And thank you for the work that you're doing. I mean, it's great. It's very important to help educate the public and help people realize how important plants are for our world and how interconnected are. Lives are with the lives of plants. Well, thank you. I couldn't be doing it without scientists in horticulturist and people such as yourself. So let's continue to work for plants and the planet will thank you. Yes. In the defensive plants already have a good one. Thank you you too. Bye. All right. A lot of sobering. Food for thought in that conversation. I thank him for taking the time to try, and some what is really complicated topic into something. That's easy enough to understand at least to wrap your head around. How changes might be occurring? Pointed matter is models are great, but you're gonna have to get boots on the ground. You're going to have to have people that understand trees can identify different plans to really understand how various species in groups are going to respond in an uncertain future. I think Dr feely and his colleagues for the attempts. They're making it's really important work in highly recommend you check out their website and read some of their publications as always thank you so much for listening. I really appreciate your support and a special shout out to all of my patriot supporters specifically today. Day Heather in Katie. Thank you so much. They're the most recent producers on this show alongside a lot of other great patrons. So if

Dr feely Andes Dr feeli Heather
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"These novel sort of species compositions might be just as troubling some of the physiological responses in a specially in a diverse system like this year. I think this, you know, we have this idea or with understanding that these species interactions are very important in. So clearly species move around or change, those interactions are going to change, and that's just gonna feed back in, you know, create more changes in. And those become very hard to study impart. Just imagine if we don't know anything about one of the players, it's gonna be harder still to know about you know, all of the players in that team there in that network, but we are trying to get at that in kind of model systems. So for example, I was involved in a study where we were working with these experiments were removing species up and down the mountain now in this case, we're actually moving corn and potato up and down the mountain working with these these local farmers in the Andes kind of small scale farming to see the same thing. We talk about that. These species might need to move up the mountain, you know, what would happen as it gets warmer. Does do corn farms need to move up the mountain to potato farms? So this this grad student, I was working with Richard Tito, heated this big experiment, and he planted the corn and the potato at different elevations. So under different temperatures, different soils different conditions. And what he found is that if the corn was grown up on her warmer temperatures it was decimated. By urban wars and the same with potatoes. And so we basically find that there is complete crop failure due to warming. But it wasn't due to the warm in itself. It was due to the rival of new pests that were normally kind of restricted to the lower elevations below were these corn farms were held in so's. We warmed up the farms. You know, you basically get all these different pests that just destroy either eat the grain itself or make it unsellable in. So that really highlighted to me that it's not necessarily the physiology of the plant. It's the interactions with some of the pests, and I was so you can imagine there's ways that interactions with pollinators disperse, there's all different sorts of interactions that dictate where and how these plants live are gonna become really important in the future. Yeah. And even if there isn't a model out there some form of predictive ability to say which direction these relationships might go. It is very troubling in at least a something to definitely be aware of in keep in mind as we forge ahead into this uncertainty. Just things can get weird. It's it's hard to make predictive assumptions based on that in how to adapt to that. If say, you're a farmer, or if you're relying on timber harvest or something like that, let alone all of the support networks that natural systems provide us to begin with. Right. And you know, what we find is that, you know, the the trees are moving, but other researchers study that came out from the same area in Peru where we work that showed that the birds are also moving up the mountains. Other researchers have found changes in the her pedal with the frogs or with the insects into all of these things seem to be moving, but they're all moving at different rates. So different species are moving, but even classes of species are moving at different rates in so. So what happens when that you know, the plant is forced higher on the mountain because it's too hot for down low. But you know, maybe the the bird doesn't move up that requires for for seed dispersal, you know, so what happens that species in the absence of a dispersal or what happens when suddenly the snakes move higher on the mountains, and they start to eat the eggs of the birds, and so they drive some of these birds locally extinct what happens to the plants..

Richard Tito Andes Peru
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"You know, if you've got approached by journalists, it's it's often saying how these are going to respond into the future in a theme that runs throughout your entire researches. They're responding climate change is currently happening. It's been happening, and plants and other organisms are already starting to respond to that. And that's exactly what you found going on in the Andes that that's exactly right, Matt. So a lot of times we think of when we talk about climate change using the future tense in everyone saying it's going to warm by this much this gonna be this impact. It's that future tense going to be will be, but you know, we really should be using the past tense or the present in all this stuff because it has already been happening for decades is happening now, it will also happen the future. But you know, we're already seen those impacts now for the tropics. It's it's been hard because we haven't had long term data. So it's hard to look at what's already happening. When a lot of cases were setting up now to observe the changes in the future. But one thing we've. I tried to do is by pulling together, all these collaborators and all this new networks applauds is we try to get as much of that data's. We can and create a baseline now often in the case of the study where we're looking to Andy's we end up with maybe fifteen twenty years worth of data that we can use. So it's relatively short term. But what we find is that over those last two decades there's been important and measurable changes. In these Andy and forests were getting changes in wear species. Are we're getting changes in what species are Kerr in which forest in. So we are observing these changes in real time. And we're looking at it over short time period. But we're confident that this has been going on for several decades before we ever got on this in clearly we're confident that this is going to keep going on in the future. There's there's no indication that that things are going to stop or so we're really just looking at this current window. And what the tells us is things are happening now. And you know, all scenarios point that's going to get worse in the future. Yeah. And to reiterate is that you said things are moving up the mountain these climate zones are moving the mountain because as that face of the mountain starts to warm those zones move upwards and part of the big takeaway from your research is that you want mechanistic understandings of what's going on in. I'm curious to know, if with the data that you have available to you, what kind of mechanistic underpinnings are there to some of these species movements. Visit warming temperatures or is it precipitation or combination of factors? What's going on? Yeah. So right now, I mean, we're really at that stage. We talk about before of documenting the pattern. So with all those colleagues, and we worked cross the Andes, and what we found more than anthem it could be summed up release at the forest is changing. Right. We find that things are not the same now that they were twenty years ago and the direction of that fits with what would expect based on climate change. So basically, we're finding in allow. These force. We find more of the species that will be used to find lower down. So we think that means that these species are kind of changing the ranges through time to include higher and higher elevations. And so we do want to try to figure out what is the mechanism behind that? And the truth is at this point. We don't have the data really detests that but we're working on it. So there's a lot of people out there myself and my grad students stuff include we're trying to gather information on the traits of these species. So looking at some of these, you know, these traits related, for example, to their climatic tolerance is trying to figure out can we actually figure out? What is physiologically? What is the range of temperatures this species find suitable or what is the range of drought tolerance for this species?.

Andes Andy Matt fifteen twenty years twenty years two decades
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"And obviously a lot of people in Peru. Just wonderful scientists, and and a lot of Patak's, honest and field assistance, we've installed this network of forest plots, these inventory, plots, primarily one turned size. But also a lot of smaller ones. It gives us this window into the forest and so at different elevations. We can say this is what the forest is like at this time, and then we can go back again. And again and look at how l- looking through that window into the forest. How is it changing through time while and that's given us a lot of insight. We've been because we have been seeing changes, and there's huge differences obviously to go up and down the mountains. These species we find have very small ranges, you know. So you go from fifteen hundred meter. Elevation and you hike up to seventeen hundred meters elevation, and you almost have none of the same species, you you'll just all those species will drop out from here to there, or as one of my colleagues miles, silman always the scribes it, you know, you can stand in one spot, and you can throw a rock over the entire range of species. And so we find that this forest is just super sensitive to temperature and climate, and you can just see this this steady turnover and species as you go up or down the mountain. And so, of course, what we find them through time. As climate is changing is that we get this steady turnover in species the world warms up and the the species down in the lowland start creeping up the mountain and migrating into our higher elevation plots. Yeah. And that's one of the most amazing things about working in the mountains is how quickly you realize that that life really is kind of on that cusp of whatever that zone nation is throwing at it. And what makes? That sort of topa graphic elevation gradient. So great for studying these sorts of climate change affects also makes these systems extremely vulnerable to actual climate change, which you know, something that gets reiterated time and time again is that not only are mountainous areas. More susceptible than some other habitats come change because of that zone nation. But here we added that extra layer of the confusion that gets added to in the tropics. So what we have our you know, the fact that we have such a rapid turnover species. What that means is that each species is confined to a very narrow range of sater's and a very small area right because there aren't steep mountains. So if you're a restricted to just a few degrees celsius that means that species only has a few hundred meters of of land that suitable to it of elevations it steep. So that means it's not a lot area and kind of one of the truisms. I think that's out there in ecology is that the smaller. Or the area smaller the population size, the more sensitive. You are to disturbance, right? It makes sense. I mean, if you're like, you said only, a hectare is is your the extent of your distribution, very relatively speaking small cataclysmic events, whether their gradual or instant can do a lot more damage to your population than safe you were spread out along, you know, all of Appalachia, even our most widespread species in the Andes have relatively small ranges because it because it steepen they have they're confined by temperature. But then if you start thinking about some of these really rare endemic species, they're not confined to just a elevation band, but they're confined to elevate band within an individual valley. And so they can have very small population sizes for the most part, we don't know who those species are. But we know that they're there, and we know that they're they're endanger. Yeah. In thinking about mountainous systems, like the Andes in the tropics where you do get up of beyond treeline into snow. Kept peaks. I'm curious from a more evolutionary biology, graphic context think something about the limited distribution and narrowness of his own for a lot of these species is because you have a largely tropical flora from the low Lynch trying to adapt to what can essentially become frosted sub-tropical or even temperate zones farther up the mountain range. I think that is part of it. So I think in some parts so saying Columbia were doing some work. Now, you know, we get some of these temperate tax that come down these temper tax that have like the oaks and stuff that have common their work living in the high mountains of Colombian stuff..

Andes Peru Patak sater Lynch Appalachia Columbia seventeen hundred meters fifteen hundred meter hundred meters
"andes" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"andes" Discussed on The Science Hour

"International sure also my concern is that even though the and in amazon is geographically small in size it plays of really important ecological role the majority of the set a man of the nutrients a lot of the organic matter and water that is feeding the lowland amazon is actually exported from the andes and so you could say that the andes drive the ecology and the biochemistry of downstream systems at the same time there's importance of the andes for some of this species particularly migratory fish that live in more lowland areas most of their life but then move up into and ian rivers for spawning are feeding migrations so the concern is that when you put a dam on an indian river that might trap sediments that might change the hydrology that might block the migratory pathways for some of these fish is that impact extends down way into to the lowlands actually met someone who works with the energy research authority in brazil and i asked her so how are you considering these andy and dams and some of your planning and consideration of projects in the brazilian amazon she said you know we are not we don't have this kind of information and it takes a lot of effort to go and do the groundwork to collected some a detective would trucking down the road form the final number we documented 142 existing dams or under construction and a hundred and sixty proposed dams i ask you don't have any way of picturing home that might due to a river system with of us some of them bought before you'll feeling well my feeling is that there's really a need for more of these regional perspectives that consider the impacts of many dams on one system in this study we looked at it in terms of.

andes ian rivers brazil amazon andy
"andes" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:43 min | 4 years ago

"andes" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Un presence organization so i went to this event yesterday with with the nando parrado he was the survivor one of the survivors of the andes 19th seventy two crashed with the i think it was uruguayan a rugby team on their way to play chile and they chartered a plane and everything was great people laughing joking in the cabin until the pilot thought he was over chilean started descending and had a navigational errors before gps in nineteen seventy two and descended right in the middle of the andes mountain range crashed into the mound plane ripped in half nandor lost his sister and his mother on the flight and the rug of the rugby team can came together and you had started working as a team to survive they spent these guys had not seen the snow whatsoever right we from in on the beach and urguay to eleven thousand feet in the andes with tshirts and street use on and you had that story of survival is amazing i highly encourage anyone to go watch out on on youtube you can see us talk the point of the story is life is a great right up until the fucking pointing great and that's what those people experience in vegas complete terror it's i've seen it at jfk i've been in combat with welltrained people that was the first time i experienced crowd panic in that kind of herd mentality and it scared the shit out of me man i'm not gonna lie but i had a plan i rehearsed this plan took cover created space i got the hell out of there i got onto the tarmac with the were the airplanes and baggage carts were an and made a plan from there.

chile gps andes youtube vegas Un rugby andes mountain eleven thousand feet