18 Burst results for "Anderson Co"

"anderson co" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

03:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"A man of many hats Kurt Andersen is a radio host, an entrepreneur, a television producer and novelist but before becoming a wizard of all things, he started out as a journalist after graduating from Harvard Anderson Co founded spy a satirical magazine which mocked American celebrities and media icons in the late nineteen, eighty s and nineteen nineties including now president trump from their kirk worked as an editor in chief of. New York magazine then moved to The New York Times and later created his own radio show these days he describes himself as a book writer but Anderson says he's always had more than one plate spinning at a time in this episode of influencers I speak with Kurt Andersen about his newest book is infamous nickname for President Donald Trump and how America's middle class is at war with the ultra rich. Allow everyone, and.

Kurt Andersen Harvard Anderson Co Donald Trump New York magazine president editor in chief The New York Times producer writer America
"anderson co" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:15 min | Last month

"anderson co" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Always city. The moment looking for is a move to the upside for Asian enquiries. The equity bands that came was expected. Should be making itself felt in this part of the world. After gains in the US and Europe buys returning to tech, we've got equity futures advancing in Japan, Hong Kong in Australia difficult. The S and P 500 Index rose the most That has since June. It did actually full finish well off its session highs. Tez. They're also bands 11% don't forget a third of its value was wiped off in recent days and We've got a computer chips and hardware makers really underpinning this move to the upside elsewhere. We got the dollars sliding after we had a report, saying officials have become more confident in forecasts of the region's economic recovery. That's ahead. Of their policy meeting Thursday. It doesn't mean that the is likely to be holding off from any stimulus, at least for now. Investors have a couple of things on the radar in this neck of the woods. Malaysia's central bank is expected to keep interest rates on change. Japan's called machinery orders data Also joon is a short while so That's a look at what we have Stars markets go. Let's find out what's happening in terms of some of that global needs to get over to San Francisco and joined the man himself the man himself. Wow. Okay, I'm gonna put that up on the wall. Thanks. Rish. President Donald Trump is admitting today that he downplaying the severity of covert 19. His critics say he lied so as to not create panic tapes, released by journalist Bob Woodward and CNN show the president knowing as early as February, 7th and covert 19 was airborne and was five times as deadly as a flu. This as he stood at a podium and to create it would just go away. Joe Biden on the campaign trail says those lies cost tens of thousands of lives US cases today. Increased 0.2% Day today. China's President XI Champagne has announced a China will work with Saudi Arabia within the framework of the G 20 to make over 19 vaccines affordable and available to all countries. New York City will slowly reopen inside dining on limited capacity. September 30th UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has told the British public to limit social contact as much as possible. The U. S has revoked over 1000 visas of Chinese nationals. According to our TR s and many California's haven't had any son today as smoke blocks it out, remain mostly dark in some areas until noon and another high level. Ah, well spitting contest. Tesla's CEO Elon Musk is trading barbs with former Clinton Labor Secretary Robert Rice, who had criticized Musk is a modern day robber baron for employee pay cuts. Musk says employees get stock and calls him a modern day moron in San Francisco. I met Baxter. This is Bloomberg. I see the smile, Brian. You like that one, Doctor, I d'oh. I just love finishing a story on you. And he says you're a modern day more on. Um, You know, these guys come up with some some very interesting terminology, and that's why they're in the news all the time. Yeah, well, what we don't know is whether he did his happy dance after he after he posted that I've got a good line here, which will make you wait until the end of my next segment. And And this is the headline working from home. Not good for mental health. Oh, that one that one's coming up and you'd actually be probably the best to talk to about that. Anyway, We'll get to that in a moment. From what? I see you're working at home. What was that about about mental health or working at home about working from home and how you keep such sound mental health because you've done it a lot. Okay back to business here. ABC in Australia. China has slammed the Australian government for blatant, irrational behavior over a foreign interference investigation. The Foreign Ministry in China Said that Australia embroiled a group of Chinese academics and journalists in this Ah and the media outlets in China, alleged that national security agencies in Australia raided the homes of four Chinese state media reporters in June so way back in June. Seize their equipment in order them to stay silent about the probe. In the South China morning Post. And this is an interesting story, saying that Washington puts heat on US executives at Chinese firms with TIC Tac, Only the latest example. So this piece explorers the pressure that American executives are under now if they've taken jobs with Chinese companies. Another one of the posts that Hong Kong will revamp its pen. It's anti pandemic strategy here in anticipation of a winter wave of infections and so the government's doubling testing capacity setting aside more manpower for contact tracing And will procure vaccines that are among some of the measures on the table. Now, finally working from home Not good for mental health is RTHK story. And this is experts looking at what people are doing at home and why it can be troublesome. Dr. McQueen, Chip of the new Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association says is concerned about it. For people working at home. They don't have a very clear line on when to start work, and when to end your work for the day, the boundary becomes blurred, and some of these people may express some stress. His advice, stay optimistic and exercise more. Rashad. I'm excuses. Anderson, co editor for Bloomberg Markets, Live lug and discussing the market news of the day. Thanks for joining his Andrew. So I suppose everybody really wants to know whether this Riley that we've seen is A dead cat bounce, But I don't think cats bounces thing full. Maybe if you're free zone first and drop them. Yeah, good question. I'll point to a couple of things and say it's too early to know. Of course, one day does not a rebound make on Ly the Dow recoup. Yesterday's loss is not the SNP Northern aspect nor the NASA 100. On the other thing, I would point to a shot of the the You know something we have on a Bloomberg terminal Ballenger bands, which is something that our clients and listeners they're probably familiar with..

China US Australia Bloomberg Elon Musk San Francisco Japan President Donald Trump Bloomberg Markets Hong Kong Europe Joe Biden California South China New York City Bob Woodward NASA flu Tesla
"anderson co" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

08:12 min | 4 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Can agree on is that state sponsored violence and law enforcement have been an impediment to our ability to thrive, and so when we have conversations around what needs to fund the police in Reinvest in the communities that have been fragmented by these systems. It's a conversation that we should all be able to come to the table together and justice. Why do you think actually that there's been that lack of awareness of who all has been at the foundations of these movement? Is it willful ignorance is it? Is it just what's what's underlying that? It could be of the above in there also seems to be in urban meant within the black community somehow. Black Trans in Queer. Folks are immune to the taxes of white supremacy, and that were sheltered by the politics of the og. BTU umbrella and saw fifty two percents of lgbtq people of Color, according to a report by the southerners on new ground and the transgender law center, said experience, high levels of violence by law enforcement, and so as we continue to see why enforcement take black lives with their humanity, and not be on hold responsible were also seen disproportionate violence within the community toward black lives, and so I think that there are people who know, and then there are some now. Travel lately, a number of companies have expressed their support of both black and Q I a rights struggles some of policy changes including the hookup APP grinder this month. The company said it would remove a function that lets users filter out profiles by ethnicity I think some people were surprised that grinder even had this feature. What do you make of? This feels like one of those realizations that that actually was just talking about the some LGBTQ, why people may have about just how deeply prejudices can run within the community that claims to embrace everyone. Well the whole idea of kind of ratio preference racial discrimination within the Lgbtq community is not new. And Grinder has known that for as long as it's been in existence, and so I see that this particular move. It's just kind of lip service. In this particular moment. They have removed it a long time ago. We didn't need to witness you know somebody with knee on the back of their neck in order for us to be moved toward this type of movement and. And type of change companies like grinder, who perpetuate a lot of ways some of this racism, some of the oppression that lgbtq people of Color Exhibit experience rather within the community. There's so much more that they could be doing with the technology with the data that they have with the money that they have and this particular move is really. It's really empty. And travel, it's it's. It's not lost on me that there is a certain degree of. Fetish is ation I think is the right word one talking about black men inside the community. I mean I'm getting that right? Very very much I. Mean we many of us within the community? We've heard you know the the no fats. No right so there's an anti fatted antiques them conversation to be had. There's also the note blacks, no Asians I'll these other ways in which members of the community, primarily white members of the community other further. And further marginalize those of us who are at the intersections of a variety of identity so like I said it's not a new conversation. and I'm looking to grinder Jack to the other APPs to do more, and if you're not familiar with any of these APPs by the way, and you're watching this, do not google them. Stay pure remaining. Let's look ahead to the future representative Kenya. What were you doing to ensure the best outcome for black LGBTQ people come the November election. Is there one particular aspect of policy that you're focused on for the future? So one of the things that I've really been been looking at. Is this idea around data justice is? Often in our public policy, we all can sink of moments where our public policy is actively antagonistic against folks who exist on the margins, but one of the things that I've often seen walking into committee hearings as. Only one of two openly lgbtq members as one of the youngest members as the only openly Algebra two person of color, and what so often happens, you're not even a part of the conversation at all, and so there's been a national movement of activists and others around clearing the senses, and in Pennsylvania one of the things I've looking act is a bill that I introduced data for lgbtq lives that would add. Add the subject question to all forms. We collect demographic information about LENTINI question around sexual orientation gender identity, because the reality is at the state level. We collect almost no data about our community in large part because people don't care. They don't think we should be a part of the conversation and we're actively ignored so one of the things that we need to do is make sure I'm not the only. lgbtq person or queer, and in these spaces because when I've seen, is that when we're in these faces when our lived, experiences are in these faces the conversation shifts, and we need more events chesting to attack, ultimately dismantle structures of oppression and I. Just want to call up that acronym you use. Oh, G. S. O. G. I.. That sexual orientation and gender identity right. Correct got before I. Let you go in one sentence if I could get from all three of you just one sentence if you could give one piece of advice to a young black LGBTQ a person who's watching this, who's looking to the future wondering what the future's going to look like? What would that be in one sentence only representative Kenya? What would you say one sentence? I would say that sometimes the most radical thing you can do is just be yourself, and I would encourage them to truly truly embrace that in every single space. Ashley, one sentence. What would you say? I would say take ownership of the moment. Every generation has bad movement that. They are and this is yours. And Treville we go. I just add that you come from a long lineage of queer entrance brilliance embrace it. Trivial Anderson Co host of the PODCAST fanti neglected to mention the president of the Los Angeles. Chapter of the National Association of Black. Journalists Actually Marie repressed creator of your essential and Pennsylvania State representative knock Kenya of North Philadelphia everybody. It has been a pleasure. Thank you also very much and hey. We're glad you made time for this hour as well. Hopefully, it's clear now. Just how very robust onum we really are especially these days, black lives, matter and the Lgbtq I, movement are both making strides, but it all begins when people connect when we discover just how much we need each other. In his letter from Birmingham Jail Dr. King wrote that we are all tied in a single garment of destiny. We've seen what can happen when that garment unravels. Until we meet again I'm Joshua Johnson. Thanks for watching. Getting. Again and protesting and being able to really talk about what's happening in the world, and where we selling to have arrest, all black lives matter mean that we should address the homophobia in our black community and address the racism. LGBTQ community, so it's about joining to communities together and creating that dialogue and conversation about ways that we can better each other as human race. Opportunity for coalition building, and then to really take this movement to the next level and bring about lasting sustainable change for a follow up..

Grinder Kenya representative National Association of Black Joshua Johnson Pennsylvania Dr. King Jack Birmingham Ashley Treville Los Angeles G. S. O. Philadelphia Anderson Co Marie Pennsylvania State president
"anderson co" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

08:10 min | 4 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"Think that one thing that we can agree on is that state sponsored violence and law enforcement have been an impediment to our ability to thrive, and so when we have conversations around what needs to fund the police in Reinvest in the communities that have been fragmented by these systems. It's a conversation that we should all be able to come to the table together and justice. Why do you think actually that there's been that lack of awareness of who all has been at the foundations of these movement? Is it willful ignorance is it? Is it just what's what's underlying that? It could be of the above in. There also seems to be in urban meant within the black community somehow. Black Trans in Queer folks are immune to the taxes of white supremacy, and that were sheltered by the politics of the og BTU umbrella, and saw fifty two percents of lgbtq people of Color, according to a report by the southerners on new ground and the transgender law center, said experience, high levels of violence by law enforcement, and so as we continue to see why enforcement take black lives with their humanity, and not be on hold responsible were also seen disproportionate violence within the community toward black lives, and so I think that there are people who know, and then there are some don't. Travel lately. A number of companies have expressed their support of both black and. I, a rights struggles some of policy changes including the hookup APP grinder this month. The company said it would remove a function that lets users filter out profiles by ethnicity. I think some people were surprised. That grinder even had this feature. What do you make of? This feels like one of those realizations that that actually was just talking about the some LGBTQ why people may have about just how deeply prejudices can run within the community that claims to embrace everyone. Well the whole idea of kind of ratio preference, racial discrimination within the Lgbtq community is not new. And, grinder has known that for as long as it's been in existence and so I see that this particular move. It's just kind of lip service. In this particular moment. They have removed it a long time ago. We didn't need to witness you know somebody with knee on the back of their neck in order for us to be moved toward this type of movement and. And type of change companies like grinder who perpetuate a lot of ways some of this racism, some of the oppression that lgbtq people of Color Exhibit experience rather within the community. There's so much more that they could be doing with the technology with the data that they have with the money that they have and this particular move is really. It's really empty. And travel, it's it's. It's not lost on me that there is a certain degree of. Fetish station I, think is the right word one talking about black men inside the community. I mean I'm getting that, right? Very very much I mean we many of us within the community. We've heard you know the the no fats. No right so there's an anti fatted antiques them conversation to be had. There's also the note blacks, no Asians I'll. These other ways in which members of the community, primarily white members of the community other further. And further marginalize those of us who are at the intersections of a variety of identity. So like I said it's not a new conversation. and I'm looking to grinder Jack to the other APPs to do more, and if you're not familiar with any of these APPs, by the way, and you're watching this, do not google them. Stay pure remaining. Let's look ahead to the future representative Kenya. What were you doing to ensure the best outcome for black LGBTQ people come the November election. Is there one particular aspect of policy that you're focused on for the future? So one of the things that I've really been been looking at. Is this idea around data justice is? Often, in our public policy, we all can sink of moments where our public policy is actively antagonistic against folks who exist on the margins, but one of the things that I've often seen walking into committee hearings as. Only one of two openly lgbtq members as one of the youngest members as the only openly Algebra two person of color, and what so often happens, you're not even a part of the conversation at all, and so there's been a national movement of activists and others around clearing the senses and in Pennsylvania one of the things been looking act is a bill that I introduced data for lgbtq lives that would add. Add the subject question to all forms. We collect demographic information about Lentini question around sexual orientation and gender identity, because the reality is at the state level, we collect almost no data about our community in large part because people don't care. They don't think we should be a part of the conversation and we're actively ignored so one of the things that we need to do is make sure. I'm not the only. LGBTQ, person or queer person in these spaces because when I've seen is that when we're in these faces when our lived, experiences are in these faces the conversation shifts, and we need more events chesting to attack, ultimately dismantle structures of oppression and I just want to call up that acronym you use. Oh, G. S.. O. G., I. That Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Right. Correct got before I. Let you go in one sentence if I could get from all three of you just one sentence if you could give one piece of advice to a young black LGBTQ a person who's watching this. WHO's looking to the future wondering what the future's going to look like? What would that be in one sentence? Of Kenya. What would you say one sentence? I would say that sometimes. The most radical thing you can do is just be yourself and I would encourage them to truly truly embrace that in every single space. Ashley one sentence. What would you say? I would say take ownership of the moment. Every generation has bad movement that. They are and this is yours. And travel before we go. I. Just add that you come from a long lineage of queer entrance brilliance embrace it. Trivial Anderson Co host of the PODCAST fanti neglected to mention the president of the Los Angeles Chapter of the National Association of Black. Journalists Actually Marie repressed creator of your essential and Pennsylvania State representative. KNOCK KENYA OF NORTH PHILADELPHIA, everybody. It has been a pleasure. Thank you also very much and hey. We're glad you made time for this hour as well. Hopefully, it's clear now. Just how very robust onum we really are especially these days, black lives, matter and the LGBTQ. A rights movement are both making strides, but it all begins when people connect when we discover just how much we need each other. In his letter from Birmingham Jail Dr King wrote that we are all tied in a single garment of destiny. We've seen what can happen when that garment unravels. Until we meet again I'm Joshua Johnson? Thanks for watching. Getting. Again and protesting and being able to really talk about what's happening in the world, and where we selling to have arrest, all black lives matter mean that we should address the homophobia in our black community and address the racism Lgbtq community, it's about joining to communities together and creating that dialogue and conversation about ways that we can better each other as human race. Opportunity for coalition building, and into really take this movement to the next.

Kenya grinder representative National Association of Black Joshua Johnson Dr King Pennsylvania Lentini Jack Birmingham Ashley PHILADELPHIA O. G. Marie Los Angeles Chapter Anderson Co Pennsylvania State president
"anderson co" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

"LGBTQ PEOPLE? Come the November election. Is there one particular aspect of policy that you're focused on for the future? So one of the things that I've really been been looking at, is this idea around data justice is? Often in our public policy, we all can sink of moments where our public policy is actively antagonistic against folks who exist on the margins, but one of the things that I've often seen walking into committee hearings as. Only one of two openly lgbtq members as one of the youngest members as the only openly Algebra two person of color, and what so often happens, you're not even a part of the conversation at all, and so there's been a national movement of activists and others around clearing the senses and in Pennsylvania. One of the things been looking act is a bill that I introduced data for lgbtq lives that would add. Add the subject question to all forms. We collect demographic information about Lentini question around sexual orientation and gender identity, because the reality is at the state level. We collect almost no data about our community in large part because people don't care. They don't think we should be a part of the conversation and we're actively ignored so one of the things that we need to do is make sure. I'm not the only. bt. person or queer person in these spaces because when I've seen is that when we're in these faces when our lived, experiences are in these faces the conversation shifts, and we need more events chesting to attack, ultimately dismantle structures of oppression and I just want to call up that acronym you use. Oh, G. S, O G I, that sexual orientation and gender identity right. Correct got it before I. let show in one sentence if I could get from all three of you just one sentence if you could give one piece of advice to a young black. LGBTQ a person WHO's watching this. WHO's looking to the future? Wondering what the future's going to look like? What would that be in one sentence? Representative Kenya. What would you say one sentence? I would say that sometimes the most radical thing you can do is just be yourself and I would encourage them to truly truly embrace that in every single space. Ashley one sentence. What would you say? I would say take ownership of the moment. Every generation has bad movement that. They are and this is yours. And travel before we go. I just add that you come from a long lineage of queer entrance brilliance embrace it. Trivial Anderson Co host of the PODCAST. FANTI neglected to mention the president of the Los Angeles. Chapter of the National Association of Black. Journalists Actually Marie repressed creator of your essential and Pennsylvania. State representative knock Kenya of North Philadelphia everybody. It has been a pleasure. Thank you also very much and hey. We're glad you made time for this hour as well. Hopefully, it's clear now. Just how very robust onum we really are especially these days, black lives, matter, and the LGBTQ I movement are both making strides, but it all begins when people connect when we discover just how much we need each other. In his letter from Birmingham Jail Dr King wrote that we are all tied in a single garment of any. We've seen what can happen when that garment unravels. Until we meet again, I'm Joshua, Johnson. Thanks for watching. Getting. Again and protesting and being able to really talk about what's happening in the world, and where we selling to have arrest, all black lives matter mean that we should address the homophobia in our black community and address the racism. LGBTQ community, it's about joining to communities together and creating that dialogue and conversation about ways that we can better each other as human race. Opportunity for coalition building, and to really take this.

LGBTQ Kenya Pennsylvania National Association of Black Lentini Representative State representative bt. Ashley FANTI G. S Anderson Co Los Angeles Dr King Joshua Philadelphia Marie Birmingham president Johnson
"anderson co" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"Can agree on is that state sponsored violence and law enforcement have been an impediment to our ability to thrive, and so when we have conversations around what needs to fund the police in Reinvest in the communities that have been fragmented by these systems. It's a conversation that we should all be able to come to the table together and justice. Why do you think actually that there's been that lack of awareness of who all has been at the foundations of these movement? Is it willful ignorance is it? Is it just what's what's underlying that? It could be of the above in there also seems to be in urban meant within the black community somehow. Black Trans in Queer folks are immune to the taxes of white supremacy, and that were sheltered by the politics of the og BTU umbrella, and saw fifty two percents of lgbtq people of Color, according to a report by the southerners on new ground and the transgender law center, said experience, high levels of violence by law enforcement, and so as we continue to see why enforcement take black lives with their humanity, and not be on hold responsible were also seen disproportionate violence within the community toward black lives, and so I think that there are people who know, and then there are some don't. Travel lately. A number of companies have expressed their support of both black and q i. a rights struggles some of policy changes including the hookup APP grinder this month. The company said it would remove a function that lets users filter out profiles by ethnicity, I think some people were surprised that grinder even had this feature. What do you make of? This feels like one of those realizations that that actually was just talking about the some LGBTQ why people may have about just how deeply prejudices can run within the community that claims to embrace everyone. Well! The whole idea of kind of ratio preference racial discrimination within the Lgbtq community is not new. And Grinder has known that for as long as it's been in existence, and so I see that this particular move. It's just kind of lip service. In this particular moment. They have removed it a long time ago. We didn't need to witness you know somebody with knee on the back of their neck in order for us to be moved toward this type of movement and. And type of change companies like grinder, who perpetuate a lot of ways some of this racism, some of the oppression that lgbtq people of Color Exhibit, experience rather within the community. There's so much more that they could be doing with the technology with the data that they have with the money that they have and this particular move is really. It's really empty. And travel. It's it's. It's not lost on me that there is a certain degree of. Fetish is ation I think is the right word one talking about black men inside the community I mean. I'm getting that right. Very very much I mean we many of us within the community. We've heard you know the the no fats. No right so there's an anti fatted antiques them conversation to be had. There's also the note blacks, no Asians I'll these other ways in which members of the community, primarily white members of the community other further. And further marginalize those of us who are at the intersections of a variety of identity, so like I said it's not a new conversation and I'm looking to grinder Jack to the other APPs to do more, and if you're not familiar with any of these APPs by the way, and you're watching this, do not google them. Stay pure remaining. Let's look ahead to the future representative Kenya. What were you doing to ensure the best outcome for black? LGBTQ people come the November election. Is there one particular aspect of policy that you're focused on for the future? So, one of the things that I've really been been looking at. Is this idea around data justice is? Often in our public policy, we all can sink of moments where our public policy is actively antagonistic against folks who exist on the margins, but one of the things that I've often seen walking into committee hearings as. Only one of two openly lgbtq members as one of the youngest members as the only openly, Algebra two person of color, and what so often happens, you're not even a part of the conversation at all, and so there's been a national movement of activists and others around clearing the senses, and in Pennsylvania one of the things I've been looking. ACT IS A bill that I introduced data for lgbtq lives that would. Would add the subject question to all forms. We collect demographic information about LENTINI question around sexual orientation gender identity, because the reality is at the state level. We collect almost no data about our community in large part because people don't care. They don't think we should be a part of the conversation and we're actively ignored so one of the things that we need to do is make sure I'm not the only. LGBTQ, person or queer person in these spaces because when I've seen. Is that when we're in these faces when our lived, experiences are in these faces the conversation shifts, and we need more events chesting to attack, ultimately dismantle structures of oppression and I just want to call up that acronym. You Use Oh G. Oh Gee I. That sexual orientation and Gender Identity Right. Correct got before I let show in one sentence if I could get from all three of you just one sentence if you could give one piece of advice to a young black LGBTQ a person who's watching this. WHO's looking to the future wondering what the future's going to look like? What would that be in one sentence? Representative Kenya. What would you say one sentence? I would say that sometimes the most radical thing you can do is just be yourself, and I would encourage them to truly truly embrace that in every single space. Ashley one sentence. What would you say? I would say take ownership of the moment. Every generation has bad movement that. They are and this is yours. And Treville before we go. I just add that you come from a long lineage of queer entrance brilliance embrace it. Trivial Anderson Co host of the PODCAST fanti neglected to mention the president of the Los Angeles Chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists Actually Marie repressed creator of your essential and Pennsylvania State representative knock Kenya of North Philadelphia. Everybody, it has been a pleasure. Thank you also very much and hey. We're glad you made time for this hour as well. Hopefully, it's clear now. Just how very robust onum we really are especially these days, black lives, matter and the LGBTQ. A rights movement are both making strides, but it all begins when people connect when we discover just how much we need each other. In his letter from Birmingham Jail Dr. King wrote that we are all tied in a single garment of destiny. We've seen what can happen when that garment unravels. Until we meet again I'm Joshua Johnson? Thanks for watching. Getting. Again and protesting and being able to really talk about what's happening in the world, and where we selling to have arrest, all black lives matter mean that we should address the homophobia in our black community and address the racism Lgbtq community thoughts about joining to communities together and creating that dialogue and conversation about ways that we can better each other as human race. Opportunity for coalition building, and to really take this.

Grinder Kenya representative National Association of Black Joshua Johnson Pennsylvania Dr. King Jack Birmingham Ashley Treville Philadelphia Los Angeles Chapter Anderson Co Pennsylvania State Marie president
"anderson co" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Can agree on is that state sponsored violence and law enforcement have been an impediment to our ability to thrive, and so when we have conversations around what needs to fund the police in Reinvest in the communities that have been fragmented by these systems, it's a conversation that we should all be able to come to the table together and justice. Why do you think actually that there's been that lack of awareness of who all has been at the foundations of these movement? Is it willful ignorance is it? Is it just what's what's underlying that? It could be of the above in. There also seems to be in urban meant within the black community somehow. Black Trans in Queer folks are immune to the taxes of white supremacy, and that were sheltered by the politics of the og, BTU umbrella, and saw fifty two percents of lgbtq people of Color, according to a report by the southerners on new ground and the transgender law center, said experience, high levels of violence by law enforcement, and so as we continue to see why enforcement take black lives with their humanity, and not be on hold responsible were also seen disproportionate violence within the community toward black lives, and so I think that there are people who know, and then there are some don't. Travel lately, a number of companies have expressed their support of both black and be i. a rights struggles some of policy changes including the hookup APP grinder this month. The company said it would remove a function that lets users filter out profiles by ethnicity. Were surprised that grinder even had this feature. What do you make of? This feels like one of those realizations that that actually was just talking about the some LGBTQ why people may have about just how deeply prejudices can run within the community that claims to embrace everyone. Well the whole idea of kind of ratio preference, racial discrimination within the Lgbtq community is not new. and. Grinder has known that for as long as it's been in existence, and so I see that this particular move. It's just kind of lip service. In this particular moment. They have removed it a long time ago. We didn't need to witness you know somebody with knee on the back of their neck in order for us to be moved toward this type of movement and. And type of change companies like grinder who perpetuate a lot of ways some of this racism, some of the oppression that lgbtq people of Color Exhibit experience rather within the community. There's so much more that they could be doing with the technology with the data that they have with the money that they have and this particular move is really. It's really empty. And travel, it's it's. It's not lost on me that there is a certain degree of. Fetish is ation I think is the right word one talking about black men inside the community I. Mean I'm getting that, right? Very very much I mean we many of us within the community? We've heard you know the the no fats. No right so there's an anti fatted antiques them conversation to be had. There's also the note blacks no Asians. I'll these other ways in which members of the community, primarily white members of the community other further. And further marginalize those of us who are at the intersections of a variety of identity, so like I said it's not a new conversation. and I'm looking to grinder Jack to the other APPs to do more, and if you're not familiar with any of these APPs by the way, and you're watching this, do not google them. Stay pure remaining. Let's look ahead to the future representative Kenya. What were you doing to ensure the best outcome for black LGBTQ? People come the November election. Is there one particular aspect of policy that you're focused on for the future? So one of the things that I've really been been looking at is this idea around data justice is? Often in our public policy, we all can sink of moments where our public policy is actively antagonistic against folks who exist on the margins, but one of the things that I've often seen walking into committee hearings as. Only, one of two openly LGBTQ members as one of the youngest members as the only openly Algebra two person of color, and what so often happens, you're not even a part of the conversation at all, and so there's been a national movement of activists and others around clearing the senses and in Pennsylvania. One of the things been looking act is a bill that I introduced data for lgbtq lives that would add. Add the subject question to all forms. We collect demographic information about Lentini. Question around sexual orientation gender identity, because the reality is at the state level. We collect almost no data about our community in large part because people don't care. They don't think we should be a part of the conversation and we're actively ignored so one of the things that we need to do is make sure I'm not the only. LGBTQ, person or queer person in these spaces because when I've seen is that when we're in these faces when our lived, experiences are in these faces the conversation shifts, and we need more events chesting to attack, ultimately dismantle structures of oppression, and I just want to call up that acronym you use Oh. G. Oh Gee I! That sexual orientation and gender identity right. Correct got before I. let go in one sentence if I could get from all three of you just one sentence if you could give one piece of advice to a young black LGBTQ a person who's watching this. WHO's looking to the future wondering what the future's going to look like? What would that be in one sentence? Additive Kenya what would you say one sentence? that. Sometimes the most radical thing you can do is just be yourself and I would encourage them to truly truly embrace that in every single space. Ashley one sentence. What would you say? I would say take ownership of the moment. Every generation has bad movement that. They are, and this is yours. And Treville before we go. I just add that. You come from a long lineage of queer entrance brilliance embrace it. Trivial Anderson Co host of the PODCAST fanti neglected to mention the president of the Los. Angeles chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists, Actually Marie repressed creator of your essential and Pennsylvania state representative. KNOCK KENYA OF NORTH PHILADELPHIA everybody. It has been a pleasure. Thank you also very much and hey. We're glad you made time for this hour as well. Hopefully, it's clear now. Just how very robust onum we really are especially these days, black lives, matter and the Lgbtq a rights movement are both making strides, but it all begins when people connect when we discover just how much we need each other. In his letter from Birmingham Jail Dr King wrote that we are all tied in a single garment of destiny. We've seen what can happen when that garment unravels. Until we meet again, I'm Joshua Johnson. Thanks for watching. Getting. Again and protesting and being able to really talk about what's happening in the world, and where we selling to have arrest, all black lives matter mean that we should address the homophobia in our black community and address the racism. LGBTQ community thoughts about joining to communities together and creating that dialogue and conversation about ways that we can better each other as human race. Opportunity for coalition building, and to really take this.

Grinder Kenya National Association of Black Pennsylvania Joshua Johnson Lentini Dr King representative Jack Birmingham Ashley Treville PHILADELPHIA Anderson Co state representative Angeles president Los Marie
"anderson co" Discussed on 99% Invisible

99% Invisible

11:00 min | 6 months ago

"anderson co" Discussed on 99% Invisible

"We gotta find a way to make this into the whole for this using nothing but that damn that's great scene in movie history. Anyway we just start throwing stuff in a car. I put one hundred and fifty two hundred bucks on my credit card and ran a bunch of stuff to the lab and we started piling things together until Made our first generation of later as you can tell tyler. Mental doesn't normally make ventilators. Most of the time I make robots swim through water. Pipes to find leaks. This is a huge problem with infrastructure. Twenty percent of the world's clean water is lost to leaky pipes. But suddenly that wasn't the most pressing problem in the world when came and hit us like it did the ability to travel. And do you know some big projects we have coming up went away so we started to look at what else we can do. And my co founder of the ventilator project is actually also my roommate we we work in the same building and we just started talking about the fact that ventilators are going to be a huge shortage. And so I started digging into it and you start to find out that if any later is not difficult product. The lack of difficulty doesn't mean it's easy it means it's straightforward so tyler in his Co. pounder at the Ventilator Project Alex Frost assembled a team of over two hundred remote volunteer engineers medical regulatory and business professionals to try and help solve the global ventilator shortage as fast as possible and even though the details from company to company are very different. A lot of manufacturers are making a similar pivot. You know if you're a manufacturer that's kind of what you're always looking like. Can we make something like the quake that serve in our blood you know? This is Matt. Anderson Co founder of sound devices. They normally make high end audio mixing and recording consoles a couple of weeks ago I was texting back and forth with my head of Manufacturing Lisa and said you know I wonder if we could make ventilators or masks or something. The ended up concentrating on facial masks. I came in and talked to my sales guys and said hey guys WANNA call some hospitals and see if this is true about there being a shortage. 'cause I don't know. And they made some calls and they came back and they said. Yeah definitely. Hospitals really need these badly so That's you know a few minutes later. We just started buying parts. You know that was on a Monday that we started that and then it was thirty two hours later we had the first ones coming off the end of the line. And today if you go to the product page on sound devices dot com you can order eight thirty two channel three six track mixer and a one hundred pack of single use medical face shields and much like the ventilator project when Matt described his company's pivot to our producer and fitzgerald who you'll hear in the next clip. It wasn't the technology or the know how needed to make the product. That was the hard part you take the foam sticking on their staple on the elastic. And you're done it. Sounds really simple but Getting these three parts in volume has been difficult so we have supplier. It's it's our normal suppliers for the plastic shield and for the foam. Luckily we've got great suppliers for them there right Nearby in Wisconsin and we buy them and that's all great the elastic piece. That's been kind of a nightmare to get in quantity. I'll give you a for instance. Last week two of our purchasing people Lorraine and we were driving all around northern Wisconsin going from Walmart Walmart and Joanne's fabric to joins fabric buying up all the elastic. They could find. I feel like when you picture manufacturing. You don't picture manufacturer it's driving Joann fabrics to get the stuff well and normally you don't put this in a special situation right so yeah it's typical when you call you. Say I WANNA buy this much foam and they say lead. Time is six weeks and you go. Okay no problem you plan for that well. In this pandemic six weeks does us. No Good Supply. Chains regulations and factories have to be more nimble than ever before because the virus is a moving target. Just ask Jen. Ceo of the Industrial Sewing Innovation Center in Detroit which normally makes fashion apparel. I will tell you that this has been such a quickly changing environment. At first it was mass mass mass mass so we sampled all these all these nests and then it was no longer messages. Really Gowns and gowns has really turned up the big the big problem and really what we're most suited to make and what is in isolation gown exactly `isolation gown is there's varying degrees and entrust me when I say. I have learned a lot in the last three weeks I have. Wow I mean acronyms. I didn't know before the whole thing. What makes isolation gown is that it has articulate protection to varying degrees? So if you're in surgery you have you know really tight cuffs around your wrist in tight around your your neck Highest grade material in the level. One is just sort of like a sheep that you put over. That just helps you a little bit. The industrial sewing innovation center also known as Isaac was already a mission driven company before Corona Virus. So the industrial sewing in innovation center is designed to be a people centered institute that trains people for advanced manufacturing of some goods apparel and to do so in a way that is responsible. The fashions stories are very Polluting irresponsible industry for the most part it puts about forty five billion units garments into landfills every year before consumer one of the solutions to changing these bad practices is to manufacture closer to home so instead of stores speculative buying clothes they think will sell nine months in the future. They use more advanced and local manufacturing to quickly fulfill orders on demand. So you get ready for a whole waste stream and now you have a whole resource pool that you can now allocate to paying higher wages and being sustainable from that standpoint we really believe that having a sustainable product is not sustainable unless people making them have sustainable wives. You can't fight every battle at the same time right. I totally get that. But how have you approached balancing your mission to the moment that's right you can't make everything first. Priority so sustainability. I have to tell you right now is not our number one priority. Because I mean we're working on polypropylene and these are disposable. Gowns wants needs thrown out. It's the opposite of sustainable. No but you know we have learned a lot about how that stuff gets recycled. So we're learning as we go about these waste streams in what you can do about these way strains so it's interesting that even though we're creating ways are also understanding what you do with it when it's done but I think what hasn't changed is our commitment to training people and treating people differently than they've been treated in a factory environment so we were just making different products. So how do you physically make the factory safe? So that workers can be separate and still do their jobs question. Yeah so one of the things that we had to do is when you're when you're manufacturing in a lean way you reduce costs by reducing the space by which you hand things to each other though in a typical cell so is a team of people working on different parts of an item wants the items through the cell. It's completed literally have pieces of fabric. That are that are tied together. That are kind of making their way around. You know the cell so you're very very very close and that's how you're at remain competitive so we had to distance that so literally. What we did was where the brand new gorgeous machines that are programmable. They're really beautiful and inbetween them. We've rigged these you know corrugated cardboard pathways sort of duct tape. You know between machines so that we can create enough distance. We sixteen to pass the material. Cross the men to wear masks and gloves. So it's been this real you know just figure it out. Make it work. As we continue to navigate the pandemic notably without the proper planning and guidance federal executive relying on the ingenuity and generosity of these manufacturers to fill in the gaps. There will be a lot of just figuring it out to find out more about the ventilator project the sound devices in the industrial sewing innovation center. Go to nine. P I dot org ninety nine percent. Invisibles impact design covered supported by autodesk. Autodesk enables the design and creation of innovative solutions to the world's most pressing social and environmental challenges to address the shortage of personal protective equipment. Autodesk is helping connect design and manufacturing resources to develop new solutions for P. p. e. and life saving devices. Learn more about these efforts at AUTODESK DOT com slash redshift? A site that tells stories about the future of making things across architecture engineering infrastructure and construction in manufacturing. I have a special announcement. We have a book coming out. It's by Kurt. Kolstad and me in illustrated by Patrick. Vail. It's called the ninety nine percent invisible city when we're back outside and to appreciate the design of the city and broader world around us. This will be your guide and it comes out on October. Sixth from Houghton. Mifflin Harcourt and right now you can see the beautiful cover and find links to preorder it on our website. It's ninety nine. P I dot org slash book. Ninety nine percent of visible was produced this week by Rebecca Cantor Fitzgerald and Vivian Lay. Mix Tech production bus reviews of music by Sean Right now. Came Angle is our senior producer. Colston is the digital director. The rest of the team is senior editor Delaney Hall. Joe Rosenberg Crisper Ruby. Avery troubling Sophia. Closer and the Roman marks. We Are Project Ninety one point seven. Klw In San Francisco in produced on radio row which is distributed in multiple East Bay apartments but in our heart. It is located in beautiful downtown Oakland California..

Industrial Sewing Innovation C autodesk tyler Matt Rebecca Cantor Fitzgerald producer Wisconsin co founder Walmart Sean Right Manufacturing Lisa Alex Frost Oakland California San Francisco Co. Anderson Co Joann Vail Isaac Kurt
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 8 months ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
"anderson co" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

10:54 min | 1 year ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Brings you. News commentary. A. And analysis from black left perspective. I'm Glenn Ford along with my co-host Newly Bailey. Coming up much of what you read in. The corporate media is pure propaganda. A fictionalized account of the World Margaret Kimberly and other reporters unmasked unmask. These lies before pets crowd in New York City. We'll get a report on the racial dimensions of the struggle for socialism in Venezuela Venezuela and activists say f the police and they're brutal presence in the New York subway system but first activist list and author. William C Anderson says radicals should not bow to the pressures to tone down their demands just to get along with the the Democratic Party Anderson Co authored. A book called as black as the resistance and recently wrote an article for truth out titled Old. No matter who's elected we must keep demanding more. Generally what I was trying to get across was the work that we are doing Wing and our movements is extremely important and a lot of times people feel a little disillusion or they lack some inspiration. They might go down about if things are actually changing or not but I think that elections are always a way to gauge a lot of the changes that are taking place in this country because what politicians are ultimately trying to do is co op movements PAT's and appeal to mass movements in a way that shows that organizing being effective because if it wasn't being affected they wouldn't be trying to do that in the first place so it's not so much that people should seal inspired like hey we should put our faith in politicians but but it's more so the fact that people should recognize. This is having an effect so the work that people are doing because it's not like the establishment Schmidt is going to try to appeal to people using what movements are doing unless it actually taking root and people's minds and community for folks are organizing if there had not been the mobilizations of twenty fourteen and twenty fifteen. It's inconceivable that many of these issues that are being debated by the Democrats would be talked about it. All and that includes of course reparations. Yeah absolutely absolutely absolutely. There's a lot of different issues on the table that are being discussed ways but I think a lot of people would have never imagined from healthcare care to abolition and we should be fair enough to ourselves and the tireless organizers recognize. We've seen some pretty significant difficult changes in Washington from Democratic Socialist and abolitionist proposals being put forth. And for what it's worth I think about the Loyd James who warned that there's an attempt to appropriate. Abolition as well as organizers like Mariam Cop and they pointed out really that there's people people using this word they don't actually know what I mean and you see it popping up and things like progressive prosecutor organizing. And so you know a lot of things get sucked into collection than an to be establishment and are kind of parroted back in this way where they tried to take the actual substance out of the work. Worked at grassroots organizers are doing but it's still important to recognize that organizers are being effective and that why this is happening happening but is some of this cynical circus and I'm talking. Not about the organizers. Work about what's happening in the Democratic primary sorry and in the debates so we see the Medicare for all is embraced by lots of candidates but not by the Democratic Party as a whole not by Nancy Pelosi and the same of course with the green new deal which democratic corporate leadership looks at with disdain and contempt. I really think that we have to kind of get past this idea that wherever asking for too much I think. Sometimes that people think we're asking for too much or these proposals over here being put forth or a little bit the to quote unquote radical or. They're too expansive or this or that. That's something that we really have to push back against particularly when it comes to election. The system is already taking too much and we have to dispel this idea that we're asking too much because we don't make the biggest demands possible possible since the system is already taking too much going to destroy us all if we allow it to so. I think that actually when it comes to a lot of election issues that the acid be much bigger and much more substantial than what's being demanded already and I think that that's one of the things bat comes to mind when we talk about. What's on the table? And and as far as like the cynicism and the thinking around the practicality ability of what's being asked isn't the measure of the work the organizer not in the attention that it gets from from the corporate parties who are hostile to transformative change but in how those issues resonate with the people and if the the parties don't come through well then the people know that there's got to be a change in the politics right right and you know well the thing about it is. I'm thinking about how a lot of lettuce particularly disparage. The people they're supposed to be organizing being condescending. Think about the things people are involved in and it's fair to critique but how you do it matters and that goes for everything from pop culture to sports thing even elections and when we're thinking about how people are having things marketed to the by corporate party politics right basically. What I'm saying here is if these organizing tactics that are happening at the grassroots level? Weren't working then. They just wouldn't wouldn't even bothered to try to mimic it all the whole reason that the Democratic Party for example copies and mix and traffic coop. These movements is because because they know that it is appealing to people and so there's a process that has to happen where a lot of folks have to recognize. This is. We're working. This is being effective and a very big way because that's why the parties are trying to take messaging from us. That's why they're trying to take what we're doing and turn it into something that is caught up in Washington but of course the corporate parties don't just steal the message agenda even use it and contorted to their own purposes. They also absorb a lot of the organizers themselves and I am making reference to black lives matter people who become operatives for the Democratic Party in effect. You know that's always something that movements I've had To deal with. There's a lot of people who are going to go into politics and I think that at the end of the day that there's not really anything too surprising prizing about that is really kind of like par for course and folks have to be really really careful about this idea that we're going to to reform our way out of the crisis that we're in because really reformism and sort of approach thinking that you know incremental mental small changes work overtime. That's really what that sort of mentality leads to is saying you know. Hey I'm just GONNA go into the the establishment and try to change things from the inside out and people have always done that for a very very long time and there's always been pushed back and we just have to keep pushing back against against it because it doesn't work and it's not effective. I think that we really need to be thinking about abolition instead of reform. What about the rise? The phenomenal rise in the number of folks who are questioning capitalism. Now we know of course that many of them don't I don't understand what socialism actually is but nevertheless they liked the sound and feel the word right and that is going back cleaned. What I'm talking about here? There are a lot of young people who are rejecting capitalism and then that is the case. I think that it says something that you have the rise of organizations like the USA and kind of there's more representation happening within the Democratic Party Party with Democratic Socialist and folks who are talking about socialism whether they're true to the principles of that and reality or not. There's still a present happening or presidents appearing in the Democratic Party that a lot of people would've never dreamed of seeing their lifetime and I think that that is exactly what I'm talking about when I say the Democratic Party and politicians are going to always try to use what they know is appealing to people. And they're going to try data. Follow the tide of people's changing sentiments. And make that a part of the establishment so people will keep feeding into it and trying to play this game the ultimate. I think a lot of people at the top know that the system is under threat if people are actually become come fully aware of what they're up against and what the system doing to us. Daily that was author and activist William C Anderson. WHO's also so social media editor for Black Agenda Report Margaret Kimberly Co founder and senior columnist for Black Agenda Report? It teamed up with a clean journalist. Max Blumenthal and Erin Matei before a packed house in Midtown Manhattan. The subject object was propaganda. The lies that corporate media tell in service to U. S. imperialism. It's funny thing when I was trying to figure figure out what to talk about.

Democratic Party Democratic Party Anderson Co Democratic Party Party William C Anderson Washington New York City Margaret Kimberly Glenn Ford Venezuela Newly Bailey Mariam Cop Loyd James PAT Schmidt Max Blumenthal Nancy Pelosi Black Agenda Manhattan
"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:07 min | 1 year ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"How to do is still the wall will discuss those challenges that every entrepreneur faces and how they overcome the obstacles and scales. The wall to success. Joining me now is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO of VERA site is a molecular diagnostic companies specializing in products that reduce unnecessary surgeries and other invasive procedures its first product of firma has helped thousands of people with sideway nachos. So avoid surgery in the diagnostic process body. Welcome to the program. Thank you for me, the US health industry, huge as we know estimated at nearly three trillion dollars is not always quick to embrace change though. So have you found it to be? Little difficult getting doctors to sign onto your new technology in new ways of doing things. I think there's always hurdles in getting physicians to adopt new tests because they're used to using their their existing procedures experience to do what safe for patients their site. We focused firmly on building out a lot of evidence behind our test that will build the confidence not only by physicians, but also by patients to adopt the tests and then follow the results to keep people at a surgeries that they didn't need. How do you come up with your best ideas? I think we come up with our best ideas growth. Thank. Very often. Someone will have an idea that is improved on by debating and looking for the best solution all along the way, and we've had to do that many times as we've built the business with the course of the last nine years, and I know that you just recently came out with third products for diagnosis of lung cancer. What are you big challenges right now in in building on the business and success? You've had I think this year specifically were we're faced with London New challenges because we do have three products now on the market just a year ago, we were a single product company. And so we're expanding commercially significantly sales and marketing growth, we have to remain focused on each product. Which was the different stage process. We have additional clinical studies that have to be conducted to continue to build at the evidence in. Lastly, probably one of the most important things in our area healthcare is convincing payers to like insurance companies convincing insurance companies value that they can penetrate from by covering these tests. We've had great success with affirmative and we plan to replay that playbook with perceptive in. Him Busia wouldn't the biggest challenge in convincing insurance companies, for example to say, hey, this may be new, but it's really worthwhile to you because it can reduce costs in the long run. We think it starts with picking clinical question to answer that actually matters with science and technology are fingertips today. You could answer almost any questions typically that you can think of but often those tests aren't gonna have an impact in change, what physician impatient will do next. So we look cynical questions that actually are going to change clinical care in a way that's gonna improve the outcome for the patient physician that also provide an economic benefit to the insurance companies because if they don't get the economic benefit in addition to that clinical value, they may be hesitant to change what they're doing today. All right. Tell us a story about the single biggest mistake you have made in starting and. Growing your business. I think the single biggest mistake is really underestimating the power of culture. I think that when you think about what the success of company rights on? It's all about the people, and the people that you bring together to form the company and grow the company the more aligned the they are to the vision of the later, and the more people are rowing the boat in the same direction that the easier it is to achieve the goals, and just like positives. People coming into the culture can help you overcome hurdles along the way because there are optimists take into liver in energy. That's very positive often. If you bring someone who's misfit to the culture, it can have a negative impact. So I would tell entrepeneurship don't ever underestimate the power of culture. And have you brought in misfits, and how did you deal with that? We've we've made it we've made some hiring decisions along the way that weren't probably the best fits. For us as a company or for them as an individual. It's always a two way street in that marriage has to be good on both sides. Okay. Tweeden broadcasting the NASDAQ entrepreneurial center in San Francisco this scale the wall when we.

Bonnie Anderson US NASDAQ VERA San Francisco London New co founder CEO Busia entrepeneurship three trillion dollars nine years
"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Welcome to the program. Thank you for the US health industry. Huge as we know estimated at nearly three trillion dollars is not always quick to embrace change though. So have you found it to be? A little difficult getting doctors to sign onto your new technology and new ways of doing things I think there's always hurdles in getting physicians to adopt new tests because they're used to using their their existing procedures experience to do what safe for patients very site. We focused heavily on building out a lot of evidence behind our test that will build the confidence not only by physicians, but also by patients to adopt the tests and then follow the results to keep people at a surgeries that they didn't need. How do you come up with your best ideas? I think we come up with our best ideas for growth think. Very often. Someone will have an idea that is improved on by debating and looking for the best solution all along the way, and we've had to do that many times as we've built the business that the course of the last nine years, and I know that you just recently came out with your third products for diagnosis of lung cancer. What are your big challenges right now in in building on the business and the success you've had this year? Specifically were we're faced with London New challenges because we do have three products now on the market just a year ago, we were a single product company. And so we're expanding commercially significantly sales and marketing growth, we have to remain focused on each product, which was the different stage in that process. We have additional clinical studies that have to be conducted to continue to build at the evidence in. Lastly, probably one of the most important things in our area of healthcare is convincing payers to you know, like insurance companies convincing insurance companies the value that they can benefit from by covering these tests. We've had great success with affirmative and we plan to replace that playbook with percep-. Invidia wooden is the biggest challenge in convincing insurance companies, for example to say, hey, this may be new, but it's really worthwhile to you because it can reduce costs in the long run. We think it starts with picking clinical question to answer that actually matters with science and technology our fingertips today, you could answer almost any questions typically that you can think of but often those tests aren't going to have an impact and change what a physician patient will do next. So we look cynical questions that actually are going to change clinical care in a way that's gonna improve the outcome for the patient physician that also provide an economic benefit to the insurance companies because if they don't get the economic benefit in addition to that value, they may be hesitant to change what they're doing today. All right. Tell us a story about the single biggest mistake you have made in start. And growing your business. I think the single biggest mistake is really underestimating the power of culture. I think that when you think about what the success of company rights on? It's all about the people, and the people that you bring together form the company and grow the company the more aligned the they are to the vision of the leader. And the more people are rowing the boat in the same direction that the easier it is to achieve the goals and just like positive people coming into the culture can help you overcome hurdles along the way because there are optimists take into liver in energy. That's very positive often. If you bring someone who's misfit to the culture, it can have a negative impact. So I would tell entrepeneurship don't ever interested the power of culture. And have you brought in misfits, and how did you deal with that? We've we've made we've made some hiring decisions along the way that weren't probably the best fit. Fits for us as a company or for them as an individual. It's always a two way street and that marriage has to be good on both sides. Okay. Broadcasting from the NASDAQ entrepreneurial center in San Francisco, this scale the wall where we talk about the heart realities of failure in business. It's powered by NASDAQ private market, stay private on your own terms. For more information, go to N P, M dot com. And with us today is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO of VERA site this difficult easier or are there always knew challenged challenges? And hurdles that come along. You're away. It seems like there's always new challenges in hurdles along the way. I think it's it becomes a way of life in a in a high growth in constantly changing business and tell us about the last time you had a problem and had to ask for help. You know, honestly, problems come up. Weekly daily monthly. I think that often. One of my colleagues, and I often refer to the business in the space that we're in is like playing welcome all because the minute you solve one problem something pops up, and so by nature, we've very rarely sit around exhilarating in the wonderful things that are going on. Or always looking for. What is the next problem that's gonna pop up? And so we've kind of been led by theme of always having a plan and always having plan b for everything we do we often have backup plans in case plan, a doesn't work. We already have the heat in place to head a different direction that kind of segues nicely into the next question. I was going to ask you, which is what are the three biggest lessons to learn in dealing with the challenges of rowing or starting a business. I picture your vision. The passion. That got you to where you are today. Usually there's been a lot of thought a lot of foresight into where you're trying to get as vision things will come along every day to distract from that that the best of vice is to really be a trade of the vision. I think the second one is this idea of having a plan we as a startup, really balanced. The idea of mixing planning was doing awesome companies will start go do. And then realize maybe we need the backup a little bed. So we've always had a plan, and this this theory of planned do and always having a backup plan because things will go wrong every day. And if you already have a backup plan in place mitigating strategy, and it's quicker to recover. From those setbacks in third is not underestimate culture because cultures. What kills the company and allow.

US NASDAQ London New percep Bonnie Anderson San Francisco rowing entrepeneurship co founder CEO three trillion dollars nine years
"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:09 min | 1 year ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"How to do is scale the wall will discuss those challenges that every entrepreneur faces and how they overcome the obstacles and scales. The wall to success. Joining me now is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO of faira site is a molecular diagnostic companies, specializing in products that reduce unnecessary surgeries and other invasive procedures its first product of firma has helped thousands of people with thyroid nachos to avoid surgery in the diagnostic process body. Welcome to the program. Thank you for me, the US health industry, huge as we know estimated at nearly three trillion dollars is not always quick to embrace change though. So have you found it to be? She little difficult getting doctors to sign onto your new technology and new ways of doing things I think there's always hurdles in getting physicians to adopt new tests because they're used to using their their existing procedures experience to do what safe for patients so very site. We focused heavily on building out a lot of evidence behind our test that will build the confidence not only by physicians, but also by patients to adopt the tests and then follow the results to keep people out of surgeries that they didn't need. How do you come up with your best ideas? I think we come up with our best ideas for growth thing. Very often. Someone will have an idea that is improved on by debating, and, you know, looking for the best solution along the way, and we've had to do that many times as we've built the business that the course of the last nine years, and I know that you just recently came up with your third products for diagnosis of lung cancer. What are your big challenges right now in in building on the business and success? You've had this year. Specifically were we're faced with London New challenges because we do have three products now on the market just a year ago, we were a single product company. And so we're expanding a commercially significantly sales and marketing growth, we have to remain focused on each product, which was a different stage in that process. We have additional clinical studies that have to be conducted to continue to. Held at the evidence in lastly, probably one of the most important things in our area of health care is convincing payers to you know, like insurance companies convincing insurance companies the value that they can benefit from by covering these tests. We've had great success with affirma-, and we plan to replay that playbook with perceptive in Busia wouldn't the biggest challenge convincing insurance companies, for example to say, hey, this may be new, but it's really worthwhile to you because it can reduce costs in the long run. We think it starts with picking clinical question to answer that actually matters with science and technology our fingertips today, you could answer any questions I in typically that you can think of but often those tests aren't going to have an impact in change. What a physician impatient will do next. So we look clinical questions that actually are gonna change clinical care. In a way, that's gonna improve the outcome for the patient physician that also provide an economic benefit to the insurance companies because if they don't get the economic benefit in addition to that clinical value, they may be hesitant to change what they're doing today. All right. Tell us a story about the single biggest mistake you have made in starting and growing your business. I think the single biggest mistake is really underestimating the power of culture. I think that when you think about what the success of a company rise on it's all about the people, and the people that you bring together to form the company and grow the company the more aligned the they are to the vision of the leader. And the more people are rowing the boat in the same direction that the easier it is to achieve the goals and just like positive people coming into the culture can help you overcome hurdles along the way because they're Optima steak and deliver an energy that's very positive often. If you bring someone who's misfit to the culture, it can have a negative impact. So I would tell entrepeneurship don't ever interested the power of culture. And have you brought in misfits, and how did you deal with that? We've we've made it we've made some hiring decisions along the way that weren't probably the best. Fits for us as a company or for them as an individual. It's always a two way street and that marriage has to be good on both sides. Okay. Broadcasting from the NASDAQ entrepreneurial center in San Francisco, this scale the wall.

Bonnie Anderson US NASDAQ faira London New San Francisco co founder CEO affirma entrepeneurship Busia three trillion dollars nine years
"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"How to do is still the wall will discuss those challenges that every entrepreneur faces and how they've overcome the obstacles and scales. The wall. It's a success. Joining me now is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO a parasite it's a molecular diagnostic companies specializing in products that reduce unnecessary surgeries and other invasive procedures. Its first products affirma- has helped thousands of people with thyroid nachos. So point surgery in the diagnostic process body. Welcome to the program. Thank you for for me. The US health industry huge as we know estimated at nearly three trillion dollars is not always quick to embrace change though. So have you found it to be a little difficult getting doctors to sign onto your new technology and new ways of doing things I think there's always hurdles in getting physicians to adopt new tests because they're used to using their their existing procedures inexperienced to do what safe for patients with various site. We focused heavily on building out a lot of evidence behind our test that will build the confidence not only by physicians, but also by patients to adopt the tests and then follow the results to keep people out of surgeries that they didn't need. How do you come up with your best ideas? I think we've come up with our best ideas, turn growth thank. Very often. Someone will have an idea that is improved on by debating and looking for the best solution all along the way, and we've had to do that many times as we've built the business over the course of the last nine years, and I know that you just recently came up with your third products for diagnosis of lung cancer. What are your big challenges right now in in building on the business and the success? You've had. Yeah. I think this year specifically were we're faced with new challenges because we do have three products now on the market just a year ago, we were a single product company. And so we're expanding commercially significantly sales and marketing grows, we have to remain focused on each product, which was a different stage in that process. We have additional clinical studies that has to be conducted to continue to build at the evidence. And then lastly, probably one of the most important things in our area of healthcare is convincing payers to like insurance companies convincing insurance companies the value that they can benefit from by covering these tests. We've had great success with affirma-, and we plan to replay that playbook with perceptive, and in Busia wouldn't is the biggest challenge convincing insurance companies, for example to say, hey, this may be. Be new, but it's really worthwhile to you. Because it can reduce costs in the long run. We think it starts with picking a clinical question to answer that actually matters. Science and technology at our fingertips today. You could answer almost any questions scientifically that you can think of but often those tests aren't gonna have an impact and change what a physician impatient will do next. So we look clinical questions that actually are going to change clinical care in a way that's gonna improve the outcome for the patient and physician that also provide an economic benefit to the insurance companies because if they don't get the economic benefit in addition to that they may be hesitant to change what they're doing today. All right. Tell us a story about the single biggest mistake you have made in starting and growing your business. I think the single biggest mistake is really underestimating the power of culture. I think that when you think about what the success of a company relate rights on? It's all about the people, and the people that you bring together to form the company and grow the company the more aligned the they are to the vision of the later, and the more people are rowing the boat in the same direction that the easier it is to achieve the goals, and just like positives. People coming into the culture can help you overcome hurdles along the way because there are optimists Jake and delivering energy that's very positive often. If you bring someone who's misfit to the culture, it can have a negative impact. So I would tell entrepreneurs don't ever underestimate the power of culture, and that you brought in misfits, and how did you do? With that. We've we've made it we've made some hiring decisions along the way that weren't probably the best fits for us as a company or for them as an individual. It's always a two way street and that marriage has to be good on both sides. Okay. Broadcasting from the NASDAQ entrepreneurial center in San Francisco, this is scaled the wall when we talk about the heart realities of failure in business, it's powered by NASDAQ private markets. Stay private on your own terms. For more information, go to N P, M dot com. And with us today is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO up faira sites. This is a difficult easier. Or are there are always new challenges challenges and hurdles that come along your away. It seems like there's always new challenges and hurdles along the way. And I think it's it becomes a way of life in a in a high growth in a constantly changing business and tell us about the last time you had a problem and had to ask for help. You know, honestly, problems come up. Weekly daily monthly. I think that often. One of my colleagues, and I often refer to the business in the space that we're in is like playing welcome all because the minute you solve one problem. Something else pops up, and so by nature, we very rarely sit around exhilarating in the wonderful things that are going on. We're always looking for. What is the next problem that's going to pop up? And so we've kind of been led by a theme of always having a plan. And always having a plan b separate everything. We do. We often have backup lands in case plan, a doesn't work. We already have the he's the place to head a different direction that kind of segues nicely into the next question. I was going to ask you, which is what are the three biggest lessons to learn in dealing with the challenges of growing or starting a business? I. The passion that got you to where you are today. Usually there's been a lot of thought a lot of foresight into where you're trying to get as a vision things will come along every day to distract you from that. But the best advice is to really be. They traded the vision. I think the second one is this idea of having a plan we as a startup, really balanced. The idea of mixing planning was doing awesome companies will start, you know, go do do do. And then realized maybe we need to back up a little bit. So we've always had a plan, and this this theory of planned do and then always having a backup plan because things will go wrong every day. And if you already have a backup plan in place in the beginning strategy, then it's quicker to recover. From those setbacks, and the third is not tapper underestimate culture because cultures. Wet kills the company and allows should've. Passionately achieved Bonnie Anderson with their sights. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you very much. And you can join us every Friday as we scale the wall, powered by NASDAQ private market, stay private on your own.

Bonnie Anderson co founder CEO affirma US NASDAQ Jake San Francisco Busia three trillion dollars nine years
"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:06 min | 2 years ago

"anderson co" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"How to do is fill the wall will discuss those challenges that every entrepreneur faces and how they've overcome the obstacles and scales. The wall to success. Joining me now is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO of Barra site is a molecular diagnostic company, specializing in products that reduce unnecessary surgeries and other invasive procedures its first product affirma- has helped thousands of people with thyroid nachos. So points surgery in the diagnostic process body. Welcome to the program. Thank you for the US health industry. Huge as we know estimated at nearly three trillion dollars is not always quick to embrace change though. So have you? Found it to be a little difficult getting doctors to sign onto your new technology and new ways of doing things I think there's always hurdles in getting physicians to adopt new tests because they're used to using their their existing procedures inexperienced to do what safe for patients so very site. We focused heavily on building out a lot of evidence behind our test that will build the confidence not only by physicians, but also by patients to adopt the tests and then follow the results to keep people out of surgeries that they didn't need. How do you come up with your best ideas? I think we come up with our best ideas through growth thank. Very often. Someone will have an idea that is improved on by debating and looking for the best solution all along the way, and we've had to do that many times as we've built the business over the course of the last nine years, and I know that you just recently came out with your third products for diagnosis of lung cancer. What are your big challenges right now in in building on the business and the success? You've had I think this year specifically were we're faced with new challenges because we do have three products now on the market just a year ago, we were a single product company. And so we're expanding commercially significantly sales and marketing growth, we have to remain focused on each product, which is the different stage in that process. We have additional clinical studies that have to be conducted to continue to build at the evidence. And then lastly, probably one of the most important things in our area of healthcare is convincing payers to like insurance companies convincing insurance companies value that they can benefit from by covering these tests. We've had great success with affirma- and way plan to replay that playbook with. In busia. Is the biggest challenge convincing insurance companies, for example to say, hey, this may be new, but it's really worthwhile to you because it can reduce costs in the long run. We think it starts with picking a clinical question to answer that actually matters with science and technology our fingertips today, you could answer almost any questions scientifically that you can think of but often those tests aren't going to have an impact and change what a physician and patient will do next. So we look up cynical questions that actually are going to change clinical care in a way that's gonna improve the outcome for the patient and physician that also provide an economic benefit to the insurance companies because if they don't get the economic benefit in addition to that clinical value, they may be hesitant to change what they're doing today. All right. Tell us a story about the single biggest mistake you have made in starting and growing your business. I think the single biggest mistake is really underestimating the power of culture. I think that when you think about what the success of a company relate rights on? It's all about the people, and the people that you bring together to form the company and grow the company the more aligned the they are to the vision of the later, and the more people are rowing the boat in the same direction that the easier it is to achieve the goals, and just like positives. People coming into the culture can help you overcome hurdles along the way because there are optimistic and delivering energy that's very positive often. If you bring someone who's misfit to the culture, it can have a negative impact. So I would tell entrepreneurs down ever underestimate the power of culture and have you brought in misfits, and how did you deal? With that. We've we've made it we've made some hiring decisions along the way that weren't probably the best fits for us as a company or for them as an individual. It's always a two way street and that marriage has to be good on both sides. Broadcasting from the NASDAQ entrepreneurial center in San Francisco, this is scale the wall when we talk about the heart realities of failure in business, it's powered by NASDAQ private market, stay private on your own terms. For more information, go to N P, M dot com. And with us today is Bonnie Anderson co founder and CEO up Veira sites. Does it ever get easier? Or are there always knew challenged and challenges and hurdles that come along your way, it seems like there's always new challenges and hurdles along the way. And I think it it's it becomes a way of life in a in a high growth in a constantly changing business and tell us about the last time you had a problem and had to ask for help. You know, honestly, problems come up. Weekly daily monthly. I think that often. One of my colleagues, and I often refer to the business in the space that we're in is like playing welcome all because the minute you solve one problem something pops up, and so by nature, we very rarely sit around exhilarating in the wonderful things that are going on. Or always looking for. What is the next problem that's gonna pop up? And so we've kind of been led by a team of always having a plan. And always having a plan b for everything we do we often have backup plans in case plan, a doesn't work. We already have the his in place to head a different direction that kind of segues nicely into the next question. I was going to ask you, which is what are the three biggest lessons to learn in dealing with the challenges of growing or starting a business? I be true to your vision. The passion. That got you to where you are today. Usually there's been a lot of thought and a lot of foresight into where you're trying to get a vision things will come along every day to distract from that that the best advice is to really be traded the vision. I think the second one is this idea of having a plan we as a startup, really balanced. The idea of mixing planning was doing often companies will start doodoo do. And then realize maybe we need the backup a little bit. So we've always had a plan, and this this theory of plan do and then always having a backup plan because things will go wrong every day. And if you already have a backup plan in place amid mitigating strategy, then it's quicker to recover. From this setbacks, and the third is not to ever make culture because cultures wet feels the company and allows should've passionately vision. Bonnie anderson. With their sights. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you, very much and Nick and join us every Friday as we scale the wall, powered by NASDAQ private market, stay private on.

Bonnie Anderson co founder US CEO Barra NASDAQ affirma busia San Francisco Nick Veira three trillion dollars nine years
"anderson co" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"anderson co" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"One of the things again, we're being joined by Tom Anderson, co founder chairman and CEO I should say founder not co-founder excuse me, but found her of supernova lending supernova companies, and they are essentially the engine under the hood, if you will to our RBC credit access line, one of the things that is benefit is the ease perhaps of our credit access line. You said this earlier the ability to avoid selling assets for cash you can. Use your assets as loan collateral of cashing instead of cashing in a portion of your investment portfolio, as you mentioned what took place with your personal emergency. As an example, Tom back in two thousand eight and I think it provides this alternative source of liquidity that allows individuals to maintain their progress towards their long term investment goals without disrupting anything in the short term, and we often field a lot of questions from our clients that inquire about the risks when they look into possibly requesting an c credit access line. You know, it is again, a very simplistic format in completing a short online application, so the ease of doing this makes it very nice. But one of the things I think that people are concerned about because a line of credit against your investment portfolio has been growing in popularity in recent years. It also has been receiving a lot of press lately twice. It's a great for you to come on the air here this morning and join us on the weekly report. But is this something that our listeners here on WCBS talk radio for the weekly wealth report something that they should consider when incorporating debt into their financial plan. First of all, it's it's a great question, and the the consideration should be driven by conversations with their financial adviser. So what we're finding in general in the industry is that what seventy percent of listeners to this show right now are borrowing money and most people borrow money at some point in time. The power lines of credit like this is that for those who qualify on. There's no cost. There's no ongoing fee to have them. There's really limited downsized the proactively having it in place because you automatically have increased your liquidity and the second that you increase your liquidity increase your flexibility. You don't have to use it by having it in place. You're automatically better prepared for emergency. I'm licensed to provide different continue education across a lot of different things. But the rule of thumb is set up lines of credit and good times access them in bad times. There's just value having general quitting on the sidelines. You establish that you can then when you have.

Tom Anderson co founder chairman and CEO founder co-founder seventy percent
"anderson co" Discussed on The Rewatchables

The Rewatchables

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"anderson co" Discussed on The Rewatchables

"From these movies like these are commercial properties that don't really have any subtext. They're not really about anything. They're just like, let's have a good time time. Let's let's make people laugh and that's okay. So that's a good thing. But I think it's worth talking and then we could talk about, oh, in in this place to because when Wilson was like there's like a moment in like the early two thousands were like, you're kind of like, is this guy next Robert Redford total. You know, he he's in a couple of movies and you're just like, holy crap. Like this guy might have all the tools you need to be like a giant movie star who makes good stuff. And I think the tension with both Vaughn and Wilson is this awareness that like, you know, they can hit certain heights and they could be making quality stuff every time, but they're making Jurassic, world's the draft. Sequel or they're in behind enemy lines, which is also pretty watchable movie, but they'll do crap and this substance stuff to that. I think that like when they get to wedding crashers, this is the perfect marriage of like it's not bottle rocket or or or swingers, but it's not. It's not the break up. It's not. It's not like kind of like a phone in job. His careers really. Interesting. Well, since this is my dog like he, the Redford thing is funny. It's funny that you say that because he clearly took two tracks. He was like on the one hand, Wes Anderson's co-writer in buddy, and I make all these really cool. You know, small arthouse films. And on the other hand, I want to go to Kabul was Sheryl Crowe. No, I'm gonna. Do I spy? Or I'm going to do four days on meet the parents. Don't do Shanghai New, but I don't know if there was. I don't know if he had a plan. Maybe he didn't. I think Vince von really thought about him. It was like, I'm gonna go this way. I think own Wilson's like how much this. How much twenty eight days and I'll make five million bucks. Great. I'm in. It's definitely nice the project. Oh, maybe I should do a good one. Now he worked a lot for you really thousand using a lot of movies. It's also really interesting with him. We will say the word interesting too much. I guess it is interesting with him. He basically hit the Weser Anderson lottery. He makes fuck in film with his brother short film. But the director is there buddy Wes Anderson like, what are they answer that it's amazing. I am not as nearly as big of a Wes Anderson famous mothers, but I would say he's one of the best ten direct Oriel talents. We've developed in the last three decades and not for nothing. But Owen Wilson got three screenwriting credits three of the best movies the last thirty years. I think you can make the case Wes Anderson's best movies are the ones that made with Owen who wrote with on Rushmore in Tenenbaums. In those herbs, I five movies are these ads, some great work in the last five or six years, but those are the movies. I think that are really imprinted on people's brains so he his career could have gone any number of direction. It's weird where he is right now, but I think he had issues, but you look at that you look at Affleck and Damon or best friends, and what's happened to them when they're friendship was really part of the story initially. And then the other one is Vince Vaughn and Jon Favreau and Favreau is one of the most bankable directors we have like, what is he doing? Like a ten episode Star TV show said this entire A-List director career for awhile. It seemed like he was just going to be on party of five..

Owen Wilson Wes Anderson Vince Vaughn Robert Redford Sheryl Crowe Weser Anderson lottery director Kabul Jon Favreau Shanghai New Jurassic Tenenbaums Affleck Damon twenty eight days three decades thirty years four days six years
"anderson co" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"anderson co" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Far were married and they would often fill in co host when steve edelman and sharon anderson co host the show married when they would go on vacation i had totally forgotten that haman roseanne filled in all i mean i guess i wouldn't say all the time but quite a bit it was not live in missouri or something i don't know lived in iowa for a period of time i do remember that they would come in and cause so tom arnold has been in since then to visit on twin cities live in interviewed him and it's very interesting for him to come back into the studio because it reminds him of that time and he and roseanne do not have a good relationship they have a good relationship with i'm pretty much thinking anyone it doesn't seem like arnold wrote for roseanne beginning in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight they got married in nineteen ninety and then they divorced four years later and he was fired from the show the same year and he said that he could see her twitter twitter eruption coming from a mile away you know this is fair because i think that that there is something in a lot of people there is an element of selfdestruction right i mean there are a lot of people who are afraid of success who you see them doing really well and then you see them self sabotage i mean this is not just limited to roseanne i mean no but i will say i think social media makes it far easier for people to self destruct how true he said i had a feeling this was going to happen when i first heard it was coming back the reboot that is what tom arnold said and he said when i read her social media in the very beginning i saw how she was so into the conspiracy stuff with donald trump and house and saw how far gone she was how crazy that was i just knew that this would not end.

steve edelman missouri iowa tom arnold donald trump sharon anderson haman roseanne twitter four years