33 Burst results for "Andes"

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

My Seven Chakras

05:05 min | Last week

Longevity Secrets Of The Himalayan Yogis With Aditya Jaykumar Iyer

"If you're on the part of spirituality, you've probably come across the Book Autobiography for Yogi and Other Yogurt books. They talk about these mystical Himalayan yogis would live for a hundred and ten honored and twenty, one, hundred, thirty years or even beyond that what are the secrets? How are they able to live deal such an ordeal and more importantly power they were retain their youthful glow in the air vigour and energy. Even at such an orphanage are all those stories just mitts and rumors are is there some truth to what they're saying today I'm going to attempt to tell you at least one secret that might be key to living longer and I'm going to tell you how you can apply these secrets. Into your life to live longer once I've action tribe Asia here, host and founder of my seven chuckers my seven chuck dot com the place where we help you expedience healing awakening and abundance. While what are you? It has been right. So many changes corona wireless masks, social distancing staying at home, and of course, the implications of all of this on our mental health, our jobs, our relationships, and the entire word and this phase. Has Allowed a lot of us to really go inwards and find out what we're truly passionate about and how we can align with our life's book, and for me this is really affirm to me that Mike Calling lies in helping you heal yourself Gombe yo mind and relax your diabetes and I've been meaning to do more of these solo episodes but you know what? I just don't WanNA create episodes for the sake of it. Which is why I took the time to go inwards, get more clarity and alignment on exactly. I'm here to do and be a sponge and really dive into the stories into the practices dealt out experimented on myself and research all of the stuff that will help you my friend lead a better quality life and I feel that I'm ready to share because I have honestly missed connecting one with you. I do the interviews but this thing that we have here. That especial so I appreciate you listening and I want to do more of this but the question for today's what is the longevity secret of the Himalayan. Yoga. So to attempt to answer this question, let's I stand the a lifestyle. Most of these Yogis were live high up in the mountains inside kids where there was record and with less oxygen at that elevation what would they eat? They would mostly various and fruits and food available out in nature, and they would have bath in the cool cool waters of the rivers Gord explosion, and of course, they will also do. Yoga. And they would also do. Dancing practices to align themselves to purify their energy and to connect with the universe. But have you noticed something about people living high up in the mountains whether it's mountains in Tibet or Himalayas are Switzerland or the Andes? These people they seem happy. This seem youthful they seem radiant. They seem fit. So can there be something about the oxygen. Our lack of oxygen there might be factor in this three words action tribe brief. Intermittent hype boxer I'm going to explain more but hold onto these words. Brief intermittent hypoc show you somewhere in the nineteen thirties. Russian scientists discovered that when you reduce the desired level of oxygen in your blood for a brief period of time that are many positive outcomes outcome such as increased level of haemoglobin production. Production of nitric oxide, which defends the body and especially the tissues against oxidative damage and prevents erectile dysfunction in men, and also another benefit is the increase assocation of stem cells which have the unique capacity to differentiate into worship. Any kind of cell in your body, which has major implications for healing and longevity. So these Russian scientists discover amazing benefits of brief intimate hype box. Here I know it's a lawful, but they were busy trying to replicate this in their elite athletes and perform us, and they will literally Dick these high-performance athletes on helicopters to high altitudes where there is less oxygen they created these hypo Barak. Chambers to systematically reduce oxygen levels and gas mixtures that contained ten percent oxygen, even less than that to induce intimated HYPOC boxy conditions in the body.

Mike Calling Yogi Gord Explosion Hypoc Founder Asia Andes Chambers Switzerland Himalayas
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 2 weeks ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:02 min | 2 weeks ago

Science News Briefs from Around the Planet

"Hi. I'm scientific. American Assistant News. Editor Sarah Lou in Frazier and here's a short piece from July twenty twenty issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science, technology and medicine. The article is titled Quick Hits In it's a rundown of some non corona virus stories from around the globe. From, Turks and Caicos Islands analysis of Ano- lizards collected before and after hurricanes, Irma and Maria in twenty seventeen and eighteen months later revealed that the surviving lizards and their descendants had larger and therefore grippier Topaz. The team examined Lizard photographs from natural history collections and seventy years of hurricane data to confirm the trend. From Italy sediment samples drawn from the tree and see revealed hotspots with up to one point nine million micro plastic particles per square meter, the highest concentration ever recorded on the sea floor. Most of pollution comes from wastewater and sewage systems. Researchers say. From Antarctica, paleontologists found a fossilized forty million year old frog on Seymour. Near the tip of the peninsula, The FROG is related to modern ones living in temperate humid conditions in the Chilean Andes. From Iraq researchers probing the Turkish State Archives found the earliest known record of a meteorite causing a death. The object struck a hilltop in neighboring Iraq in eighteen, eighty, eight, killing one man and paralyzing another. From Japan results gathered from the KAMIOKA. Observatory which includes an underground detector tank filled with fifty five thousand tons of water, suggested intriguing discrepancy in how neutrinos, an anti neutrinos oscillate potentially violating symmetry between matter and antimatter. From Kenya scientists identified a malaria blocking microbe in mosquitoes on the shores of Lake Victoria. Every mosquito catalog with this apparently benign fungus was free of the disease, carrying parasite and experiments showed the fungus prevented its transmission. That was quick hits. I'm Sarah Lou Frazier.

Sarah Lou Frazier Iraq Sarah Lou Chilean Andes Caicos Islands Editor Antarctica Turkish State Archives Kamioka Malaria Kenya Japan Turks Italy Lake Victoria Irma Maria
Marcela Lobos | Healing with the Medicine Wheel

Hay House Meditations

05:53 min | Last month

Marcela Lobos | Healing with the Medicine Wheel

"In all spiritual and meditation traditions maps provided for seekers for the journey, irs who are moving across the landscape of their soul. These maps can be found in secret texts, holy images, prayers and poems from saints, and Yogis who have traversed the rocky train of spiritual people and transformation. The maps point us in the direction of our own spiritual truths for tumors bathed in clarity, strength and empathy. I'm Matteo donal hosted they. Hey, how's meditations? PODCAST and I'm happy to welcome on today's show Marcel Lobos to discuss one of these ancient maps procedures like you and me and that map is the medicine wheel? Marcel has been initiated in the healing and spiritual traditions of the Amazon and the Andes. For many decades I spoke to her while I was visiting her retreat center in the mountains of Chile just before the pandemic his around the world. Martinez senior teacher, the four win society, and is married to its founder Dr L. Deauville do. On today, show Marcella speaks about her own healing journey, and how she's applied the ancient methods of healing found in the medicine wheel. She then takes us on a journey in the podcast around the four directions of the medicine wheel where we talk about the healing archetypes that we work with including the serpent, Jaguar hummingbird and condor. The result of the journey through the medicine wheel is to emerge a luminous warrior with clear discernment, an unbound energy to be of service to others. Let's get right to my conversation with Marcella. So. It's great to welcome Marcella logos onto the house meditation podcast today we're recording down here. In the amazing sort of Sacred Valley of in Los Lobos in Chile so welcome on the PODCAST Marcella tank, Kim materials and honor to be with you, and to be with all our listeners on very excited to share anything that can be of help. Today I have a feeling. It's going to be a good journey. Loved tourneys. Before. We Speak About meditation practice and your meditation practice in about this. Your unique as I understand it contemporary practice that derives out of Shamanism I just wanted to ask you about how your spiritual practice started in your life. I feel it started with being raised by parents that gave me a lot of space to daydream. My House My parents were atheist. So, nothing was imposed to me. Though I grew up in a Catholic Very Catholic county went to Catholic school, but my parents really understood my inner freedom, and they let me not go to. My religious classes day they gave me they spoke with the teachers and say they. Want to do it. They led me to really explore my own. Spirituality my own connection to nature to dreams, because since I was a little girl, had a lot of vivid, dreaming on my parents recognized that today they were really free spirited in that way, and I think that's foundation, and it was here that you grew up in Chile yes. I grew up in China and funny enough I did explore a lot of religious settings because. I didn't go to religious class I. Dig grew up among Catholics season so I ended up learning. Then my aunt, one of my aunts was one of the heads of the witnesses of Jehovah. Jehovah witnesses. Okay, thank you and so I learn a lot of The Bible stories with her. Though whenever I went to my grandmother, she would say no. No, my darling, she says telling you stories that. That people believe but really what happened the UFO's game and gave the tablets to Moses and everything. My. Grandma everything she. That her little sister. Explain to me from the Bible. My grandmother would turn it into a UFO story. And why was that with the UFO story? Sorry, because my grandma was said to rebel on her husband was a doctor and she wouldn't go to. Hospital or medical setting, she only took homeopathy. My best friend was Mormon. Say went to more among tour too many times. You haven't many different kinds of influences. Was More to be outside and if you will communing with nature, yeah, I, I had an early. On. Drive to to just lay on the grass and count the pedals of the grass, and trying to find for for lack and just spend a lot of time with not be known to tame, and whatsoever saw I learned to be with myself. And people nowadays feel like they have to entertain their children non stop and they they cannot stand seeing their kids who, in nothing by my mother also led me to be, and and wouldn't finance attention, so I got bored a lot of many times and I would think even depressed. Point. But that helped me. Be With myself a nobody rescue with nobody rescuing me.

Marcella Chile Marcel Lobos Matteo Donal IRS Andes Sacred Valley Los Lobos Moses Dr L. Deauville Catholic School Martinez Founder Amazon China Kim Materials
Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

Science Friction

05:49 min | Last month

Why is this Peruvian farmer suing Germany's largest power company RWE?

"So. You're bad to make a Peruvian Pharma. WHO's suing Germany's largest power company W? A this is a heist could radically disrupt debate over climate action and week you'll also hear from our wwl representatives in a rare interview about the controversial case. Germany's shutting down all power stations over the next twenty years, so it does that mean for the transition of business. And he gone to meet the man who has become a thorn in the side of fossil fuel companies because he's dredging up their own data to challenge them. This is climate in the courtroom pot one. Murder. Looking. I am suing so that the big companies need to take into account that they should not pollute. Way of saying enough is not. He's not paid by anybody to do this. He knew that it would take years. He knew that could be lost. It could be one. He knew that he would probably be facing some animosity on the ground in his village. But. He decided to do this to just show himself and his children that if there is an injustice you can act upon. or It is like a coal. Companies surely won't even feel since they are so wealthy. We need to start from somewhere. The fend ourselves. Another goal. Record. No nobody's asking to shut up shop. We know that this transformation will take decades on the corporations can lead that effort transforming companies from simply providing liquid fuels for example. To invest in carbon capture sequestration to invest in offshore wind, for example particularly in the rich, western, world, concluding Australia where the preponderance of historic emissions have enabled our economies to grow wealthy. We need to decarbonised faster than the developing world so that they can have a chance. Proper development as well. What is the concern of people who live on islands where the water level rises? What is the concern of people who suffer from hurricanes that haven't been there before? Their concern is that greenhouse gases must be reduced greatly of course, our responsibility as a power generator through reduce your to emissions, and that's what we're doing. Closing down power stations, investing into renewable supporting co two targets, also the embiid ones porting energy transition. Third episode where taking you to the Philippines for human rights showdown over climate change that's commanding attention, even in the face of president deterred has discords for drug uses and jailing of journalists, but first. Why is a Peruvian Pharma and Mountain God in the central Andes, attracting such international attention? My Name is Dr Road of. I'm a lawyer in private practice on my practices located in Hamburg. Germany and I represent so Luciano you in his quest and case against. With just German Energy Utility look the road of a high and is regular attorney in private practice, but before that she co founded the pioneering Ngo, the Climate Justice Program in two thousand and three ended her PhD on international climate, protection law, after years working in climate policy. What I find is that people have been coming to me increasingly in the last ten years. Asking for advice on what you know what you could do with respect to the increasing inadequacy of action with regard to what the science tells us. And then in two thousand, fourteen I decided to take on the first case with just this RWE case since they've multiplied and the man at the heart of bet, landmark case was half a world away at the end of a correctly online. My name is sold. Luciano you year I am and guide. From family of a small apartments, daughter I am a forty years of age or the. So who lives in the bustling town of us and in the mountains, above what else is a gateway for tourists heading off on hogging adventures in the stunning coordinator Blanca Mountain range of the central, Andes. But for locals, those mountains are life. Komo From clouds he goes to the moments and these hills with our culture in the area. There is a great dependency on the fence in agriculture in what us. The Mon I are everything for a farmer in a month and guide. It is like an office that gives you subsistence cool more fifteen. About two. Hundred. And my client is assistance the with his family in the Small Village Code Yuba. I'm he plans potatoes and vegetables, and I'm raises Guinea pigs to then have food. He has children and his own old parents. So in the season he will take tourists up to the glaciers and Laguna. And so did his father when he was little bit younger,

Germany Peruvian Pharma Luciano Private Practice Small Village Code Yuba Climate Justice Program Murder RWE Laguna Andes Hamburg Blanca Mountain German Energy Utility Philippines Australia Coordinator
Amazon Fires Contribute to Andean Glacier Melting

60-Second Science

00:14 sec | 3 months ago

Amazon Fires Contribute to Andean Glacier Melting

"From Bolivia a new study traces. How smoke plumes from heavy Amazon burning in two thousand seven and twenty ten deposited black carbon and dust in the Andes speeding up melting of the Zongo Glacier by boosting heat. Absorption

Bolivia Zongo Glacier Andes Amazon
"andes" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

Ellen on the Go

05:34 min | 4 months ago

"andes" Discussed on Ellen on the Go

"The tenants of his and we go deep. We go in-depth on Andy laster. Ellen's backyard. Ooh Both. I'm I'm married everybody in the second. Everybody hey everyone well. This is really changed. Me because microphones in our face when we do them at work but now we have these like desk. Podcast special microphones like the olden days of radio and it really has changed my whole voice own for those who can't see him. He's now in a high leatherback share with Lily. Throw behind him yes. He's actually sitting upright for the first time in months today and he has some kind of polar bear skin on top of that share. Are you coming from Saddle Peak Lodge am concert of Fo- situation that Lori likes to put? The dog is just the Buffalo tenderloin. I'm just curious I did not kill visit. A little gamy. I know this is off topic with game. Did you see Sarah Palin unmasked singer now you have to watch the clip. Okay let me know watch it. Why well it all? It was so unfortunate timing because all happened at the same time like for home all starts was quarantining in that became the news. But you have to see. I didn't watch it. Oh my gosh I will absolutely watch it. Seems like a logical step from vice presidential candidate to. Oh Yeah maxine brings going to be there next season things don't seem upside-down at all. They seem totally fine. You can host the apprentice and then become president of the United States kids. Anything is possible. Chef Jose Andres my God. Is that true? These little amazing. I love having him on our show. I loved did NBC profile last night on sixty minutes. Now Yeah he was growing that his oldest you. Wow Eddie. Why don't you talk a little bit about? Tell us about the first episode of. Tell us about the first episode of sixty minutes pilot was it like cruiser was Don Hewitt Ed. Can you please tell everyone about chef? Jose how amazing so chef. Jose Andres is A. He's a he's a chef right. He's a highly successful shift. He is Spanish. She is from Spain and he had a restaurant is a lot of restaurants but he had. I came to know of him because he had a restaurant in Los Angeles called bizarre and bizarre. It was just like the M- the world's most exotic experimental Thomas. That's that's really. What a good description and it was. Incr- like you leave going. Oh my gosh has the best noodle I ever had. I went there two or three times each time when I can't it's overwhelming. How amazing it is right. But now he has a much with. The first event was that moved him but he started showing up at natural disasters for the sole purpose of feeding people who were able to get food for themselves providing meals for people who were stranded in hurricanes in the wreckage after tornadoes. You know he was in Puerto Rico after the hurricane hit Puerto Rico. He was in the Bahamas after the Bahamas got shredded by a hurricane. He's incredible and now when the corona virus started you may remember the biggest stories when it first started where people trapped on cruise ships right these cruises and they not only weren't allowed off countries and states and cities wouldn't allow them to dock. Yeah they were just didn't want him or they didn't know what to do and he got a there was a princess cruise ship. That was not. I WANNA say it was by San Francisco. I may be wrong with I. Think up in northern California. He went up there with his team and he was feeding passengers on this ship. Most of whom were really sick and since then. He's just been everywhere. He has dedicated his life in the last two months to getting to keeping his his staff working and to getting food to people who need it. He's he's just like an angel. I don't know what exactly when he began taking on these missions of feeding people who were under served during a real times of crisis. But he's been doing it for the last couple years and it seems like he has figured out the math of how to make it happen. I if I look at the problem and go oh my Gosh. I know they need to eat and I can't think of how to make that happen on such a scale and he seems to have figured it out and he's he's just a blessing like he's a godsend to people it's like it takes the thinking out of it and he goes. I'm just GONNA make food like I'm GONNA make meals. I love cooking. I love food and there is a way you know. He specifically said on sixty minutes and there is no food shortage. What we need is to get the food to the people who need it. And that's what he's doing and he's he's brilliant at it like in addition to that. If you're GONNA be that kind of like an angel on earth you should. It also doesn't hurt if you're if you happen to be in addition to that a phenomenal show guest. He's just like funny and fun and energetic and loves to drink and drinks and it just warms. Ls assistant says. He was as he was doing this and started his daughter to open a bottle of champagne. And he he he's just lovely. And here's a little bit of Jose Ellen on the show I love you so much. What is art? And that's Andy in the background. I'm not letting him in the House. Because we're we're you know so..

Andy laster Chef Jose Andres Jose Ellen Jose Andres Sarah Palin Puerto Rico NBC Don Hewitt Saddle Peak Lodge Bahamas Los Angeles Spain California maxine United States president Eddie San Francisco Fo
"andes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:34 min | 6 months ago

"andes" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of Los Andes restaurant now agreeing to pay over seven hundred eighty thousand dollars for allegedly failing to pay their employees overtime carries didn't have to admit to any wrongdoing as part of this agreement a spokesperson for the family says they acknowledge they were aware that they weren't calculating employee overtime correctly labor department pro focusing on payroll between October twenty thirteen and October twenty sixteen investigators say one hundred twenty eight employees were not paid the overtime rate of time and a half whenever they worked more than forty hours in a week as back payments will be made in monthly installments and they'll run through June of twenty twenty four times a day you might not want to go outside pretty cold out there go out for dinner at night on the town wouldn't blame you for staying in if you do there's a movie for you whether you're single are partnered up depending whether your head store single enjoying a romantic comedy can be a curse or a blessing Robert Thompson is a professor of medium pop culture at Syracuse University if your happy and love the romantic comedy and Valentine's day can be the most wonderful thing in the world if you happen to be between happiness both of them can be absolute curses and what you choose a binge on may depend on where you live in love according to Google trends the most watched rom com in New York I'll have what she's having is when Harry met Sally Californians love clueless sixteen candles is tops in Chicago mayor Ruben CBS news New York and this portion of the news brought to us by window world of Boston word six fifty one traffic still tough out there we'll check.

Robert Thompson professor Syracuse University Valentine Google New York Harry Los Andes Chicago Ruben CBS Boston
"andes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:43 min | 7 months ago

"andes" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Know them or even deal with them and then there are stories of how police and government easily gained access to these DNA samples in short the Andes to many of these delays stores are not always happy or very positive and the market for DNA testing is not as bright as it used to be I'm Kim commando was in for him commandos Sunday afternoons at foreign K. T. A. R. news right now we're gonna listen for the latest in traffic from the valley Chevy dealers traffic center detour Dan always make it a little bit of a move on as the freeways are Jeff but no big moves I'm seeing a little bit at a slowing out here and there and even some better news the I ten was about rollover has cleared so we're good to go there there are brake lights in both directions dieser road for that little construction patch they have out there outside of that bill the ease bartender the ways are definitely user friendly most of this light to moderate slowing from fifty nine sixty Seventh Avenue area all the way into the deck park tunnel we do have a bunch of service street Rexall forty Third Avenue and Grand Avenue Seventh Avenue and Dunlap eighty Third Avenue in camelback also Dobson north of rocket geo and we got a big crash involving a cement mixer truck it rolled over on its side and that's why dieser road is closed at Glendale until further notice you might want to get with the dice are rolled instead but let's real road closed lips real road at Glendale for that role over this traffic report is brought to you by no cure sciatic like pain is often the result of spinal disc herniation call the sciatic experts in over here today for eight OO eight five five sixty six eighty six or it'll be so you are not calm teacher to engage your is partly cloudy skies today with a high of seventy two tonight clear the low forty eight right now in Glendale mostly clear skies forty seven degrees why others brought to you by Howard air.

Andes Kim commando Dan Jeff dieser road Glendale spinal disc herniation K. T. A. Chevy Howard
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 9 months ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"A new study finds that fires in the Amazon rainforest are speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes Mountains mountains that provide water to millions of people. NPR's Richard Harris reports scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers. Now our research team has identified another threat to these important water. Sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles net smoke sometimes settle settled on mountain glaciers. Those dark particles capture energy from the sun. Like a patch of blacktop that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo Glacier these black particles along with dust increased meltwater runoff runoff during the peak fire season the study is published in the Journal scientific

Amazon Andes Mountains Richard Harris NPR Zongo Glacier Bolivia Brazil Journal Scientific France
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

All Things Considered

00:52 sec | 9 months ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"Fires in the Amazon rain forest to speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes mountains according to a new study NPR science correspondent Richard Harris reports the tropical glaciers like those in the Andes provide water for millions of people scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers now a research team is identified another threat to these important water sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles in that smoke sometimes settle on mountain glaciers those dark particles capture energy from the sun like a patch of black top that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo glacier these black particles along with dust increased melt water run off during the peak fire season the studies published in the journal scientific

Richard Harris Andes Amazon Brazil France Bolivia NPR Zongo Glacier
"andes" Discussed on WBAI

WBAI

10:27 min | 11 months ago

"andes" Discussed on WBAI

"Other. eastern Africa. they tropical Andes in the in the new Shia are projected to lose more that eight percent of their current ice mass hi. in films people's life around the world where ever they leave. the green and then on the ice sheets are increasingly losing mass. these ice sheets together with place for minutes on all the time and drivers of sea level rise in addition to the expansion of warming sea water. sheets we continued to mess in response to Boston come on forming the planet experience global sea level rise for decades and centuries to come. I see see ice is declining in every month of the year and he's getting thinner. if global warming is seven one point five degrees Celsius above pre industrial levels yeah he goes from would be ice free in September. the month with the least he's only once in every hundred years buffalo one warning of two degrees this will all come up to one year in three. frozen sign in rock is fooling with the potential of adding more greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. you know even if global warming is limited to well below two degrees a long long quarter of the near surface come across we thought by twenty one hundred. Ivo greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase only around seventy percent Nielsen Emma frost would be lost. people living in the optics is that the indigenous peoples are already adjusting via troublesome hunting activities. to the seasonality and safety of non ice and snow conditions. but this success in the ducting depends on funding capacity is an institutional supports. four million people live permanently in the arctic region. and small island developing states are home to sixty five million people on. sixty six hundred and eighty million people live in low lying coastal zones and this would increase to a minute a billion people by twenty fifty. the offer to go to sea level rise and coastal extremely them. during the twentieth century the global mean sea level rose by about fifteen centimeters. its currency rising more than twice as fast and the face would further accelerate. reaching up to one point ten meters in twenty one hundred interjections emissions not shop the reduced. we also increase the frequency of extreme see the body mounts. which for instance during high tides and in some stores. many cities and small nine on. as well as in the US will be exposed to risks of flooding and then lost anybody by twenty fifty. with those major investments in other stations they would be exposed to escalating flood risks thank you bye. marine life is already being affected by warming and changes in ocean chemistry which impacts on the people that depend on it. to date the ocean has its all ninety percent off the heat in the climate system. if we take up to two four times well he then between nineteen seventy and presence by two thousand one hundred if global warming is limited to cool degrees. hello I'm Dan rather and you're listening to what's the frequency Kenneth with musical host Paul Fischer in New York City. and up to five to seven times more hi emissions. looming in the ocean sweet uses mixing between walk on a and therefore limits the supply of oxygen and nutrients for marine life. marine heat wave I have dealt with in frequency in nineteen eighty two. leasing in intensity. they are projected to further increasing frequency duration stand and intensive. their frequency would be twenty times hi at two degrees one me from head to pre industrial levels..

mass. Boston Andes Nielsen Emma frost Africa. US arctic Dan New York City. Kenneth Paul Fischer two degrees five degrees Celsius fifteen centimeters seventy percent ninety percent eight percent
News in Brief 25 September 2019

UN News

03:47 min | 11 months ago

News in Brief 25 September 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations fighting in Libya is spreading on the capital Tripoli and contributing to widespread lawlessness war crimes and a humanitarian -tarian crisis the UN's top human rights forum has heard addressing the Human Rights Council on Wednesday Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights. Kate Gilmore said that today the people people of Libya fear a return to a full scale civil war the situation in the country deteriorated in April when offensive to take Tripoli was launched by forces of these self stalled Libyan National Army under the command of General Kelly for after the result has been the deaths of at least two hundred eight thousand civilians and hundreds more injured Miss Gilmore said with more than three hundred thousand persons internally displaced while another four hundred thousand live within one two three kilometers from the clashes in Tripoli also at the Human Rights Council so Kazan Salami the head of the UN mission in Libya and smell said that widespread violations of the arms embargo by external actors had made things worse the current conflict conflict has now spread outside of the Capitol was the air and drone strikes launched against the strata sedan it also sparked the Michael Conflict and the city of Mozell in southern Libya where does the over one hundred civilians with killed over the bus to wants breath as secretary general recently warned the conflict risks escalating into full blown war together with the UN Human Rights Office this Mr Salami the Human Rights Council to establish an investigative mechanism to promote accountability in Libya the wells oceans and frozen spaces have been taking the heat for global warming for decades climate experts said on Wednesday in an appeal for urgent measures to tackle rising sea levels and melting blasio's ACEA is sheets and permafrost the experts from the Intergovernmental Panel on climate change warned that without a radical change in human behavior hundreds of millions of people could suffer more frequent natural disasters and food shortages according to their special report six hundred seventy million people who live in the world's high mountain regions and around the same same number in low lying coastal zones depend directly on the planet's oceans and frozen resources in addition for million people live permanently in the Arctic region and Small Island Developing States are home to sixty five million people without major investment in adaptation these low-lying zones would be exposed to escalating flood risks and some island nations are likely to become uninhabitable the IPC report insists it notes that in Europe Eastern Africa the tropical Andes and Indonesia smaller BLASIO's are projected to lose more than eighty percent of their current ice mass by twenty one hundred under worst emissions scenarios. This is likely to increase hazards for people for example through landslides avalanches rockfalls and floods in addition to problems for farmers and hydroelectric power producers downstream and finally a new generation of global commerce. Hamas and finance deals is needed to help poor countries grow without them having to resort to high polluting energy sources the UN trade and development agency UNCTAD said on Wednesday stay in a call for a green new deal for the world's economy in reference to the measures introduced in the United States during the Great Depression to boost growth UNCTAD maintained that what is needed is a clean break from current sturdy measures. UN Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved UNCTAD beliefs but it is going to require governments investing around one point seven a billion dollars a year in low mission policies that is around one third of what is currently spent on fossil fuel subsidies the agency noted adding that these strategy could generate at at least one hundred and seventy million jobs and resulting cleaner industrialization in the Global South Daniel Johnson U._N. News.

UN Human Rights Council Libya Tripoli Unctad Kate Gilmore Kazan Salami United Nations Mr Salami Libyan National Army Miss Gilmore Commissioner IPC Europe Intergovernmental Panel
It's Officially the Best Time of the Year to Cook

Bon Appetit Foodcast

11:54 min | 1 year ago

It's Officially the Best Time of the Year to Cook

"Talking about the fall playbook from the September issue of Bon appetite and really should have been the whole Lsu but we'll talk about the issue with the issue Chris. Do you remember when this story is being conceived and you you and Andy and I were talking about what this story could or should be. What was what was the mission we sort of decide upon we wanted to get into sort of get people into the mindset of like okay like summer's over but that's not necessarily a bad thing like we want people to be excited to get back into the kitchen and you know just give them like some recipes that that are kind of simple uncomplicated whether it's something that cooks quickly but it's kind of hands off you know or some combination of Maimi? It's longer cook time but I'd like with zero. Prep just give people an excuse to feel great about getting cooking again getting back in the kitchen. A one phrase that I have bandied about is the Shen situational cooking because I think that dictates a lot about what we make when is it. Is it Sunday when you've got all day to sort of braise something in your job in Tuesday night when you wanna eat something good but it's six twenty eight. PM and you haven't started cooking yet. That's a lot of ways we sort of approached these recipes of which seven recipes Andy. I don't believe so one of the recipes got cut so yeah which one guy cut. I don't understand got cut it. It was it was designated to become a digital exclusive yeah yeah. It's like the right part which one was it. Was the lentil bowl well. I don't think it was called that I think it was like it was like girls wasn't with with the Spice Chili oil and then it was just like I am just going to call it a lentil bowl for now 'cause it got cut. I think we realized that people only want to work so hard on a lentil bowl. That's true and it took a little bit of doing. I don't know I do get excited like that. When there's fall there's a little bit of bite in the air and summer's over in summer is great. Go to the beach grilling all that but it's nice actually just get serious about wanting to be in the kitchen. Point your cast iron skillet point out your Dutch oven getting your tongs and cooking again yeah and having the patience to really think about what ingredients I mean th you should be thinking about ingredients around but really putting the time in for cooking the dish you wanna be cooking the first recipe this. This is Morocco recipe right now. Oh yes that's very interesting interesting. He's got all this pasta. So of course I wanna eat this just by the title Creamy Pasta with with crispy mushrooms. Yes I wanted to come up with the positive I've done so many over the last. I think almost four years here but I don't think I've really done a creamy creamy pasta dish with mushrooms. I love Pasta Love Mushrooms. I was like the smick sense and it feels very fall and I thought this could come together fairly quickly and that was my hero and then we do a lot of creamy pasta from the standpoint of Oh you know glossy emulsified butter. Oh yes but I was like Andy. Just put cream in the pasta. You know how you make creamy pasta sometimes if the move fast and and you know not break things like just put cream in the pasta and my life I started twitching when he said this heavy cream andy make it delicious. I don't know how many recipes I have have that call for every cream but in this case I did go for it and it really did make a difference. It just made it easy. It was like a nice little thing crutch to the US also when you blend heavy cream and then throw some parmesan cheese it is so good. Is that the problem with Italy one of those again on the streets as the pastas that you can't stop eating. It's like you don't want to see a calorie counter going but it's amazing sorry so this one. Mike you can use either just simple criminally mushrooms. You can find any market or you can go to the farmer's. There's market and splurge on a lot of interesting wild mushrooms and re introduced different flavors and textures guess a question. I always have when I love a mushroom positive because it feels it was very autumnal. How do you cook the mushrooms themselves so they get Nice Brown and caramelized and Krispy before you know blending with the cream and all that because I sometimes I get Kinda just squeaky and squishy and you know what techniques so sometimes you if they're using a lot of motions Russians in this case we're using a pound of mushrooms. You really want to do it in batches. Most likely I like tearing my mushrooms up a lot of us do that and you end up getting these kind of crackly pieces and so they get Brown because also when you cut him up the end up looking like canned mushroom sometimes they just don't look right I kind of tearing them to their natural shape and and then I took them in oil in this case extra virgin olive oil and then I just go pretty hard undisturbed until the brown around on the edges to they develop a crust. Yes over yeah. Give it a little bit of a toss. I don't even know if I really flip flipping each individual mushroom. If you work in the line my new restaurant shaking I think I read somewhere and wait a minute petite mushrooms to develop a nice caramelized crust you. I don't add salt till the very end. Assault draws out too much moisture. Is that correct yes. I don't see my mushrooms until both sides are deeply brown and crispy see around the edges. Ah also some shallots. I love that smell when you shall. It's there's no sort of introduce a pretty classic yeah and then you get all the mushrooms on add the shallots shallots You're not trying to get too much earlier softening them and then wall while you're doing that. You have the mushrooms ready to go. There cooked the shelter going. you cook your pasta and you're going to cook it. Just under all dented like two minutes before for and then I add the pasta the heavy cream and let that go until the cream has reduced lightly and then I add a bit of zest and juice from half Philemon ooh. There's a lot of the cream is so heavy who you have creaming of butter and your Parmesan yeah so there's quite a bit affect and you have extra virgin olive oil so you need a bit of zest and juice. You need that acidity kind of brightened things up and bring everything back to life again. Yeah couple of tips here love the pulling the mushrooms apart pushing the mushrooms by hand tearing the much mushroom by hand I love not salt in the mushroom still after they're nice and Brown then thirdly what you guys in the test kitchen seem to love to do is use a Dutch of in when you're sort of like tossing pasta with whether it's mushrooms or any sort of saw that you that is high enough side toss and swirl and get everything inc.. It's it's such a good little insurance policy for being able to really work the pasta around and like let's face it even just twelve ounces nevermind a pound of Pasta in the largest skillet you own. It's it's fine to work. Bring it over to the sink to try to toss pasta over that so that you don't get all of your stove okay. I'm going to bet that this is all right. Let me say what is the next one. It's called Sweden saucy pork chops. I'm GonNa Citrus Morocco too good. It's kind of a dad families or not honey over to pick up. Some pork chops underway right. Oh my God all right. Wow that's how you really see me. Hunched over like the plate of pork chops like not talking. Can anybody on a Tuesday this to cope we buy some good bone in rib pork chops but you call for one inch thick one so they cook really quickly quickly but so you don't have to overcook them you add some sugar to sort of Maryland Dryer up. Whatever so we get a quicker caramelized cross yeah just just salt in a sprinkle of sugar on the pork chops because the thing is pork chops an in a perfect world we all be buying like pastor raise heritage breed pork and it would be super fatty and rich and unctuous? You know just whatever you do to it but this is kind of optimize to work with any pork chop. This is like you know and this is a a method of cooking them that really mitigates that tendency to have them dry out and get like really kind of like cardboard so adding that little bit of sugar to the outside means. You'RE GONNA get crazy amounts of color within just a few minutes. You don't need to overcook that first side in order to get the color you want and that is like that is like the death of like the one inch inch thick pork chop. We went back and forth about what pork chop to us because we'll all of a sudden you want like a much fatter one in order to get got like a really great crust without using sugar but this just like. Let's get that really quickly and then you're really just you're. You're just you're picking that second. Side very briefly can interject with any piece of protein. One side is always going to get more done than the other in that side gets the beautiful cross that society serve up right. It's what's going on underneath doesn't matter yeah exactly it's like the old sort of old school. French like approach which is like you have the presentation side and then like who cares what the second side it's super yummy super easy pan sauce with some red wine vinegar that sort of introduces acids and capers butter and then disorder garlic and in the water. It's Rosemary and it all together. Yep and you serve it and it probably start to finish. How is this dish. Take fifteen minutes if that if that yeah I mean twelve twelve so yeah. It's it's great. You know like that kind of like that wet cook. You know kind of environment. Just like means like nothing's going to dry out doing when people see like some like pants author very impressive fastest like no that's just like cooking the pan and thrown much ingredients speaking of hands when I saw the photo for this sheet Pan Potato Hash with fixings and it was beautiful she he tray of these beautifully shingle potatoes at our oven. Crisper looks like homemade potato chips. I was like Oh my God that look so good. The question is which one of you develop this Chris Morocco. Wow okay okay yeah. That was me at this is this is. Andy doesn't do brunch brought. She's not doing potato doesn't brunch. Andes Andes Andy's protein smoothie. He's busy working out on Sunday morning onto this again. This is a very bad move like making brunch where the family well it look potatoes you can you can make them as complicated as he want where you can make them as simple as you want and this is just a great way to take a lot of potatoes and make them unbelievably. Lee crispy Jammie Chewy. Just everything you want so big russet potatoes. You don't even know thinly sliced. D Use a a mandolin it. Can you slice slice by hand because honestly the irregularity like it's going to be totally. I liked that because in some get extra crispy tender and that's fine in the oven these you're going to be in the oven for close to an hour you know were and you're. GonNa get some that are like crazy. Crisp like potato chip and others are just going to be no more in the center. They're going to be a little bit like Kinda. Chewy Jab ultra tender so I- similarly toss him with all spread them out on a sheet trays by two and a half pounds four twenty five forty to fifty minutes and an almost that's when you take it out almost with goes tray of nachos chose. It's like it's some. It's like the lovechild of like palm. Anna clarified butter like beautiful kind of fanned out sort of potatoes I did. I did this video with molly. Baas mayor. Would we are talking about cooking school in the next video video coming out on what is it on. It's on the Broccoli as a people are talking about urine. That video was wrong is so much about cooking.

Andy Chris Morocco Brown LSU United States Morocco Maryland Assault Krispy Mike Italy Molly Anna Crisper Sweden Rosemary LEE Jammie Chewy
Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

BrainStuff

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Is Permafrost Really Permanent?

"Brain stuff lauren Bogle bomb here in two thousand ten. A woolly mammoth carcass was discovered in Siberia near the coast of the laptev sea nicknamed Yuka. This specimen of the long extinct beast died around twenty eight thousand years ago yet her body was astonishingly well preserved complete with patches of reddened for brain that was largely intact and nucleus like cell structures so how did her body lasts so long without rotting away the short answer is Yuka was frozen but not inside some glacier iceberg after death you can became encased in a layer of what's known as permafrost. Let's break down what that is as we know. Water freezes at thirty two degrees Fahrenheit four zero degrees Celsius permafrost is any ground materials such as soil sediment and rock that remains at or below freezing temperatures for at least two consecutive years. It's about twenty five percent of all the land area in the Northern Hemisphere is known to contain permafrost. It was American paleontologist Simone W Mueller who originally coined the term permafrost appointment two of the words permanent and frost despite that name permafrost doesn't last forever thanks to climate change. It's been been thawing in large quantities. This has serious ramifications for the environment and the economy generally speaking permafrost tends to occur in places where The average air temperature is zero degree Celsius or lower every year. According to the national snow and Ice Data Center most of the Northern Hemisphere's permafrost sits between the high high latitudes of sixty and sixty degrees north Siberia Canada Alaska and parts of Scandinavia are loaded with this frigid turf further south permafrost tends to be found in high elevation areas like the Tibetan Plateau and this was elps permafrost isn't as widespread below the equator but it does underlie parts of New Zealand the Andes Mountains and Arctic adjust as its locations vary so does its composition. It's not uniform. Some sections are ice-free while others are made up of more than thirty percent ice likewise the depth age and extent of permafrost. Ken Vary widely oftentimes permafrost permafrost sits beneath an active layer of ground that is a layer that thaws and re freezes seasonally. The permafrost itself can measure anywhere from less than three feet. That's one meter thick to more than five thousand feet or fifteen hundred meters thick and it can get Patchy Northern Alaska occupies a continuous permafrost zone that means permafrost underlies more than ninety percent of the local terrain but at lower latitudes. It's a different story pretty much everything south of the Brooks mountain range sits discontinuance tenuous permafrost zone here permafrost resides under a smaller percentage of the land surface. That's partially because as counter intuitive as it may sound snow. Snow is a really good insulator so when thick blankets of snow stick around all year long they might keep the ground too warm for permafrost likewise in spots. That's where permafrost already exists insulating layers of surface level snow are liable to heat it up but while snows and impediment. Pete is a boon widespread in and around the southern Arctic. Pete is a kind of ground material. That's made up partially decayed organic matter like mosses or swamp plants by and large the. Ground beneath it is kept cool shielded from solar heat this pete safeguards permafrost evergreen forests lend a helping hand to their thickly thickly needled branches pine trees limit the amount of sunlight and snow that hits the surface in the process the evergreens help keep permafrost thawing so permafrost is common below the clustered pines and high elevation high altitude areas the arrangement is mutually beneficial since liquid water can't sleep through hard permafrost. I it acts like a drainage barrier unfrozen water. That's absorbed into the active layer gets trapped. They're barred from travelling deeper into the earth. This water sustained some of the plants that live at the surface although not all permafrost sticks around more than a couple of years some is quite old at minimum. The permafrost in prudhoe Bay Alaska is thought thought to be five hundred thousand years of age and some of the permafrost beneath the Canadians Yukon territory could be more than seven hundred thousand years old inside the ladder scientists. It is found in ancient horse leg complete d._N._A.. Samples Permafrost can keep all kinds of organic matter preserved over long periods of time in two thousand twelve Russian scientists is regenerated live plants from ice age fruits that have been encased in permafrost for about thirty thousand years unfortunately as permafrost thaws the trapped organic organic material decomposes releasing carbon and methane into the atmosphere those gases exacerbate climate change and the bad news is according to a twenty nineteen can study published in nature communications various permafrost deposits around the world have warmed up by a couple of degrees between the years two thousand seven and two thousand sixteen right now approximately one point seven billion tons of carbon is trapped in permafrost scientists. Don't know how much of this will be released into the atmosphere. If current trends continue continue or how quickly it will In the city of New Orleans gresh alone more than one hundred residential buildings have been damaged because the one solid permafrost beneath them is softening the warming permafrost has has also triggered landslides drained lakes and torn roads apart. It's yet another reason to be concerned about our contributions to climate change but to end on a positive note remember the woolly mammoth Yuga found in Siberian permafrost in two thousand ten. She was so well preserved that an early twenty nineteen scientists were able to extract eighty eight eight nucleus like structures from her cells an attempt to coax them back to life. The team injected the nuclei into mouse ovarian cells and while the cells never fully divided divided they did complete the process called spindle assembly which is a step where chromosomes attached to spindle structures before the parent cell breaks into two daughter cells. Perhaps as genetics progresses will be able to help the process

Northern Hemisphere Yuka Pete Lauren Bogle Siberia New Orleans Northern Alaska Alaska Simone W Mueller Ice Data Center Prudhoe Bay Alaska Andes Mountains Brooks Mountain KEN Siberia Canada Tibetan Plateau Scandinavia New Zealand Thirty Two Degrees Fahrenheit
Why Do Some People Eat Dirt?

BrainStuff

06:17 min | 1 year ago

Why Do Some People Eat Dirt?

"Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel. Von here in gas stations and flea markets. All around the southeastern United States, you can find packets or boxes containing crumbles whiteclay in Kenya. You can buy reddish dirt on the street formed into little pellets that look like baby carrots in Uganda. You can buy Yankee doodle brands dirt at the grocery store, a website called earth's. Klay store sells Klay from all over the world and ships them right to your home. But what are you supposed to do with it? When it gets to you. Well, you eat it. You might have a vague sense that you've heard of people eating dirt before pregnant women. Maybe pica is the overarching term for craving and eating things that are not food in the sixth century, see the physician Flavius Asia's noticed people sticking nonfood items in their mouths the way that Magpies pica in Latin pick up random objects in their beaks e figured these people had entirely indiscriminate appetites for just any old thing and termed the behavior after the magpie. It turns out pica is kind of misnomer because pica cravings are actually very specific though. According to the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders or DSM. It includes a range of behaviors some people crave paperclips, batteries or coins. These potentially dangerous cravings are considered by the DSM to be actual disorders. But pica can also include cravings for Ross starch that's amylase g ice, that's pathogen and dirt. That's geology. Geology is one form of pica found an almost every country in the world. We spoke with Sarah young assistant, professor in the department of anthropology at Northwestern University. She said I was surprised when I first saw it. I was studying pregnant women nog Raphy in Zanzibar. And I asked a woman what she ate when she's pregnant, and incidentally, she said every day, I take earth from this wall and eat it. I was just learning. Sahelian was pretty good at it. But I really didn't think I was understanding correctly. My research assistant was like, yeah. You heard right. Young ended up writing her PHD dissertation on geology and winning the Margaret Mead award in twenty thirteen for her book craving earth, which detailed her research about geology practices worldwide in her research. Young tracked down medical literature historical texts research on animal behavior soil science in parasitology and came to the conclusion that there are four possible explanations. As to why people eat dirt. The most common longest running take on geology is that there's no good reason for it that it's a pathology. It's an aspirin behavior of some unknown origin, young explained, the racism sexism and classism behind that simplistic, take, quote, it's the women they know not what they do explanation. It was basically white men writing about this for the past few hundred years, and it was dismissed as abberant we can refute this. There are so many species of animals that go to great risk to get clan. Charcoal like the coldest monkey that steals charcoal from villagers, but even so we know very little about geology because for centuries. Scientists were stubbornly lacking curiosity about it. When scientists did start looking into it, the first hypothesis they came up with to explain why hundreds of thousands of people worldwide craven eat dirt is that. There must be something useful in the clay micronutrients of some kind young said the mother nature's multivitamin explanation is a really intuitive one. But. Fortunately, it doesn't really shake out for starters. Although the Klay her study participants in Zanzibar were eating was tinged with red indicating iron content investigations into whether that iron could be absorbed and used by the body came up empty, plus according to young people generally prefer whiter Klay. If you give geologist to the option of snacking on Georgia, white Kaelin or the reddish clay found on men's bar. They'll almost always pick the white Kaelin, which does not contain iron. So we turn to another hypothesis could hurt provide protection from germs the explanation that eating dirt somehow an immune system boost might not make sense on the surface. After all we're supposed to stay away from dirt wash our hands cleaner, close take off our shoes when we enter the house, but clay face masks can draw germs and oils and dead cells from your skin, and they're made of dirt. Right. According to young eating clay might collect stuff inside of the gut similar to how a mud mask collect stuff from your face. But why would somebody need an intestinal mud mask? The answer is protection from pathogens and harmful compounds many harmful microorganisms and compounds can enter your body via the things you eat. You digest the food and it's absorbed through the wall of your intestine and into your bloodstream, but lots of potentially harmful stuff can get to his in this way to Klay may stimulate the mucous membranes on the surface of your guts to create more mucus, thus forming a sort of protective barrier against those pathogens and compounds young said, it can also bind with whatever harmful thing you're eating for example, in the Andes people eat wild potatoes, which contain these toxic chemicals called glencoe alkaloids. But after they dip the potatoes in clay, they become safe to eat. But while eating clay might protect from pathogens and harmful chemicals, which is especially important in pregnant women. There's something of Goldilocks principle at play here. You want to shield yourself from the harmful stuff, but you also don't want to protect yourself from the nutrients you need, for example, if you eat a steak that's full of both bioavailable iron and pathogens. But you eat clay at the same time. The iron could also become bound by the clay and wouldn't be absorbed by your gut, although the claim might be protecting you from pathogens to some extent. It's also preventing you from absorbing the nutrients the fourth hypothesis for why people eat dirt or clay is that it might help nausea vomiting and diarrhea by coating stomach after all a number of anti-diarrhea treatments. Have Kaylynn in them. Kaelin puts the KO in kopech tape. Though, the reasons for geology are still rather mysterious young stresses that it's far more common than we realize partially because of those old stigmas against it. Young said people don't like to talk about it or admit it when I'm doing ethnic, graphic interviews. I always ask how much earth do eat instead of do you eat earth? Because so many people have sworn they don't eat it. And later told me that they do, but they lied because I didn't want you to think I was

Klay Zanzibar Klay Store Uganda Young Lauren Vogel United States Kenya Nausea Margaret Mead Kaylynn Flavius Asia Northwestern University Research Assistant Kaelin Sahelian Aspirin Ross
"andes" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

The Sheepdog Project

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on The Sheepdog Project

"Is they all seem to be handling this trick pretty well. Right. You should know that the point of the Andes they're supposed to be in is actually fourteen thousand feet. So they would be a lot more winded than it shown them, basically, it's giving you the pressure that they're kinda hike in the national park shows. Panting a little bit when they're throwing the bags. They all have really nice climbing ropes too. So I'm sure they got those in this village huts, they got state of the art climate ropes. But again, another huge plot. Whole groups phone apart red flies being an asshole. And as they're coming down. They're coming down the west side of the Andes through an area. That is just really treacherous rocks. The size of votes wagons. All of a sudden, they starts take fire from back up at higher elevation in their genius plan is to have two guys. Flank uphill. Closing about two hundred yards. Over rocks varying in size from a suitcase to Volkswagen with pretty much a lot of cover. But no concealment that's their plan, which obviously is not gonna work. But it doesn't matter because basically the person that's ambushed him is the kid when the soccer shirt he pops up shoots Aflac in the head. So any movie that Aflac dies in isn't completely bad? Right. That's why this is getting to stars. Instead of just one. So athletes character is dead. They continue to make the track. The the kids killed in the processes, well, they wrap up athlete's body, so they're taking his body with them, right? They get to a point that they send Benny ahead. There's a little bit more infighting there. And then they ultimately sent Benny to do a reconnaissance. He basically comes back and says, okay this town, we gotta go through is on high alert. They know where common and he says every kid in town has a rifle and they're all looking for us. I'll get into more this minute. But that's completely unrealistic given where they are geographically. So they gotta go in. They got move fast and be light. There's no way they're going to do it with. They don't have the mules anymore. So they got to the point where they had to crest the hill. They had to turn the turn the meals loose. So they make the decision. They're basically going to carry cash wise what they can carry some day packs, and they're gonna throw the rest down a ravine, which they do and their reasoning is in order to carry their buddies body. They have to lighten up as much cost because they're not gonna lead his body. So they do that. So they head down to the town of Beni goes ahead to get on the boat, and then get a smaller power to come back in and meet them like to swim out to it. Of course. So he gets a small like motorized dugout to come back and pick them up on the coast. But they still got to meet him there as they're moving down they encounter one of these kids who's looking for him literally like middle school or young teenager the kids scared shitless. They disable him take his vehicle and they're driving up the coast. There's also a scene where you see like basically looks like kids on spring break around fire. You know, they're like teenage kids, but they've gotta Matic rifles. So the reason this makes no sense is. In South America, the interior, right? Were you encounter all the narcos? And you know, what the kind of the wild west areas are nothing like the coast the coast air the coast areas. Even where the smaller towns, are you just don't see stuff like this. You know, there are places on the interior where yet you're gonna see the walking around with guns and everything else, you're not gonna see that on the coast. Okay. That's a lot more built up area for the most part. The coast is not like the wild west huge tourism industry in South America. I've been up and down the coast of Peru of Columbia of Chile..

Benny Andes South America Aflac Volkswagen soccer Peru Chile fourteen thousand feet two hundred yards
"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

Monstruo

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on Monstruo

"He is released in just fourteen having served about less than seventeen days in jail per murder in some half hearted attempt at making his stay as hard as possible on him. The authorities keep him in solitary confinement for the fourteen years. He actually serves by Ecuadoran law. He's released two years early on good behavior. They tell him that time in solitary is to protect them from the survivors of his victims. Some of whom chipped into put a price on this head twenty five thousand dollars American. He spends these years watching the newspaper clippings of his crimes yellow on the walls of his cell. They cover every inch from the floor to the ceiling. He's rearrested less than an hour after his release and taken to Columbia to face, stricter Justice of the Colombian authorities the Colombian still execute murderers, and many of the families who still follow the case think this will finally be their chance to see Justice done, but they are mistaken. Pedro spends the day long rides for the Andes to Columbia staring at the window watching the sun dance between the mountain tops. It has come to visit him every day in prison. Never pouring over his face. The way did is a free man warming is naked body in the steaming dawn, but it has always remained a stain on the walls of the prison that could always worm its way through this crack that thing that could find wherever he go. The Colombians fine Pedro on fit to stand trial. And he's taken to the psychiatric ward instead of the electric chair in just three years. He's found sane by state. Psychiatrist papers drafted for his release the thirties have no recourse to change. This band is the are by the system a system, they think they are the administrators of that they have made together with the other decent law-abiding citizens of their country. But Pedro noses system was woven by darker more mysterious hand thing beyond things who sees the world by bleeding. It's red light Dan upon the land upon peyser Lopez who took that profane sacrament and by his great massive hands worked as its highest priest ashamed of their iniquities, their incompetence, the Colombian authorities pack pager Lopez into a car in the middle of the night and drive them to the outskirts of Boghetta. Rumors abound already of his early release. And I don't wanna. Shot to death on their own front. Stairs by one of the Esino hired by the families of his victims. He watches them drive away down the road, the Knight's still deep and quite cold on his shoulders and face. He doesn't curl up. Shiver though, the young Pedro who might have more severely felt a loneliness aching cold of the night have been scrubbed away through rape violence years ago. There was only Pedro Lopez. Now, the living bogeyman of South America with all the world before him. Pedro finds it can only think of his mother, and so he begins to walk the night lingers forever and possibly long as he travels from Bogota to Lima thinking of all the things a man, not not think of the bloody path led a little boy through the night into the bloody knowledge of the son. And in time he finds himself standing before his mother's front door. He spends the night terrorizing her. Making threats reminding her of old times of her betrayal and her own couple -bility and his crimes the red light of dawn finally breaks, and he goes to kill her, but finds can't know deep wellspring familial affection stops him, no sense of guilt. She's merely old and inconsequential now anybody on earth could murder this old used up hor for any reason, she is not worthy of the sun. She is not worthy of Pedro Lopez..

Pedro peyser Lopez murder Columbia Andes Justice South America Dan rape Boghetta Bogota Lima twenty five thousand dollars fourteen years seventeen days three years two years
"andes" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"It's hard to imagine a worst human being then federal Alonzo Lopez tardy even think of him as being a human being the monster of the Andes is one of the most prolific serial killers child, rapists and child murderers in history. The worst of the worst when he was captured for trying to lure a local street vendors young daughter away from her family in Ecuador in one thousand nine hundred local authorities suspected him for the murder of four other girls whose bodies they just recently uncovered police were blown away we confess not only those murders. But the murders of a total of a hundred and ten little girls in Ecuador loan. He'd also been busy and Peru and Colombia the number was so outrageous authorities thought he was lying. But when Pedro lead them to the bodies of fifty three girls, they certainly believed him then and the one hundred ten victims may just be the tip of the iceberg. All in all thirty suspect. Pedro Lopez of killing over three hundred and fifty girls between his native Colombia, Peru and Ecuador in the mid to late seventies. After he was convicted. Of the murder of fifty seven girls in Ecuador in nineteen Eighty-three. He was given the maximum sentence allowed for any crime in that country sixteen years in prison. Yep. Confessed to one hundred and ten murders. Led police to fifty three gravesites found guilty in court, a fifty seven murders all the killings aid recovered bodies for and he was sentenced to only sixteen years, and then he'd be released two years early for good behavior. And after he's released who be immediately detained again deported to Colombia and imprisoned in a psychiatric hospital for additional crimes. They're only to again, be set free after just a few years. This time set free for good Petra Alonzo Lopez whereabouts have been unknown since nineteen ninety eight he may still be alive. He may still be killing Colombian. Authorities have suspected him of additional murders since two thousand two who is this monster. Why does he do what he does? How does someone becomes so cold so vicious house able to kill so many children before getting caught? Why was he ever allowed to be freed and sixteen years? That's it. What's the story behind Ecuador's? Criminal Justice system. We traveled to South America today. Revisit Columbia for the first time since we talked about Pablo Escobar Pablo and petro were born a year apart actually and both grew up in extreme poverty in Colombia and both chose to exploit the broken criminal Justice system of Colombia and northwestern South America in general in the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies for their own selfish ends, but in very very different ways as bad as Pablo Escobar was and he was a very bad, dude. Petra was in my opinion, so much worse. If I had to pick either him or Pedro to babysit my kids. I'm sure as hell gonna go with Escobar. You could argue the Pablo at least tried to help the four tried to help some people even if he it cocaine epidemic led to cows deaths and destroyed lives petro caused only pain. It's a bummer Escobar. Never met Petra Lopez in the nineteen seventies. I'd like to think he would have had him tortured. And killed federal murdered little girls from the same impoverished neighborhoods Pablo at least tried to help in his own misguided ways. So get ready for a dark true crime suck today. Another example of why certain sexually violent people may need to be put on an island. We talked about last week or perhaps just from moved from the planet entirely work can wait. It's time for time sec. Happy Monday time suckers who Ray for Monday hip, hooray hooray, but time such a jolly good for time to the good times. When we talk about super talk show like we do today. I don't know something like that. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Thanks to our space lizard, supporting the show via patriot for allowing this show to continue for coming out to support the happy murder tour stand up shows as well. Meet more and more spaces on the road had a blast and Philly got some more cool gifts to adorn the walls of the suck dungeon as well. And thanks for all the brave courageous messages from the victims of sexual abuse past week. Holy shit. Glad the episode helped reinforce the message that it is not your fault when you are victimized..

Pablo Escobar Pablo Pedro Lopez Ecuador Colombia Pablo Escobar Petra Alonzo Lopez murder Alonzo Lopez Escobar Peru Andes South America Philly petro cocaine Ray Columbia sixteen years two years
Science News from around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Science News from around the Planet

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. Here's a short piece from the December two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Angkor Powell from Ecuador. Scientists have identified a new hummingbird species in the Ecuadorian Andes, but very few of the birds exist and the species is considered critically endangered. Its habitat is shrinking as nearby communities burned the native landscape to make way for cattle grazing from Germany, Germany has launched the world's first hydrogen powered trains in an effort to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels the trains, which can reach speeds of up to one hundred forty kilometers per hour. Have fuel cells that convert high. Hydrogen oxygen into electricity from Rwanda Rwanda is setting up its first research center for noncommunicable diseases, including diabetes cancer such illnesses currently account for forty six percent of the country's total deaths by all diseases a one hundred percent increase from the year two thousand from China. The Chinese government is requiring athletes who want to compete for the country in the twenty twenty two Beijing Olympic Games to have their genomes. Sequenced officials say this practice is to screen for medical conditions that could affect the competitor's performance. But some scientists have called a discriminatory from Pakistan. Researchers have detected the flesh eating amoeba Gloria fowleri in the domestic water supply of Karachi Pakistan's most populous city, the metropolis a fifteen million people has seen alarming uptick in cases of fatal type of encephalitis caused by the parasite. And from Israel. Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known brewery in a cave near Haifa. They found residue from thirteen thousand year-old Wheaton barley based beer that resembled Partridge. The previous earliest known brewery was thought to be five thousand years old that was quick hits by uncle Apollo.

Rwanda Pakistan Steve Mirsky Germany Ecuadorian Andes Angkor Powell Editor Haifa Gloria Fowleri Ecuador Partridge Chinese Government Beijing Israel China One Hundred Forty Kilometers P Thirteen Thousand Year Five Thousand Years One Hundred Percent
Science News From Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:23 min | 1 year ago

Science News From Around the Planet

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. Here's a short piece from the December two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Angkor Pol from Ecuador. Scientists have identified a new hummingbird species in the Ecuadorian Andes, but very few of the birds exist and the species is considered critically endangered. Its habitat is shrinking as nearby communities burned the native landscape to make way for cattle grazing from Germany, Germany has launched the world's first hydrogen powered trains in an effort to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels the trains, which can reach speeds of up to one hundred forty kilometers per hour. Have fuelled cells that convert high. Jn oxygen into electrically from Rwanda Rwanda is setting up its first research center for noncommunicable diseases, including diabetes and cancer such illnesses currently account for forty six percent of the country's total deaths by all diseases a one hundred percent increase from the year two thousand from China. The Chinese government is requiring athletes who want to compete for the country in the twenty twenty two Beijing Olympic Games to have their genomes. Sequenced officials say this practice is to screen for medical conditions that could affect the competitor's performance. But some scientists have called a discriminatory from Pakistan. Researchers have detected the flesh eating amoeba Gloria fowleri in the domestic water supply of Karachi Pakistan's most populous city, the metropolis of fifteen million people has seen in alarming uptick in cases of fatal type of encephalitis caused by the parasite. And from Israel. Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known brewery in a cave near Haifa. They found residue from thirteen thousand year old Wheaton barley based beer that resembled Partridge. The previous earliest known brewery was thought to be five thousand years old that was quick hits by encore Paulo.

Rwanda Pakistan Steve Mirsky Germany Ecuadorian Andes Ecuador Editor Haifa Gloria Fowleri Chinese Government Wheaton Beijing Israel Partridge China One Hundred Forty Kilometers P Thirteen Thousand Year Five Thousand Years One Hundred Percent
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"These novel sort of species compositions might be just as troubling some of the physiological responses in a specially in a diverse system like this year. I think this, you know, we have this idea or with understanding that these species interactions are very important in. So clearly species move around or change, those interactions are going to change, and that's just gonna feed back in, you know, create more changes in. And those become very hard to study impart. Just imagine if we don't know anything about one of the players, it's gonna be harder still to know about you know, all of the players in that team there in that network, but we are trying to get at that in kind of model systems. So for example, I was involved in a study where we were working with these experiments were removing species up and down the mountain now in this case, we're actually moving corn and potato up and down the mountain working with these these local farmers in the Andes kind of small scale farming to see the same thing. We talk about that. These species might need to move up the mountain, you know, what would happen as it gets warmer. Does do corn farms need to move up the mountain to potato farms? So this this grad student, I was working with Richard Tito, heated this big experiment, and he planted the corn and the potato at different elevations. So under different temperatures, different soils different conditions. And what he found is that if the corn was grown up on her warmer temperatures it was decimated. By urban wars and the same with potatoes. And so we basically find that there is complete crop failure due to warming. But it wasn't due to the warm in itself. It was due to the rival of new pests that were normally kind of restricted to the lower elevations below were these corn farms were held in so's. We warmed up the farms. You know, you basically get all these different pests that just destroy either eat the grain itself or make it unsellable in. So that really highlighted to me that it's not necessarily the physiology of the plant. It's the interactions with some of the pests, and I was so you can imagine there's ways that interactions with pollinators disperse, there's all different sorts of interactions that dictate where and how these plants live are gonna become really important in the future. Yeah. And even if there isn't a model out there some form of predictive ability to say which direction these relationships might go. It is very troubling in at least a something to definitely be aware of in keep in mind as we forge ahead into this uncertainty. Just things can get weird. It's it's hard to make predictive assumptions based on that in how to adapt to that. If say, you're a farmer, or if you're relying on timber harvest or something like that, let alone all of the support networks that natural systems provide us to begin with. Right. And you know, what we find is that, you know, the the trees are moving, but other researchers study that came out from the same area in Peru where we work that showed that the birds are also moving up the mountains. Other researchers have found changes in the her pedal with the frogs or with the insects into all of these things seem to be moving, but they're all moving at different rates. So different species are moving, but even classes of species are moving at different rates in so. So what happens when that you know, the plant is forced higher on the mountain because it's too hot for down low. But you know, maybe the the bird doesn't move up that requires for for seed dispersal, you know, so what happens that species in the absence of a dispersal or what happens when suddenly the snakes move higher on the mountains, and they start to eat the eggs of the birds, and so they drive some of these birds locally extinct what happens to the plants..

Richard Tito Andes Peru
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

03:41 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"You know, if you've got approached by journalists, it's it's often saying how these are going to respond into the future in a theme that runs throughout your entire researches. They're responding climate change is currently happening. It's been happening, and plants and other organisms are already starting to respond to that. And that's exactly what you found going on in the Andes that that's exactly right, Matt. So a lot of times we think of when we talk about climate change using the future tense in everyone saying it's going to warm by this much this gonna be this impact. It's that future tense going to be will be, but you know, we really should be using the past tense or the present in all this stuff because it has already been happening for decades is happening now, it will also happen the future. But you know, we're already seen those impacts now for the tropics. It's it's been hard because we haven't had long term data. So it's hard to look at what's already happening. When a lot of cases were setting up now to observe the changes in the future. But one thing we've. I tried to do is by pulling together, all these collaborators and all this new networks applauds is we try to get as much of that data's. We can and create a baseline now often in the case of the study where we're looking to Andy's we end up with maybe fifteen twenty years worth of data that we can use. So it's relatively short term. But what we find is that over those last two decades there's been important and measurable changes. In these Andy and forests were getting changes in wear species. Are we're getting changes in what species are Kerr in which forest in. So we are observing these changes in real time. And we're looking at it over short time period. But we're confident that this has been going on for several decades before we ever got on this in clearly we're confident that this is going to keep going on in the future. There's there's no indication that that things are going to stop or so we're really just looking at this current window. And what the tells us is things are happening now. And you know, all scenarios point that's going to get worse in the future. Yeah. And to reiterate is that you said things are moving up the mountain these climate zones are moving the mountain because as that face of the mountain starts to warm those zones move upwards and part of the big takeaway from your research is that you want mechanistic understandings of what's going on in. I'm curious to know, if with the data that you have available to you, what kind of mechanistic underpinnings are there to some of these species movements. Visit warming temperatures or is it precipitation or combination of factors? What's going on? Yeah. So right now, I mean, we're really at that stage. We talk about before of documenting the pattern. So with all those colleagues, and we worked cross the Andes, and what we found more than anthem it could be summed up release at the forest is changing. Right. We find that things are not the same now that they were twenty years ago and the direction of that fits with what would expect based on climate change. So basically, we're finding in allow. These force. We find more of the species that will be used to find lower down. So we think that means that these species are kind of changing the ranges through time to include higher and higher elevations. And so we do want to try to figure out what is the mechanism behind that? And the truth is at this point. We don't have the data really detests that but we're working on it. So there's a lot of people out there myself and my grad students stuff include we're trying to gather information on the traits of these species. So looking at some of these, you know, these traits related, for example, to their climatic tolerance is trying to figure out can we actually figure out? What is physiologically? What is the range of temperatures this species find suitable or what is the range of drought tolerance for this species?.

Andes Andy Matt fifteen twenty years twenty years two decades
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"And obviously a lot of people in Peru. Just wonderful scientists, and and a lot of Patak's, honest and field assistance, we've installed this network of forest plots, these inventory, plots, primarily one turned size. But also a lot of smaller ones. It gives us this window into the forest and so at different elevations. We can say this is what the forest is like at this time, and then we can go back again. And again and look at how l- looking through that window into the forest. How is it changing through time while and that's given us a lot of insight. We've been because we have been seeing changes, and there's huge differences obviously to go up and down the mountains. These species we find have very small ranges, you know. So you go from fifteen hundred meter. Elevation and you hike up to seventeen hundred meters elevation, and you almost have none of the same species, you you'll just all those species will drop out from here to there, or as one of my colleagues miles, silman always the scribes it, you know, you can stand in one spot, and you can throw a rock over the entire range of species. And so we find that this forest is just super sensitive to temperature and climate, and you can just see this this steady turnover and species as you go up or down the mountain. And so, of course, what we find them through time. As climate is changing is that we get this steady turnover in species the world warms up and the the species down in the lowland start creeping up the mountain and migrating into our higher elevation plots. Yeah. And that's one of the most amazing things about working in the mountains is how quickly you realize that that life really is kind of on that cusp of whatever that zone nation is throwing at it. And what makes? That sort of topa graphic elevation gradient. So great for studying these sorts of climate change affects also makes these systems extremely vulnerable to actual climate change, which you know, something that gets reiterated time and time again is that not only are mountainous areas. More susceptible than some other habitats come change because of that zone nation. But here we added that extra layer of the confusion that gets added to in the tropics. So what we have our you know, the fact that we have such a rapid turnover species. What that means is that each species is confined to a very narrow range of sater's and a very small area right because there aren't steep mountains. So if you're a restricted to just a few degrees celsius that means that species only has a few hundred meters of of land that suitable to it of elevations it steep. So that means it's not a lot area and kind of one of the truisms. I think that's out there in ecology is that the smaller. Or the area smaller the population size, the more sensitive. You are to disturbance, right? It makes sense. I mean, if you're like, you said only, a hectare is is your the extent of your distribution, very relatively speaking small cataclysmic events, whether their gradual or instant can do a lot more damage to your population than safe you were spread out along, you know, all of Appalachia, even our most widespread species in the Andes have relatively small ranges because it because it steepen they have they're confined by temperature. But then if you start thinking about some of these really rare endemic species, they're not confined to just a elevation band, but they're confined to elevate band within an individual valley. And so they can have very small population sizes for the most part, we don't know who those species are. But we know that they're there, and we know that they're they're endanger. Yeah. In thinking about mountainous systems, like the Andes in the tropics where you do get up of beyond treeline into snow. Kept peaks. I'm curious from a more evolutionary biology, graphic context think something about the limited distribution and narrowness of his own for a lot of these species is because you have a largely tropical flora from the low Lynch trying to adapt to what can essentially become frosted sub-tropical or even temperate zones farther up the mountain range. I think that is part of it. So I think in some parts so saying Columbia were doing some work. Now, you know, we get some of these temperate tax that come down these temper tax that have like the oaks and stuff that have common their work living in the high mountains of Colombian stuff..

Andes Peru Patak sater Lynch Appalachia Columbia seventeen hundred meters fifteen hundred meter hundred meters
"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"So then we can say, okay. This is what needs to be changed or these are the species that are gonna be threatened or these are going to be the impacts of those changes. So we really need both of those things the pattern and the process, right? And I have a feeling that it's not just the great species or regional level sort of thing. But also kind of the the types of changes that you can kind of expect or again, these things that apply best to management level situations where okay, we can maybe think about refused areas where this might not be a severe buffer against it. Almost feels like a nice mixture of triage on one hand. But also kind of ameliorating some of the other aspects on another. Yes, I mean, that's right. So the more we're in kind of a crisis mode. So we have to use that information that we could get make some quick decisions. But then we can kind of go back and gained greater insight to start applying to these other systems and try to protect them before. They hit those crisis modes. Yeah. Yeah. So preventive medicine is just this kid is affected. So geographically speaking. There's a lot of options, but where his most of your recent work been focused. Yeah. So for the past maybe fifteen years or so up in working in the Andes mountains, so mostly down in Peru. So most of my work kind of my fieldwork has been based down in southern Peru in mono national park, which is this amazing national park biosphere reserve that is considered one of the most diverse places on the planet and. It's it's very famous mostly for its lowland forest. So there's been a lot of great work that's come out of coach, cashew biological station or other areas in the lowlands. But what's great about modern national park is it actually protects an entire watershed. And so it goes from from the the low lowland Amazon at about two hundred fifty three hundred meters of elevating and that park goes all the way up to to to the ridge line to the divide at about close to four thousand meters in so you're working in that park. We're able to work across incredible elevations gradient, and because it gets colder as you go higher in the mountain. It gives us things to incredible temperature gradient, and so we can go we can walk up and down this mountains, and we can look at forests that are growing at different temperatures at different precipitation under different conditions, and that gives us the Billy to kind of look at how these forests are resp-. Bonding to changes in climate that our current because of spatial differences because of elevation differences, and then we can kind of take that information try to predict how they'll change through time because climate change and so we've been working with a big team. There's a large team from different universities..

Peru cashew biological station Billy Amazon two hundred fifty three hundre four thousand meters fifteen years one hand
How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

BrainStuff

06:07 min | 1 year ago

How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten. Donovan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here during the bronze age the Incas built the largest pre-columbian empire in the Americas extending along the west coast of South America from Bolivia to Chile they not only thrived in the harsh climate and dry steep slopes of the high Andes. They also served up masterclass and technical road-building that would have made the Romans quake in their sandals. Thank created a twenty five thousand mile highway system that's about forty thousand kilometers complete with rope bridges across treacherous mountain chasms. They also engineered millions of acres of high altitude terraced farmland and constructed an earthquake proof citadel on top of a craggy mountain peak one point five miles that's two point four kilometers above sea level, the even figured out how to freeze dried potatoes, but unlike the neighboring Maya and as techs and the ancient Mesopotamia's Chinese Egyptians, the Incan never developed a system of writing what they did have were keep Lou or not at length of cord made from Lana oral Pakowal or cotton. They hung in rows like. A curtain from a thicker central rope, which was sometimes coiled up to resemble the string mop these bundles were often color coded, although most surviving keep who are now a uniform camel color and could contain just a few strings or hundreds when the Spanish arrived and wiped out the entire in Kosovo ization, they found keep who everywhere but destroyed many of them in the nineteen s a science historian named Leland lock studying the keep who at the American Museum of natural history in New York City discovered the knots and the key PU represented numbers and the bundles of textiles were most likely recordkeeping devices similar to Advocacy's probably used to hold census data or to keep track of the contents of storehouses or how many lamas were paid tribute. He realized that the height of a not and its position on its cord civilized units tens hundreds thousands, and so on and the position of a string off the main rope could denote things like specific people or villages, but even after lock cracked the code. He noticed that some of the key. He studied seemed. To be anomalies. He figured these were used for ceremonial purposes. There are however anecdotal clues that entire narratives could be passed along through keep Oooo a one seventeenth century Spanish conquistador reported meeting an in-command on the road. Who carried keep Oooo that he said told of all the deeds of the Spanish in Peru. Good and bad. Keep who couriers reportedly ran all over the Incan empire. The cords looped over their shoulders, but finding living people now who can help researchers unravel. The secret of the nuts has proved very difficult. If not impossible so research has made slow progress in the past century since the early nineteen nineties Harvard anthropologist named Gary Burton has been working to decipher what if anything the key booze that don't fit the normal mold of accounting devices might mean collecting database of over nine hundred keep who in the process has discovered that beyond the position and height of the nods. There are other factors to take into consideration. When reading Kiu the color of the string. The direction. The knots are twisted and the type of knots used through cross-referencing, keep Kiu in the Harvard collection with Spanish documents from the exact time and location in Peru, where they originated he has recently been able to prove that the direction. The knots are tied in could note, which clans individuals belonged to another researcher named saving Highland at Saint Andrews university in Scotland has recently found that some keep who still exist within villages in the Andes the locals there has shared. Some new information about them, for instance, that the different materials used in the strings is significant and their understanding is that the devices were used to tell stories of warfare Highland. Also reports evidence of network symbols in the strings, it could be for all their ingenuity the Incas never learned to use symbolic written language, but it looks like they may have been just a little more creative with their storytelling than any other major civilization to date. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler clang, her more on this and lots of other historical, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. The end of the world with Josh Clark is a ten part podcast series about all the ways we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two and yes that sounds scary. Dangerous place other. I mean, the the universe is is the house going to no care for life on earth and devastating that brings a tremendous amount of energy with flesh-eating the earth surface embroiling alive. Anything that can't take cover underground Newark. And mind boggling we accidentally trigger some sort of existential risk or are exposed to an existential destructive event that sort of for humanity. And it definitely is all of those things, but it's hopeful to and in need you to listen and understand. So you can help save the future of the human race. Join me stuff, you should know. Josh Clark for the end of the world an immersive podcast experience available now on apple podcasts. The iheartradio. Uh-huh app and everywhere you get your podcasts.

Josh Clark Apple Peru Andes Researcher KIU Walt Disney Donovan Strickland Vietnam South America Lauren Vogel Gary Burton Americas New York City Maya Bolivia Harvard Kosovo American Museum Of Natural
"andes" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on WTVN

"It's not just you know, the the Andes it it when I when I started looking at the distribution of sites. It's like this is this is a worldwide. This is a worldwide phenomenon. The earliest sites those alliances to the Bering Sea Paul exist in South America in the Andes region in Europe in northern Africa. And what I do in the book is actually plot out the locations of sites worldwide as a function of time. And so you start with the earlier early a set of sites, you know, one hundred thousand years or so back, and then there's a pole shift in the polls shifts from the Bering Sea to to the Norway see and soon after that there are sites that show up on the coast of South America places like Carol sue pay, and these are these are sites that are in a tremendous state of ruin along the the coast and sites in in Central America places like chips, and it's and Saloum and and numerous other sites some some temples in India and so. So you go from one poll ship to another, and then there's another set of sites that are aligned to the Greenland poll and then Hudson day poll, and of course, the current pol-. And so you get for each pole shift. You get a distribution of sites showing up and you see a certain pattern, and it's a worldwide. It's.

South America Bering Sea Paul Bering Sea Andes Central America Carol sue Hudson Europe Norway India Africa Saloum one hundred thousand years
"andes" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"andes" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"It's not just you know, the the Andes it it when when I started looking at the distribution of sites. It's like this is this is a worldwide. This is a worldwide phenomenon the earliest sites those alliance to the Bering Sea Paul exist in South America in the Andes region in Europe in northern Africa. And what I do in the book is actually plot out the locations of sites worldwide as a function of time. And so you start with the earlier a set of sites, you know, hundred thousand years or so back, and then there's a pole shift in the polls shifts from the Bering Sea to to the Norway see and soon after that there are sites that show up on the coast of South America places like Carol sue pay, and these are these are sites that are in a tremendous state of ruin along the the coast and sites in in Central America places like chips, and it's and Saloum, and you know, and numerous other sites, some some temples in India and so. You. So you go from one poll ship to another, and then there's another set of sites that are aligned to the Greenland poll, and then the Hudson Bay pole, and of course, the current bull. And so you get for each.

South America Bering Sea Paul Bering Sea Andes Central America Hudson Bay Carol sue Europe Norway Africa India Saloum hundred thousand years
Millions of Venezuelans have fled their homes, and it's affecting the entire region

The Takeaway

04:25 min | 2 years ago

Millions of Venezuelans have fled their homes, and it's affecting the entire region

"And we'll be keeping an eye on. This story as it. Develops of, course Jacqueline Charles is. The Miami Herald correspondent for the Caribbean Jacqueline thank you so, much for joining us thanks for having me Here at the takeaway we've been closely. Following the migrant crisis playing out at the US Mexico border but there's another migrant crisis that. Hasn't, gotten much attention in the US media and it's causing shockwaves in South America I'm talking about. Venezuelan migrants forced to flee their country. To neighboring Colombia in, search of refuge nNcholas Casey's been, following this, and he's the New. York Times. Bureau chief for the Andes it's. A different kind of migrant crisis that you say say in Europe it's in some cities not as. Easy to pick out when you walk into them this isn't. Like you're going into a German city and you're seeing a place. Where the government. Settled Syrians who who look different speak a different language the border between Venezuelan Columbia was very open for many years so when you see lots, of Venezuelans in these cities it doesn't necessarily look like there are. People who, are coming from somewhere else you just noticed that there. Are. A lot of people a lot of. People on the streets In these towns the medical system is getting tact because a lot of the. People are coming because they need to get treatment food is low in some places that Venezuelans. Have come to because they're looking to buy things the main thing that you're saying the. Main tension is that you have a lot of extra, laborers that are, working there and one, of the things and this is of course a classic issue. That comes up when you have a big movement of people that need money is that Colombian say that, work 'specially very basic, work is getting scarce. To them because Venezuelans are coming in and working at much. Lower hourly rates and we know that Columbia also just, had a presidential election where they voted for Yvonne Duquet who is a young. Right wing populace what is this new presidents take if any on these migrants coming from Venezuela Well really none. Of the candidates who was running for president took the Venezuela migrant issue as their main issue even though? It's becoming a huge one in Columbia in terms of seeing a plan would you do with these like many. Hundreds of thousands of people in the country it's not clear what's going to happen and what. Was clear during the election was that no matter who became president of someone was going to have to deal with this crisis in a way that wasn't necessarily going to be just mass deportations because that's not possible along a border that's his poorest is the one between Colombia Venezuela people will just come back and I'm wondering if there are Venezuelans right now because of the crisis who are who may have been thinking. About coming to the United States and have since seen what's happened with our southern border policy and perhaps change their mind do you. Think those two things are related our border policy and and and immigration strategies And the fact, that, Venezuelans are largely staying within Colombia and Brazil as, opposed to coming to the United States will I. Think Venezuelans are looking at what's happened under Donald, Trump especially in the last you, know weeks with the separation of families that are just terrified like anybody who was? Thinking of coming north even in Columbia. Were where I live I've talked to Venezuelans there was someone who would come to my house actually who buy new through friend of a friend and was telling me he'd lost everything basically there had been people had come armed people that come. His business kidnapped him kidnapped his daughter and. His, wife were both living at the house and they fled after that had happened they lost their their business which was a fruit business they came to club and he was telling me that he wanted to go north and try to see if he could get. Asylum he was looking at what was going on with Trump and was saying it was Terrifying idea to, go that far to not, know whether he would be. Thrown in jail at, that point while he was waiting dictate his case heard so absolutely what's happened in the US has had an. Extremely chilling effect for anybody who was looking to migrate legally or illegally right now Casey is the New York Times bureau chief for the Andes Nick thanks so much.

Columbia United States Casey Colombia Donald Trump Venezuela Jacqueline Charles President Trump Bureau Chief The Miami Herald Europe Caribbean York Times South America New York Times Andes Nick Mexico
"andes" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on KELO

"And then that night the most incredible close encounter experience we had the cabin took place that's been talked about many times and again by named witnesses the thing about this people always debunked me but they don't they ignore the fact that all these witnesses have come forward raven dana lori barnes and others that night had close encounters that they talked about many times so you know i it just isn't these things happen and there's some kind of a connection between this experience if it's aliens or not i don't know and the dead a very profound deep connection and he had been reading letters for about two years when she came out of our office one day and she said whitley this has something to do with what we call death and from that moment on she never thought of death the same way then in two thousand and four she had an out of body experience i mean a near death experience and after that she was like an a an expert on the afterlife she'd been there and done that many people that they go to the other side and or they have the andes they come back they're more psychic and they're more aware of what's around them i remember when i had my embolisms i i don't know if i went completely other side but i did see the light when i came back i felt like my show and my insights have been a lot better since then i've been a little bit more in control and and basically ahead of the game so there's something about taking a piece of the afterlife with you back into this life which opens your mind to all kinds of things all kinds of new things things you wouldn't normally talk about or even want to care about so i can understand that well at least strieber with us tonight on ground zero your phone calls coming up opening the lines at triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred that's triple eight hundred seventy three thirty seven hundred we'll be back with more and whitley strieber tonight on ground zero don't go away.

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"andes" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"The andes and other places there so this will be a very wide range survey here we go morning in mm mm king london man mm uh mm ooh mm in the newsroom mm len goodman good mm mm moore no in the the the the the the the the the the in the end the malik monk two the president did the the demand my boys'll ow science for to it'll gave the ad boom the than them dan o'brien among other things leoneto coming two two the buck the ma the with the none of them will dnc within cave did michael wolff tbi and the yep two the two two the win the bid the demand and england above the in the bowen laminated the burlington's day be at the moment the digital of that the daily event laugh hey then tomorrow with the in my two not better event and make them the dnc one bon iver the uae the people and.

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"andes" Discussed on The Science Hour

The Science Hour

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"andes" Discussed on The Science Hour

"International sure also my concern is that even though the and in amazon is geographically small in size it plays of really important ecological role the majority of the set a man of the nutrients a lot of the organic matter and water that is feeding the lowland amazon is actually exported from the andes and so you could say that the andes drive the ecology and the biochemistry of downstream systems at the same time there's importance of the andes for some of this species particularly migratory fish that live in more lowland areas most of their life but then move up into and ian rivers for spawning are feeding migrations so the concern is that when you put a dam on an indian river that might trap sediments that might change the hydrology that might block the migratory pathways for some of these fish is that impact extends down way into to the lowlands actually met someone who works with the energy research authority in brazil and i asked her so how are you considering these andy and dams and some of your planning and consideration of projects in the brazilian amazon she said you know we are not we don't have this kind of information and it takes a lot of effort to go and do the groundwork to collected some a detective would trucking down the road form the final number we documented 142 existing dams or under construction and a hundred and sixty proposed dams i ask you don't have any way of picturing home that might due to a river system with of us some of them bought before you'll feeling well my feeling is that there's really a need for more of these regional perspectives that consider the impacts of many dams on one system in this study we looked at it in terms of.

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"andes" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

SOFREP Radio

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"andes" Discussed on SOFREP Radio

"Un presence organization so i went to this event yesterday with with the nando parrado he was the survivor one of the survivors of the andes 19th seventy two crashed with the i think it was uruguayan a rugby team on their way to play chile and they chartered a plane and everything was great people laughing joking in the cabin until the pilot thought he was over chilean started descending and had a navigational errors before gps in nineteen seventy two and descended right in the middle of the andes mountain range crashed into the mound plane ripped in half nandor lost his sister and his mother on the flight and the rug of the rugby team can came together and you had started working as a team to survive they spent these guys had not seen the snow whatsoever right we from in on the beach and urguay to eleven thousand feet in the andes with tshirts and street use on and you had that story of survival is amazing i highly encourage anyone to go watch out on on youtube you can see us talk the point of the story is life is a great right up until the fucking pointing great and that's what those people experience in vegas complete terror it's i've seen it at jfk i've been in combat with welltrained people that was the first time i experienced crowd panic in that kind of herd mentality and it scared the shit out of me man i'm not gonna lie but i had a plan i rehearsed this plan took cover created space i got the hell out of there i got onto the tarmac with the were the airplanes and baggage carts were an and made a plan from there.

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