12 Burst results for "Anders Olsen"

"anders olsen" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

04:06 min | Last month

"anders olsen" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"I was breathing through my mouth. I know that. Because i would always go to sleep with a glass of water about this big my bedside and wake up every couple hours and take a hit from it because my mouth is dry. So i wouldn't call myself a chronic mouth breather but i was doing quite a bit. Get into some of the specifics what it's like when you're breathing air through the nose. Why is that such an advantageous way breathing so the numbers imagine taking a billiard ball right and jamming that ball inside of your head. That's the equivalent space of all sinuses. Okay in the nose so this stuff. Isn't there randomly. It is served so many functions about thirty different functions when we take air in through the nose it has to go through this as of different structures right. These different structures are coated with mucus. Silia all this different stuff to help filter out pathogens help fight off viruses bacteria that is warmed. It's pressurize its condition. So that by the time it reaches the lungs are lungs can actually absorb about twenty percent more oxygen breathing through the nose than equivalent breath through the mouth. And if you think that's not gonna make a difference throughout the day or throughout the night. You're you're crazy you know so again. This is textbook stuff so talk about your personal experience saying you put the nose plugs in. What was that like awful. You know we knew this wasn't a picnic at the same time. We wanted to make clear that this wasn't like some jackass stunt. You know we weren't doing this just to unnecessarily inflict pain upon ourselves. We wanted to see what was like to be in that. Twenty five to fifty percent of the population that is habitually mouth breathing out the difference was we were measuring what happened so right off the bat it felt terrible i was like how are we gonna do this for ten days. We still kind of laughing about it was me and one other person. Amanda managed to sucker this guy. Anders olsen from sweden amrried. Therapist bake nasal breathing. Guy said you know..

Amanda Anders olsen ten days sweden amrried Twenty five one about twenty percent fifty percent couple hours thirty different
"anders olsen" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

06:46 min | 9 months ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Similar in in some cases to outside of Mount Kailash in bed I'm like, why do I feel different after this weird butter thing and eventually something came of it so You, you connected with the free divers. You saw superpowers in action. You saw lots of people and had some experiences sweating, and that drew you into this but I wanna talk about sinuses because you open your book with that and I have maybe never said this on the show I was three days away from scheduled sinus surgery when I figured out what to do on cleaning out my sinuses and avoiding the surgery I it was a book called Sinus survival but it wasn't about breathing through my nose and walk me through what you did. especially the measurements of the thickness of bone in your face to fix your sinuses before we can go into the rest of the breathing stuff you did. So I just WanNa be very clear. Some people absolutely need surgical interventions with their nose. They're completely messed up but from what I learned from the top researchers in the field is most of us don't. So when an an t says, okay, I've looked at scan you have a deviated Septum, we need to put you right into surgery right now seventy five percent of the modern population has a Septum that is clearly deviated to the naked eye. So you should maybe step back and try some less invasive techniques. That will be less profitable for for them, but but could save you from a from a lot of trouble. So I start working with the chief of Reynolds Research Stamford Guy named Dr Jack Nyack had several interviews. Stanford's pretty close to my house here in San Francisco. So who's down there we'd have these three hour lunches and he kept telling me about all of the wondrous things that the. Knows does. So it filters air humidifiers, air pressurized air, and it's really our first line of defense and he also told me something that was pretty shocking to me. Was that about twenty five to fifty percent of the population that's on the higher end, our chronic mouth readers. So we don't use our noses either because we can't because there are always plugged up or we just choose not to. So I asked him I said we know that there's so many problems associated with mouth breathing. I'm the science is very clear on that increased risk of respiratory infections crease risk of snoring sleep out the goes on changes the shape of your face if you do it too much and when you're young so no one's arguing that but nobody knew how quickly it came on and so I asked him I said, but one or two year at Stanford man what are tested and he didn't know how. So he didn't. Have money allocated. So I mentioned well, what of what of I get myself and one other person to do an experiment? He was all game for it. So we spent ten days with silicon up our noses to just be breathing through a mouse and the point of this wasn't to do sorta jackass super size me stunt it was just a low oursel- position that. So much of the population was already in. so much of the population mouth breathing different was we were calculating exactly what was happening to our bodies Every minute of every day, not every minute of it. Often three times a day we retrieve the amounts of data. Yeah. Crazy amounts so. That that was it. We knew it was gonNA suck No one was was kidding each other that this was gonna be a pleasant thing but we didn't know it was going to suck so so hard so quickly. So my blood pressure just within a few hours shot up about fifteen to twenty points just off the bat in the series stage to hypertension. So that was bad. Then I went to. Bed that night I started storing and I had not been snorted all few days. Later, I was snoring for about four hours throughout the night I had sleep apnea. We're totally stressed we can focus on anything. I mean our heart rate variability was just in a gutter. It was a complete disaster to the point that after about five days I looked at Anders Olsen, who was the other participant in the study. I don't know if I can do this for another five days, but but we did and it just got worse you know it got worse when I read that part of your book was like man, you just explained my childhood I grew up in a basement that a toxic mold. I had sinus infections every month for fifteen years I'd gone antibiotics for them which. God. But So I I remember also I would get these chronic nosebleeds must have been maybe ten and when I say chronic I mean every day my nose bleed and I became a little bit paranoid because you're like sitting in class and there's like blood coming out your nose it's just not cool so. I'm I just decided. I'm not gonNA blow my nose anymore as a child would do So I went for at least a month with a clogged sinuses but I didn't know what that was doing for my teeth and for my jaw and even for my brain, what happens to you when you do not breath your nose at all for a period of time like that just walk listeners through through that So when we're breathing through her mouth, you can think of the lungs as an External Oregon when we're mouth breathing so they're just exposed to everything in your environment. If you live in a city like I do that means pollution that means pollens if you're in an enclosed space with with black mold or other problems that means dust. So our noses have all these hairs and Sylvia and different structures to filter gunk out. That's what they do and by. Reading like that you get none of those benefits of filtration. So that's that's the first big problem. But what it does immediately is is mouth breathing. You're going to be breathing into the upper part of your chest, which is much less efficient, which means you need to take more breaths to get less oxygen. So your Your heart rate's GonNa go up. You'RE GONNA place yourself into a sympathetic state where you stress levels are gonna go up in all of this as a downstream effect on your ability to think on your ability to exercise on your ability to basically do anything because we take about twenty thousand to twenty, five, thousand breath every day on the upper end can take that many breasts today. And if you're taking those breads inadequately or inefficiently, it's going to catch up with you. The body will compensate for some of that time. Their bodies are really good at it. That doesn't mean we're healthy and after a while it's just gonNA break you down. So it's so many people have chronic. It's like twenty five percent of the population. So many people are out breathing. So many people have asthma that we've accepted this as completely normal and it's not in the science is very clear but damage this.

mouth breathing Mount Kailash Anders Olsen Reynolds Research Stamford respiratory infections San Francisco Stanford Oregon Dr Jack Nyack hypertension Sylvia
"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:09 min | 10 months ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With the outcome of the 2020 election, and the possible makeup of the Supreme Court could mean for LGBT rights in America. That's next time on the takeaway weekday afternoons at three on 93.9 FM. This is w N. Y. C. FM. HD and AM New York. Good morning, Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Camilla Hammers squared off in their first and only debate last night, Harris slammed the Trump administration's pandemic response. Has more than 210,000. Americans have died. And here's Pence. When you say with the American people have done over these last eight months hasn't worked. That's a great disservice. The sacrifices the American people. May I'm David First it's morning edition from NPR and W. When I see more than half of parents who are also teachers say they can't properly do their jobs from home while caring for their child. Former New York state Senate majority Leader Jo Bruno has died and there has been a surge in the number of whale sightings and the waters around New York City will hear more. It's Thursday, October. 8th news is next. Live from NPR News. I'm Korova Coleman, the independent commission that runs presidential debates, says it's proceeding with planning for the next debate between President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. This is set for October 15th and will now be a virtual town hall. President Trump is still recovering from covert 19 at the White House, and it's unclear how his health may affect this event. A Nobel Committee has awarded this year's prize in literature to American poet Louise Glick. Anders Olsen of the Nobel Committee says Glick has an unmistakable voice. It is candid And uncompromising. And it signals that this port wants to be understood. But it is also voice full of humor and biting wit. Glick is a former poet laureate of the United States. She's also received the Pulitzer Prize. Vice president Mike Pence, and California Senator Kamala Harris held their only debate of the election season last night in Salt Lake City. One major focus was the Corona virus and President Trump's response to the pandemic. NPR Sarah McCammon has more I asked what a potential Biden administration would do to push back the Corona virus pandemic. Democratic Senator Kamala Harris mostly focused on the performance of the Trump administration. Well, the American people have witnessed what is the greatest failure of any presidential administration in the history of our country. Vice President Mike Pence defended President Trump's response. And said victims of Cove in 19 are in his thoughts daily and in his prayers, But when you say with the American people have done over these last eight months hasn't worked. It's a great disservice. The sacrifices the American people have made more than 200,000 Americans have died from the virus, and the U. S. Has reported more cases than any other country. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Louisville Police have released a long awaited internal investigation. Into the shooting death of Briana Taylor. The report from the Kentucky Police Department raises fresh questions about how Louisville officers obtain the search warrant that brought them to her door. Officers killed Taylor and one officer was wounded from member station W F P L. Eleanor Klibanoff reports in applying for the search warrant. Louisville Detective Joshua Jane's said Taylor's ex boyfriend, the target of their narcotics investigation was receiving packages at her apartment. Jane's, told a judge he had verified that with a U. S postal inspector, but this new report shows that wasn't true. The neighboring shy VLY Police department asked the postal inspector who said there'd been no packages shyly. Sergeant Tim Sawyer told investigators he passed that message onto Jane's not but no boxes. That address is flagged and will notify our postal inspector when one goes there. Not one there months. The FBI is currently investigating how and why Louisville police obtained that warrant. For NPR news. I'm Eleanor Klibanoff in Louisville. This is NPR. And this is WNBC in New York, four minutes after eight o'clock. Good morning. I'm David 1st 55 degrees now in New York City, going up to 65 this afternoon. New York City officials say they will start enforcing the state's new covert 19 restrictions in some hot spot zones. Today, non essential businesses in parts of Brooklyn and Queens will be shut large public gatherings will be barred in schools in some areas will go to remote learning. Mayor de Blasio says is a chance to prevent a larger resurgence of the virus. The next few weeks are going to critical. We have the opportunity here to keep this outbreak small to address it to stop it to turn it around. It's up to all of us. The closures will last a minimum of 14 days. The city has a lookup tool on their website to help residents determine if they live or work in one of the affected zones. Members of the local Orthodox Jewish community gathered in Brooklyn for the second night in a row to protest renewed restrictions imposed on neighborhoods with spiking infection rates. Gotham ists, Jake often Hearts reports. Violence erupted in Borough Park for the second straight night on Wednesday, as hundreds of demonstrators gathered to denounce the lock down measures at around 10. PM an angry mob was surrounded a Jewish journalist, pinning him against a wall and kicking him while accusing him of snitching on the community. Police eventually escorted the man from the scene. But the crowd continued to seek out new targets, including an ABC News reporter. Shortly after the NYPD retreated from the rally, claiming they couldn't control the group. Members of the community say they'll continue demonstrating until the restrictions are lifted. The deadline for New Yorkers to register to vote in November's election..

President Trump New York City Vice President Mike Pence NPR Senator Kamala Harris Trump administration Louisville NPR News Briana Taylor Louise Glick Sarah McCammon Joe Biden L. Eleanor Klibanoff Brooklyn Louisville Police New York Joshua Jane Pulitzer Prize Nobel Committee
The 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature goes to American poet Louise Glück “for her unmistakable poetic voice"

Morning Edition

00:28 sec | 10 months ago

The 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature goes to American poet Louise Glück “for her unmistakable poetic voice"

"Awarded this year's prize in literature to American poet Louise Glick. Anders Olsen of the Nobel Committee says Glick has an unmistakable voice. It is candid And uncompromising. And it signals that this port wants to be understood. But it is also voice full of humor and biting wit. Glick is a former poet laureate of the United States. She's also received the Pulitzer Prize. Vice president

Louise Glick Pulitzer Prize Anders Olsen Vice President Nobel Committee United States
"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:01 min | 10 months ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Francisco and North Highland, Sacramento at five o'clock, Good morning vice president. Pence defended the administration's approach to the pandemic, Senator Kamala Harris says whatever they tried, it hasn't worked The vice presidential debate in this hour of morning edition from NPR news. Coming up. Head of the candidates come across to some voters. I'm no well, King and I'm Steve Inskeep. And how's the debate rated by their political supporters? We hear this hour from representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York. Also, Donald Trump is not the first president to obscure information about his health. One president at surgery on a boat And another hit out after a stroke. And how do teachers teach when they have their own kids at home? It's Thursday, October 8th con the mayor of London is 50 thie news is next. Fly from NPR News. I'm Korova Coleman, the independent commission that runs presidential debates, says it's proceeding with planning for the next debate between President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. It's a set for October 15th and will now be a virtual town hall. President. Trump is still recovering from covert 19 at the White House, and it's unclear how his health may affect this event. The Nobel Committee has awarded this year's prize in literature to American poet Louise Glick. Anders Olsen of the Nobel Committee says Glick has an unmistakable voice. It is candid And uncompromising. And it signals that this port wants to be understood. But it is also voice full of humor and biting wit. Glick is a former poet laureate of the United States. She has also received the Pulitzer Prize. Vice president Mike Pence, and California Senator Kamala Harris held their only debate of the election season last night in Salt Lake City. One major focus was the Corona virus and President Trump's response to the pandemic. NPR Sarah McCammon has more I asked what a potential Biden administration would do to push back the Corona virus pandemic. Democratic Senator Kamala Harris mostly focused on the performance of the Trump administration. Well, the American people have witnessed what is the greatest failure of any presidential administration in history of our country. Vice President Mike Pence defended President Trump's response. And said victims of Cove in 19 are in his thoughts daily and in his prayers, But when you say with the American people have done over these last eight months hasn't worked. It's a great disservice. The sacrifices the American people have made more than 200,000 Americans have died from the virus, and the U. S. Has reported more cases than any other country. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Louisville Police have released a long awaited internal investigation into the shooting death of Briana Taylor. A report from the Kentucky Police Department raises fresh questions about how Louisville officers obtain the search warrant that brought them to her door. Officers killed Taylor and one officer was wounded. Remember station WFP, Oh, Eleanor Klibanoff reports in applying for the search warrant. Louisville Detective Joshua Jane's said Taylor's ex boyfriend, the target of their narcotics investigation was receiving packages at her apartment. Jane's, told a judge he had verified that with a U. S postal inspector, but this new report shows that wasn't true. The neighboring shy VLY Police department asked the postal inspector who said there'd been no packages shyly. Sergeant Tim Sawyer told investigators he pass that message on to Jane's not put no boxes. That address is flagged and will notify our postal inspector when one goes there. Not one there months. The FBI is currently investigating how and why Louisville police obtained that warrant. For NPR news. I'm Eleanor Klibanoff in.

President Trump Senator Kamala Harris president NPR News Vice president Mike Pence Louise Glick vice president Louisville Police Briana Taylor Louisville Sarah McCammon Joe Biden Eleanor Klibanoff NPR Joshua Jane Nobel Committee Hakeem Jeffries
"anders olsen" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:36 min | 10 months ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on KCRW

"The candidates come across to some voters? I'm no well, King and I'm Steve Inskeep. And how's the debate rated by their political supporters? We hear this hour from representative Hakeem Jeffries of New York. Also, Donald Trump is not the first president to obscure information about his health. One president had surgery on a boat and another hit out after a stroke. And how do teachers teach when they have their own kids at home? It's Thursday, October 8th Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London is 50 Thie news is next. Line from NPR News. I'm Korova Coleman, the independent commission that runs presidential debates, says it's proceeding with planning for the next debate between President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden. This is set for October 15th and will now be a virtual town hall. President Trump is still recovering from covert 19 at the White House, and it's unclear how his health may affect this event. A Nobel Committee has awarded this year's prize in literature to American poet Louise Glick. Anders Olsen of the Nobel Committee says Glick has an unmistakable voice. It is candid And uncompromising. And it signals that this port wants to be understood. But it is also voice full of humor and biting wit. Glick is a former poet laureate of the United States. She's also received the Pulitzer Prize. Vice president Mike Pence, and California Senator Kamala Harris held their only debate in the election season last night in Salt Lake City. One major focus was the Corona virus and President Trump's response to the pandemic. NPR Sarah McCammon has more I asked what a potential Biden administration would do to push back the Corona virus pandemic. Democratic Senator Kamala Harris mostly focused on the performance of the Trump administration. Well, the American people have witnessed what is the greatest failure of any presidential administration in the history of our country. Vice President Mike Pence defended President Trump's response. And said victims of Cove in 19 are in his thoughts daily and in his prayers, But when you say with the American people have done over these last eight months hasn't worked. It's a great disservice. The sacrifices the American people have made more than 200,000 Americans have died from the virus, and the U. S. Has reported more cases than any other country. Sarah McCammon NPR NEWS Louisville Police have released a long awaited internal investigation. Into the shooting death of Briana Taylor. The report from the Kentucky Police Department raises fresh questions about how Louisville officers obtain the search warrant that brought them to her door. Officers killed Taylor and one officer was wounded from member station W F P L. Eleanor Klibanoff reports in applying for the search warrant. Louisville Detective Joshua Jane's said Taylor's ex boyfriend, the target of their narcotics investigation was receiving packages at her apartment. Jane's, told a judge he had verified that with a U. S postal inspector, but this new report shows that wasn't true. The neighboring shy VLY Police department asked the postal inspector who said there'd been no packages shyly. Sergeant Tim Sawyer told investigators he pass that message on to Jane's not but no boxes that addresses flayed and will notify our postal inspector when one goes there. Not one there months. The FBI is currently investigating how and why Louisville police obtained that warrant. For NPR news. I'm Eleanor Klibanoff in Louisville..

President Trump Louise Glick Vice president Senator Kamala Harris NPR News president Louisville Police Louisville Mike Pence Sarah McCammon Joe Biden Briana Taylor Hakeem Jeffries Nobel Committee Joshua Jane NPR L. Eleanor Klibanoff Pulitzer Prize Steve Inskeep
"anders olsen" Discussed on Good Life Project

Good Life Project

07:30 min | 1 year ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on Good Life Project

"Says that we are chronic mouth breather so so half of US breathing from the mouth so so the experiment was set up to see what was happening to a large percentage of the population every day. What was happening to their minds bodies and I looked for some research on this. If anyone had done this and they're just there wasn't a lot so I had been in conversations with the chief of Rhino Research at Stanford and about by our third interview starting to get pretty chummy with the is nameless Giac guard nyack great dude and I I patched idea. I've said well you know we can sit here over lunch and talk about the stuff hypothetically or or we can test it. What do you think? And he said yes so me and one other one other guy. Anders Olsen who is a world renowned breeding coach and therapist? So I thought Oh this is going to be interesting. Well if we took one of the best breeders in the world and made him like fifty percent of the population what would happen to his body so over ten days they plugged our noses with us. Silicon with tape over that so that we were forced to breathe only to our mouths were forced to breathe the way we would likely be breathing in the future. The way large swath of the population is already breathing. So within a single night My snoring increased by thirteen hundred percent We felt awful. We fell constantly thirsty. We felt fatigued. There were psychological markers but what I found what was more interesting was what was actually the data. What was happening to our bodies so we took pulmonary function tests before blood were cats. I mean anything you can imagine seventy different markers and by the end of those ten days. I was snoring and hadn't been snoring before the other subject snoring through half the night we had sleep apnea. We felt absolutely awful. Our bodies were cooling. We were losing a to which is essential molecule in the body It was it was horrendous. It was as awful as probably sounds but The good part about this as we were then able to switch our modes after ten days so they move those those plugs out and we put tape over our lips and we just breathed from our noses and the first night all the snoring disappeared sleep apnea disappeared. Every heart rate variability went through the roof. We're able to exercise much more efficiently We had more more power longer endurance. Easier recovery. I mean I could go on and on. I won't give you the whole the whole layout but it just echoed. What what the Chinese had been saying for thousands of years in one one quote that I thought was great was on this is from the Dow Says the breath inhaled through the mouth is called NICI or adverse breath which is extremely harmful? Be careful not to have breath inhaled from the mouth. That was twelve hundred years ago so everything that that we found added credence to that. It seems so obvious but you look at any other animal fifty four hundred different mammals. They're not brought mouth breathing unless they're throwing off heat their thermal regulating their breathing through their noses. All the time and humans should be doing this as well. It changes your your mental state and Your physiology it also really interesting numbers around performance you know in terms of just the difference between breathing through your nose versus your mouth. Yeah and and trainers had been looking at this in researching this for years about twenty years ago. Dr John Do Yard had bicyclists get on a stationary bike and then train by just breathing through the mouth and just breathing through their nose in. He found that someone who had been breathing. Forty Seven Times. A minute through the mouth was breeding fourteen times through the nose but the same amount of oxygen and was able to push so much harder with less effort so the competitive advantage is huge. You know double. Digit percentage advantage to doing this. And it's something that is just mostly loss on us because a large percentage of the population. I would beg to say half of it or more has problems breathing through their nose. We've we've lost this ability on some of its due to evolution in some of its due to the environment but I think one of the most important health hacks that everyone should do. All the time is breathe through your nose. Science certainly backs that up and it sounds like it's all there's a use it or lose it affect to that too so it's you may have trouble starting to get back into it because especially if you're one of that fifty percents that you know brees predominantly through your mouth because it kind of gets plugged up when you don't use it. It's you know. It's like almost like a muscle atrophying. It's at the tissue inflaming. It makes it harder do but then as you slowly reintroduce it it begins to open up and you may find yourself able to do it. In a way that you thought was wouldn't be possible with exactly right at a doctor. Another doctor at Stanford had looked at the noses of patients who had learned jammies who had a hole drilled in their throat so they could breathe out that that channel and she found that their noses within two months to two years had completely plugged up one hundred percent because they weren't used and she fixed her herself her own chronic mouth breathing by training herself to breathe through her nose all the time. And the more you do it the more you're going to be able to do it because you are changing your physiology. You're changing your your anatomy year strengthening the soft tissues on the back of the mouth and widening your airways by just breathing through your nose because of the pressure you know in in a lot of people are are hesitant to do this because they say oh. I. Don't get enough oxygen breathing through my nose while you're going to get about twenty percent more oxygen breathing through knows than through your mouth. So which is what makes it especially effective for exercising yet. Something I think it just pattern to experience breath feeling a certain way and it takes a little while sort of for brains to be like. Oh this is as it's going to be okay as a little uncomfortable and beginning much me. Okay but your body wants to. It really wants you to break through that. That's the thing this is it. Shouldn't it might feel a little force at the beginning but it will be rewarding you ten times over if you start breathing through the nose for one of the other things that you explored was the effect of different breathing patterns and you mentioned earlier even before you got into this you were having all these conversations with the three diving crew about these mythical and mystical stories about people throwing heat off their body in the cold and healing everything. And how could that even be possible? And it's funny you you you reference Herbert Benson. Who wrote a book? It's gotTa be thirty five forty years ago now about the relaxation response. I reference these monks. Who Part of their their right of passage was to sit outside. You know in Subzero temperatures covered in wet shawls and they would do a type of breathing and meditation where there were not just not die but they would literally dry shawls you would see them steaming off them and I remember reading that years ago and being has needed and researching and discovering this.

mouth breathing Stanford US Anders Olsen Rhino Research Dr John Do Yard Herbert Benson Giac Seven Times NICI brees
"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From npr news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm mary louise kelley the nobel prize in literature will not be given out this year the swedish academy was thrown into turmoil last fall when sexual harassment allegations surfaced against the husband of one of its members the academy says it will postpone the award until next year man next year it's going to give out to npr brooks editor petro mayor has been following the story this isn't the first time that the academy has declined to give out a literature prize but it is the first time since world war two the academy has been embroiled in a really complicated longsimmering scandal allegations surfaced in swedish papers last fall that a prominent man later revealed to be the husband of an academy member had assaulted or harassed at least eighteen women over the past two decades including apparently sweden's crown princess victoria the man also reportedly leaked the names of several prize finalists three academy members resigned last month to protest their organizations handling of the allegations and not long afterward the head of the academy was forced to step down leaving too few members and too much bad press to decide on a prize winner this year in a statement posted this morning acting permanent secretary anders olsen said the decision was arrived at quote in view of the currently diminished academy and the reduced public confidence in the academy lars higgins stain the executive director of the overall nobel foundation he says it's imperative that the academy restore public trust and today's announcement was a step in the right direction demos say that they take the it gives them time to start with the changes necessary take insane says it's up to the academy to make things right but he would like to see a younger more diverse membership i think many in the industry feel that this two thousand eighteen pauses appropriate that's paul bogart's he's the head of pr for cannot doubleday which published last year's winner couso ishiguro as well as past winners including alice munro and orhan pamuk the nobel is a big sales boost for whoever wins especially if they've got a nice fat.

orhan pamuk nobel lars higgins anders olsen permanent secretary petro editor brooks harassment npr audie cornish alice munro couso ishiguro paul bogart executive director sweden nobel prize mary louise kelley two decades
"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Activity learn more at mozilla dot org from npr news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm mary louise kelley the nobel prize in literature will not be given out this year the swedish academy was thrown into turmoil last fall when sexual harassment allegations surfaced against the husband of one of its members the academy says it will postpone the award until next year man next year it's going to give out to and books editor petro mayor has been following the story this isn't the first time that the academy has declined to give out a literature prize but it is the first time since world war two the academy has been embroiled in a really complicated longsimmering scandal allegations surfaced in swedish papers last fall that a prominent man later revealed to be the husband of an academy member had assaulted or harassed at least eighteen women over the past two decades including apparently sweden's crown princess victoria the man also reportedly leaked the names of several prize finalists three academy members resigned last month to protest their organizations handling of the allegations and not long afterward the head of the academy was forced to step down leaving too few members and too much bad press to decide on a prize winner this year in a statement posted this morning acting permanent secretary anders olsen said the decision was arrived at quote in view of the currently diminished academy and the reduced public confidence in the academy lars hakin stain is the executive director of the overall nobel foundation he says it's impera that the academy restore public trust and today's announcement was a step in the right direction demo sake that they take the year it gives them time to start with the changes necessary taken stain says it's up to the academy to make things right but he would like to see a younger more diverse membership i think many in the industry feel that this two thousand eighteen pauses appropriate that's paul bogart's he's the head of pr for connotes doubleday which published last year's winner couso ishiguro as well as past winners including alice munro orhan pamuk the nobel is a big sales boost for whoever wins especially if they've got a nice fat back catalogue that.

audie cornish mary louise kelley nobel prize sweden executive director paul bogart couso ishiguro npr harassment editor petro permanent secretary anders olsen nobel doubleday two decades
"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At mozilla dot org from npr news this is all things considered i'm audie cornish and i'm mary louise kelley the nobel prize in literature will not be given out this year the swedish academy was thrown into turmoil last fall when sexual harassment allegations surfaced against the husband of one of its members the academy says it will postpone the award until next year man next year it's going to give out to npr brooks editor petro mayor has been following the story this isn't the first time that the academy has declined to give out a literature prize but it is the first time since world war two the academy has been embroiled in a really complicated longsimmering scandal allegations surfaced in swedish papers last fall that a prominent man later revealed to be the husband of an academy member had assaulted or harassed at least eighteen women over the past two decades including apparently sweden's crown princess victoria the man also reportedly leaked the names of several prize finalists three academy members resigned last month to protest their organizations hand feeling of the allegations and not long afterward the head of the academy was forced to step down leaving too few members and too much bad press to decide on a prize winner this year in a statement posted this morning acting permanent secretary anders olsen said the decision was arrived at quote in view of the currently diminished academy and the reduced public confidence in the academy lars hakin stain is the executive director of the overall nobel foundation he says it's imperative that the academy restore public trust and today's announcement was a step in the right direction moines say that they take seriously it gives them time because start with the changes necessary hey can stain says it's up to the academy to make things right but he would like to see a younger more diverse membership i think many in the industry feel that this two thousand eighteen points is appropriate that's paul bogart's he's the head of pr for canals doubleday which published last year's winner couso ishiguro as well as past winners including alice munro and orhan pamuk the nobel is a big sales boost for whoever wins especially if they've got a nice fat back catalogue that.

alice munro nobel anders olsen permanent secretary petro editor brooks harassment npr orhan pamuk audie cornish couso ishiguro paul bogart moines executive director sweden nobel prize mary louise kelley two decades
"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"anders olsen" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Challenging president adwan in turkey and the campaign to put new zealand back on the map literally all of that after the knees hello i'm julie candler with the bbc news the palestinian president mahmoud abbas has apologized after he was accused of making anti semitic remarks in a speech earlier this week had suggested that historic persecution of jews was caused by their conduct not their religion from jerusalem yellen now reports in a long rambling addressed hundreds of palestinian officials on monday the eighty two year old leader asked why over the centuries there had been massacres of jews in europe he then quoted books which he said showed these were caused not by hatred of their religion but by their involvement in banking and money lending israeli officials accused him of grave antisemitism and holocaust denial and international criticism followed in a statement mr bass now says he's sorry to those offended condemns antisemitism and calls the holocaust the most heinous crime in history the nobel prize for literature will not be awarded this year after the organization that selects the recipient got embroiled in a sex scandal the sweet shikata me has been in turmoil over its handling of allegations by eighteen women that they were sexually assaulted by the husband of a board member who ran a project with funding from the academy speaking to reporters one member of the academy the writer anders olsen explained the reasons behind the decision dumpsters for a into dealer we have decided not to wooded price this year and we did that after long and intense discussions we reached the conclusion that the confidence in the academy so low in your world at the moment and that is the deciding reason why we now refrained from awarding the price the chinese president xi jinping has marked the two hundred aniversary of the birth of karl marx praising the communist philosopher has the greatest thinker of modern times mr she urged china's ruling communist party to go back to the roots of marxism mean it was totally correct for history and the people to choose marxism combining the basic principles of marxism with a concrete reality of china and unceasingly promoting the significance and modernization of marxism is totally correct communist party members need to adopt the reading of marxist works and the understanding of marxist theories as a way of life and as a spiritual pursuit jeanjean turkey's main opposition party the.

julie candler mahmoud abbas europe mr bass nobel prize xi jinping karl marx china communist party president bbc writer anders olsen chinese eighty two year
Palestinian president apologizes over anti-Semitic remarks

02:29 min | 3 years ago

Palestinian president apologizes over anti-Semitic remarks

"Challenging president adwan in turkey and the campaign to put new zealand back on the map literally all of that after the knees hello i'm julie candler with the bbc news the palestinian president mahmoud abbas has apologized after he was accused of making anti semitic remarks in a speech earlier this week had suggested that historic persecution of jews was caused by their conduct not their religion from jerusalem yellen now reports in a long rambling addressed hundreds of palestinian officials on monday the eighty two year old leader asked why over the centuries there had been massacres of jews in europe he then quoted books which he said showed these were caused not by hatred of their religion but by their involvement in banking and money lending israeli officials accused him of grave antisemitism and holocaust denial and international criticism followed in a statement mr bass now says he's sorry to those offended condemns antisemitism and calls the holocaust the most heinous crime in history the nobel prize for literature will not be awarded this year after the organization that selects the recipient got embroiled in a sex scandal the sweet shikata me has been in turmoil over its handling of allegations by eighteen women that they were sexually assaulted by the husband of a board member who ran a project with funding from the academy speaking to reporters one member of the academy the writer anders olsen explained the reasons behind the decision dumpsters for a into dealer we have decided not to wooded price this year and we did that after long and intense discussions we reached the conclusion that the confidence in the academy so low in your world at the moment and that is the deciding reason why we now refrained from awarding the price the chinese president xi jinping has marked the two hundred aniversary of the birth of karl marx praising the communist philosopher has the greatest thinker of modern times mr she urged china's ruling communist party to go back to the roots of marxism mean it was totally correct for history and the people to choose marxism combining the basic principles of marxism with a concrete reality of china and unceasingly promoting the significance and modernization of marxism is totally correct communist party members need to adopt the reading of marxist works and the understanding of marxist theories as a way of life and as a spiritual pursuit jeanjean turkey's main opposition party the.

Julie Candler Mahmoud Abbas Europe Mr Bass Nobel Prize Xi Jinping Karl Marx China Communist Party President Trump BBC Writer Anders Olsen Chinese Eighty Two Year