35 Burst results for "Andersen"

What a Newbie Needs to do

Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

05:20 min | 1 d ago

What a Newbie Needs to do

"Hi thanks for sitting down with me. Today tim anderson here the appraisers advocate. And in this podcast. We're going to talk about the skills a newbie should bring to the job hunt a little. While ago i engaged in a very unscientific search for what newbie should bring to the table. I asked a bunch of my fellow. Appraisers what they felt a newbie should have in order to attract an employer in order to attract a supervisor mentor. What we're going to go through today is basically a summary of those remember. Not everyone of the eas will apply in every case further. Some of these a newbie. Just won't have without some experience. But the point is a lot of these are learnable. The new can get if that newbie is willing to go to the time and effort to get them. So let's get into it in no particular order. The first one was listening skills in other words the appraiser the newbie needs to understand what it is. The client needs not what it is. The client wants further listening skills had to do with listening to the mentor. Listening to the supervisor. This is clearly part of learning his also part of critical thinking because the newbie quite frankly and gaining experience needs to understand through listening through critical thinking whether what the supervisor is teaching is right wrong or indifferent. let's face it some supervisors. Some mentors aren't very good. at teaching. Some are superb. Next would be delegation the appraiser must understand what is minutia and what is important and therefore leave them in you show alone now. Clearly a newbie is going to be working on a lot of the minutia. That's how the new learns but the point is we can't lit perfect. Get in the way of don. That's what delegation means. Another one was attention to detail. Meaning time management and personal integrity. The attention to detail has to do with deadlines. Every job comes with a deadline. If you can't meet it then don't take the job. If you take the job thinking you can meet it but it turns out for whatever reason you can't then professional honesty professional integrity says you get in touch with the client and you say so to see what the client wants to do. This is what keeps the client. Happy not so much that the client gets the number client wants but the client understands what's going on with the appraisal. What's going on with the appraiser. It's also a sign of personal integrity to admit an error and then worked to overcome it so attention to detail was the very most important one. Indeed of all the people. I talked to attention to detail. Time management and personal integrity came up right at the top. Another really important. One was tech savvy in other words. The appraiser understands how to use the computer understands. Math understands finance now in understanding the computer this basically means understanding how to working word quickly had a work in excel up to and including log functions and pivot tables which quite frankly are rather advanced concepts but not difficult to learn because it's not necessary to learn the math behind them. The computer does all that the appraiser needs to understand what present value is in other words the six functions of a dollar without understanding that it's difficult to learn the more advanced concepts of appraising then the appraiser has got to understand. Mls how to do an mls search properly how to narrow an mls search down properly. So that the only thing under analysis our properties more or less like it's properties comparable to the subjec- the appraiser the newbie needs to be responsible and adaptive responsible. Goes back to the work work ethic week. We talked about adaptive means. There's more than one way to solve a problem. Don't get dependent on that one way. Learn other ways to solve a problem. Someone who can who can see and then solve a problem is a lot more important to an organization than merely someone who can see a problem so the key here is being able to solve problems. Part of work ethic is putting in the hours not only on the job but on education as well. I'm not talking so much about formal college education. I'm talking about the kind of education you have to do to know how to use. Mls to know how to use excel. Yes i'm also talking about continuing education. Some continuing education. Frankly isn't very good. Some is superb. Therefore part of work ethic part of being responsible and adaptive is doing research to find out those continuing education classes that are worth the effort that are worth the time that are worth the trouble to make the movie more attractive to a supervisor or a mentor.

Tim Anderson DON MLS
"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

06:08 min | Last month

"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

"One of the first pieces of advice. Any nascent author receives is right about what he or she knows. Typically the recipient of this advice looks at this council from left to right. However in this podcast. I'm going to advise you to look at it from right to left yes. This is uncommon. however when we're through you'll see the wisdom of writing your appraisal reports backwards. Sound confusing really. It's not probably. Everyone has gone to the internet specifically to youtube. They found a video on a totally silly topic. Such as how the person in the video made a million dollars in twenty four hours selling that whiskers. He scraped off his face the previous morning. The point here is the maker of that. Video was not able to produce it tape. It edited render it. Put it up on youtube at cetera until he had indeed scrape the whiskers office face and then sold them for a million dollars in other words. He made the video backwards. I he did what he was going to tell you about that. He told you about it then. He made the video thus the actions came before the video was propose here. Is that you. I do all the analyses etcetera to arrive at a credible value opinion. And then you write the report. Most appraisers start the appraisal process by opening an appraisal report form in their computer. Then they fill out certain items that do not require analysis. This includes the client's name. The property dressed the taxes last year and so forth. There is nothing wrong with this process per se. However how can the appraiser begin to write the report not merely filling in the blank since basis on the form without already knowing what the subjects values. How can the appraiser begin to write the report without already. Having done the analyses necessary to arrive at a credible value conclusion. How is it possible to summarize the appraiser support and rationale for the is and use conclusion unless the appraiser has i through the necessary analyses. How can the guy in the video share with. You is secret of making a million dollars in twenty four hours by selling day-old whiskers without having i shaved this. Of course assumes he's telling the truth if it's on the internet it has to be true right as much as most appraisers do not like the us pap document. It does provide an excellent model for the preparation of an appraisal in an appraisal report. This model is straightforward standard one age the appraiser in developing credible value conclusion standard to age the appraiser in communicating that value opinion to the client and the other intended users in other words standard. One comes before standard to therefore this is the model we should follow in concluding evaluation and reporting it to the client given how straightforward this model is. It's a puzzle as to why more appraisers don't follow it. This podcast is not the time or the place to go through a detail model of the appraisal process. That model is available elsewhere however. This is a good place to summarize those steps. So let's do it. I the appraiser mass is all of the necessary cost sales rental listing depreciation data etcetera necessary to form a credible value opinion. However this is merely step one so there is no reason to form the value opinion yet next. The appraiser analyzes the data to find out which are irrelevant which ones will aid in forming a credible value opinion. And which ones are just noise. Then the appraiser discards the irrelevant data. Usually by archiving in the work file this eliminates it from further consideration but allows it to be used in later. Appraisal reports gave it becomes relevant after eliminating irrelevant data. The appraiser is then free to analyze the relevant data. It's from these relevant data and this necessary information. The appraiser former credible value conclusion part of this process is to determine how much weight the individual approaches merit in the final value conclusion. This includes an analysis of each of the data quanta sery- in order to determine how much weight to give any given approach in other words. It's possible to have great costs. Data yet ended up giving the cost approach relatively little weight. Why if this approach is one to which the market gives relatively little weight then so should the appraiser therefore by this time the appraiser will have visited the neighborhood and subject property. She will also have determined the neighborhood's boundaries. She'll have confirmed the sales data with a party to the transaction et cetera. Finally sheila formed a credible value conclusion. What this means. Is that all of the heavier. Praise lifting is done. I all that remains now is to analyze and interpret the data and then write the report now. After all of these efforts writing the report is going to flow a lot easier because the appraiser has already answered the questions necessary to form a value conclusion writing. The report should be straightforward. Unfortunately in podcasts. Such is this one. There is not time to go into a great deal of detail. Relative to the appraisal reporting processes i am however available for private consultation in these matters the point here is it by doing the research and analysis first second step in the appraisal process writing. The report comes easier that task then becomes one of merely telling the reader. What you already know. There is a real benefit to you in changing the way you write your appraisal reports. Consider these by doing the research and analysis. I you free yourself from toggle back and forth between doing the research and writing the report by doing the research and analysis. I when you write the report you are indeed writing what you already know. This will save you from a lot of false starts and stops during the tenure of the appraisal report writing process by following this model. And because you are writing what you already know it will likely take less time to write the actual report.

youtube tim anderson
Write it Backwards?

Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

06:08 min | Last month

Write it Backwards?

"One of the first pieces of advice. Any nascent author receives is right about what he or she knows. Typically the recipient of this advice looks at this council from left to right. However in this podcast. I'm going to advise you to look at it from right to left yes. This is uncommon. however when we're through you'll see the wisdom of writing your appraisal reports backwards. Sound confusing really. It's not probably. Everyone has gone to the internet specifically to youtube. They found a video on a totally silly topic. Such as how the person in the video made a million dollars in twenty four hours selling that whiskers. He scraped off his face the previous morning. The point here is the maker of that. Video was not able to produce it tape. It edited render it. Put it up on youtube at cetera until he had indeed scrape the whiskers office face and then sold them for a million dollars in other words. He made the video backwards. I he did what he was going to tell you about that. He told you about it then. He made the video thus the actions came before the video was propose here. Is that you. I do all the analyses etcetera to arrive at a credible value opinion. And then you write the report. Most appraisers start the appraisal process by opening an appraisal report form in their computer. Then they fill out certain items that do not require analysis. This includes the client's name. The property dressed the taxes last year and so forth. There is nothing wrong with this process per se. However how can the appraiser begin to write the report not merely filling in the blank since basis on the form without already knowing what the subjects values. How can the appraiser begin to write the report without already. Having done the analyses necessary to arrive at a credible value conclusion. How is it possible to summarize the appraiser support and rationale for the is and use conclusion unless the appraiser has i through the necessary analyses. How can the guy in the video share with. You is secret of making a million dollars in twenty four hours by selling day-old whiskers without having i shaved this. Of course assumes he's telling the truth if it's on the internet it has to be true right as much as most appraisers do not like the us pap document. It does provide an excellent model for the preparation of an appraisal in an appraisal report. This model is straightforward standard one age the appraiser in developing credible value conclusion standard to age the appraiser in communicating that value opinion to the client and the other intended users in other words standard. One comes before standard to therefore this is the model we should follow in concluding evaluation and reporting it to the client given how straightforward this model is. It's a puzzle as to why more appraisers don't follow it. This podcast is not the time or the place to go through a detail model of the appraisal process. That model is available elsewhere however. This is a good place to summarize those steps. So let's do it. I the appraiser mass is all of the necessary cost sales rental listing depreciation data etcetera necessary to form a credible value opinion. However this is merely step one so there is no reason to form the value opinion yet next. The appraiser analyzes the data to find out which are irrelevant which ones will aid in forming a credible value opinion. And which ones are just noise. Then the appraiser discards the irrelevant data. Usually by archiving in the work file this eliminates it from further consideration but allows it to be used in later. Appraisal reports gave it becomes relevant after eliminating irrelevant data. The appraiser is then free to analyze the relevant data. It's from these relevant data and this necessary information. The appraiser former credible value conclusion part of this process is to determine how much weight the individual approaches merit in the final value conclusion. This includes an analysis of each of the data quanta sery- in order to determine how much weight to give any given approach in other words. It's possible to have great costs. Data yet ended up giving the cost approach relatively little weight. Why if this approach is one to which the market gives relatively little weight then so should the appraiser therefore by this time the appraiser will have visited the neighborhood and subject property. She will also have determined the neighborhood's boundaries. She'll have confirmed the sales data with a party to the transaction et cetera. Finally sheila formed a credible value conclusion. What this means. Is that all of the heavier. Praise lifting is done. I all that remains now is to analyze and interpret the data and then write the report now. After all of these efforts writing the report is going to flow a lot easier because the appraiser has already answered the questions necessary to form a value conclusion writing. The report should be straightforward. Unfortunately in podcasts. Such is this one. There is not time to go into a great deal of detail. Relative to the appraisal reporting processes i am however available for private consultation in these matters the point here is it by doing the research and analysis first second step in the appraisal process writing. The report comes easier that task then becomes one of merely telling the reader. What you already know. There is a real benefit to you in changing the way you write your appraisal reports. Consider these by doing the research and analysis. I you free yourself from toggle back and forth between doing the research and writing the report by doing the research and analysis. I when you write the report you are indeed writing what you already know. This will save you from a lot of false starts and stops during the tenure of the appraisal report writing process by following this model. And because you are writing what you already know it will likely take less time to write the actual report.

Youtube United States Sheila
"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

04:38 min | Last month

"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

"In three and two and one. Hi thanks for sitting down with me today. I appreciate it. I'm tim anderson. The appraisers advocate. And we call his podcast. Have you ever thought about writing backwards. One of the first pieces of advice. Any nascent author receives is right about what he or she knows. Typically the recipient of this advice looks at this council from left to right. However in this podcast. I'm going to advise you to look at it from right to left yes. This is uncommon. however when we're through you'll see the wisdom of writing your appraisal reports backwards. Sound confusing really. It's not probably. Everyone has gone to the internet specifically to youtube. They found a video on a totally silly topic. Such as how the person in the video made a million dollars in twenty four hours selling that whiskers. He scraped off his face the previous morning. The point here is the maker of that. Video was not able to produce it tape. It edited render it. Put it up on youtube at cetera until he had indeed scrape the whiskers office face and then sold them for a million dollars in other words. He made the video backwards. I he did what he was going to tell you about that. He told you about it then. He made the video thus the actions came before the video was propose here. Is that you. I do all the analyses etcetera to arrive at a credible value opinion. And then you write the report. Most appraisers start the appraisal process by opening an appraisal report form in their computer. Then they fill out certain items that do not require analysis. This includes the client's name. The property dressed the taxes last year and so forth. There is nothing wrong with this process per se. However how can the appraiser begin to write the report not merely filling in the blank since basis on the form without already knowing what the subjects values. How can the appraiser begin to write the report without already. Having done the analyses necessary to arrive at a credible value conclusion. How is it possible to summarize the appraiser support and rationale for the is and use conclusion unless the appraiser has i through the necessary analyses. How can the guy in the video share with..

youtube tim anderson
"andersen" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

03:47 min | 3 months ago

"andersen" Discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"A man of many hats Kurt Andersen is a radio host, an entrepreneur, a television producer and novelist but before becoming a wizard of all things, he started out as a journalist after graduating from Harvard Anderson Co founded spy a satirical magazine which mocked American celebrities and media icons in the late nineteen, eighty s and nineteen nineties including now president trump from their kirk worked as an editor in chief of. New York magazine then moved to The New York Times and later created his own radio show these days he describes himself as a book writer but Anderson says he's always had more than one plate spinning at a time in this episode of influencers I speak with Kurt Andersen about his newest book is infamous nickname for President Donald Trump and how America's middle class is at war with the ultra rich. Allow everyone, and.

Kurt Andersen Harvard Anderson Co Donald Trump New York magazine president editor in chief The New York Times producer writer America
"andersen" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:26 min | 5 months ago

"andersen" Discussed on The Book Review

"Kurt Anderson joins us. . Now he has a new book out. . It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. . Kurt thanks for being here. . Thanks for having me. . All right. . So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? ? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. . Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. . Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, , the last fifty years, , and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. . This is a different story. . This is not a spontaneous organic. . Problem that I'm talking about here. . About the Paradigm. . Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. . Evil Jesus, it's , this very rational, , very specific, , very strategic, , long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. . So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. . It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. . No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. . It's a wholly different thing. . What would i. . have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. . Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So . these. . Are People of the economic rights. . The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. . The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. . All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, , which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, , did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? ? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. . I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. . There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. . We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. . That is the other half and it. . Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever , I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, , , what about climate change? ? Yes. It's . a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, , but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. . To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. . But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. . For instance, , it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. . Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, , and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, , things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. . Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. . So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, , but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, , which is a significant INC because it reflects. . So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. . Horrific. . US government trump administration response to the pandemic, , which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. . So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. . This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, , but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly, ,

America Kurt Anderson Kurt The New York Times Pamela Paul John Hearses Leslie m M. Bloom Fantasyland reporter President United States Clinton
Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

The Book Review

05:26 min | 5 months ago

Kurt Andersen on Evil Geniuses

"Kurt Anderson joins us. Now he has a new book out. It's called evil geniuses the unmaking of America a recent history. Kurt thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. All right. So your previous spoke to this was fantasy land and I feel like there's a connection where did you leave off in that book and pick up in your new book? There's definitely a connection and they really amount to kind of a two volume history of the screwing up of America the last half century. Fantasyland was about how this chronic condition in America of the weakness for the irrational and magical thinking in entertaining lies. Turned into this acute illness after having been a centuries long chronic illness, the last fifty years, and thus the President United States as the poster boy for that. This is a different story. This is not a spontaneous organic. Problem that I'm talking about here. About the Paradigm. Shift and hijacking of our political economy that happened starting fifty years ago by who what the people I call. Evil Jesus, it's this very rational, very specific, very strategic, long war that had the effect in a hundred different ways of making the majority of Americans worse off. So if fantasy land talked about America has propensity to believe in nonsensical illogical things. It sounds like evil genius is this kind of why the efforts that were made on the part of institutions and individuals that have led to that kind of thinking. No actually not that led to that kind of thinking that. It's a wholly different thing. What would i. have having a Neo Liberal Clinton Centrist Democrat all of my adult life partners may culpa for simply being. Oblivious to what the economic right was doing. So these. Are People of the economic rights. The coax are the most obvious buzzword way of saying that and how they manipulated and used and changed through all of these different means the way we thought society. The economy should be since the new deal they used the fantasies and delusions and. All that of their political allies on the right to enable their real project, which is to make Americans think the government has no role in anything involving the free market when you are working on fantasy land, did you know that you were going to be writing the second kind of companion book? I really didn't know that it was late in the game working were. I realized wait I am kind of telling half the story here. There is this other story that isn't about look at Wacky America. We've always been wacky for four hundred years and believed all kinds of nonsense but I realized that there was this other story about how the economy changed in how politics changed and what technology is doing. That is the other half and it. Really came when I was out talking about fantasy land with people readers, whatever I remember early on a woman rating stood up and said, well, what about climate change? Yes. It's a matter of nonsensical disregarding science in the facts, but it's it's all about people like the Koch Brothers shifting the way people thought in denying science and I said yeah but it wouldn't have happened. To the extent has the United States without this underlying iffy grip on empirical reality. But I realized that it was both of those things you know people all over the world had if he grips on honeybear curiosity but they don't have this massive politicized denial of climate change. For instance, it's the to in concert in so many ways that has led us where we are. Okay I have to time related questions the first about the writing of the book and the second about the time that you cover in the book, and I'm getting very specific about the timing of the writing the book because as you know, things are moving so fast that the second you think that something is the big story. Something else becomes the big story and these are both kind of Sixteen Post Twenty Sixteen Bucks where did you do pick up in writing this book and also when did you stop because you know it probably I'm assuming this was a pre black lives matter but maybe post covid book or am I getting that First of all fantasyland I wrote and finished before Donald Trump was even nominated. So it wasn't like Oh look Donald Trump I'll reverse engineer how that happened over several Hundred Years This I delivered it early February, but then bless random house had the next several months to incorporate, which is a significant INC because it reflects. So much of what I'm talking about the pandemic and the. Horrific. US government trump administration response to the pandemic, which illustrates most of my major themes in this book. So I the whole last chapter is about that and indeed the the black lives matter protest also is in here as well to the degree that relates to what I'm talking about this. This is a book less about race than it is about economics and technology, but it certainly all of the peace and I dress both the pandemic thoroughly,

America United States Fantasyland Kurt Anderson Donald Trump Kurt President United States Koch Brothers Clinton Engineer
"andersen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"andersen" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Trump is much more influential behind the scenes than people think I know that she was very influential when they were deciding on Mike Pence's VP. I I did some reporting on that and that she was, she was the one saying that they needed to pick pence because her husband had all this baggage. You know they needed somebody who is going to get the Christian conservatives in line and. I think that shows that she's Savvier than people think Malania, but she is not warm and I mean. That's just undeniable. At think that Jill Biden is much. Much warmer much more like a Michelle Obama or Laura Bush like able to connect with people affectionate with children, and all of that that I think we've. We've kind of been missing that kind of a warmth in our first lady, I think. Do you think that would make a difference right now? In the kind of moment that we're in with the pandemic with black lives matter you know what what would it look like to have a more vocal more present first lady while I think? Michelle Obama were first lady. It would obviously be a better is she would be able to speak to the black lives matter movement in a way that no one else can, and when you know Dea Pendleton was killed. She went to her funeral and that was a huge moment in in her time. As first lady and I think that during the pandemic. We really didn't hear much from wants trump in. Every now, and then she would send a tweet about you'd the seemed always kind of tone deaf to me about you know spending time with your family and enjoying time at home or something when people are really struggling I mean she just has a really kind of detached way of approaching this role in In you know that's what I. When I wrote this op Ed, for CNN I had said that I is, she did an interview one of her rare interviews where she said that the hardest part of being first lady is the criticism and people trying to make money off of you an end to me. The in studying first lady is the hardest part is like witnessing the devastation that people face when they lose their homes for visiting six kids in the hospital, and any just seems so like it just seems so ego centric to me, so yeah, if we hadn't Joe Biden in office right now I think it would be just a a more. Human face on on that role. There's a lot of attention right now. Of course on a removing statues of people who were who were racist in the pastor had other problematic aspects. Things like removing Woodrow Wilson's name from the Public Policy School. At Princeton, we think. How should we be thinking of former presidents? Vice Presidents you know are. Is this way that we make them larger than life that we literally make statues of? Of them and things is, is that problematic? IS THAT FITTING INUIT? How how do they sort of reacting to to this move to to remove names? Remove statues, and and what that might mean you know it's so complicated I. Think it depends on the person you know entirely. If you were these somebody who was a traitor to the country you know when in in was ended up. Siding with the confederates during the civil war or something like that, that's a really with the president's Tyler. Did I think that that's something? That's you know clearly terrible. And then it gets more complicated with Thomas Jefferson right and he and his relationship with Sally Hemmings, and the slaves that he had on his plantation I mean that is just something that we haven't grappled with fully, and if you're. Depends on each person in each President I did follow the Woodrow Wilson Story and that does make sense because he was, he was saying and doing things that were even racist, even considering the time that he was president. As you do, put it in context, but some of what he he said at the time was you know even out of a the norm? What one would have expected you know. During a time when there was. A lot of racism in there still is obviously a lot of racism in this country, but it's a tough question to answer I don't know I mean. What do you think? Yeah I mean I. I have a tendency to not want to lionize anybody. But you know on the other hand I, think it's possible I like that idea of sort of contextualising in the time in place you know if if it was a like Washington own slaves, and that's terrible in slavery is. Okay, but it makes more sense in his time than it would have later. You know so i. I think. You're right that it's complicated, but but I'm okay with removing all statues of everybody. We do put Awada these people on a pedestal. I was listening to a by. She's a great Canadian, but she's talking about Costlo and havoc, also like everyone thinks he's just amazing, but he was actually. You know kind of a jerk and there were a lot of other artists who were more talented. You could say than he was for some reason. We kind of put people on this pedestal and. The, like as he said, lionize them, and there's no, there's no getting rid of it, and there are so many more people who would be worthy of that kind of praise that never got will never get. Which is Kinda Sad? So last question for me is tell me about this relationship between George W, Bush and Michelle Obama. What the Heck's going on there? I mean it is a really sweet relationship. Right into this. Really it is a genuine friendship. They do get along I. Mean they sit next to each other at? Events because of just a Manassas the way it is with protocol that. The lineup is always that she's going to be sitting next to him. So that's where they started talking. And you know the whole exchanging of Hug the Sonian African American. History Museum was very intentional. You know that he by talk to you said that they both do really like each other and when Obama went to George H W Bush's funeral. You know Bush gave her this huge bear hug that he didn't read anyone else with that same warm, but it's also done so. So that we can see it. It's right. It's so that we can see that that there is this friendship that crosses party lines and gender lines, and everything else and so I. I do think it's genuine Biolo- counts it is, but there's an undertone to it that it's it's something more to when the both of them realized that it's more now than ever for people to see these very sweet interactions between the two of them. Yeah, no, it's. It's lovely when you see it. Much I couldn't be nice to him but okay. Yeah, it's a i. mean the men's especially is just so human. Right? It's. It's like what we're missing right now is just that. Human touch that by the OBAMAS billy I mean, she was just amazing at it at making fun of ourselves and having fun in those late night. Television interviews all of that. That Malania can't do, and I know that you know in talking to her closest friend in the white. House says that she feels a lot of pressure She's following Michelle Obama's footsteps. Who wants to do that right, so you have a little sympathy for her..

Michelle Obama George H W Bush president Mike Pence Jill Biden Joe Biden Woodrow Wilson Trump Malania Obama CNN Dea Pendleton VP Sally Hemmings Woodrow Wilson Story Thomas Jefferson History Museum Princeton
"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

02:30 min | 7 months ago

"andersen" Discussed on Tim Andersen, The Appraiser's Advocate Podcast

"Had cetera then finally proximity to an airport in and of itself is not necessarily a negative for example you. You Live Next O.`Hare Airport in Chicago. That may be negative, but then remember the influence of the airport is already going to be built into the sales that are next to the airport. In many parts of the country, there are private airports around which are building huge expensive custom built homes, some that are capable of handling jets, so as a result people go. Go in and spend millions of dollars on a house on a big site, so they can park jet in the garage. Most people park cars in the garage. Well, these houses which tend to be very expensive custom built beautiful homes have ain't yet in the garage. Well, proximity to that airport is not only not a problem. It adds a premium value to. To those who want to be able to park their airplane in the garage next to the house. That is all we're going to talk about. In this particular podcast, we'll talk about other neighborhoods stuff in future podcasts, but the point I'm trying to make here is Fannie Mae is looking number one for an analysis of all of these factors and number two for. For me to tell her what the risk factors are in the neighborhood now, Fannie Mae judges the risk via her own criteria, but she can judge those risks unless she knows what they are. That's our job just so you'll know and this is the shameless commerce part of the podcast. If you go to my website Tim at the appraisers advocate dot, com. which is my email address by the way, but if you go to my website, the appraisers advocate dot com front slash products. I, have a book there. That will help you understand what Fannie Mae requires of the neighborhood analysis. I hope you'll take a look at it and quite frankly I hope you'll buy it. Now I want to thank you for being with me today. It's always a pleasure to chat with you. It's always a pleasure to work with you. Again my email address. Is Tim at the APPRAISERS ADVOCATE DOT com. Get in touch with me if you have any questions on what we've talked about today. Get in touch with me if you have any questions about what's in the book on Neighborhood Analysis. If you get.

Fannie Mae Tim Neighborhood Analysis Chicago
Education and AI

Data Crunch

04:10 min | 9 months ago

Education and AI

"Today we chat with David Growl Nick. President and CEO of cloudy scope learning. I've had a longtime interest in both education and technology. Going way way back as I was lucky enough to go to an elementary school outside of Washington. Dc called green acres. School in Rockville Maryland. Which was very project based so was non traditional education. You WORKED ON PROJECTS. You worked collaboratively with people you were. Teachers will was almost as much an advisor and mentor is a traditional teacher. Wasn't person in front of the room talking at you. And you learn how to learn how to think creatively and pursue your own interests and learn by doing and to all of that state with me as I got older and I developed interest in technology from a really young age. I had my first computer at thirteen which was at a time when people did not have a computer at thirteen and was interested in through that in how computers could learn what what did artificial intelligence mean and it was a field that was was a bit of a mystery and ended up as I was fishing. College getting the work of an artificial intelligence professionally and Roger. Shank who was at Yale and Roger was just at the time leaving Yale with some faculty to start an institute northwestern university that brought together cognitive psychology computer science and they I and education to apply artificial intelligence techniques to education and so I did my program and ended up being asked to focus particularly on business problems in the corporate world and worked with some corporate clients through Andersen Consulting. And it's kind of what you know the work that continues to this day. Yeah that's great. What what year around where you're doing you're just so sharp. Phd For me was starting in eighty nine and wrapping up in ninety four. Got It okay. So that was before the wave. Hit everything right. You guys are working on this stuff on the cutting edge. Sounds like yeah absolutely it was. It was We were considered on the cutting edge. Cutting EDGE LAB. We were written up in the early days of wired magazine and all that kind of stuff and it was really interesting place to be a tremendous group of people. We had some of them. I still work with to this day. We had people who were excellent writers with people who are really cutting edge thinkers in AI and in education and an in cognitive psychology with sometimes almost the cognitive side sometimes gets left out right. It's you know how do you how do you think and learn how do you how do you understand what you're what you're experiencing and all of that goes into designing experience. Yeah those are really really fascinating place to be built on a lot of the principles that that I kind of believed in my formative years and couldn't work any better. Yeah that's awesome now. You've seen this whole progression of AI. Machine learning all the. What's your perspective on that? Since you've you've lived this entire cycle now yeah I've lived yeah. I've lived a few cycles when when I first started doing it it was kind of you know the You know the almost almost became the dying gaze of of a at one point right like we were doing really interesting things. I think in applying it to education but as a field was considered was considered a failure the years since my PhD were mostly. What's considered a winter? You know really. It just didn't have high hopes we expected to be in a jetsons like world and we are not what happened and now. I've seen the renaissance and the renaissance has been certainly interesting to see. There's a lot more computing power now which has helped. There's a lot more public interest in and understanding of what I could be an some of. That's probably more more good than bad. Sometimes there's a little scary. We also are in danger of being over hyped once again and I think that's the thing that we we look at them and I'll talk to people sometimes even about what's possible. What kind of conversations online systems can have with people and there's usually it overstatement of what reality is and so. I think that's something to be cautious of as as we move forward and keep thinking about where I a I techniques and machine learning which which to me which attrition list is a subset of I can fit in and not you know not overstate and not necessarily feel like the goal has to be a fully functional human replacement. I don't know that that's a societal gopher lotteries INS but even in terms of technology. It's not clear that that's what we need. And and particularly the world of education. It's not clear that that's what we would want

AI President And Ceo Yale Rockville DC Roger Washington Maryland Wired Magazine David Andersen Consulting Advisor Shank
Matthews, Andersen lead Maple Leafs past Lightning 2-1

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

Matthews, Andersen lead Maple Leafs past Lightning 2-1

"Toronto used a pair of power play goals to beat the lightning to one at Scotiabank arena after William knew lander gave to little one nothing lead in the first Tampa Bay took it to the leads in the second period and were rewarded with the tying goal by Henri Paul not to make it one of peace after forty minutes Auston Matthews games are what will the lead for good early in the third period scoring his forty seventh goal of the season to control the game and the first I think it would've been nice to kind of capitalize on a couple chances in and maybe build ourselves a bigger lead but I'm sure it's really good team around that on the other side of Mitch murder read John tomorrow's had to assist each in the victory the Leafs lead Florida by three points for the final at lending division playoff spot join the debate to run

Toronto Scotiabank Arena William Lander Tampa Bay Henri Paul Murder Florida Auston Matthews Mitch John Leafs
Matthews, Andersen lead Maple Leafs past Lightning 2-1

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 11 months ago

Matthews, Andersen lead Maple Leafs past Lightning 2-1

"Toronto used a pair of power play goals to beat the lightning to one at Scotiabank arena after William knew lander gave to little one nothing lead in the first Tampa Bay took it to the leads in the second period and were rewarded with the tying goal by Henri Paul not to make it one of peace after forty minutes Auston Matthews games are what will the lead for good early in the third period scoring his forty seventh goal of the season both Mitch murder read John tomorrow's had to assist each in the victory the Leafs lead Florida by three points for the final at lending division playoff spot join the debate to run

Toronto Scotiabank Arena William Lander Tampa Bay Henri Paul Murder John Florida Auston Matthews Mitch Leafs
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:38 min | 11 months ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"So you can keep listening online forever to all one thousand eight studio three sixty episodes we've made but after twenty years. This is our last waltz. I hope you enjoy it. Oh and by the way that first Broadway production of cats it only ran for eighteen years so we win I'm tall melodic and one of the highlights of my experience at the show is. I got to take a trip with Kurt to Japan. It does. You'll see sixty in Syria. Our main guest for that show are kind of cultural. Guide was named Lisa Katayama and so she said well one of the things that you must understand to understand this culture of Kawai. The cult of cute in Japan is. I have to take you pootie. Kura booth. This is called Mecca Sticker Picture. Meta or photo booth. All these preteen and teen girls. Were crazy about at the time we go into. This place was kind of feels like a casino but a Casino for twelve year. Old Girls with flashing lights and ping-kin. Kitty cats and all these images flashing all over the walls and music blasting these little booths and so at least in curtain going to this photo booth. Here's the camera and we get to choose anything. Choices Burger. You WanNa be sweet beautiful girl or colorful wig beautiful they were doing these hoses and picking little cats stars in flowers. Everything was pink and Sparkley pose. And that's just step one now. It's time to decorate the photos all right so now you grab a pen and just go to town on this vote So there's little bug little mushrooms little Ravitz all those little. He was just like this is cool. You live fight. Our friendship and vote on sticker picture from four up coming up the next guest on studio three sixty with Kurt Andersen. Is Kurt Andersen? When you started out how would you describe courtesy of Mike and the beginning my exit interview conducted by Alec Ball? That's next two years ago I was looking on the Internet and I saw these intriguing images that look like Scifis set and eight people in red jumpsuits in front of this glass pyramid and was shocked to learn that this wasn't a science fiction movie it was real and when. I found out that so many of these people were still alive. I was determined to tell their story. Matt Wolf is of the documentary spaceship Earth which premiered at Sundance. Two Thousand Twenty spaceship Earth is about. In one thousand nine hundred one science experiment were eight biosphere went to live sealed inside an enormous terrarium in the Arizona. Desert with miniature replica of Earth's ecosystem. They called it biosphere two. It's also an inspiring story about what small groups of people can achieve when they put their minds together towards a common goal idea extends to how Mac worked with his own small. Making a film is really about problem solving and putting together a puzzle and it takes all sorts of creative minds to do that. It's something he could only achieve with the help of jocks so much of the collaborative work I do is remote this a lot of communication. I mean I'm going back and forth with my collaborators all day constantly so I'm reviewing music used that come in from the composer or I'm looking at new motion graphics. Somebody's uploading a new cue sheet for me to look at and to see the latest creative assets that have been completed. We were the small group that brought together are diverse skills and interests and our goal is to tell this story that's been mostly overlooked forgotten. Dropbox helps filmmakers and their teams make their best work. You can learn more about how your team tease dropbox to bring great ideas to life at dropbox dot com slash film. Studio three sixty. As I said earlier I've interrogated lots and lots of people on this show so for this final episode. We decided on a role reversal today in my chair for Awhile is Alec Baldwin who in addition to acting here and they're also hosts a podcast called. Here's the thing and here today conducting my exit interview Alec. We have known each other for a long time. But I don't I I can't really recall. Hey how did you meet I? I don't know I walked into a restaurant with like a Elaine's type of place. If not that and you were there with the People. That was really no place for me at that table. It was all the elite of the Literati. I I think he made that up but I do remember another restaurant. Where sometime in this century where we I was coming in you were going out and he said Hey. Hey and and and you said to me I want your life. I want a radio show and to write books I said Okay all yours and then hosted the show and then a few years later in two thousand ten guests toasted this program and Wash my career launch your radio career. Your podcast radio. We had never had a guest host. And here's you being me. This is studio three sixty. I'm Alec Baldwin. Kurt Andersen is recuperating from a costly painful and completely unnecessary dental procedure. I'm Alec Baldwin sitting in for Kurt Andersen who was locked in the trunk of my Toyota. Kurt Anderson will be in next week. Assuming he gets the anti-venom in time I loved all those and I didn't know about them and I didn't write those by the way. Well I L O eld each time so you've written books since then one with me and I wrote a book it up with my name on it you can. I help you sell it. Well and sell it. We did that parody memoir by our current president if he gets reelected. We're going to go to Brooklyn really. We're GonNa oh I think we'll do the show if he gets reelected upside there. There's an upset I'm heartened. I'll have a career after this program covered so now that you're a skilled and successful podcast host Here you are and it's all yours taken away but when you started out I mean. This is a cliche question but you started out. How would you describe Kurt Anderson at the Mike and the beginning? And what was he like? I it's hard the first few years. I occasionally listen back to those and Yeah I I didn't know quite what I was doing i. I was Tentative on my show when I tried to get to was what I call the billiard break. What's the question that opens up the table for to run the town I do? I asked the question that's going to open up that person to feel comfortable to feel safe. Yeah not very many years ago I realized. Oh what this is like. Having I say having not been on a date in forty years It's like a first date. That will never have a second but you want to impress them on the first and you want them to love you but you know you know. It's not going to go anywhere because it's not a date. I E with no hope of a second. Yeah what about somebody who was a dream get and you got some? Just somebody thought. Oh God. Wouldn't this be great there many including you ala however I was going to Susan's on tag. Who had been a hero of mine and And early on in the show when we were about to invade Iraq and I thought oh we're going to eight Iraq. Let's try to book students contact. Who's been in the Balkan war written about war you know was a lefty and now is okay with certain. Let's let's have her on as my guests for the show and we'll do a bunch of pieces about war and she agreed. Oh my gosh. I don't think I've ever researched more for a guest that I did for Susan Tech because I didn't want to disappoint her. Basically and then like two days before coming on her assistant calls my producer and says you know contact does not suffer. Fools like what What on Earth would. They have suspected they needed to say that to you. Well it was early on you know in the show. So who knew and she came on. We disagreed about things but we had the best two hours conversation. It was a dream and I think if people do feel a turned off or indifferent Two images of horror and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about so in a sense your change of heart about the power of images to portray war and atrocity. I represents kind of a disk disillusioning or a real loser. Well that's a very clever way of putting it A disc disillusioning. Yes the disillusionment. That's that's right. That's absolutely right plus afterward she. I think of the thousand people or whatever that I've interviewed on this show. The only handwritten thank you note. I've ever received another dream guest was Tom. Hanks somewhat less daunting because I'd actually met him before he was on the show back. When I was a journalist writing for the New Yorker I did a profile of him and Years later at some screening of some movie. He came up to me he goes. Kurt Andersen the great writer. Kurt Andersen John in the middle of this crowd. I thought my Gosh what a nice guy. But a mench what a match and then I asked him on the course of studio three sixty to do something most recently on this two hour documentary we did about two thousand one space. Odyssey which I knew he was a big fan of he came on and and was amazing music by wrote and did the openings of the speak of Strauss. Exactly what you have to start with is the.

Kurt Andersen Alec Baldwin Kurt Kurt Andersen John Kura booth Susan Tech Japan Lisa Katayama Mike Syria Alec Arizona Alec Ball Iraq Matt Wolf Sundance Sparkley Scifis
How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

07:38 min | 11 months ago

How Studio 360 Got Started

"Hosting studio three sixty Kurt. Anderson Co founded. Spy magazine was a writer editor. Columnist design and architecture critic and playwright. He'd also just written a novel turn of the century which came out in nineteen ninety nine. The Britain plays. He worked for television. I mean he just was a renaissance person in the arts and in journalism and that was exactly the kind of person we were looking for. That's Melinda Ward the former chief content officer for Public Radio International and creative studio three sixty. And here's Julie Bursting again. I remember that lunch that I had with him when I was interviewing for the job. And he said you know. I've been working with a vocal coach to try to get me to not sound like I grew up in Omaha. That didn't work. Well I said to him. We're firing that person because you need to sound like you if you sound like just yet. Another announcer with a announcer voice. This show is GonNa fail so you gotta sound like yourself. Good Morning. I have realized over the years that I am always. I think much better at this. If I've worked out for Sunday off my super villain name. I speak Spanish. I'M CISCO I need. This is a child to crew. I had a forty five this record in. Oh this is the end and I'm curt Anderson. Thanks very much for listening so for me I was. I would always record Kurt in his sessions and I was in some of his first sessions. And you know he was brand new at doing it. He wasn't sure what P popping was. He didn't know how close to sit to the microphone. He didn't know what a pickup was. It was fun to help someone figure all that stuff out in the interviews. I felt like it took them awhile. Loosen up I'm just GONNA say that. Pairing Him with interesting people felt like the best way to use him so in those early days we just looked for really cool funny interesting people for him to sit down with and that got him excited to come into the office and into the studio and do that and I still remember the day that season Santana came in people do feel a turned off or or indifferent. two images of horror and and war and suffering that they see in that they feel indignant about I think it's comes not because they're blase but because they feel impotent or powerless and I think that's perfectly understandable reaction and I saw Kurt in our conference room and the look on his face of sort of terror was really powerful but I knew he would do a great job but I could see that. This was like the first person we've ever had in the studio that he was a bit in awe of it was just this powerful show about how artists have looked at war since homer and she was phenomenal and he did a great job. Do you feel okay about the new. Whatever you say okay. We show him how current into a lot of different situations that require lots of different levels of sort of being alert to possibilities. We just through so much stuff at him and you know it's a different kind of show in that. He didn't generate ideas but he would rarely say no. I remember doing this segment on sky. Come up with this talk show within the video game halo and we had. Kurt like go and be like an Avatar in the game. They're shooting I'm trying to defend us here. Your need to move faster Kurt. I'm sorry I mean it seems funny to think about it now but like at the time it was super crazy and cutting edge at this guy had figured out how. Sorta hack the game and had this whole virtual reality six months after Katrina. We planned a trip to go to New Orleans. Really figuring out how they were going to try to solve this problem of of how to. Kinda rebuild the city and what the design questions were around at all. The water is gone now of course but the wreckage. That remains is absolutely shocking. Presumably the people in this neighborhood are among those who a great many of them majority perhaps didn't have that's right. They didn't have a choice. I think that's one of the great travesties of Katrina went on a trip to New Orleans for a few days to kind of produce it and get all the different voices together. But you know he's always been really passionate about design and kind of see him step up and really tap into the the human element of what was going on there. It wasn't just like an architecture is it was about people's homes and lives. It was really interesting to see him in that element because so often he is just in a studio and actually one of a favorite memories of working with them in the studio was a program that we did In two thousand fourteen and it was our nineteen fourteen episode and we produce the whole thing as though we had been on the air in nineteen fourteen and today's program we present to you through the medium of radio some singular developments taking place in the arts today in literature drama music and the media. Moving pictures new technologies and new ideas are changing. What we the American people create and how we are entertained. He delivered it in the crazy. Old Timey Voice. That people use stood us for broadcast announcing and our technical director at that time. John Galore. Who brought in a megaphone? Like a troll off Warne and had Kurt record threw it into the mic to compress everything down. I mean I've seen Kurt Geek out on many wonderful occasions but I have never seen him geek out that joyfully. It may not be too old to speculate that later. Generations will look back upon nineteen fourteen as a remarkable year perhaps as a year in which the twentieth century cruelly began. This week on the PODCASTS. Were looking back at the early years of studio three sixty which is drawing to a close after two decades of covering arts and culture on the radio after the first year on the air the show was finding its groove and its audience but then in the fall of two thousand one. The unthinkable happened. There has been an explosion at the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan. The upper floors of northern tower at the World Trade Center has experienced an explosion studio three sixties original offices were at wnyc in the municipal building at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge just blocks away from the World Trade Center. I remember coming into work in. Minneapolis and hearing on the radio about the the hit on the towers and then coming into PRI and of course the WNYC studios were right under. The twin towers are right next to them and the that a lot of people took came up under the twin tower so we were horrified and terrified didn't terribly worried about a whole. Wnyc staff and studio three sixty staff you know found out later that Julia Burstein had been in the office and she had had she'd left. Wnyc had to walk all the way up the west side of Manhattan to think it was her brother's apartment or something to call day and coughing and choking and nobody knew what was going on.

Kurt New Orleans World Trade Center Wnyc Public Radio International Anderson Co Britain Curt Anderson Spy Magazine Melinda Ward Julie Bursting Chief Content Officer Omaha Julia Burstein Manhattan Cisco Writer Santana
Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:43 min | 11 months ago

Studio 360 Extra: Aural History: How Studio 360 Got Started

"Invited the rock the World Wrestling Federation champion to speak at the Republican National Convention. Pupil sock it to me. I became an official painter. I don't express political desires in my novels. I just tell story. Hello I'm Chris Anderson and this is studio three six. That's how studio three sixty began. Its first episode on November. Four two thousand just before we elected George W Bush and we all learned what a hanging Chad was my special guest today in Studio. Three sixty is the artist. Barbara Kruger. Who will talk with us about politics and power in movies and music and even in her own art? I make art about the collision of my days and nights with the culture that has constructed and contains me all that and more coming up in studio three sixty from WNYC and PRI public radio international originally produced out of WNYC. Here in New York. The show is all about the cool but complicated and sometimes strange ways that art touches our lives two decades later. That mission hasn't changed. Even if the people making the show have come and gone I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez executive producer of studio three sixty but I was still wet behind the ears associate producer when the show debuted two decades ago. I was away from the show for about ten years before returning to the staff in two thousand seventeen so as the show draws to a close sadly after twenty years I turned to some of my friends from the formative years of studio three sixty for their impressions. Could we create these beautiful stories that represent all sorts of interesting things that are going on in the country in terms of arts and then have Kurt sit with some of that? He was comfortable with and talk about them. That's Julie Bursting who was executive producer of studio three sixty when the show launched and who wrote the studio three sixty book called spark in two thousand eleven and this is Carrie Hillman who was our first senior producer and is now the executive producer at story car. At the time there had been a lot of magazines shows and it was a way for us to sort of do something different and fresh and it was like a a really creative solution to like a lot of really boring magazine. Formatted programming so I was like really game to try to figure it out. We also had two assistant producers. I'm Michelle Seagull. I started at studio three sixty as a assistant producer. In September of two thousand. I stayed through twenty thirteen as a pretty Sir and I'm now the managing producer of Sleet Studios I'm Tall Milad and I started at St Three Sixty as an intern in the year. Two Thousand and I was there until two thousand fifteen When I left I was senior producer of the show for about ten years before that and I now work at Pushkin Industries Heading up development also on staff during the early days of the show was producer and technical director. Steve Nelson Steve's now a programming executive at NPR Johnson. Do you remember what the working title was when we got there? Oh yeah hot ticket right which is first of all a terrible name and doesn't get to any of the big ideas that studio three sixty does as a name but secondly this is sort of in the relatively this was during the post dotcom boom and someone typed in hot ticket dot com into a website and it was an adult site for general audiences for sure. That was the end of hot ticket as a name every week. Studio three sixty we explore. One big idea in-depth. Today we look at the intersections of art and medicine. The idea of studio three sixty or an art show for public radio had been kind of kicking around for a long time. People were on the ground producing pieces. Trying to sort of see what would stick Eventually they brought Julie Burstein and she had this idea of like putting on pieces that sort of built on one another in having an artist or somebody else react to each piece. We started calling it a through line which was just an idea that we would carry through the show and I think the idea of having a theme came from we have to have some structure in order inside it to be able to play. The idea was that Kurt would open the show with a monologue is always delightful to look back and see that exotic bits of civilization. John Ashcroft was a senator his most celebrated crusade a failed crusade for some years. Now one of my hobby horses has been the blurring lines between news politics crime or and entertainment and then he would have a person in the studio with him and then we would present pre recorded pieces to play for this person. I try in my work to speak to the human in US and That human end to bear kind of witness and in enabled react to it. That's really fascinating That makes me think of this. Yes we looked a lot at the degeneration of people's memories and one of the pieces of research we discovered is precisely why I found listening to that piece so fascinating so it would give us an opportunity. Say something that took them off of their typical talking points that gave us an insight into the way they think their personality It also added some depth. I think to the the pieces themselves because you can't do everything in five minutes and so maybe you have to like leave something on the cutting room floor but you can resurrect it a little bit with with the like well-placed Kirk question so I thought it was really cool. I loved gathering stories from really disparate places and putting them next to each other and then talking about them. It was just so much fun. Do you remember a point when you realize it was working? I have to say. I think that first Shakespeare show because it was a whole show bringing Shakespeare up-to-date but we had Neil Gaiman Willie's just grumbling about the fact that he's a crappy writer and the San man the eponymous Lord of the rings who happens to be in this up goes over to will and offices deal are you will shakespeare. I have we met. We have but men forget in waking hours. And you and Steve or maybe it was Steve. That incredible intro He started it with Scharzenegger's hang on not to be not to be tied in the phase of man when in disgrace with fortune and men's on have we hear. Hello I'm curt Anderson and Mrs Studio Three six. It was so hilarious and it was just. It was like okay. We got it this works. I'm Peter Clowney and I was studio three six I Adler and these days I live in Saint Paul and I'm vp of content strategy for stitcher. It's a struggle sometimes to do a show. That has a theme I approach. That idea would caution now if someone wants to do a show that theme like to say like remember. It's got multiple pieces in it. You're going to have the fifth favourite piece about Gardens in this episode. But it's true that like building on the ideas across an hour is like really meaningful. My name is Eric Linski. I started as an intern. In two thousand four became assistant producer and then decided to become a contributing reporter of which I was to studio three sixty through the beginning of two thousand sixteen and I am now the host and creator of the podcast imaginary worlds. Yeah I remember this one episode where they had Madeleine Albright the through line theme was democracy and so she's sitting in the studio with Kurt and then one of the pieces was about American idol. Which was the hottest thing back? Then and they were talking about how people were taking American idol democracy far more seriously than actual presidential elections. Have you ever had a chance to see American idol? Well I actually have and I've been pretty depressed As I am by television generally these days which seems to be going to the lowest common denominator and I. I don't like the word Elitism as we kind of lost me on this last segment of him and it was really funny here. Man Albright come out of that piece. And what do you think of that? She was not too thrilled with the peace to quality that piece but what she was hearing in the piece. I'm Derek John. I was a producer and editor on the show from about two thousand four to two thousand twelve ish and since then I've done a whole bunch of work in the podcast world but I am now currently an executive producer of the how to with Charles Duhig podcasts. At slate when the theme through line shows worked man they were amazing. I mean it was like we had set this high bar and they were so hard to pull up when they clicked and everything fit together. It was truly fantastic radio and it was hard I would say we had some shows that weren't successful and that's actually what led to having to change one. Really terrible through line. Thematic show was fish the fish just literal fish in the sea. Animals really jumped the shark on that one

Producer Executive Producer Kurt Steve Nelson Steve Madeleine Albright Intern World Wrestling Federation George W Bush Chris Anderson Wnyc Barbara Kruger Official Republican National Convention Mrs Studio United States Chad John Ashcroft Julie Burstein Michelle Seagull Jocelyn Gonzalez
New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

10:09 min | 11 months ago

New York Icons: Kaufman Astoria Studios

"New York for its entire. History has brought people together of wildly different backgrounds and that might be different races or cultures or a geographic areas Irish people and Jews and African Americans and you know Italians but also different classes. You had the tenement girl and the rich playboy and everybody in between well. That's just a natural for storytelling. But when these stories were told by Hollywood what was distinctly New York about them could get flattened out for the mainstream. If you look today at a Marx brothers movies the first couple of Marx brothers films. They're throwing all these terms around. Mommy's Nora Nori. There is Jewish for free loader animal crackers in the coconuts where designs you know for a New York audience but when the Marx Brothers then do moved to Hollywood and they begin making films for MGM. There's no Yiddish in those movies anymore. Right they become the sort of universal. You Know Hollywood movie Marx Brothers that that's from forty second street classical nine hundred thirty three musical about the Broadway chorus girl who becomes a star that connick number has the busby Berkeley dance formations but it also has the skyline the elevated train street vendors and attempted rape and murder. It's a film about New York. Made in Hollywood that helped form what sanders calls the mythic city. That dream version of New York. That's a distillation of the real place. Forty Second Street and all those back stage musicals that were made all the homes that were about the putting on of a Broadway show. They were shot in Broadway theaters. They were shot in Hollywood sound stage theaters. You know there was just endless numbers of these amazing films which did not have a single frame except possibly the establishing shot the opening shot would be shot in New York as the credits ran by with music behind him in. May Nineteen thirty. Three paramount turned the Astoria studios over to its main creditor western electric that companies filmmaking arm Eastern Services Studios INC operated it as a rental studio for independent productions. Its output varied widely. The Scoundrel for example was set in Manhattan's literary world. Noel Coward plays a ruthless hated publisher. Julian place the woman he charms. Mary's then abandoned putting something happened. Man I do live. I hope you're playing folk killed when you're dying using it on. The homepage of the year does not think of human when he dies. He's condemned to damnation unless he finds one person on Earth to mourn. Him novelists writes Ben. Hecht and Charles MacArthur rotated but at Astoria. They also got to produce and direct. They won an academy award for best original. We don't be Marquette. Hulu your new. There was a series of Spanish language. Musical starring Tangos Star Carlos Gardell Tambien. A nineteen thirty. Three's Emperor Jones was based on the controversial Eugene O'Neill play main character was a black pullman porter who escapes prison to become dictator of a small island. The film could only have been made with independent funding. Then the studios were called to service for World War Two. The Department acquired the property in Nineteen Forty Two and the pictorial center of the army. Signal Corps moved into make trading and propaganda films. They expanded the facility and built barracks for the soldiers. The army used motion pictures in the war effort and turned to experienced filmmakers for help frank. Capra worked on a series of orientation films called why we fight one episode related to our won the Oscar for best documentary. Just what was it? Made US change our way of living overnight but turned our resources are machines our whole nation into one vast awesome producing more and more weapons of war instead of the old materials by the end of the war the ABC employed over two thousand people making movies over half of them civilians. All this work even brought new film techniques like multiple angles shooting and change film in even more momentous ways for five years American audience. It has been seeing newsreels. And it's someone you know. A movie maker said well you couldn't you couldn't bring in the enemy for for production meeting you know before. The battle and people went out with sixteen millimeter cameras. And these lightweight cameras that could go everywhere. They saw actual action after the war audiences and creators had developed a taste for this more realistic filmmaking. There was an appetite. For a new kind of filmmaking. That would be used more available light less contrived cinematography be shot with faster. Granier film be more shot on location and feel more like a took place in real place and not this kind of fabricated construct and be more adult this desire for realism meant the glossy representations of New York. That Hollywood made before the war wouldn't do director is like Ilya. Kazan felt their stories needed New York locations and New York talent. You don't understand I coulda had class. Gerber contamination could have been somebody by the MID FIFTIES NEW YORK. Filmmakers were more than just contenders. The Oscar wins for on the waterfront in nineteen fifty five and Mardi fifty six affirm. That excellence could come from outside. Hollywood New York is setting is capable of whatever mood or dramatic statement? You WanNa make architecturally in its light for talk about winter light as Mr Bergman did. New York's winter light image. That Sidney Lumet in the documentary film titled by Sidney Lumet. He grew up on the lower east side in nineteen fifty seven. He went from directing theater and TV. Two movies with twelve angry men. You're asking us to believe that somebody else did the stabbing with exactly the same kind of knife. Larger a million or one go onto make more New York classics like Serpico Dog Day afternoon and network. He died in twenty eleven. I'm not comfortable anyplace but New York when I leave New York for any other place in the United States My nose starts to bleed. Filmmakers at this time took full advantage of New York locations for their exterior shooting. When they needed a controlled indoor set they may do with whatever studios were available. Tv Or old movie studios the old Bronx by graph for example operated as a rental studio under different names until the seventy s the Astoria Studios. Meanwhile were still occupied by the army. There was some leftover stages from the twenty s and they reuse them and Sidney Lumet told me amazing stories of going onto these studios which he was in an editing room up in the Bronx. That had been Edison's old editing suite with an e draw you know kind of worked into the curtains E for Edison. These were the oldest movie studios in the world and they were using them in the nineteen fifties to make all those great early in mid fifty s movies like Twelve angry men and on the waterfront the city eventually recognized how vital New York and the screener to each other in nineteen sixty six mayor. John established the first mayor's film office in the world to lower hurdles to filming their Lindsay's film office streamline the permitting process and removed a lot of red tape for shooting in the city he even dedicated a police. Unit to location shoots then in nineteen seventy. The army moved production to different site and turned the Astoria property over to the federal government. This was not simply a movement of some soldiers because most of the people making the films were grips carpenters electricians and actress who were part of. New York's commercial motion picture industry so they were not at all happy when this plug got pulled in Astoria. The complex sat abandoned. For years unprotected and open vandals people would go in there. Rip The copper out of the walls and those people with a purpose then they were also just people in there for mischief terrible condition in the meantime you have this eyesore at the edge of a residential communities have halfway between the area and Long Island city. It's just getting worse and worse and worse. They abandoned cars dropped all around weeds growing through the sidewalk. I remember this very clearly. The film unions local community and the city got together to preserve the studio site. Save film jobs and clean up the neighborhood in nineteen seventy seven. They formed the nonprofit a story of Motion Picture and Television Center Foundation. They managed to prevent the studio from being sold off or turn down by getting the site on the National Register of historic places a process that normally took years.

New York Hollywood Astoria Studios Army Sidney Lumet Astoria Marx Brothers United States Oscar Nora Nori Marx MGM Noel Coward Long Island Eastern Services Studios Inc Manhattan Carlos Gardell Tambien
The making of Yanni

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

03:56 min | 1 year ago

The making of Yanni

"In the nineteen nineties. I wrote an op Ed. For The New York Times where I tried to make sense and make fun of an inexplicable pop phenomenon that was sweeping the planet. Another single name star. Yanni was a huge deal at the time this new age composer and performer doing concerts at the Taj Mahal and the Forbidden City in Beijing. He released his live at the Acropolis album in the spring of Nineteen ninety-four which sold more than four million copies. This baffled me and my times s I propose facetiously that Johnny success must be the product of some powerful global conspiracy because this young Yanni guy and his music were so completely blah. Lots of people agreed. There's one guy the worst guy the music the Yanni man. You know Yanni first of all anyone who looks like a magician and doesn't do magic I don't like oh no. This is yawning. This guy is the biggest pothole I've ever seen in my life. So how did it happen? How did somebody who made? What sounded like high-end Muzak? How at that moment of Nirvana and a tribe called quest? Did he emerged as this superstar? Studio Three Sixty Seven Chong has the answers. The nineteen ninety. Tv special of Yanni's concert at the Acropolis has all the trappings of a musician. Doing a victory lap. After really hitting the big time there was set against the backdrop of the Parthenon backed by no less than the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Tossing back. His dark flowing locks as tap that his synthesizers while an enormous crowd cheered them on. But if you thought that this was Yanni's ward for being world-famous you'd have it backwards. Yanni wasn't on TV. Because he was a star. He was a star because he was on TV. Yanni was a niche player. He was big in his area. But that's relative George Barris produced and directed the live at the Acropolis special and worked with Yanni for years. He wasn't considered a big player. In the overall music field. Yanni's field was the world of instrumental electronic new age music. He had been releasing albums for a small new age label since the mid eighties and they got respectable sales within that market but the general public dismissed all that stuff as music for hot stone massages or being put on hold. He was being buttonholes. A new age artists and there was no superstar Andrea. If Yanni was well known for anything it was for being the new boyfriend of a celebrity opened. The front door opened the door. I took one look at him. I lost my heart. This entire one thousand. Nine Hundred Oprah episode is actually devoted to dynasty actress. Linda Evans and her meet cute with Yanni. It was as if he was made. Just for my eyes. I mean there's nothing about exposure was nice but Yanni wanted to be more than talk show fodder the frustration was. He was hitting like a glass ceiling. But we believe in the music we saw there could be used in a lot of other areas than just in elevators and that was the challenge we had to get it out there and let the public decide the what options beyond he have. His music wasn't really radio. Friendly an MTV wasn't exactly making a lot of room for instrumental new age composers. And then.

Yanni Acropolis The New York Times Taj Mahal Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Beijing Linda Evans MTV Chong Johnny George Barris Andrea
Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:57 min | 1 year ago

Adam Driver Hates Watching Himself in Movies

"It'll be interesting to see during the Oscar. TV Show exactly how Adam driver reacts when they play a clip of his best actor nominated performance because he hates seeing or hearing himself on screen so much that a few months ago he walked out on Terry Gross in the middle of an interview for fresh air when she played a clip of him which surprised me because when I talked to him in two thousand thirteen he was indulgent as we watched one scenes from the TV show girls. I did ask him why it made him so uncomfortable. I mean lots of reasons I just forgot why look like to was reminded in my God. That's what you have to go through that But mostly because I feel like If he was gonNA continue if it was going to kind of go on that You know I came from a theater background or you. Don't get to look at the end result or what what is actually being a Brosseau. You just have to do your homework than As much as you can then show up on the day and be open to something being different or not knowing the answer and I think think in things that I've watched in the past one I would just obsessed about them for months and drive myself crazy after you saw your work of things that I wanted to fix and change your or do over again in an obviously you can't and and same thing with the people around me. I just drive them nuts with like ask him quite so we would just couldn't wouldn't it be allow you to like. Oh next time and I won't do that or get better the next time. I don't think it's necessarily a good idea. Just kind of seems to be what I think. I have a natural tendency to try to make things perfect or better looking or Change it for the sake of changing at arbitrary Changing making it look better in the things that I'm interested in an watching in film theatre and television role is the imperfect or the ugly part of it. I just know it myself. Especially while we're shooting I have no interest to see what is coming

Terry Gross Oscar Brosseau Adam
This Woman's Work: Black Gold by Nina Simone

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:19 min | 1 year ago

This Woman's Work: Black Gold by Nina Simone

"Classic Kulgam. Sundays is a program of community listening events founded by Coline Cosmo Murphy were fans listened to essential albums uninterrupted. On state of the art sound systems systems. For this woman's work we're highlighting classic albums by female artists who have made a lasting impact on music and pop culture. This time the grammy nominated donated live album black gold by Nina Simone for us. It was recorded in front of a packed audience at Philharmonic recall in New York City on October. Twenty six thousand nine hundred sixty nine and released in nineteen seventy. The record captures the commanding poignant performance by Nina Nisa Mellon that night but we also hear her onstage banter between songs at times she seems Aloof and dignified. But then she's teasing lighthearted and the audience is clearly delighted lack gold displays Nina Simone's talents at interpreting Asong not to mention her range moving from soul and Gospel to show tunes and folk music through it. All her distinctive voice soars into moments of defiance and uplift is record represents not only an artist at the peak of for talents but an important figure in the civil rights movement in the US in this episode of this woman's work. Nina Simone's black gold.

Nina Simone Nina Nisa Mellon Coline Cosmo Murphy Grammy United States New York City Asong
It’s Super Bowl Week

ESPN Radio

09:15 min | 1 year ago

It’s Super Bowl Week

"David Tyree catch Malcolm Butler picked what do you want to force always forward to is super bowls of Jim Nagy the the senior bowl Reese's senior bowl director joins us now you're the show opens up a foreman plan Jim you know I love bringing those two losses up over the four winds because they are the two of the more historic losses we've ever seen in Super Bowl history how are your partner I'm doing great intake from young Courtney yeah that that's the worst part of Superbowl time for me now with all the highlight packages before lead up to the game always showed up to play its role and you were part of obviously yes as I mentioned to both of them before we get into the game and taking us behind the scenes what it's like for coaches scouts during Super Bowl week listless codes back to the Reese's senior bowl when you go back and look at the film and practice and the guys who really stood out give us a few names for every NFL team RB well and fell fans team is not in the Superbowl a few people that that could help their team coming up next season and I wanna drafted in April yeah it's you know we've actually been doing that the last couple days in the office that would be that you could director the game week itself I I'm walking around in and you know talking to GM's and coaches and trying to reconnect with people at an end this year we had some we took some roster hits during the week so I was trying to fill it roster holster practice so we better go back to the tape but a couple of years but a bunch of players that have stood out but dental dams to wide receiver from Baylor had a great week six six three two hundred fifteen pounds what is the right of Baylor another one Antonio Guinea gold and is another big receiver from liberty six four two twenty had a great week chase Claypool with six four two thirty really good we got a Notre Dame another deep inside of all Josh you Jay really stood out you know it's a linebacker for Michigan he can play off the ball he can play Alanis courage you can rush the passer are you sure all of that during the practice week so the cool thing was during the week this this your guys we we we we voted on our practice player the week we had that we have the players do it and I I felt like that meant a lot more to them that it came from their peers and and we really have to position group they went against the most during the week so line voted on the line no corners vote in a white out invites versus so I posted those on our on our Twitter and everything so everyone could see those entry now going back to watch the tape I think the players really got it right we love talking about quarterbacks it really is never too early to start stacking your board will who stood out to you the most in a jail it hurts is obviously the big name coming into the week but by the end of the week where do you I guess you're one through three who should we be looking at that position what are your according Jaylen with it was a big name come in a week if you the big week all week you know just from is tied to the state of Alabama with our game beautiful Beale everything it up did up in Tuscaloosa I DO and had a really strong week he really did you got better you know you got better as the week went on kind of like Daniel Jones did last year Justin Herbert what the overall practice player of the week again voted on by the players that that he was the game MVP as well so just in case a minute really he lit up every day he's got everything you need the big very intelligent death politic you got a strong arm he was accurate all week in really what he showed behind the scenes with the answer a lot of questions that people might have about the leadership and I I don't know why they were questions out there about that but the time Justin he's got a he's got a really good way about him teammates really responded to him all week we put him in a bunch of different situations where you have to show that leadership he just to be just a great kid I got a talking to dad they they did a great job with this on it it made me think yet enjoyed love would be the other one throw that grow in that mix and their direct your junior from Utah state who really talented really natural thrower you know do a great ball all week we just they were so far we've just gone through the one on one at that and a little bit of the team here at seventeen got to the game yet but but Jordan had a really strong week and then in the game entity Gordon for Washington state but the offer the player the game for his side you know he was backed up Gardner Menchu last year in Washington state if you've gotten sandlot look them up all or two and then you get the game to do just make things happen so many did that on Saturday the other quarterback group is really strong this year Jim nagging at the senior bowl director here with us on it pretty fits image on ESPN radio according Cronin infer Freddy I mean if it's Simmons and an elaborate a little bit more on Jordan love because talking to a tech coach Gary Andersen a Utah state he likened him to possibly when it comes to do the draft stock the next to Josh Alan where his stock could skyrocket during Super Bowl week DD do you agree with that do you think he had that kind of a week yes interval week but I got you here right coach any any any you know he's but he's wanted a lot of places and I think that your Jordan came into the year with a really high expectations there was a lot of media types that first round great Doug Jordan enter in sort of the league so that we you know him being a junior graduate are fortunate enough to get him and he didn't have the kind of the year that that maybe a lot of people expected at Utah state I think the no the coaching change you know at definitely had something to do with it it's it's hard it's hard runner whose game the first year that's why what Joe burrow did with Joe Brady coming in for the St Louis with you know even more impressive like I don't think Joe burrows got enough credit for that he was running a scheme for the first time but you know in Jordan I think Jordan might've been feeling the expectations of of the first round step two we don't have a chance to really talk about that when he came down to mobile last week but but the judge with the Josh our comparison it is a very good one you know Josh was the guy that statistically didn't have a great last year while making that came down to to your call and let it up but we all know how that turned out he went seventh overall so could Jordan get back up in the top ten I mean I I don't know that I mean that's that's pretty lofty but he did he did everything you could do down here you such a natural pro respond watch all week so it'll just be like you're the profits worry and up but I do think it's gonna be a starter at the next level one of my favorite assignments that we do every year at the senior bowl from ESPN will go around and ask outs kind of for their take on what they're seeing it practice and since it is Superbowl week it's always fun to hear the comparisons to guys were being you are playing in the game currently it in Harrison Bryant from Florida Atlantic one of our so you know one of our reporters ask out and he said quote he can beat George cattle two point now do you see that sort of comparison you know here so it's really good the past game it really is I mean Kittles kills really developed in a such a good blocker into get Georgia's coming out of that I will program where they used the tide and a lot of a lot of scrimmage though this from a background standpoint here isn't going to be a little bit behind for work short was coming out in any not quite as big a body of George kill but in the past can definitely you know higher than what the Mackey award for a reason because he can you know he's really good after the cat he's he's really athletic you catch the ball it is really good after the catch in which you didn't really see it after you he didn't run a whole you know he did run a a lot of it run a lot of different routes and that's what the that's what the scalp got that the that this week in mobile was with him running all those route that is going to have to do with the next level and his ability to separate get open yeah I mean I think you're the couple tied into this year's group Paris and be in one of them you know a guy Bryson Hopkins from Purdue had a great week out and drop in a small school player gate and had a great week I think I think those three guys might be the you know the first three cat up the board this year what is the deepest position group that you have observed so far you know it's probably what out in again a lot of it has to do with the junior class is really strong at the top with jury duty he Nick in the engine all from Colorado I mean there's a lot of good ones but the senior class is loaded you know we had with a guy come to mobile and it is a little banged up when he got here so we had to you know he didn't pass the physical but Brandon are you calling from Arizona state is a really explosive guy I think he's going to go in the first round and then all those names I mentioned before you know it getting including those K. J. hill mile state with the guy that was voted Platt practice clear the week from his side of it from inside of the team so then it is wide receiver crew it's all going to depend on where that run happens you know I think there's teams that are probably feel like they've got it well enough where they can wait to the third or fourth round and get a starter you know maybe hit on the next Terry McLaurin who is in the funeral last year when the third round it as you guys know how to add an unbelievable you rookie year for for the Redskins so but it you know how many first rounder that'll just be you know when they start going they start calling everyone kind of panic that it it starts taking them so depending on when their run goes it'll be interesting but there's a bunch of first round talent type receivers Mr strapped Reese's senior bowl director four time Super Bowl champion Jim Nagy here with us on ESPN radio Corning Corning ami AMP at Simmons and let's get to the Superbowl you you watch that game also as much as anybody and you scouted take us

Malcolm Butler Jim Nagy Reese Director David Tyree Foreman
"andersen" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

Huddle Up with Gus

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

"Of online betting better more more transparent and more power in more entertaining for the game or so they educated so they don't have a gambling but that so it's also fun for them engaging and We are. We're trying to partner with a lot of different among others the NFL will hoping to. We'll get into that space now with the repeal of after that it's up to the individual states to write would do what they want to do with the online gaming space so lots of interesting stuff. Stop going on guys do about it. Yeah we had. We had a nick bond deal on from him. So let's kind of the same thing that you're doing right. Yeah draft kings just signed a deal with the NFL Fan Duel is one of the biggest ones. Obviously and BETTA collected has affiliate partners partners in the space daily fantasy sports bass WROTO GRINDERS DOT com. We have begs inside dot com and US This dad bed. US BED DASH US DOT com so a lot of a lot of different -ffiliated partners that are trying to gauge. The I game on make negative more positive transparent experience. It used to be that the of of of Offshore Bookies had all the power and it was kind of a dark space. Now it's it's becoming much more transparent than and lighter much better for the game all right. Well I've won some money in college being more in tecmo superbowl he. It was money into the Super Bowl. Him kicking in Bo Jackson running. I kick tecmo. Yeah it was unbelievable. I you get those. Were like sixty fifty five yards from tecmo I got I really. I got mad street cred with my kids. I have a fifteen year old and a nineteen year old. WHO's a sophomore Michigan state by now but I made I was on Madden Twenty Twenty nineteen I think it was might have been twenty two alleged kicker? They're so mad and they said man a and we can More than we can You know we can do it. We we can play right now in your chickens fifty five yards a more one last thing we do we do a little no huddle we fire some questions that normally wouldn't get asked and So it's it's a Lotta Fun. Just fire back Good days agape warning if there was going to be a mount rushmore kickers. Let's assume you're on it. But who are the other three kickers on Mount Rushmore. Yon Standard Justin. Tucker Adam Viteri. Yeah Yeah Nice is going to be the next kicker to get in the hall of fame. Oh absolutely yes might be ballot all right more. What's your biggest pet peeve second bowls I think just the dishonesty you know not not being authentic right lag about the intensity of human beings should be should be offended right all right if you were a NFL commissioner for day now we kind of went through some of the issues with the kickoff and stuff you guys talked about others kicking Wolf Your Commissioner for day? What would what would you change Well out rather be a take a bigger picture and I'd say I would I would Make sure that we took care of pre-nine three guys and the legends. That builders game and make sure they have a pension that is commensurate with their contribution to the league. It's a disgrace that the players that came before have lackluster pension and healthcare health. Care for life and A better pension for for everybody right. I agree with that one. So mort if we're flipping through your phone right now and we land on somebody that you could call them and they would pick up. WHO's the most famous person in your Rolodex right now? Wow I got Jimmy Buffett in their five o'clock somewhere maybe that's well I don't have Jimmy. I have Jimmy Buffett offense like right hand guy can get to Jimmy. Jimmy would take the call. I bet you listen to a lot of Jimmy Buffett near time Yeah who else. I have. Prince the Crown Prince of Denmark seeing more Nansen Fan. He's he's a navy seal. ex-navy seal is really pretty bad to the bone guy. You can kill you on about twenty years his Royal Highness Crown Unprincipled Says Name Ground Prison Frederic F. R. E. D. E. R. I k.. Frederick Frederick Awesome Awesome. He's a pretty good. If more than if you go back in time and tell young morten Andersen one bit of advice will that Oh man you know don't don't burn the candle on both ends. Maybe as as much maybe wing it for eight years before you realize you hit a performance plateau and now became real serious. If I don't get my shit together together I'm out of the League so I would say have have more Like levity and perspective earlier but you know when you're not fully baked. I think the the problem is you don't have leverage. You don't have respect if you think you're invincible. You know this us. Oh yeah you know. We think we're invincible. And with age and wisdom comes comes this perspective that maybe I could have done it in a in a different Wade. I might have been even better at what I did will maybe not ask three girls the prom. Well that was ultra misunderstanding. I understand you daughters. I have full respect for the diviners. Believe me now there you go so more if you could be anyone else for one day alive or dead. Who would that be a rock doc? Enroll guy lead singer of a band standing on stage and just rocking it. Out like owns or Yeah let's Zeppelin. Could you imagine ought to be Robert. Plant for twenty four hours would be like a lifetime of us. Nineteen seventy four. Something talmadge that like Gene Simmons like Robert Plant without all the drugs and all the venereal diseases I think like Roger daltry would be good to. Do you know what I mean. We would be bad mick jagger will be cool stones or like Queen on on the what was the biggest live aid. Live in. Wembley did you like that movie. Oh yeah did I did like it. It was good. It's pretty good. It's really good. Do you offer for us. It was great that crowd scene was. I couldn't imagine I mean. Can you imagine the Lady Radio Gaga and the whole thing moving all his heart power. You must feel right. Oh Yeah Tom Will speak a movies. Do you have a favorite sports. Nitty favorite. Sports movie has to be caddyshack sports movie. Oh yeah definitely. It's sports movie. Well lets you. Don't consider golf a sport. It's a sport. What your handicapped? By the way. A twelve point five. I wasn't eight by couldn't play to it. I'm so happy. Twelve five takes a lot of pressure off. I'm eight two in. I wish I was to just keep tuning in your scores Ores and you will be asked. Are you lefty Walker. I'm sorry you oh you play left-handed Golf Then he can do the mile. No I don't hit it. Hit pretty straight so okay potter. So what would your nickname be on the golf course. Would it be still the great Dane or King King of kicks now. I don't know I don't I mean I play golf more for the Camaraderie in all play in a lot of events whereas sham bealer scrambled rambled. You're not playing. You're on ball a lot in the networking and socializing and telling stories and they they want you there. 'cause yeah play with you they WANNA hang out. They don't care where you hit either. Just don't yeah if you can play a little bit. Yeah and you swing out your ass in the ball just goes everywhere. And he's he's got a beard the next cooler. I just play bethpage black with in the Joe Nemeth Tournament. And that's like the Tom. Death March man. Oh so how long did take seven hours now. took us about five hours. But it's walking with caddies and it's just oh difficult. Yeah they wanted me to play this year and I couldn't because we were doing something with podcast and have you ever played it. No you need to go because we go through the day before we play Glen Oaks which is Gusta like reading is on Long Island. Yeah you'd love it. I live four doors down from months ago I played that damn sparked had played the pike national national over in Morgantown. One time I was at the Redskins I wasn't very good outrageous beautiful. Yeah all Laurel Nisa. Although I'm Laurel if you ever get to the lower valleys beautiful too but if you ever get to Pittsburgh we'll go play. Oh that sounds fun. We'll go play my core for some member at first but eight more. We appreciate you coming on jumping in with us today. Okay and tell us some stories that maybe people haven't heard and and I think our.

Jimmy Buffett golf NFL US Offshore Bookies nick bond Bo Jackson Madden Twenty Twenty Michigan partner morten Andersen Mount Rushmore Redskins Glen Oaks Tucker Adam Viteri mick jagger Pittsburgh Robert Plant
"andersen" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

Huddle Up with Gus

13:02 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Huddle Up with Gus

"Let's get in the huddle. It just goes on how to up with Gus. Thanks for joining us today. I'm here with my co host. Dave Hager Dave got a really good guests today hall of Famer her great nickname the great dane the great Dane and also the King of kicks. I think there's an the matador is so claims but today on a show of US Morten Andersen more than how you doing buddy. I am an great to see gus. you know all the guys I held my balls. You were the best. Yeah thank you I. I took great pride in holding your boss just the way you wanted the best or after see this is how you this is how you opened the show guys it is it. is T's a great Dane and then you come right with the ball's job and then more than likely his balls really big. Okay Yeah So. That's a really big vertical big ball. So that's the size. I think he had like a fourteen eighteen. Chew ground Teen Thirteen he asked he hated. saggy balls to they had to be nice. And it'd it'd be stitched. Yeah they had a big definitely stitch man. You know one type Dave more than I were in the field house at the Vikings and we challenge each agenda the throw like into a trash. Can you save from twenty yards. Hit that so at an indoor facility is all these trash cans along the back wall and we out early night hold for him and so then I said well I'll throw him and you kick them in and he actually beat me. That's how accurate. But we had to move in because he was like at that time. You're like forty seven so five forty one really could go from so far forty five. I wasn't forty hours and forty five and then we're money. Oh Yeah Oh yeah. And I had to learn to hold for a left-footed Kicker Elliot had very Mary He. He was so strict on how I had to do it. But I had learned the ultra left footed a never health one in like two days. And what's great in the rush. Everything everything switched. Your brain has to sweep you have to you know. Usually when you're holding for a right footed kicker one hands front. Switch it over. Yeah News just if you've ever overdone you're right into all right. Yes so try and do something. Left handed is is terrible. Like I'm using data from one end up I had an all led to catch it and you had to catch gus and hold it with your right hand and turn it with your left hand. Because I didn't want the I didn't want this hand to cover the ball As I'm coming into the ball right so when you held it with this you could turn it here and I had a clear view of the ball. It was just things like that we talked about. I think in a very powerful way you know. Hey this is what I expect of you and I think you are very open to it. Even though you were quarterback a little bit of primitive you know Prima Premadonna. You're you you check the EGO at the door. I was impressed and we had a really good year. Yeah we did. We had a great year and the other thing too is he filmed everything the only anytime I've ever been film holding for kicker for three angled three on the front the back and shoulder held camera. We have it was amazing Guy Morton. Let's go back to when you grew up overseas Before you you are an immigrant into the United States of America what was it like growing up over there. What was that first member of you were? You fell in love with sports. I was five years old and I remember. It was the night before I had to go to the very first soccer practice and I slept with my soccer shoes on like next to my pillow. My Mom and dad bought me these red. Patrick which is a French brand of soccer shoes and I was so excited barely slapped then. I kept looking at these shoes going. I'm GonNa wear these tomorrow in a kick the ball tomorrow. Five years old this started. That's how it started man. Did you have an idled. There was somebody who looked up to in the world there was a German striker called Gad Moolah and I will use to when we when when we did Make believe you know playing in in the in the backyard or whatever with buddies I would tell everybody just called me middle. Just Call Me Middle Man. Yeah just this Miller and the old scoring machine for the German national team. He was a little guy but he was always in the right spot at the right time. I said I wanNA be like that. I always want to be in the right spot the right time and I kind of feel like I I was. Yeah that's ever since I can remember I was. I was Terry Bradshaw plane and and if I played baseball I was always I was either Willie. stargell Dave Marker. I'm Pittsburgh I so I love those guys but we all had those idols growing up What other sports did you play grown-up so this is a sport? That's not very common. In the United States called team Handball Olympic pick sport. Now I'm not talking about the handball. You play in prison. You know against the wall. Great Not Shit that sport prison handle all seven guys are golly. It's an Olympic sport very physical very good. That 'cause I could jump and I was a gymnast. I did a lot of gymnastics nasty trampoline and vaulting. So I had a lot of a Lotta spring. I could jump really high and in team handball. You so you can jump in the defense trying to block your shot. You're still hanging in the air shooting the ball. You got a shot at goal so that was something I became really good at did did you. Did you have a good arm at a good left arm back then. They didn't like what's team hamble like as a kid are their the children playing team hamble. Oh yeah very young five years age really just like soccer here across Football I mean peewee football. You know it started at young and basketball. Same thing is what's going on in the states very young age. Yeah it's funny when you see like on the Olympics Olympic team handball. It's one of those. were she go. It's almost like a curling where you go. How are people like? Where do they get involved with that? But it sounds like inserting especially here in the states state. You don't see I remember in gym class playing it in high geico as we used to use a volleyball to write about two sizes. There's a little smaller than of all right. And all and I remember I used to love. Just what more can I jump in the air and I I wouldn't care if I scored Um I just wanted to hurt the goalie in front of the net so bad and I can remember after one like jim classical came out and he had like six welts all over so I don't think I scored a goal but hit the goalie like six times. It was not dodgeball. Gosh I'm just having fun but is it's a great sport so you played that you were gymnast hugging and gymnastics. I was looking for job and I went to a I went to school. I got an instructors. Licence and I was teaching gymnastics. Initially while I was doing it. I just like the the physicality of it the jumping flying in the air you go into a trampoline and you draw your clips in the end you land on Matt. It's pretty wild stuff events trampoline Floor exercises unbolting in so when I came to high school in at Ben Davis High School I I was on the gymnastics team. There I was a kicker on the on the the football team and in the winter did gymnastics in this. In the spring I was along the track and field Iran the anchor on the eight eighty around the one to one ten twenty and I was a long jumper while so I get a lot of different. So how old were you when you came to. The states are seventeen actually on my seventeenth birthday. I landed in Indianapolis with the Baker family. A family that I live with for ten months in the intent was to save ten months not forty thirty two years. What was that program called? It you came over at did was called youth understanding. Why if you and it? Basically promotes international exchange between teenagers teenagers. So while I was in the states my family in Denmark my mom and dad had a kid from Denver Colorado named Bob corless and he took over oh my room and and live there and learn Danish for ten months so it was literally it was an exchange. Did he stay. is He still living in. And then he got out of the back to Colorado he would back out of examining weed is legal. You know what was the biggest difference between Denmark and Indianapolis tablets. Oh Man let me count the ways like your initial reaction did you. Did you speak English really well. I mean I didn't. I barely spoke the game The the most bizarre thing looking back on it Gaza's like I. I didn't speak language. I didn't know anybody and now I'm so entrenched in this I just became a US US citizen about a month and a half ago or the as a love it so you know it's Kinda come full circle. Oh for me but I. I didn't know a person. My story is really the American dream it really is. It's going from nothing having nothing to creating something because of a great opportunity in the greatest country on. That's how I feel and how you so if you take that into what's happening today with off uh-huh that's going on in our country of the kind of being divided because of immigration and all these things in the rhetoric that's out there. How do you feel about that because it does give give so many people an opportunity to live their dreams? Yeah well three things. I never talk about politics religion in sexual preference as I'M GONNA Bought having said that I believe in strong borders. I believe in coming here illegally. And you know pay taxes like everybody else else and be gainfully employed and create a live a great life that you may not have had an opportunity to do in the country you came from if you WANNA come to the United States law-abiding citizen you have to understand the bill rights. You know. And and and you have to understand that it's a lawful country and that we all I'll have to coexist with respect despite our cultural differences or nationalities languages. This is what America was built on. This is a melting pot of immigrants unless you are unless you came over involuntarily or you are a native American. We're we're immigrants and it's entrees build on on the thought that a better life was to be had in this country and you had to work hard. If you had the talent you would be given given the opportunity and you would abide by the laws. This is something I believe in very strongly and part of that is strong border control. I don't I don't think you can just open the floodgates commit people in. That's that's not healthy for any society. No countries doing that right now that it's hard in that it is hard for people that are kind of fleeing persecution and stuff like that and we don't have to get into all that but there are I think there are caveats everything right. There are definitely should be legal legal but there are people that need help. I always say we should help our own. I because we do have a lot of people I just gave guy driving up here today. Day One of my because he did you see him on. I saw come here yes so at my protein bar. I handed out the window to upset. Good luck place. You what do you what do you have. Do you have a Gus Gus bar no no I just had a gatorade bore. I still love those things because they came to us all the time in the NFL. And we're still having when you play. Aj blocked from like two thousand eight with the Vikings Helmet. Well they stay forever. They're like a twinkie. The so when you go to high school you have a great Advantage over the other guys in high school. Because you have this this great dialect that nobody's ever heard before Indianapolis and I'm sure the girls loved it. Well I mean I did have a what kind of a unique situation around prom. Time because in Denmark the cultural divide there you go out a big group of people and you figure out who who you like. Who Don't live you hang? Hang around that them right Awin prompt time came. I invited three girls. They all accept it. They all all said yes.

United States soccer Gus Gus Dave Hager Dave Denmark Vikings Indianapolis America Morten Andersen gymnastics Dane football Colorado Guy Morton handball gus. Kicker Elliot Ben Davis High School Famer Pittsburgh
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"And by the way I like love actually as well and Intel. We did that story. I didn't know I was supposed to feel bad about that. So what's something you like. That's unpopular or is just really surprising that somebody like you like something like that. That is your guilty pleasure. Tell us about it in an email or a voice memo and send it to incoming at studio three sixty dot org and that's it for this week show to do three. Sixty is a production of PRI. I public radio. International in association with slate and our production team is Jocelyn Gonzales. Indra Newman Sandra Lopez Montalvan. Evan Chow. Lauren Hanson Sam Kim. So Hee Saunders. Tommy Bavarian Morgan flannery. And I am Kurt Andersen. He's it will make a lot of money. Is it winning. But I thought we'd have a lot of fun. Thanks very much for listening to in our public radio. International next time on studio three sixty two key. Is that kind of avoid that you fall in love with before you realize you shouldn't. The longing status beauty and comfort turns deadly when Ripley lashes out at him. It's not that you want him to die. But you're ready for some kind of justice. Listed reinvention in Patricia Highsmith's Ripley trilogy. An American icon next time on studio three.

Kurt Andersen Indra Newman Sandra Lopez Mont Jocelyn Gonzales Patricia Highsmith Hee Saunders Intel Evan Chow Tommy Bavarian Lauren Hanson Morgan flannery Sam Kim
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Wynton Marsalis was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his work. Blood on the fields at two and a half hour jazz or thorough about a couple moving from slavery to Freedom Freedom Heaven Jus- own freedom is on his aw. It was the first time a jazz composition had ever won. But even the Wynton Marsalis is best known as a jazz trumpet player he also as a classical composer. Sorry himself he has written four seemed funny as and a Violin Concerto and this year he released a recording of symphony number three the swing symphony with adjusted adjusted Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Robertson. In these but guess extra Wynton Marsalis sits down with Kurt Andersen to talk about his love of classical music. He says it all started with a chance encounter on a New Orleans Streetcar when he was just a kit. So guy went into the back of the STREE- rijkaard white trump'll from college. which was unusual for a white guy? DOOKIE saw my trumpet trumpet case. Weight as a kid in the in the seventies. You're you're you're sitting in the back of the Streetcar. 'CAUSE 'cause that's the wire you didn't have to was not required that's where you were just was a mandated. You you wanted to sit there. Yeah but it was an area that was not populated with white. Gotcha so this student for. Some reason stepped across those lines and put his trumpet case down by mine so I was not dead daddy to see him. Everybody of course started looking at him and he was insisting on. Tell me something I was kind of not as friendly and fuzzy as I should have been but then he gave me an album just absolutely ran. mcgurn said check this album and it was an album of a trumpet. Player named Maurice Andrey and I thought you know classical music okay. Okay man the famous French but I didn't know he was a dead time. I was thirteen and I read the the album jacket or something said that his parents were coal miners and man. Is People. Disguise people worked in coal mines and he played classical trumpet. I got to put this on when I get home so I put it on. It was a recording..

Wynton Marsalis Kurt Andersen Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint New Orleans Streetcar Pulitzer Prize STREE David Robertson Maurice Andrey mcgurn
The Symphonic Side of Wynton Marsalis

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:15 min | 1 year ago

The Symphonic Side of Wynton Marsalis

"Wynton Marsalis was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his work. Blood on the fields at two and a half hour jazz or thorough about a couple moving from slavery to Freedom Freedom Heaven Jus- own freedom is on his aw. It was the first time a jazz composition had ever won. But even the Wynton Marsalis is best known as a jazz trumpet player he also as a classical composer. Sorry himself he has written four seemed funny as and a Violin Concerto and this year he released a recording of symphony number three the swing symphony with adjusted adjusted Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Robertson. In these but guess extra Wynton Marsalis sits down with Kurt Andersen to talk about his love of classical music. He says it all started with a chance encounter on a New Orleans Streetcar when he was just a kit. So guy went into the back of the STREE- rijkaard white trump'll from college. which was unusual for a white guy? DOOKIE saw my trumpet trumpet case. Weight as a kid in the in the seventies. You're you're you're sitting in the back of the Streetcar. 'CAUSE 'cause that's the wire you didn't have to was not required that's where you were just was a mandated. You you wanted to sit there. Yeah but it was an area that was not populated with white. Gotcha so this student for. Some reason stepped across those lines and put his trumpet case down by mine so I was not dead daddy to see him. Everybody of course started looking at him and he was insisting on. Tell me something I was kind of not as friendly and fuzzy as I should have been but then he gave me an album just absolutely ran. mcgurn said check this album and it was an album of a trumpet. Player named Maurice Andrey and I thought you know classical music okay. Okay man the famous French but I didn't know he was a dead time. I was thirteen and I read the the album jacket or something said that his parents were coal miners and man. Is People. Disguise people worked in coal mines and he played classical trumpet. I got to put this on when I get home so I put it on. It was a recording.

Wynton Marsalis Kurt Andersen Lincoln Center Orchestra Saint New Orleans Streetcar Pulitzer Prize Stree David Robertson Maurice Andrey Mcgurn
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Of Studio Three Sixty is brought to you by Fitbit. Let's face it. The holidays are exhausting. That's why fitbit is the perfect gift. It's an incredibly easy easy way to get a good night's sleep and now with new features for two thousand nineteen. There are more reasons than ever to add one to your list. Fitbit helps you understand your sleep by by creating your own personalized sleep score every night it keeps track of how well you sleep measuring your sleep. Duration time in Rem sleep. And how much you move around sleep score is fitbit's most advanced form of sleep analysis. And now you can even check it right from your own rest in addition to the APP and that's just the beginning. The new smart wake system analyze that data and wakes up at exactly the right sleep stage. That means you'll wake up feeling more refreshed than ever and ready to take on the day need another reason about free shipping at FITBIT DOT com. This holiday season help your loved ones break up with the snooze button once and for all shop fitbit dot dot com and find gifts for everybody on your list. Hi this is Kurt Andersen and I am the host of studio three sixty. If you've ever wanted to start your own podcast. You might think. Thank you need all kinds of equipment to set up turns out. All you need is anchor. Anchor is an all in one free tool from spotify that lets you create your own podcast and get heard everywhere anchor you can record edit be heard on all listening platforms and they'll even pair you with sponsors to help you try to get paid eight for your show. It all works in your web browser or right from anchors mobile APP and best of all. It's totally free. Start Your podcast with anchor today by going to anchor dot. FM SLASH STUDIO THAT'S ANCHOR DOT FM Slash Studio Studio Three.

dot Kurt Andersen spotify
Disney Animation Chief Jennifer Lee Is The Queen Behind Elsa And Anna

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:32 min | 1 year ago

Disney Animation Chief Jennifer Lee Is The Queen Behind Elsa And Anna

"Just when you thought you had pushed it out of your consciousness it's back manager. Danny that of course is the theme song from frozen. The movie was a massive. Hit the Disney film long-held the crown as the highest grossing animated movie worldwide frozen was written and Co directed by Jennifer Lee who has since been named Walt Disney animation studios chief creative officer the first woman to hold such a position during the making making of frozen to. NPR's Elizabeth Blair sent some time. Spent some time with her in frozen to water. Air Fire and earth are important to the story so he's the wind in the movie the characters call her gail sometimes. She's he's playful and sometimes she's angry. We played a little louder in a windowless room at the Disney animation studios in Burbank. Supervising sound editor Odin. Benny test test plays the different wind. Sounds for a group of people working on the film including Jennifer Lien and her co director. Chris Buck because she blasts that. That tree tree limb away from Ana. That's gale goes your the magic and Gail starts to go around Elsa and then spits the others out. This kind of collaboration goes on on for just about every aspect of an animated Disney movie says Jennifer Lea and you go shot by shot moment by moment frame by frame and discuss everything everything from the emotion to the effects to the camera. The first frozen was inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale the snow queen one of the heroines. Elsa has magical powers she can make ice and snow in a split second for inspiration for the new movie Lee and a team from Disney traveled to Norway Finland and Iceland wasted on a glacier for the first time really hit us. What would elsa feel standing here? The glacier it's a thousand feet deep is thousand years old it's of nature completely and something she would probably be so connected to and we realized is sort of the mythic round her power. That opened up the story to be something even bigger for us. That's something begins as a secret. Siren that calls astounds.

Disney Gail Jennifer Lee Jennifer Lien Walt Disney Elsa Hans Christian Andersen Elizabeth Blair Jennifer Lea Danny Burbank Chris Buck Chief Creative Officer NPR Benny Editor Director Norway Finland Iceland
New York Icons: The Bell Jar

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

09:24 min | 1 year ago

New York Icons: The Bell Jar

"It's good to meet you as Clark is the author of the forthcoming nine hundred page biography of Platt I meet up with her and we take a look at the magazine Plath oversaw that summer you know what struck me the first time I looked through this was the number of ads you just can't quite believe how many ads are in this Zine it's almost page after page and of course fashion spreads to fashion magazine so in a back room of the New York Public Library where flipping through a copy of the magazine Clark points out one ad in particular it's for shape wear that's also sportswear so this Janssen add anyone for action anyone for beautiful perform an action there is a woman with a Barbie Physique wearing a hat and gloves connect with a bra and girdle as she gets ready to serve in a game of tennis this is positively the most pleasant to wear slimming trimming smoothing soothing figure maker ever devised and there's a poem called the applicant where she uses this kind of language I noticed you were stock naked how about this suit blackened stiff but not a bad it when you marry it it is waterproof shatterproof proof against fire and bombs through the roof believe me they'll bury you in it Mademoiselle had become interested in her after a story she had submitted a year earlier one it's national fiction contest but Clark says that Platt Struggle old in her role as managing editor she had wanted to be fiction editor at just nineteen years old plath had already published poems and won awards Mademoiselle published some of the top writers of its day Dylan Thomas Tennessee Williams Truman capote but instead of selecting editing short stories plan throats fashioned blurbs including one praising the versatility of sweaters I think plath found her self suddenly embedded in this fashion and beauty industry and she's become part of this vast propaganda machine that woman's women into objects and she wanted to be the subject of her own life she didn't want to be the objective someone else's life so I think that contributed to her sense of disillusion that summer suddenly it was her job to kind of objectify women bio green they were promoting it for fall title green with black bio green white bio green with Nio green it's kissing cousin fashion blurb silver and full of nothing sent up there fishy bubbles in my brain they surfaced with a hollow pop but it isn't just the limitations of fashion and magazines that got to plant she was also troubled by the limitations placed on women in the nineteen fifties even in New York City that place of possibility I made a point beating so fast I never kept the other people waiting who generally ordered only chefs salad and grapefruit juice at one point in the bell jar she says everyone in New York to reduce PAS not trying to reduce plath has an enormous appetite is her actual appetite was legendary she wants emptied out hosts refrigerator before a dinner party but she had an appetite for everything you know she wanted to be the best writer she wanted to so I'm close she wanted to raise honeybees you went to make her own honey and she just wanted it all can women have it all it's a question still asking it had just started to come up in the nineteen fifties when women who've done the whole rosie the riveter thing during the war were now expected to be homemade occurs again even though many thrived in the workforce and developed real professional aspirations it was an ongoing discussion within society about whether women could do three things at once dying Johnson got married one month after the gas ownership Mademoiselle the summer had changed her and given her a greater sense of what her life could be but then she had four children within the span of six years so I was home with these little kids but they had naps and that's when somebody said why don't you the novel about something that you can do during nap time you know that's the way things evolve house of naptime Johnson has since written more than a dozen books and been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Plath during a man who would support her as a writer was a major anxiety when she wrote about extensively in her journals in the Bell Jar Esther Greenwood reflection in her sort of boyfriend a medical student at Yale who everyone told her was such a good guy I also remembered Buddy Willard saying innocent minister knowing way that after I had children I would feel differently I wouldn't want to write poems anymore so I began to think maybe it was true that when you were married and had children it was like being brainwashed and afterward you went numb as a slave in some private totalitarian state a few years later plath thought she found a man who would not brainwash her as a graduate student at Cambridge she met fellow poets Ted Hughes who she married in Nineteen fifty sex both enjoyed growing reputations as writers when they were interviewed by the BBC's Owen Leeming in nineteen sixty one you'll have to give the impression that Oh you spend your whole Mary lives thinking poems and reading to each other I think our domestic life is is practically indistinguishable from all the people who live around I'm not the only main difference is that Ted doesn't go out to work at nine and come home at five he retires about nine to to his room and and works but I certainly having a life just like all the other housewives and mothers district shopping dishes and taking care of the baby in four so for Hughes Writing was a fulltime job a career but plath was a wife and mother who happened to write perhaps like Johnson during nap time plath was actually writing the bell jar at the time of that interview she alluded to it when she was interviewed again the next year this time by the BBC's Peter or he asks plath if there are particular themes that she's interested in exploring and he rambles off this list of ingredients that she's baked right into the bell jar Robert lulls poems about his experiences in a mental hospital for example interested very much these peculiar private and to move subjects it's I feel have been explored in recent American poetry I think particularly the poorest and Sexton who writes also about her experiences I always wanted to write the long short story I wanted to rise Nawfal now that I have attained shall I say a respectable age and have had experiences I feel much more interested in pros in the novel I feel that Plath published the bell jar under a pseudonym because she was so worried about offending the people she fictionalized as characters in it one of those characters was her editor at Mademoiselle who she called JC in the Bell Jar JC asks esther what she wants to do after college and suddenly she draws a blank unable to list off for am visions of being a professor writer or an editor and a writer. I've always thought I'd like to go into publishing I tried to recover thread that might lead me back to my old bright salesmanship I guess what I'll do is apply at some publishing house you ought to read French and German. JC said mercilessly and probably several other languages as well Spanish and Italian better still Russian hundreds of girls flood into New York every June thinking they'll be editors Utah for something more than the run of the mill person you better learn some languages. JC is a tough editor who cuts her down to size in that way she calls to mind another memorable story said Ed Women's magazine in New York so you don't read runway no for today you had never heard of me now you have no style or something fashion while similar take down to Andy Sacks her would be assistant that's a complete exaggeration of winter is the longtime editor of Vogue and the basis for maranda priestly

Editor New York Clark Platt Utah Ed Women Vogue Andy Sacks Nineteen Years One Month Six Years Mill
The Bell Jar

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:51 min | 1 year ago

The Bell Jar

"The bell jar by Sylvia Plath is set mainly in New York City but it's not always thought of as a New York novel like Catcher in the raw I or the age of innocence are that's probably because what's autobiographical the novel tends to eclipse other aspect of it just a month after the Bell Jar was first published in nineteen sixty three plath killed herself since the book is pretty autobiographical and its narrator attempt suicide it can be hard not to read it as a sort of literary suicide note but of course there's a lot more to the novel it's about a young woman from the Boston suburbs who like plath Lanza Plum Internship Guest Editing Women's magazine in New York in the summer of Nineteen fifty-three and it does a lot to capture what did and still does go along with trying to make it in New York all the outsized possibilities and outside disappointments on this Shen of New York icons producer Beenish Ahmed has the story of the Bell Jar I I read the Bell Jar when I was sixteen and Board in Ohio dreaming of being a writer and reporter in New York City a lot like Sylvia plath who won a golden ticket to that Dream Life a summer working at a top women's Xena when Sylvia Plath was at Smith college she went to guest editorship to Mademoiselle magazine her and a number of other girls to New York in the Mark Nineteen fifty three if you know anything about the bell jar is that it's based on Sylvia plath its own life when the main character Esther Greenwood goes back home after that summer she liked plath attempt suicide is committed to mental institutions and is treated with octroi shock therapy but the bell jar is not just a story of an unstable teenager plath uses her own story to reflect on the culture she lived in she lays out that mission right there in the first sentence it was a queer sultry summer the summer they electrocuted the rosenbergs and I didn't know what I was doing in New York Julius and Ethel Rosenberg had been convicted of conspiring to sell secrets about the atomic bomb to Soviet spies that's a powerful Metaphor says novelist med bullets are the beginning the first lines of the bell jar she talks about the execution of the Rosenbergs and then later on the character of Greenwood experiences electroconvulsive therapy and you make the link as a reader about electricity the and the terrible time in America which I didn't live through the rosenbergs but just the sense of her pain being expressed so beautifully so

Ethel Rosenberg Smith Dream Life Reporter Producer Plath Lanza Boston New York America Sylvia Plath Julius Esther Greenwood Mademoiselle Magazine Writer Ohio Beenish Ahmed Bell Jar New York City
The Security Token Ecosystem w/ Vertalo CEO Dave Hendricks

CRYPTO 101

09:14 min | 1 year ago

The Security Token Ecosystem w/ Vertalo CEO Dave Hendricks

"Dave so so tell us about your background catch us up what were you doing before you were tokenism assets advert also so my career goes back pretty far especially with regard securitisation I started my career at a little money accounting for Arthur Andersen did that out of college and I specialized in technology and databases Arthur Andersen. it was an accounting firm so I got involved in a lot of assets securitisations and this is like back when all the toys were made out of Wood the nineteen ninety s when I left three Anderson I went to work for a Goldman Sachs j Robert Joint Venture and we helped big the savings and loan crisis out of the ground and and securitized all of these real estate assets? I built databases to do that. then ended up going to Oracle or go corporations you know database company and I ran the worldwide relationship between Oracle and Arthur Andersen and it was after that that I met Baxter my co-founder and he and I were principals at what became the world's largest email markets the platform something called Chiel we learned there a lot about building massive scaling systems that could house the data of competitor I on the same system logically separated providing are basically big data and data delivery sir services to retailers and publishers who were getting an email and we were really really early in the email kind of like as early as emails people we're in Bitcoin in two thousand eleven or twelve and after that I went on to co found a company called Live intent that was in two thousand nine we invented programmatic advertising in email meeting we place ads in emails rendered when you open the no so and it was some stuff that happened in our series d. round of funding two thousand fifteen that provided some of the inspiration to war for Taller and William and our other co founder couch on Gujaral who's a former FCC attorney a securities lawyer and I got together on boat two thousand sixteen in Berlin and in Tala was fascinating I I kinda picked up on a little something that you mentioned that we I haven't really had discussed on the show so the savings and loans crisis of the late eighties nineties on can you talk a little bit about that because I think that comes to bear you know principally on why crypto exists you know one of the reasons so talk about that experience in what for those of those those of us that haven't heard savings loan crisis maybe a defined that and then talk about what it was like digging out of that yeah so starting in the eighties extending into the very early in the ninety s the savings and loan industry in the United States was pretty much deregulated and a lot of the savings and loans we're getting big by enabling unsecured loans the originated and USA purchase real estate in secured loan is basically hey you know me lonely some money I'm GonNa go buy this thing well this happened on a mass scale it was it was really something similar to the real estate Christ though your mortgage crisis that kicked off the two thousand eight recession and what ended up happening was that when when the recession happened in in the early nineties in the people couldn't pay for all the real estate that they had bought with these SNL loans and so the SNL started calling all these loans in and there was no one by the properties so people just basically either went bankrupt or just you know for the or they just said I'm going to stop paying this this saga loan on this property and so they're they're became a just a deluge of nonperforming underperforming loans on the books of the S. and L.'s and this had a ripple effect through the economy and so the the George W Bush original og Bush president key he set up something he called the Resolution Trust Corporation to clean this up and basically the process of cleaning up the the SNL crisis was taking these underperforming loans repackaging them and then selling them to new investors or to reach or other other parties that have the cash to buy them in often these properties were being sold at fire sale prices in real quick like an underperforming the loan like is that meaning somebody was loaning out money an nobody was paying the interest on that loan so is just sitting there okay doc or so non-performing non-performing loan means that no payments are being made underperforming would mean either they're paying part of the payment or maybe there's paying the interest that they're not paying the principal with a lot of people would use the you know they were just they will just pay the interest on the loan with the hopes of getting restructured later or ending up in what's known as a workout and so what we did G Robert in Whitehall securitisation project was to build databases of all of these loans and then enable them to be purchased by other investors essentially we securitized all in this real estate sometimes it got packaged up into multiple properties sometimes it was just sold pretty by property but I was database in a network guy and so back in the days before you had the Internet the way it is today for aws before all this kind of distributed computing technology creating databases and then connecting them around the country you ask two different bank centers and billing databases of these loans that would them the then be -sposed off okay or or sold in some way to new investors and so I got I got some pretty Kinda early the hands on experience and what happens when when things go wrong in financial markets and specifically in real estate and securities it was pretty cool so but you know these are these are not financial events you want to happen very often because right now with as much elaborate there is in the system what if this happens again it's going to really have a pretty strong ripple effect and that has a lot to do with the fact that you know just developed financial products and strategies that are based on borrowing and lending rather than rather than actually valuable underlying assets. It's a big big argument for crip doctrine so if you came to me five years ago and I said Hi Dave what do you do you said token is assets. I would very very slowly back away before running for my life a lot of people listening to this podcast also feel that way right now like what is your doing what who what where why can you guess on what it means to token is an asset in crypto it's really it's really pretty simple Token is Dana asset means taking the ownership interest in a new or existing company meaning the list of holders of the securities or shares or tokens of that asset taking them from a spreadsheet or some kind of paper or other analog ledger and turn them into a pro rata distribution of smart card cracks basically it's very similar to take in a record like vinyl and then turning it into into the threes you take a whole album okay which consists of you know ten songs and you turn it into ten a friend different MP four files and you put them onto onto a thumb drive

Arthur Andersen Oracle Goldman Sachs Dave Arthur Andersen. Robert Joint Venture Wood Five Years
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"Studio threes sixteen. Hey honey direct keep sitting in for Kurt Andersen on this week twenty five years ago the album ready to die by the notorious B. I G AKA okay a biggie smalls was released. biggie was larger than life in every sense six to nearly four hundred pounds. He was also one of the great storytellers. There's in hip hop history my own introduction. A biggie was getting the cassette tape of ready to die from my oldest brother. When I was a kid here in Columbus Ohio I would listen to it and my Sony Walkman on the bus to school and then on the playground during recess and then under the covers staying up way later than I should have been this story about big? He's ready to die begins with one of its producers when I think of notorious B I g one of the first things that comes to my mind is is the big tall dude that had my accurate leaning over when we used to ride around and he's the Free Stalin my car to my beats. I am easy moby. Dj Brooklyn Native and I was a music producer for ready to it just started writing for the source. When somebody slipped me a copy of ready to die and my God I it was an out of body experience inch and I just had to talk to this guy.

smalls Kurt Andersen Brooklyn Sony Columbus Ohio producer four hundred pounds twenty five years
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"<music> I'm Kurt Andersen and this is the studio three sixty podcast. I'm Jocelyn Gonzalez from studio three sixty. We're back with another edition of this woman's work a series of stories from Classic Albums Sundays and studio three sixty classic Album Sundays is a program of community listening events founded by colleen COSMO Murphy. We're fans listened to essential albums uh-huh uninterrupted on state of the art sound systems for this woman's work. We're highlighting classic albums by Female Musicians Women who continue to influence the world of pop culture and inspire others this time we're looking at the band who seems to have landed here from some groovy.

colleen COSMO Murphy Jocelyn Gonzalez Kurt Andersen
"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"andersen" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"And that's it up sodas to three sixty. Our show is a production of PRI public radio international in association with slate. Our executive producer is Jocelyn Gonzales. Our senior editor is into Adam Newman. Our sound engineer, Santa Lopez of our producers are Evan Lauren Hanson, Sam, Kim Saunders, Tommy bizarre area. Our production assistant is Morgan Flannery, and I am Kurt Andersen, our baby boomers, a generation of sociopath. Thanks for listening. Our public radio international years ago, I was very famous actress. Next time on studio three sixty that gave me the experience to write this book about fame and why we seek it just seem Bateman on being in the side and outside the fame how out of control that seeking has become next time on studio, three sixty.

Evan Lauren Hanson Jocelyn Gonzales Kurt Andersen Morgan Flannery production assistant Adam Newman Kim Saunders senior editor Santa Lopez executive producer Bateman engineer Sam
"andersen" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"andersen" Discussed on Masters in Business

"That period let me ask you what killed arthur andersen arthur andersen killed arthur andersen and we should be very clear about that and one of the big goals that i am the book is to rehabilitate the prosecution of our three anderson because occasionally you do have to prosecute companies and put them out of business when they are rife with uh fraud when they are serial abusers of the laws the corporate laws as what anderson was now what happened with anderson is that they they destroyed documents in the enron will backup investigative forget that yeah they had gone through a series of snafus where as auditors they did a terrible job companies in their charge got away with lots of blood and they engaged in all these consent decrees where they said okay you're caught us we promised to do better this time we mean it were really not going to do much more fraud and then as soon as enron went down they began this a grass of policy of hey we haven't been subpoenaed yet shred everything exactly and as michael chertoff who was the head of the criminal division at the time says in my book this wasn't an ice cream company that was destroying documents this is a company that was up part of its business was legal advice for investigations in ceo arguably preserving duck and right at peens not destroying documents and not destroying evidence what they went on an orgy of tons and tons of document destruction email destruction as well and lil vape multiple cities not just one person so this was a kind of system wide thing then but to in the lead up to the crash the nasdaq crash there was a pandemic of accounting.

anderson fraud enron ceo arthur andersen arthur anderse arthur andersen michael chertoff nasdaq
"andersen" Discussed on Masters in Business

Masters in Business

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"andersen" Discussed on Masters in Business

"That period let me ask you what killed arthur andersen arthur andersen killed arthur andersen and we should be very clear about that and one of the big goals that i am the book is to rehabilitate the prosecution of our three anderson because occasionally you do have to prosecute companies and put them out of business when they are rife with uh fraud when they are serial abusers of the laws the corporate laws as what anderson was now what happened with anderson is that they they destroy documents in the enron will beca investigative forget that yeah they had gone through a series of snafus where as auditors they did a terrible job companies in their charge got away with lots of blood and they engaged in all these consent decrees where they said okay you caught us we promised to do better this time we mean it were really not going to do much more fraud and then as soon as enron went down they began this a grass of policy of hey we haven't been subpoenaed yet shred everything exactly and as michael chertoff who was the head of the criminal division at the time says in my book this wasn't an icecream company that was destroying documents this was a company that was up part of its business was legal advice for investigations end ceo arguably preserving duck and right and peens not destroying documents and not destroying evidence what a they went on an orgy of tons and tons of document destruction of email destruction will unveil vape multiple cities not just one person so this was a kind of systemwide thing been but too in the lead up to the crash the nasdaq crash there was a pandemic of accounting.

anderson fraud enron ceo arthur andersen arthur anderse arthur andersen michael chertoff nasdaq