30 Burst results for "Ancient Greece"

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

06:11 min | Last week

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"I don't know my Approach is, I just kind of take some time and do something different. I hit massive massive wall. Like I said last not this past winter, but the winter before and I basically didn't do anything for several months. Like I had so much stuff done in advance that I was able to do that but basically for several months, I just played Assassin's Creed Odyssey song. And it kind of just like refreshed my brain in a sense. Obviously. I worked to my day job like I didn't just stay at home and play video games all day, but like I don't need something different and but it was like it wasn't completely different. Like I was playing a video game set in ancient Greece and then I got like super excited about. Oh shoot. Okay, it's Jim to like jump back on the wagon and start doing more episodes in the peloponnese and start doing the Peloponnesian War episode sort of thing. So I kind of got out of the rut by doing something different but I was at least kind of tangentially still there if that makes any sense. So that's kind of what I did the first time I had when I like stopped doing narrative episodes and I did guest episode I started doing some guests episodes and then when I hit another ride my second one, I took off the podcast and I focused on some stuff in my life and I started playing the Assassin's Creed game and I kind of just, you know did something else for a little while? Oh, yeah that that's really good advice. Yeah. Yep. Play save myself. That's how I keep myself. You're hooked on history for sure. That's a have you played. I've never played that but I've actually haven't played Assassin's Creed Odyssey was the first PlayStation PlayStation in general definitely was the first PlayStation 4 game. But the first PlayStation game in general. I played in almost a decade. Like I stopped playing video games when I was in college cuz I lost track of time. Like I just was not able to I was just so busy and then I just kind of never I think PS2 was where I stopped off but then was like all this game looks so awesome. So I'm like, I think it was like Black Friday of 2018 or whatever. I like went out Baird the crowds and got myself a cheap PS4 and then I played Origins as well. I got really really addicted. Yeah got really addictive Odyssey that cuz then I want to play Origins as well. So For the podcast. I'm wondering like where should we start? You know, you mentioned that you're really into the origin the origin of things. So should we start chronologically or should we follow a theme so you can do both so there are it.

Baird Greece Jim
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:16 min | Last week

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"I like learning about those gee whiz type of information that just aren't necessarily necessary. And so like if when if I'm going to put all that effort and in time and putting this month project together, then I'm definitely going to do something that is a representative of me like again, this was an outlet for my passion. I'm not I never started this to get rich off of podcasting. I'm doing it became I love the material and I was studying it on my own I even used to edit Wikipedia articles. I was doing stuff on my own. I was like, well, I'll just turn into a podcast if people listened they listened if they don't don't smoke and I kind of I think that's think that's good advice to give to people like if you're going to start something like obviously you want to know what your listeners are and kind of you want to improve your craft, but you don't want to like change it so much that it's it's not you and it keeps fake that makes sense. Yeah. I totally understand that. Do you still edit Wikipedia articles? I don't have the time as much. Yeah. I took the time near as much sometimes every now and then I'll Wikipedia is is come a long way in the last decade. When when I started it's a very good resource now for bibliography I go there all the time for when I'm like, oh I'm doing a 4 episode series ended on a 4 episode series and like woman's life in ancient Greece and I was just like, okay. I have one book on this like what other books should I go and check out page? How you go there and you're like, oh, this is the resources at bottom of the page. They'll page like women in ancient Greece and I'm like, oh, okay. Well, let me see what books these are recommended and see if my library has them or that I can buy off Amazon that are less than like fifty bucks because you know, I wouldn't I'm not going to pay a whole lot of books. It's a great resource aggregator. Yeah, for sure. So, every now and then I'll be like I don't do it as much with my my narrative episodes but every now and then I will do a topic and I for example when I was doing like mathematics it was doing some research and I was like, oh the Wikipedia page for mathematics is very light and I'll just throw some stuff in there, but I don't put near as much effort into it as I used to because I used to do it a lot. That was like kind of my thing for my 2011 to like mm..

Greece representative Amazon
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:05 min | Last week

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"There's like really very little quote unquote fax. It's about how you interpret evidence that if you presented it in a court of law, it would not hold up to convict somebody in a criminal case. It would be very circumstantial at best. So with those caveats to get back your original question, there's very little evidence outside of Plutarch for that and most of the scholars Thursday. Spoken to recently really don't think that was the thing in Sparta. There doesn't seem to be much archaeological evidence for it. You would think if they did that and they throw it off Mount I get test there would be bones found like graveyards of dead deformed babies. Yeah. It seems to be more of a myth more than anything. Do you have an opinion of why this idea keeps getting perpetuated? So I'm funny enough Model S. Not funny enough, but coincidentally, I actually just do the guest interview for my podcast about disability in the ancient world and a lot of it with the doctor Debbie Snead and we talked a little bit. We I just did this yesterday. It hasn't published it but I talked about the very introspective we so your listeners can look for it in the future. But a lot of that has to do with like this modern mentality that disabled people with congenital defects or six people are born or or lesser beans that are that should be discarded or they should be made whole in some way or try to be made whole through Prosthetics or surgery. It was very interesting conversation. It made me think of oh, okay. So she's like a lot of that was like looking back on it. The historiography was influenced by our biases in the last several hundred years that oh, of course, they got rid of these people. They wouldn't they have thought. Been any value in to the society, which is absolutely not true. We we see disabled people all throughout Spartan history. They had a king that was static left foot like they had a disabled God Festus. So it's just like the Smith that's you know, perpetrating our modern biases. And again, I like to foot stomp. Like I'm sure you've had classes with in history. There's really no such thing as objective history. As long as people like to say everything is historiography is colored by our own biases some more than others obviously, but yeah, like your worldview definitely influences the way you you see things you interpret evidence and that's why it's always good to have multiple perspectives that different genders ethnicities just people different sets of eyes that live different lives to look at things differently than you would because everybody has a bias based on how they've experienced the world. Let's go back to your podcast the history of the ancient Greece podcast. What was the Turning Point Thursday? Made you decide to start the podcast. So I was pretty familiar with podcasts growing up..

Debbie Snead Prosthetics or surgery Sparta Greece Mount I Smith
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

02:45 min | Last week

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Hello and welcome back to this week's episode of amped-up radio where I'm joined by Ryan stick creator of the history of ancient Greece podcast off. I'm so excited to have you here with us today Ryan and learn about you and your show. Thank you so much for having me. I'm glad you reached out. This is I'm excited that there are younger enthusiasm enthusiastic historians getting into the podcasting game. Well, I heard that you originally back in college you weren't you didn't sneak off as a Classics major you were a chem major? Yes. That's true. I I was the first person my family to go college. I had no idea really why I wanted to do. I was just good at chemistry. So I started out doing that many really like it per se long story short. I went through a a Winding Road of different topics that I am I actually was planning on going to law school at one point and then I ended up falling into Classics when I got into well for a few reasons. I came across 300 the movie. Led me to take watch take a Greek history course. I started taking Latin cuz when I cuz it was like, oh pre-med pre-law sort of thing. I was like, oh Latin would be useful. It just kind of a perfect storm came about and I was actually like wasn't sure what I was going to do. I was like, oh pre-law or grad school, and then I studied abroad in Greece and Rome for a year, and that was my senior year and that basically still had that I want to go grad school and then when I got to grad school, I realized there weren't that many jobs. So I ended up. Unfortunately. I had I took some time off for some personal reasons and then just decided not to go back and then eventually I start the podcast as a way to keep my love of the ancient world going so and with an alternate careers or so just now you mentioned you studied abroad both in Rome and in Greece. So, how do you end up settling for ancient Greece and not sure? Room so it's a complicated story. I guess grease was always my favorite. I think it had more to do with that was the first one that I really fell in love with and bought. It just seemed more foreign to me. It was different to me. It was more exciting. I guess to me like the Romans. I like Roman Republic in history. Not the Empire. Yeah, not the Empire so much. I'm I've always been someone who's like a big fan of like the origins of things. So I guess that's kind of what I mean..

Greece Ryan stick Rome
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

06:32 min | 2 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"That's why the halkidiki they went North and colonized halkidiki named after the city state office. I mean you have other city-states that that also had colonies as well Melita wage. A lot of colonizing in the Black Sea the Athenians not so much the Spartans not so much. They had a few often ones but it seemed to be the events Corinth and Meletis were the big ones off with a few others spread around here. They're right and those would be the primary traders in the arcade. And I mean, we just it's just funny how a lot of the young players still just got didn't have them kind of confused. You know, they didn't realize that this was this whole this whole thing called Grease, you know, cuz like we say the Greeks aren't United but they still had the Olympics every year every four years I'd say so they were a culture but just seems that like the Assyrians especially because they're the ones who kept records They there's no rec. There's not one reference to the Greeks in the letter archive that they found in about mostly I mean for my understanding there was most of the interaction came between between Greek and Assyria would have came through Thursday. Egyptian lydian, there was a buffer there there wasn't it until a little bit later in the Archaic Period that the Assyrians really became I mean you had one month when they penetrated Egypt and helped Greek mercenaries helped overthrow the Assyrian yoke with Egypt and established. She was the Pharaohs name. That was Nick. Oh, yeah, it would go. So matticus was the worst Vegas and yeah, same Tech. However, you want to call them. Oh, yeah you pronounce Medicus. Well, he is dead. Yeah until I think that's in like the flight five or early five hundreds right in that. So it was when they started then they started the Greek started moving him and guide just brought in the song carry ins and then with Greeks and into, you know, Egypt to help you guy to help some Atticus like store up his there was twelve other kinglets. He's not dead. Egypt that he had actually beat I mean that's when most of the was it the 7th century and in the sixth century is where you get a huge flowering of cultural interaction between grace and the East you.

Egypt Atticus Meletis Archaic Period Spartans Olympics Assyria matticus Nick Vegas
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"They had similar religion and Customs slightly different for all intents and purposes. They were part of the Greek world just on the periphery the whole world, right? So there I mean they were trying to think a lot with the cretans are obviously we have been trading with Egypt for a long time now and I had believed as far back as the Middle Kingdom might have been earlier but I definitely know as early as the Middle Kingdom. They were the Minoans had penetrated the the Delta and trade it with the the Egyptians right Middle Kingdom being like 1800. So we're talking about the second millennium BC. That's a long time ago. Maybe it's two thousand maybe two thousand BC. Yeah mm you back there. Yeah. It's been a while. I might have met someone. Okay number on but yeah get a get a pass on the we're far away dates, but there was this really cool. I was when was doing the research, I found this about shipwreck in that they found dead. Aventine Coast from 1305 BC and they believe it was carrying Mycenaean Diplomat Mycenaean diplomatic Mission and then it did have all the other trade goods from the rest of the Bronze Age culture saw the copper and tin and you know a little bit of everyone. Yes. Yeah. So it looks like they think you know felt that there's were Greeks, you know Mycenaeans that were on a diplomatic Mission down there on a diplomatic Mission then they must have been you know in the in in the near East are aware of these people. Anyway, even if they weren't from a whole United Kingdom and yet I mean that's a one of the fascinating archeological discoveries cuz it goes to show like the extent of the eastern central Mediterranean Trade Network at that time. Cuz there were they were just Goods found from all over the place, right Jim Goods near Eastern Goods ten copper copper from Cypress ten as far ten as far away from I think Spain and at that point Mycenaeans had a dog The Minoans had a pretty decent Trade Network to in the Mycenaeans kind of just whenever they took over they kind of commandeered it so to speak and you know, and that's part of the whole wrap up into the Bronze Age collapse is like you.

Mycenaean Diplomat Mycenaean d Middle Kingdom Mycenaeans Eastern Goods Mediterranean Trade Network Jim Goods United Kingdom Aventine Coast Egypt Spain
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

04:28 min | 2 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"That there is something I've read Eric lines 1177 book. I know there are other people who disagree with him. But yeah, it's she don't take it completely as fact. I just usually get I will in my podcast episodes I'll give both I'll give a dissenting opinions and approving opinions and I'll kind of just be like, I think it might be the former latter and then move on right? Yeah. Yep. I'm sorry. What was that? I said at least I do that now early on in the podcast. I was pretty much just like kind of picking and choosing what I thought was appropriate and just yeah with it now. I'm a little bit off more like into the both sides of the status and talking about in digging deeper. As long as you don't get into the these people think there was an Atlantis and all that and then everybody knows that's what drives me crazy that kind of stuff. I mentioned that briefly when it came to creat how the earthquake or I'm sorry the volcano in Santorini. One of the theories is that may have led to the story of Atlantis, but pretty much most of Atlantis is just an allegory that you see in Play-Doh and you shouldn't be taken seriously, you know, but I know I know I would just need like a tourist guide for when you go to like Santorini or Creed to go and you say you get to say read the Lost Island of Atlantis. Yeah and by suck. Indice and buy some merchandise and go check out the volcano and all the litter in it. Yeah, you can swim out and see the volcano when I was there smoking still active. Yeah, it's cool though. So, yeah, so this out he Allah story is you know, kind of like maybe it's funny because because then they're talking about the colony of malicious, right? And then that's that's a colony. There's this obvious cause get in trouble. There's always some kind of problem with my latest. So it seems like medicine the hittite record. I believe it was off of Wanda if I remembering that correctly could be I'm not my.

Wanda Eric Indice Lost Island
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Join us for a journey as we go back to the great civilizations of the past who are the people what were they? Like? How did they begin and how did they end? Let's find out on today's special episode a fan of History's. Yes. It is a very special episode. That wasn't me or Dan reading that right? We have a very special guest about maybe a lot of you guys recognize the voice of Ryan. He's a famous podcaster if he has the history of ancient Greece podcast, so welcome Ryan and thanks for joining us today. We're actually doing this, right? Yes. Yes, finally. Thanks for having me. Yeah. No. Thanks and Ryan's are good guys always been down since I got involved. Dan told me keep in touch with Ryan. He's a he's a great podcaster and he's always, you know, trying to help other podcasters out. So we appreciate it. And for sure for sure, I am lost the podcast a couple of years a couple of years ago. You guys are moving pretty slow. So you haven't you're still in the Iron Age. Yeah. I don't think we're going to make it much past. So we woke. We come back from one thousand BC decade a time. I jumped in at the six 80s and we usually get like four episodes out of each decade. So I think I came back crossed it when I think it was in like the late eighteen hundreds a couple of years ago..

Ryan Dan Greece
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"I think that is more of propaganda after the fact. But don't quote me on that because I'm out of my depth the moment. Of course. This is what happens when you get to podcasters talking about something that's just outside of the range of what they've actually covered in the podcast so far. Seat That certainly covers all of the thematic and. Political topics I wanted to get your input on and. Get a Greek perspective. So to speak for mine listeners Is there anything you'd like to add? To our conversation about Greece in Persia. No I now I I'm just. Thankful I'm appreciative of you invited me on it I'm glad you started the podcast because I only covered the Greeks or I'm sorry I only covered the Persians maybe about. Four episodes. So, I mean obviously excluding the Persian wars but I mean like the Early History Persia. So it's been, it's been interesting to listen to like full-on detailed. Of like. Persian provinces in Persian. Cultural stuff as opposed to just covered things that you typically would find in. Herodotus. And or Stenius once he becomes. More relevant I suppose. So Yeah Yeah I am much more at I. Think I've talked. Quite a bit. Yeah Well thank you for the compliment to because. Obviously podcast was one of the great influences on. Figuring out how to get mine started and I certainly, WanNa. Thank you whether I include this in the final product or not. Being the great source of promoting the show especially early on because I really do attribute a large portion of my audience to you. You're welcome Yeah. I I would imagine of people are interested in ancient. Greece history they tend to be entrant ancient history as well as they have to kind of fit whether you like it or not tend to be in the mindsets stuck together. Thanks to Herodotus and the sources. Unfortunately there's no native. Persian historical ancient it came in and source that. All we have is the Greeks so. Persia Persians stuck with the Greeks. For better. Every now, and there's a hint of like some kind of independent tradition that POPs up in one of the Roman sources where someone like Diodoros, Nicholas, Vasquez will mention something that nobody else has ever talked about and we think maybe there was some kind of oral tradition or Britain tradition that we've lost but ultimately were stuck with the Greeks for better or worse and it's important to know what their opinions of the Persians were. So thank you for coming on it talking to us about that.

Greece Persia Herodotus WanNa Stenius Diodoros Britain Vasquez Nicholas
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

02:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"I think Alexander's actually a great place to loop back around to. Things that you've covered things that I'm about to cover because. And correct me if I'm wrong, maybe this is just A. Myth that I've heard a bunch of times is that Alexander kind of played to his Greek audience? and. Used Circuses invasion as his ballet. For invading the Persian Empire when it finally? Came to his time to invade in the fourth century. And and and and it was prior to that too like there was they always WanNa to get. The Athenians at least wanted to get revenge on the Acropolis and I don't know if it was a at least in the sources. As you'd say, I mean I don't know if that was. The sacking of PERSEPOLIS was intended to be retribution or if it was. An accident as it may seem and. Then it became that was intentional. You know what I mean. but there was always a strong urge to A. What's the word I'm trying to think of there was always a strong urge to. Get Revenge for the destruction of the Acropolis. Own. The Persians which is funny because not funny it's not the word. I. WanNA use but interesting because like the sack of the Acropolis was in a sense, the Persians getting revenge for the Athenian sackings artist, which you know conveniently forgotten about in the Fenian mindset that they act that they were part of setting fire to the. Lydian. Capital. During the eye owning revolt which I don't, I think you're. Covered that or you're about to combat just a couple of weeks ago Yeah it's. It's an interesting situation. And so does it I hadn't. Particularly engaged with a lot of the sources for Greek internal politics. Between zirk seasoned Alexander. But is there really that through line between of? suggesting. Vengeance for the Acropolis. because. I don't know through line per se I. Just I just remember from a the speeches that I've read that it was mentioned I can't give you off top my head. I like I said I haven't been I'm not that in depth into the fourth century yet. So like this is just kind of like my recollection of when I did read. Like, read some of the speeches and propaganda and political stuff. I've read some I socrates I guess I I know that I don't think it's as strong of a through line. It would, as you would say as you as you would be led to believe in popular culture..

Alexander PERSEPOLIS Fenian
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:54 min | 3 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"So you have the end of the first Peloponnesian war. There's basically there's kind of a piece in Greece that doesn't last very long but you they're not fighting the Persians they're not fighting. The spartans are Corinthians mcgarry ends and there's This is when you. Control of Athens forty seven is actually is the the beginning of the is the the date of the Parthenon Establishment. So and we didn't mention this actually but like. The Persian sacked the the Acropolis and they act of quite a bit of temples and other buildings throughout Greece, and they the the Greeks didn't Build. Them back up until the Persian threat was. Extinguished it was kind of this propaganda tool and the Athenians would use the money. To rebuild their temples, the money from the Deli league slash as seen Pyre Be Nope. you'll get into they sacked Athens twice during the Persian worse in ruins Acropolis. So Yes. So you get to the force forty-sevens and I I did a whole series on the breakdown of the peace from four, forty, seven, four, thirty, one. and the Persians are there on the periphery and so you can tell like when you when you start entering into the war, the spartans re the spartans begin to start looking towards Persia as this like potential ally from the very beginning we have. Instances through cities where there are sparring on voice or Peloponnesian envoys that get captured on their way to Persia and teens have. They develop an alliance with which are right on the border of the Persian Empire near the hell, a spot in the northern Japan and capture some of their voice and the and the Athenians probably are looking towards the the Persians as well. You see an air staff nieces play later the Kearns that there are ambassadors be at the Persian court even though they said, he doesn't really mention it until a little bit later. It's probably happening to at the very least the unions don't want the SPARTANS to become allies with the Persians. And the reason they would want that the spartans would want that is because they didn't have a fleet they didn't have money for the war they needed they needed the financial backing. And the. Persian St-. But nothing amounts to it until later in the war because in order for that to happen. The spartans eventually are going to have to give up control over. The IONIANS. which is what the which is they want tribute from me I this is the Persians want. That's their entire point of the fifth century stove sending out fleets because they're still trying to get control back of that coast. Because it lucrative city trade routes name money. So. That's that's going to be part of any deal whether the Athenians or the the Spartans, our allies with with Persia that's going to be. One of the centerpieces. So that's kind of what keeps. Drags the feet so the Athenians though do kind of enter into a nonaggression pact in the late four twenty s with Persia when Aiming to King escapes me is it's.

spartans Persia Persian Empire Athens Greece Persian court Parthenon Establishment Deli league Kearns Japan King
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Everyone I'm Trevor Kelly, was him to a special episode of the history of Persia podcast and the history of ancient. Greece. As history of Persia rapidly approaches sees invasion of the Greek mainland and arguably a sort of beginning for one hundred and fifty years of on and off conflict. In the Aegean, I wanted to get an expert opinion on the so-called Yona. So, please enjoy this detailed conversation between myself and the excellent. Ryan stick. So really what I want this to be is a conversation about Greece, sort of as it relates to Persia, but also what it is on its own because it's going to be such massive cog in the machine of the Persian Empire for most of my series. But I feel like you're probably much better equipped to explain what it really means to be Greek than I am given that you are the most of the history of ancient Greece But I think I could you introduce yourself everyone? I know a lot of my listeners overlap with your listeners but I'm sure there are some people who haven't heard quite yet. Yeah. My Name's Ryan. I am the creator host of the history of Ancient Greece podcast. On twitter at Greek history pod I know that's confusing for some. Grease history. pod was already taken so. it's not anymore. So I was thinking about switching back, but that's a digression anyway. But Yeah I I cover the history of ancient Greece from. Technically from the Paleolithic Neolithic period to the plan is to act him but I mean I only spent. One twenty minute episode of the stone. Age. So. Technically covered it but and we did a few episodes in the bronze. Age. currently right now we are in the classical period the pope nation war and the Persians are starting to get involved in the war so. There's some overlapping there I I I do I. Do kind of what Trevor does. He seems to have similar methodology I do chronological, but also fi medical when it's appropriate. So since it's the classical period and we have a lot more sources, I've been I did like a whole cultural tour of classical period. So I've been in the classical period for like two years. Now specifically have been in the fifth century for like two years. Now, I will be in the classical period for a while. If you consider the classical period to Alexandra in the conquest of the came at empire which we do so I'll be in the classical period for a couple more years. Oh Great. The yeah. The fifth century is kind of a monster topic to cover in Greek history I. Think. We have few cities in Herodotus, the to the earliest Greek historians and the two main ones. xenophon comes later he still technically fit century but. Of It so like you for the first time, you have these like dedicated histories. To a century though obviously herodotus has you know goes back a little bit further beyond that. Earlier than that to cover the rise of the Persians as I'm sure you're. You're well aware of Herodotus, his listeners. To quote myself as Herodotus says. Insert most of the podcast. The first thing I'd really like you to maybe explain to me and my listeners because obviously I got my ba in classics and what I'm in Grad School for but. I you've engaged with it much more in depth than I have I.

Greece Herodotus Persia Trevor Kelly Ancient Greece Ryan stick twitter pope nation Grad School Alexandra
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

02:18 min | 3 weeks ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Hello everyone today I'd like to tell you about Arcadia Energy Arcadia is free platform working to make clean renewable energy more widely available and affordable in the United States..

How To Teach History

Layers of Learning Podcast

06:21 min | Last month

How To Teach History

"So, what what do you do with history? What's your basic? Approach, while I will say this, you're the one who taught me how to teach history in my early homeschooling years so I do it very much the way that you Michelle For sure we've always taught history in order when I was in school I was always confused about when things were happening and how things were related to each other. When I learned about historical figure, it wasn't in context of where they were or when they lived and I never knew how things connected I I remember in fifth grade we did this project about the Aztecs and. Each like our teachers split us into groups and each group was doing a different hands on project by the Aztecs and it was a great project. I remember vividly how the Aztecs built their village or town right on top of the lake and that that's what my project was about and I remember that but I also remember having no idea when the Aztecs happened in history, I had no concept of win. That was I thought they were very, very ancient people that was my impression. And that turns out not to be true they actually were. More. In the colonial era, they were much more modern. Yeah I think that was the problem with my early education history is it just lacked connections I didn't understand what history could teach me because I didn't have any contextual basis for the people, the places, the events, I didn't have a complete picture in my mind. So that's been one of my goals with my kids is to help them see the big picture of history and to be able to. Know when and where things happened. So, let's back up and just start with when we say history exactly. What do we mean? First of all history starts with the earliest civilizations and I think that's something that. People. Get confused about because we know that there were caveman and. There's this whole Earth history that happens before the subject of history, but the academic subject of history starts with the earliest civilizations. Well. And that's not because the people who came before weren't important. It's because the people who came before didn't write down their stories in any way we don't have an archeological record of them not much and we don't have. Any records at all of them, they didn't build cities that we can go back and excavate. The academic subject of history is just the story of human civilization. That's what is. I often tell my kids. This is why it's so important for you to write down your stories because anyone who didn't have a record of their people or their lives or anything that happened. That kind of. With time and so history we're looking at, Hey, let's look at the story of the people who have lived on the earth and it's totally find teach about cavemen but there's not a lot of actual information that we know when we don't have any written records. So so layers of learning starts with the earliest civilisation. Yeah. We start with Sumer and the Yellow River valley in China and the Norte Chico People in South America. That's that's the beginning of the subject of history and we're looking at how did people create the first civilizations as they began to settle down and be able to live in a place. How did that happen? What contributed to them being able to do that and so yeah, we always start there in history and then as we go along, it includes the story of human beings, nations, cities, especially the great figures in history the heroes, the even the villains civilians to definitely but we learn about those people who somehow contributed and made a difference in the world whether good or bad. And I think we look at those things because it teaches us lessons for now. It's important to look back so that we can be educated for our lives now. Right right now, we are living at a point in history. We're making history were part of that whole subject, and if we study history, we can study all of the things that led up to. Now we can see this progression and some of its progress, and some of it is regression. We human societies tend to go through these cycles and there's Warren Destruction, and there's also building in great art and looking at all of this together is the subject of history I think that's one of the really interesting things that I have noticed as I've taught my kids history. I think a lot of people believe that we started with almost nothing in the history of the world, and then we little by little built up to this point that we have the Internet and technology and invention, and actually if you look back in history, my kids were amazed when we were studying ancient Greece and ancient Rome and they were saying if they just had the internet, they probably had pretty much what we have today. Mom they were a pre industrial society they had factories so anciently. They were very much like we are, and then it collapsed. Yeah. Followed Rome even before the Roman Empire the Mojo Daro people in India where at the same level that Rome was, but you know thousand years earlier. So it has happened over and over through history. So it's really interesting. One of the things that we learned from that is hey. Next year tomorrow who knows we could be reverting back in the exact same way that they did we are not immune in any way. And it hasn't just progressed and progressed and progressed. It has gone through cycles of change over time, and so there are lessons all along the way if we learn history in that Lens. and. Partly for that reason, Karen that that we can see progression and we can see cycles partly for that reason, we study history in order, and partly for the reason, we already talked about that it's important to have context you need to understand. Things that are going on at the same time in history you need to understand that this person came before that person that this war led to this event. Those progressions are important in history. So to teach it in order, I think vital.

Aztecs Rome Yellow River Valley Karen South America Greece Norte Chico India China
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:53 min | Last month

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"The Italian Greeks were the first to take action. They had suffered the most casualties a Gala and so they left the Army and marched off to messana the Cavalry of Syracuse made up of noblemen and Rich former oligarchs was tasked with keeping watch along the road and they considered assassinating dionysios, but he was too well guarded by his mercenaries for them even find an opportunity. So some of them left the Army and wrote in haste Syracuse when they entered the city, they gain admittance into the naval dockyards without suspicion as the guards knew nothing as a glance at gala there. They proceeded to plunder the house of dionysios, which was filled with much silver gold and other costly items in the process. They abused his wife likely raping her long dark medicines that she later would commit suicide from her shame. Died or says that they did this because it was the surest way to anger the Tyrant and therefore his Vengeance would guarantee that all the conspirators would stick by each other. Finally after coming out of his residence. They began to spread rumors at the Greeks had been defeated and that dionysios had fled after securing the city. They shut the gates against all Outsiders wage. Diagnosis was now in a tight spot caught between the Hostile carthaginians in the west and the rebels in the East who had occupied Syracuse his political base and safe haven and if the carthaginians chose to attack, they would probably have prevailed over the diminished Greek army, but the Speedy action of dionysios combined with carthaginian inactivity and rebel and competence saved the day for him home. Dionysios picked out six hundred hoplites and a hundred Cavalry men from his most trustworthy supporters and press towards Syracuse leaving behind the rest of his army to guard the refugees in their Journey dialogue as soon hand-picked forces covered a distance of about 46 miles and reached the city and dead of night upon their arrival. He found that the conspirators attempt to take control of the city was clumsy wage. As they had shut the gates of Accra Dina, but let them unguarded so He piled up reads brought from the marshes and lit them on fire when the gate was burnt down. They entered the city and found that not only did the rebels neglect to man The Gates properly but they also had not organized the Romanian citizens for.

dionysios Army Syracuse
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:38 min | Last month

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"The Antiquity and questioned podcast life the Greek history podcast. We discussed topics such as Classical Greece. They had a mistake. The Carfax and weld the Roman Empire and more archaeological topics such as Egypt. We publish two episodes a month and Tackle questions, like whether Constantine really was a Christian Emperor or the fall of the Roman Republic inevitable. And also what was the cause of the Punic Wars if any of these topics interest you give us a listen you can find us on most podcast insights and also on your Jeep. off Hello, I'm.

Roman Empire Constantine Greece Egypt
know your rights before you talk to the police

Sword and Scale

04:52 min | Last month

know your rights before you talk to the police

"The criminal justice. System. It's a pretty elegant thing crafted over centuries of refinement. You know some people don't even realize that our system of law and justice predates the birth of this country. By centuries. When settlers came to America, they brought English common law with them. And although there have been modifications and additions to that system, the basic structure remained. Things like precedent, which is the basic concept of relying on previously decided cases and using those established guidelines traditions. If, you've ever heard to lawyers argue they'll say things like Miranda, the Arizona. That's a reference to a prior already decided case that instructs the judge on how to rule on the case before the. It's up to the judge to weigh all the various arguments for a fair decision. And if there's clear precedent than the judge will usually rely on that previous ruling. Otherwise, he may decide to go the opposite way and in doing. So create new law and set a new precedent. That's often not the case and doing so could lead to an appeal and a reversal from a higher court. Anyway. This is starting to turn into a civics lesson, but it's funny just how many normal everyday citizens don't even know the basics of how our system of laws and justice works. It's really quite something. Even before the English, modernized in the seventeenth century, the roots of law date all the way back to Greek and Roman civilizations. In Ancient Greece if you killed somebody, their family had the right to kill you. At the end of the seventh century BC a man named Drako. The first legislator of Athens wrote a series of laws regarding intentional and unintentional homicide. The punishment for most of these cases was death. That's where the term draconian laws comes from. It refers to the overly harsh antiquated punishment for a crime. Thankfully since then we've made a lot of modifications to the law and our Constitution reflects the society that puts the rights of the individual before the needs of the state. For example. That case I mentioned a minute ago Maranda v Arizona. Well, that's the case where the concept of Miranda rights originated. We'll talk more about that later. But for now, all you need to know is that you should never talk to cops. They're not there to help you or be your friend. They're not looking out for your best interests when you're sitting in that hard cold chair of their eight by eight foot interrogation room. Oh. And before you start constructing your angry emails, I don't care if your husband or father best friend is a cop. I'm not saying all cops are bad. So calm your outrage. I'm giving you good solid life advice based on years of experience with cases like this. When you find yourself across from a COP whose? Questions about a crime. The only thing they're trying to do at that point is to get you to slip up so they can put you in jail. That is after all their job pudding criminals in jail. So, if you did something, don't talk to cops. If you didn't do something. Don't talk to cops just say it with me folks. Don't talk to cops. Ask for a lawyer at follow their advice. Or you may find yourself in the same predicament. That William hurt that. Jones statistically talking earlier. Wouldn't the information you'll and make sure we know who we're talking to. We can this all the time. Give me your personal. Legal name is middle. Name Jeffrey. J.. or You. Anyway. Evansville Indiana is sometimes referred to as Kentuckiana. The EVANSVILLE metropolitan area includes counties in both Kentucky and Indiana Google Map it's confusing. It is however a great example of Gerrymandering. Evansville directly borders one section of the Ohio River. In the summer of two, thousand, twelve, eighteen year old William hurt an Evansville. Native had just found himself in that cold ugly interrogation room. He was talking to Kentucky State Police officers about his alleged involvement in a suspected murderer.

COP Evansville Arizona William America Miranda Greece Athens Kentucky State Police Ohio River Indiana BC Kentucky Jones Kentuckiana Jeffrey
Narcissus and Echo

Stories Podcast

04:39 min | 3 months ago

Narcissus and Echo

"Narcissus and Echo. Once upon a time in ancient Greece there was a young man named Narcissus. From the minute he was born. It was clear to everyone that he was no normal baby. The ancient gods of Mount Olympus had gifted him with a beauty beyond measure. He was the cutest baby anyone had ever seen, and his cheeks were nearly perpetually pink from all the pinching. As, he got older. He only grew more beautiful. His hair was the gentle tumble of a hidden waterfall over golden stones. His eyes were piercing moons that sets way to the tides of your mind. His smile was pure and bright and radiant like the hot white son of a midsummer's Day flooding. You with warmth. Yes, young narcissists was blessed by the Gods with beauty. But if you're not careful, even a blessing can turn into a curse. For narcissists. It started when he was just a teen people noticed his beauty. They wanted to be married to him. They wanted to be him. They just wanted to be close to him and to make him happy. Unfortunately, all of that positive attention went right to his head. Before Long Narcissus was convinced that not only was he a beautiful handsome, strapping image of a man. He was the most beautiful the most handsome, and that he was simply the God's gift to the world. People would ask him to be friends to walk with them in the woods or play with them at their games and Narcissus would laugh in their faces. You want me to play with you. He would say I'm a work of art and your just well. You enjoy my beauty from afar. Shout your praises, but don't come to close or else I'll have to see how much uglier you all are, and it will ruin my day. This was of course, a terribly rude way to behave, but because narcissus was so incredibly beautiful, he usually managed to get away with it. This is the thing that happens sometimes, and it's not fair, but don't worry in this case. Bad behavior will not be tolerated for long. For, Narcissus, it was one long summer when he couldn't get any rest everywhere, he went. People called out to him. Narcissus Mary Me Dr. CICIS let me sculpt you nor Souza's let me just have a kiss and I can die a happy man. On and on they came, and as much as narcissus love to be admired. He hated the common people to him. It was just wildly unfair that he had to look at their average faces while they got to stare at an absolute one of a kind genuine work of art. In his mind, he decided a perfect world would be populated by him and him alone beautiful and perfect without anyone to bother him. But seeing as that was impossible, narcissus decided to take a break. One beautiful. Sun Drenched Day. He packed bag and hiked away into the forest near Mount Olympus. Out here, there was no one to bother him. There were no average faces to be annoyed by deep in the woods. Narcissus confined only be alone with his beautiful self. or so he thought in Ancient Greece even in the deep dark depths of the enchanted woods, there were creatures ready to fall in love creatures who looked familiar, but not quite human, and one of them was watching Narcissus already scrambling from branch to branch after him nimble as a squirrel, the creature was a Nymph, and her name was echo. NYMPHS are spirits of the forest, and they're always curious about human travelers. They were considered very beautiful in own right known to stop people in their tracks with just a glance acco was even more beautiful than most she had dappled skin that blushed light, pink and dark, purple like flowers, her eyes sparkled like the stars on the seas, and her hair was a wild mass of flowing green. Eco was beautiful, but she had also been cursed by the Gods in punishment for some trouble she. She had caused for Zeus and his many wives echo lost the gift of speech

Narcissus Mount Olympus Souza Greece Gods Dr. Cicis
How Does Uranus Work?

BrainStuff

06:32 min | 4 months ago

How Does Uranus Work?

"Scientists have coined an appropriate term for the large chilly bodies like Uranus ice giants. Neptune falls into the same category. But you're in. This is quite an odd duck compared to its neighboring planet. For starters you're a spins on an extreme tilt resulting in some truly wild seasons around the polls even the ice giants name is a bit peculiar and not just because it makes school kids chuckle. Okay let's not kid ourselves. You're never too old to enjoy good year in joke. Headline Writers certainly don't thinks so if article titles like NASA wants to probe urinate in search of gas and Uranus. Smells like farts are any indication. These jokes if you're not getting them hinge on the spelling of Uranus you are an US allowing for an english-speaking mispronunciation as your anus meaning rectum that where classy puns. Aside you're in his represents a break with nomenclature old tradition mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn and Neptune all took their names from Roman gods or deities however uranus uniquely was named after a Greek God in the religion of Ancient Greece. You're an was revered as the primordial God of the sky he had a son named Cronos and a perhaps more famous grandson notice Zeus. Those two figures were later conflated with two Roman Deities Saturn and Jupiter though the planet Uranus was discovered by Stromer William Herschel March thirteenth of seventeen eighty one. He didn't give it the name we use today. A loyal Britain Herschel wanted to call this far away. World Georgie 'EM CD's or Georgia Star. In honor of King George the third but by nature. That name was politically charged to avoid. Alienating non-british Stargazers German astronomer Johann Alert Buddha suggested calling the planet uranus in seventeen eighty three eventually his alternative Monica one out but back to that axial tilt a planets rotate around an axis. Which is the imaginary line connecting their northern and southern polls and they simultaneously orbit on an imaginary plane around the Sun now Earth has an axial tilt of twenty three point five degrees. This means there's a twenty three point five degree angle between Earth's axis and its plane of orbit around the Sun without the tilt our home world wouldn't have seasons or possibly life. Uranus is skewed to but to a much greater extent in relation to its orbital plane. The ice giants access has been tilted at a chopping ninety seven point seven degree angle next to Saturn and Neptune. Urine looks like it's lying on its side so what we are orientation. A computer simulation published two thousand eighteen suggests your was hit by a huge Proto Planet. Around four billion years ago then again there may have been multiple impacts or a long gone circum. Planetary Disk could have played a role however it happened. The tilt subjects both polls too long dark winters long. Bright Summer's on Uranus was orbit around the Sun or one year lasts for roughly eighty four earth years. Each poll is aimed almost directly at the Sun for about twenty one St Earth years during its summer season. Meanwhile the other pole faces the opposite direction. Enduring Alliance Dark Winter. Despite the extreme tilt urine is warmer at the equator than it is either poll. Nobody knows why. And this isn't the planets only mystery. Jupiter Saturn and Neptune already radiate more than twice as much heat as they received from the Sun. Yet you're innocence. Heat output is significantly lower. This disparity has long baffled planetary scientists as we already mentioned. You're innocent. Neptune are both ice giants planets of this sort have rocky cores covered by mantles rich. An icy half frozen slush of ammonia methane and water next up there's the atmosphere whose outer level is full of hydrogen helium and even more methane researchers found that urinalysis atmospheric clouds contain hydrogen sulfide. A compound responsible for the rotten egg stench. We all know in hate so yes. You're in literally stinks to the densest part of its atmospheric sees brutal temperatures of negative two hundred forty three to negative three hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit. That's negative one fifty three to negative to eighteen degrees Celsius. That's hardly a welcoming environment for any future astronauts but at least the color scheme would be familiar. Earth isn't the only blue planet in the solar system. Methane absorbs red light giving Uranus and Neptune deep blue complexions of the two worlds. You're in a slightly greener since nineteen seventy seven. We've known that Ernest has a ring system around its equator to date. Astronomers have counted thirteen rings encircling the planet the structures are relatively dim and lack the fine particles observed and other rings systems like Saturn's each one is composed of debris chunks that are golf ball sized at minimum for some reason smaller material gets exiled and space between these rings in also has twenty seven known moons twenty five of which renamed after Shakespeare characters like affiliate Juliet. There's Dimona puck and Miranda who's namesake appears in the tempest geologically complex. Miranda contains the single policy cliff known to humankind dubbed Verona repays. It has an estimated height of twelve point four miles. That's twenty kilometers. Meaning that if you happened to be walking along its peak and you happened to fall off. You would plummet for twelve minutes straight before hitting the ground. Others satellites of note include sicker acts and Caliban while most of your Ennis's moons spin in the same direction as the planet does these to revolve the other way. Scientists think they were once independent objects that the ice giants gravity in snared by the way how ban is another tempest character and sicker. Iraq's was said to be his mother from it's weird rings. It's puzzling climate. You're Ennis's found plenty of ways surprises. Only time will tell what further mysteries the planet holds until then although it's very dim your is visible to the naked eye on some dark clear nights if you have sharp vision if not so much. It's easily visible with noculars or a telescope.

Ennis Stromer William Herschel Miranda Britain Herschel Nasa United States Ancient Greece Iraq Johann Alert Buddha Cronos King George Georgia Star Verona Monica Ernest Shakespeare Dimona Puck
You can explore Assassin's Creed's Ancient Egypt and Greece for free

Gaming Ride Home

00:47 sec | 4 months ago

You can explore Assassin's Creed's Ancient Egypt and Greece for free

"Creed origins and Odyssey's discovery tours are free right now. Assassin's creed origins and Odyssey are both pretty great games about murdering a lot of people. But they're also pretty thorough simulations of the eras in which they take place ancient Egypt and ancient Greece respectively. The discovery tour is a mode that was added to both games after release that serves as an educational tool for the world's ubisoft his built it's basically like a virtual museum tour where you can walk around and learn stuff about the era and you'll be soft is giving both discovery tours away for free on pc right now you just need to create a ubisoft store account and you can grab them and start exploring a different era.

Ubisoft Egypt Greece
Monocle Reads: Warriors, Witches, Women

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Monocle Reads: Warriors, Witches, Women

"Let's let's talk about this new book of yours which is is fascinating and your goddess has come from really diverse cultures. Tell us about them. Because you've got one from the Shinto religion of Japan you've got got us from Bikini Fussier you've got ancient Greece. Of course tell us a little bit about some of those are tried costner as widely as possible because I think We generally know about the goddess of Ancient Greece and Roman as classic. Go says is but I tried to go with other big little bit deeper went to Mexico and Egypt and Australia and China and kind of eastern Europe I wanted to. I wanted to take in more and more stories. Make more colorful more diverse. I also tried to kind find goddesses who wouldn't necessarily straight wouldn't necessarily even female they'll kind of gender fluid ones in that to Your favorites to write about. I think my absolute favorite who was kind of a new one to me Mami Wata his an African go she's water originally Pantheon of water goddess and. I was really interesting fussy because look she looks fantastic. She's she's half woman. Half Fish is a mermaid character. She loves herself. She's in love with her own reflection. She's beautiful money she brings people money. She's she's kind of happy joyous Goethe's also already. I loved to story in how evolved so she started off as an Oscar award good as but then her story taken through Africa and codified by traders from Europe and then when the slave trade started and thousands and thousands of Africans were taken to America makes it the terrible terrible conditions in the Americas and they took her with them and they worship her made a really specific way of worshipping her through an intense dumps and go them through the tough days in America and in the Americas and gradually she became criticized and became Pau voodoo religion. And it's just that story of. Her story tells the story of people to And how all of this mutates through time it's particularly pertinent telling it from a feminist perspective at this post metoo time. How long is the book been in the works? I mean was me to something that spoke to as you were writing it absolutely. Yeah the informed it that beautiful kind of me to inform the also kind of rising in witchcraft. Catch on the news. That'd be these little groups of young women who were who went to Heck Donald trump not really kind of inspired me and just to this is. It's a new take old stories. These old archetypes for something very modern new and and me too as well. I think a lot of things. That's the story of Cassandra. Who is kind of illustrates the maitre movement beautifully? She was a great Prophet. Who was after? She refused to have sex with somebody and so she was cursed. Older prophecies were true but none of them believed and that really Kinda resonates within me too movement. I mean it's interesting. Isn't it because as women we can be revered as God says or absolutely reviled as witches? Yeah absolutely and I think sometimes some of these stores in one person would be revered as a God s and you know within sentras or even decades. They've been vilified literally demonized and turned into this figure of height because they symbolized an older religion or they symbolize something that historians or writers coming despised so so that their stories are kind of turned around and they yeah they they were even one person could be could represent both of those than yeah. Yeah I'm interested in Shinto. Tell me about your Japanese goddess. Love my Japanese go to. It's I know it was you may. So she was a some nothing good s she's a good of stumps of dawn. Mirth and revelry and she. She's just fun. Some party go almost she but she saved the country because the goddess. I'm Tera it's going into hiding in a cave. And the son of summer had disappeared from the country it needed to be brought back again so I may know. Zoom went outside the cave. She got MIRA and she did dumps and she took clothes off she wasn't wearing any underwear antidepressants on the drum. And and the some good a curious about this she came out the case and then they wrote about the start of the case and she was she was out again in the summer shining again. And I just. I love the kind of lightness that story and the fun. And she's not this serious munificence with with long has his cut flights about the. She's a real person that really resonates. I think absolutely who doesn't want to dance in the sun with no nicotine. Yes exactly that. Wouldn't she really party and an I love the fact that still today kind of drumming groups named for her she. She's inspired the drums in Shinto ceremonies. And I love that. I love her. She's alive three music today. A wonderful

Mira Donald Trump Europe Greece Bikini Fussier Ancient Greece Costner Africa Mami Wata Japan Americas Nicotine Mexico Oscar China Egypt Australia
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

04:18 min | 5 months ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"I thought that this is what it was supposed to be why am I not happy, but generally it's because like you said, they were focused so much on that piece that they lost their passion along the way and now they're just I mean the lucky ones are the ones they can take their passion and make a career out of it. So yeah. Yeah. So again, you can find me. I have a website actually need the history of ancient Greece, I have a lot of resources on there. There's photos videos links to YouTube videos links to other episode other podcasters for just wage not just what I do. try and make the website and entire educational model type of thing. There's recommendations for books and other podcasts and all that. So check that out. I'm off all different. You can listen to my podcast on pretty much anywhere you can get podcasts. I'm even on YouTube now, you know audio, I didn't know people listen audio on YouTube audio only but I guess they did so I made it and yeah, I'm on social media at Greek history pod Greece history pod was already used. So I'm Greek wage. Pod not the history of the ancient Greeks history of ancient Greece. It confuses some people but Greek history pod and then on Facebook page as well. It's the history of ancient Greece podcast wage. That's that's me. You should listen. I have a huge catalog back at it all you can work through the first few episodes are not quite as good as the later ones. So stick with me that I get better. Yeah. I always like a fine wine exactly. I give people that prerequisite to where I'd like listen. Okay, you have to make it to at least episode 5 before you decide to stop listening me because the episode like I sound super depressed because I thought that podcasting was like I have to be serious. This is a serious conversation..

Greece YouTube Facebook
"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:40 min | 5 months ago

"ancient greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"And then so you're going to continue moving through do you foresee like dead? What is the endpoint for this and then do you forsee you starting another show after this or has you know, the last you're probably going to end up being, you know, five or six years Deep Thoughts by the time you finish everything, maybe five or six years after this at the rate. I'm going right. You've got quite a a ways to to go off just a it's just depends where life takes me I suppose right. Now. The endpoint is supposed to be active the Battle of actium and 31 BC. So when Cleopatra and Mom me lose a mingling bachelor commit suicide, it's the end of the ptolemaic Egypt. Which is the last quote unquote Hellenistic successor Kingdom of Alexandria, and at that point the entire Mediterranean is Roman, you still have grease but the Greeks are Romans at that point there in the Roman Empire. I may do some like extra episodes to khong Talk about some things but the detail that I'm going and now Thirty-One b c is probably where I'm going to end just because I'm just not as passionate about the Roman Empire as I am about the the wage increase and the Roman Republic. I don't know why I just I don't find the the emperor's as appealing. Like I said, think it falls back more onto the page like the build-up of things and then then the Empire's kind of when it comes tumbling down and transitions. It just doesn't suit me and it just doesn't it fascinate me as much if I were to do a walk-in podcast. I highly doubt I will just because think this is just going to mentally Tire me out by the time I'm done. But if I were to do it second podcast my second favorite. Is off Italy from the Black Death through the Renaissance. So I would do something around that time. Completely not ancient at all, but I just don't know if I'm going to ever like once I finish this in twenty years. 25 probably hopefully at that point I will have like like a family and I will not have the time that I have now. Right? Right. Could you see yourself? Like if you had the opportunity if you're you get out of the military or you know, whatever being a full-time podcaster. Yeah. I'm I would totally jump on that very hard to get into them. It's that's a another thing. A lot of people should know. It's like you're not going to do podcasting if you're wanting to get rich that very rarely happens and usually have to have the right connections or dumb luck or you started it a way like a while ago, right that's coming from somebody with four million plus down those people. Yeah, that's one thing. You know, we're I mean, I mean get Get Money I get some donations I get ad Revenue I get patreon I make money off of it. It's a good side hustle / second job, but it's not long enough to be I mean, I know it wouldn't be enough to a full-time job. I make way more doing mind doing my day job exactly. Exactly. And that's what people that's what I I want people to really, you know, she kind of to end the note on is just The entire message behind exactly why I wanted to record this was was too old right one. I wanted to make sure that we educated people on podcasting and and why it's important to be passionate about it and walk you shouldn't do it like with money motivation and.

Roman Empire Cleopatra Roman Republic Alexandria Italy actium khong
"I'm a Feminist But...' with Robby Hoffman

The Guilty Feminist

05:49 min | 6 months ago

"I'm a Feminist But...' with Robby Hoffman

"I'm a feminist but on my way to Seattle came from San Francisco on this lovely American Canadian tour. I sat next to a woman on the plane with such impressive breasts. My instinct which curbed was to say Nice Rack Lady. Nice Rack didn't say that but just popped into my head. I just thought that was a lovely pair of breasts. You and I very different politically speaking. I tried to explain my brother's Shmole. White cat calling bad shmole should construction. Worker in Calgary Canada Nice Guy in the world group of five girls. He showed me around his house houses. You see that they all look the same off the highway. They'll look like a construction off. The you're like who would live there my brother and he's could you believe we got the House so. I'm like yeah. He showed me around. Gives me a tour of the house? He's like I got to make the bathroom however I want. And he's like a bench there because Marianna. She shaves her legs. She should take a seat. Be Safe nicest guy in the world. Try to explain to my cat. Calling is not good anymore. He's like you're telling me you could see a pretty girl and not makes him sick sacrilegious. You're going to see a pretty on. You're not going to tell her plus over there at works. He's how do you think a lot? I was Mariana. So this reminds me of if you said. Nice rack to her. I don't know maybe it's because you're a woman should by the way is not cat-calling anymore. But because he's married so it is what it is out of respect for his wife. Yes loyal his name. Shmole Shmole schmolly numbered. I am a feminist but I like the joker so so I liked it. I didn't know anybody hated it then. I went online while I I didn't see it to have a lot of knock feminists content. I didn't even look at it. Sou- with regards to feminism or not. I felt bad for him physically. He looked ailing and There was some medical concerns. I had first and foremost as a HYPOCHONDRIAC. I was very concerned about his diet. I'm the smoking and popcorn lung. That maybe he was facing a lot of concerns. Feminism the did not come up for me on the list I mean. There's a lot of content. We're asked to empathize with sociopathic white men. Dot onscreen. I feel too many stories about a man who can't stop killing. I'm not saying there is no cycle of abuse and it's never passed but we don't talk about. It's not just a simple and every single time I watch something about a psychopathic man. Which is all the time. Because that's nine tenths of the content available to me on any streaming service slash cinema. It's always feel sorry for this. Man was deliberately being violent towards women but then he beats himself often then he thinks back to when he was a child and he was beaten. And you're like that's just not. That's not good enough. Thank you and we need to stop telling better stories because it's excusing a lot of things. And in my opinion if we had not been asked so thoroughly and constantly by Hollywood and television for generations to empathize with Whiteman. Doing everything and feeling everything and so rarely asked empathize with anyone else. Donald trump could not have been elected. Electable we feel we all feel for white men because we've been trained and trained trained trained and trained in a movie and I'll just okay. Sorry this that one got on. That really took a turn at the joke. I didn't see that being so controversial but it turned out to be very interested in either. I don't read nothing about movies. I was like oh I have a night off ghost movie. Come out ready to talk about it. My girls like what am I. O O Walking Teaneck. I thought no. Okay we'll talk about it anymore. I haven't seen it because I think it's GonNa be on it for me but I am interested because that's about a stand up comedian. Great Place Great Whistle Story writer also. I'm a feminist. When I came into the amazing NEP changed. I saw his indoor art. That was sort of stained glass windows and I was so blown away and I was going to take pictures of these virago backstage and I did. I was like this is beautiful and then I looked at what I've taken pictures of. I'd taken pictures of men astride horses. Thank Neptune the mythical figure clothed men astride horses looking powerful and women with long around on rocks and Avas like Neptune Theatre. These patriarchal pictures. So I said I cannot perform here unless they covered with velvet drapes. Well they could give me the photos and put new photos isn't it? The women are topless and they're giving away the art. I'll just cut the dude out. And I got not suggested that they be given a wears enjoying the art. And I'm not I'm not saying I'm Ben no way shaming the naked women of the Neptune theatre and I'm highlighting them if anything. I think if anything I think we should all get tops off join them free the nipple and say we stand with you. Women Ancient Greece in Rome. We stunned with you topless defiance because sometimes nice rack. Yeah

Neptune Theatre Donald Trump Shmole Shmole Calgary Seattle Greece San Francisco Teaneck Rome BEN Writer Hollywood Whiteman
King Midas and the Satyr's Song

Stories Podcast

09:51 min | 8 months ago

King Midas and the Satyr's Song

"King Midas and the Sater's song. Once upon a time in ancient Greece King Midas was bored. You'll may remember King Midas as the man who wished for a golden touch and soon found himself cursed by golden food. He couldn't eat and golden wine. He couldn't drink. You'd think that would have taught him his lesson for good but MIDAS was forever a misguided man misguided and full of agreed so strong he would have stolen the sun from the sky if he thought he could fit it into his his purse without burning his fingers. Baugh there's nothing to do old Midas blustered walking about his throne room. I'm taking a walk. Walk through the Royal Woods. See that no one bothers me. He took off his robe in stocked out the door near his palace. The wilds of Greece were open into him and wild were. This was still the time of Gods and monsters. Were you were as likely to run into a center as you were a horse and any any random apple may contain curse or blessing. So it wasn't much of a surprise when Midas soon came across a seder playing his pipes sater's were rogues but of mostly pleasant kind. They would play their tricks especially on those who didn't respect nature but usually we're content to enjoy themselves selves in the woods from the waist down they looked like goats standing on two legs and from the waist up they looked like men except for the great curving horns warns that adorned their heads. This particular Seder played his pipes. Beautifully spinning a lively rustic tune that soon had MIDAS tapping his does say. Did you enjoy the Song King Midas the Sader said when he had finished minus was surprised that he was recognized for a moment moment but then he realized this later was none other than pan himself God of the wilds and Lord of all sater's finally played aide Pan MIDAS said. What do you call it? Not One is called a lower for MIDAS. The Sader said. I wrote it for you do as I I need help. Man King Midas puffed himself up a bit that pants should need help from him made him feel royal and Regal indeed indeed. Of course my good man Herb Seder or pan he said. What can I do for you? Well L. I've made a wager with Apollo. He said we're supposed to have a musical competition this very afternoon. You Bet your pipes against Apollo the god of Music King Midas said shaking his head. I think you play beautifully but Apollo is music. It comes from him rolls off him like heat from an oven. I don't see how you could win at this pan laughed. Roguishly Shot MIDAS a wink. We'll see it's my job to bring a judge to the competition. He said you come as the judge in declare me the winner. Well this sounds all well and good for you said MIDAS leaning on an old olive tree but why should I do that. We both know Apollo is sure to sound best true true who said Pan but if you declare me the winner I'll split the prize with you. Apollo has wagered a Golden Lyre and a golden draw against my pipes and a bounty of fruit and herbs. Call me the winner and and the Golden Lyre is yours. My Good King Midas now any half clever man would have learned their lesson when they turned their own kid to gold and nearly nearly starved to death trying to eat golden food. But as we know King Midas was not half clever he was maybe a quarter clever on a good day but even that was pushing it so when he thought of Apollo's Golden Lyre all heavy bodied with finely woven strings like rays of Sun. His mouth began to water. His palms began to each his hair began to sway and tickle like grass in the breeze. His brain began to sing into him a simple chance. That went gold Gold Gold Gold Gold Gold Gold Gold I think MIDAS said licking his lips tips that we have a deal. Perfect said Pan slapping the king on the back. I'm supposed to meet Apollo at the river nearby. You're by come now. Let's go win a contest together. They made their way through the woods. It was a gorgeous day with the birds birds singing and the critters of all kinds leaping and rustling about the trees when they came to the river it was even more lovely than before. Because they're air sat apollo he was a tall and golden figure holding the U shaped harp called the Liar sitting on a rock by the river near him. The birds seemed to sing sweeter. The river babbled beautifully and all the myriad harmonies of the natural world seem to come together in a single. Google heartwarming song then King Midas. He called setting down his lawyer and clapping his hands. Even the clap seemed to be a song in itself. I'm glad you've decided to come. Pan I see you have your pipes and Midas you must be here to judge King Midas. It's not a degrading and took a seat on an old log. Your exactly right sir. I wouldn't miss the chance to hear to gods such as yourselves make music. I'm I'm sure it'll be quite the show. So should we take this contest off said pan knocking his pipes free of for against his thigh. Why we got our instruments we gotTA judge? Oh about that said Apollo. I think more judges are better than just one. Wouldn't you say well said Pan looking about nervously. I suppose one could say that good. Well I invited a couple of our friends to be impartial. Judges he said shooting a sly. Look at King Midas come onto the Mola's come now. Texas King Midas gaped as the two judges emerged from the wilds quite literally to Mola's was the spirit of the mountain itself and Ted. This was the grandmother of the fresh rivers that gave Greece life now pan immediately saw that he had been outsmarted. He was the god of nature so the mountain and the rivers were his domain. He couldn't accuse them of being biased against him. If anything they would look on him more favorably than other judges. Hello to Mola's allowed at this. He said it's lovely to see you on this shah. This fine day Tethong said her voice a watery whisper. We look forward to hearing your music. Yes boomed into Mola's with all the might of the mountains play for Rosh pay on what I hear. Your Song Pan nodded and leapt nimbly upon Hannah flat rock by the river using it as a sort of stage. He put his wooden pipes to his lips and began to blow a melody. It was simple a song of the wood and the trees. It's melody was that of a hiker speed and it's notes soared like an early spring breeze by anyone's judgment. It was a beautiful song. And when he finished and laid down his pipes king midas tumultuous tempests and even Apollo had tears standing in. There is beautiful. Wonderful cried King Midas his. His heart soared pan. Could win and it wouldn't even be cheating. The Seder played that beautifully MIDAS turned and looked at Apollo Paulo eyeing his heavy Golden Lyre. The arms were solid and shining the strings like he imagined finely woven rays of sunshine. And soon soon it would be his wonderful tune said tests but we must hear Apollo play. Yes rumbled to Mola's the nature. God has proven his worth. And now it's time for the Golden God to show us. I saw song. Apollo smiled and stood towering over pan and King Midas. He stepped up onto the flat rock. Stage each and then sat cross-legged cradling close his lyre. Here is a simple song for you. He said brushing the golden strings rings and sending out a ripple of music like the warmth of a perfect summer day I hope you like friends When the song was finished they didn't have tears in there is no? They were weeping openly any pan and king midas included. The song had touched them deeply. It was more than natural. It was supernatural. It was more than music. It was a great therman Cord that stretched from the Heavens to Earth and echoed deeply through their souls

Midas Man King Midas King Midas Pan Midas Apollo Mola Greece Herb Seder Sader Golden Lyre Royal Woods Baugh Apollo Paulo Apple Google Tethong Perfect Texas TED
Medicine in the Middle Ages

The Book Review

06:39 min | 9 months ago

Medicine in the Middle Ages

"Jack Hartnell joins joins us now. He is normally at the University of East Anglia but he joins us from Pasadena much better weather there. And he is the author of a new book called Medieval Bodies Life Life and death in the Middle Ages. Jack thanks for being here. Thank you so much for having me. Let's just begin with the question of what was different about the human body and the way in which it lives in died in the Middle Ages compared with now. Well that's the big question. I guess the question that runs through the whole of the book I guess the first thing to say is that what we think of as the Middle Ages even just the terminology that we use to describe this period as a kind of sandwich he won one in seems to refer to time after what people and history of until after the kind of the chief of ancient Greece in Rome so maybe the period begins around the five hundred and something before the rebirth. The release on same ideas in the fifteenth century or the Sixteenth Century depending on where we're talking about in Europe so we're talking about the whole of the tanks in Europe the Middle East North Africa so basically the world around the Mediterranean for the best part of a thousand years so that's a lot of different people different cultures and a lot of different approaches to the body. Potentially one of the things that I think. It's really important when we talk about. This field is to acknowledge that the difference in in in fact what's happening say in Europe and this is potentially very very different conceptually to what's happening in other parts of the world as well so we try and be quite focused in what I think and write about but broadly speaking again one of the interesting things is where we go to try and learn more about what is actually relatively misunderstood moment in the past so also a different kind of written sources that we can turn to but one of the things I'm particularly interested in as an historian is he's the kind of other kinds of traces of the body and it's kind of a cultural prominence might leave in visual culture immaterial culture and also we might. Let's turn with colleagues Bioch- Eulogy to actual physical remains of humans to find also two different things so to answer your question what the body is or how people can see who it really depends on some ways way. You'll look. I'm looking right now at the cover of the US addition. And it's a really Kaushal. I put it bloodless depiction in a way of kind of gory. Amputation of a leg and a replacement presumably with a with a wooden lag as conducted by what looks to be religious men but also with the assistance of several angels one of sort of carrying the dead lower limb away and the fellow. This is being done to is lying. There is closed his head kind of wrapped wrapped up. What are we seeing here? And there's no blood there's no blood so it's a really interesting image and one of the reasons why we wanted to put on the cover of the. US Edition. Was it really sums up all of the many different complicated. I cost me so I was just talking about so the image is actually from an altarpiece so a large wooden panel painted in oil paint made in Spain probably the very end of the fifteenth century and sometime in the fourteen ninety S. We think it's actually in the wellcome collection in London which is an amazing collection of history of medicine. And as you say you have these two men seemingly go about an attention This isn't a normal amputation. Things that's really important to say. And this comes up with the end of the book this object in discussions of amputation in various kinds of medieval surgery array European medieval surgery. especially is that Hudson. Petitions were very rarely on taken. This is a moment in which medical the efficacy of surgery in particular Akilah especially what we considered to be serious surgeries things like I'm petitions. It's not something that's often attempted. It's known to be very dangerous and often very unsuccessful zestful and so in a sense. This imports the world of kind of ill health from a more secular world and places instead in a spiritual one so the two people who are undertaking. This miraculous surgery are in fact. Saints the pair of Dr Saints Cosmas and Damian who are often identified identified as a pair in European medieval Christian would actually in Byzantine just. Wow they're very popular science in the Byzantine world so in and around the eastern Europe and Greece in. What is today Turkey in the Middle East and they are two doctors who were became kind of early saints of the Christian Church and often figures amongst many other things biggest biggest who appealed to in times of heating and this is actually story that's taken from the miracle narratives which surround these two saints and the story goes like this guy has has some kind of problem with his leg? Some text described as a cancerous growth others as a much more kind of irritation of the skin of the see. It may be as Almost a kind of deadening of the leg either way is like is in trouble and he falls asleep one night and dreams that he is visited by these these two saints who take Lenk Im. PT With The kind of stories talk about golden instruments and kind of be useful very unscaled instruments. That's right delicate. Fine things with the assistance of angels and replace it with a wooden like as it does maybe seemed like but actually with the leg of an African man who had died the previous day This leg is miraculously grafted on. And surely enough the man awakes to discover that his leg has in fact been amputated and it was. It wasn't necessarily a dream or wasn't dream it's been made real upon waking and he goes and continues to pay homage to the saints in. Thanks so it gives us a really interesting idea All firstly the practicalities of some parts of medieval medicine. People are aware it's dangerous to do this kind of thing so the fact that is successful is in itself a miracle but the very idea that we're talking talking about miracles and medicine as being a spiritual concern. I think drools back to to thinking a little bit about how in some ways similar today but in some ways right differently today especially in the often heavily religious context of the late Middle Ages how healing could be seen kind of boldly health and sickness could be seen as the physical moral spiritual so one to which we tend to a doctor a real life doctor physician or surgeon or apothecary or midwife but also in the Middle Ages to our spiritual limits of curious. It's quite striking image and mom which puzzled as interesting things together

Middle Ages Middle East Europe United States Jack Hartnell Greece University Of East Anglia Pasadena Dr Saints Cosmas Bioch Eastern Europe Turkey Spain Akilah London Hudson Mediterranean North Africa Rome
Ubisoft announces Watch Dogs: Legion, Rainbow Six Quarantine, and more

Latest In Tech News

05:37 min | 1 year ago

Ubisoft announces Watch Dogs: Legion, Rainbow Six Quarantine, and more

"You'll Hymie have access your own game subscription library of over one hundred Ubisoft games, and all of their deal sees it will include early access, and new releases like watchdogs, allegiance. It'll launch on September third in twenty twenty. It'll be playable on Google Stadio also roller champions is a skill based team PB p sports game. Interesting concept, I can see them borrowing a lot of elements from rocket Louis, but rollerblade type thing. So I'm kind of interested to see what exactly is going to go on. They have a gameplay trailer that goes along with it. You'll be able to pre play a pre alpha demo for the next few days on PC. Also, those of you wondering about rainbows six wealth. Quarantine is the next version to come out is a three player tactical player versus enemy coop game coming in early. Twenty twenty looks scary almost like a horror game. We'll see how it turns. Out. They just dropped first gameplay details. So but if you're not really up to that, and you're more up the dancing just dance is still dancing. And so as we laid game in a series just dance twenty twenty is coming to switch PS four Xbox One stadia. And we yeah. You heard that, right. A. We game twenty nineteen also who mobile strategy game called Tom Clancy's, elite squad will bring characters from multiple Clancy franchises together. So you can almost put together Sam Fisher in rainbow six dude, whoever else. We want to guess team up fun. Also, the division two will be free to play from June thirteenth to the sixteenth. The games first major update DC outskirts expedition will kick off in July with episode one sending you to places like the national zoo episode to that they plan on dropping this fall will send you to the Pentagon and episode three will send you back to New York City in early. Twenty twenty. One more division news tidbit the upcoming movie directed by David Leach will be produced with net flicks. And it's going to be a little bit different. So don't expect it to be exactly what you're used to from playing in the game. So, yeah, if you're interested in division two, but you have June thirteenth start and you have until the sixteenth of play and just get tastes get a feel for the division to see if this game you want to enjoy. And obviously, if it is while good for you. You finally have the deal sees coming up. A couple of weeks later, also assassin's creed odyssey will be getting story creator and discovery tour mode, so yeah, you can make your own assassin's creed missions, including dialogue, and branching pathways and share it with others. It's an open beta starting today discovery tour lets you wander ancient Greece unhindered by enemies learning all about its history. Man. Let me tell you. They did a good job researching looking into everything. So looking forward to that rainbow six sieges next season. Operation phantom site will be out today as well. For honor has a new limited time event called shadows of the hit the Curie available all this week adventure time is finally crossing over with berol Hala, so Jake Finn, and Princess, bubblegum will be added to the game as playable characters. Plus a new buddy match type where you can play two characters at once the update is available today. They're playable for free until June twenty fifth, and then they're going to go behind a little box pay. While on you'll have to pay for it. So. You. We saw stupid anyways. Also, it's always sunny in Philadelphia actors are working with Ubisoft on TV comedy about video game development. So. Mythic quest Raven's Bank went is a television show that he cast mate. Charlie day are putting together with UB. It'll be comedy for apple TV plus about game development. Just put it on YouTube red, please, not apple TV, plus, plus signs, anyways, any case. You're all wondering the thing that kind of summed, it all up on stage for Ubisoft as it was while John Byrne. Paul brought a dog onstage. Now, the dog that John apparently talked about the upcoming ghost recon break point. That's coming at Tober fourth. The game will include AIT might for solo players as part of its post launch plan. It also have an official community for ghost recon fans called ghost recon delta company, the dog will want a beta of ghost recon break point on September fifth,

Twenty Twenty Ubisoft Tom Clancy John Byrne Google Apple Rocket Louis Youtube Sam Fisher New York City David Leach Greece AIT Pentagon Tober Official Berol Hala Paul
It's National Unicorn Day!

The Ralph Report

01:58 min | 1 year ago

It's National Unicorn Day!

"What's unicorns? You have a daughter so uniforms too big for you. Right. It is everything in my house right now. My daughter lives and dies by eunuch realize unicorn pajamas unicorns on the bed pillows with unicorns. Everything is unicorns. Now. See I don't I don't live in the world of unicorns, but they're wonderful mythical creatures Eddie, do you remember? In the mid eighties. When they when the guy did the hoax with the unicorn s and the woods, and he's like there was a whole world for like twenty seconds thought that was a unicorn, and this is going to be creepy, and everyone hates the circus. Anyway, now it's out of business, but Ringling Brothers for a while one of their star attractions was a unicorn really, and I'm not quite sure how they created that unicorn. I don't think I want to know, but they used to try it out this beautiful white horse that had somehow a fix to its, and I don't wanna know how it happened. But the for a while in the eighties. That was a big deal was at hoax. Yeah. Yeah. They've they've come full circle unicorns have been popular since ancient Greece. And the ancient Greeks believed they lived and exotic India see, that's the beauty of the internet. You can't fool anybody with that show any more back then. Yeah. You said it's over there and create a store and everybody buy into it. Oh, yeah. They live in India is a bunch of unicorns over there their magic the poop custard. Whatever may wrong. Yeah. So yeah, I look if you got a kid, then absolutely. You're into the unicorn. Craze. That's happening right now. However, if you're an adult and you still love the unicorns. Maybe you wanna look in the mirror say, maybe ridge, just I mean, I know I'm a guy in a room full of Batman toys, keep it contained. Just talk about antiques, usually and move on. Well, I'm saying if it's an antique unicorn, then maybe you can go with it. But if you're the person who's got like a bunch of unicorns on your desk at work and stuff, and it's a Batman unicorn hang onto how dare user you're calling me a hypocrite. I won't stand for it. All right. If you like unicorns. Go ahead. Go nuts. Ed. He's got a point today is also national name yourself day. We have

India Ringling Brothers Eddie Greece Twenty Seconds
Assassin’s Creed Odyssey DLC to be tweaked after forced romance backlash

Kinda Funny Games Daily

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey DLC to be tweaked after forced romance backlash

"Ooh. Yeah. The decision ominous asan's creed odyssey for glad media award in the new outstanding video game category was a difficult. One in the wake of controversy regarding its recent downloadable content. Its presence here will surely raise eyebrows. We understand those concerns in wish to address them directly one assassin's. Creed odyssey won't in October twenty eighteen it quickly became a hit with the LGBTQ community as the first role playing game and its long running franchise odyssey gave players unprecedent control over their character and story, including the ability to form same sex romantic relationships. LGBTQ identities were an intrinsic part of the game's world set in fictional, ancient Greece, and for many players Cassandra Helio and Alexis became beloved examples of authentic LGBTQ representation. This all changed with the DLC episode released last week legacy of the first blade shadow heritage in which a storyline. Unavoidably places Cassandra slash Alexi goes into a heterosexual relationship at worst. This sends the. The harmful message, the sexual orientation can be changed at will. And that LGBTQ people can choose to conform to hetero normative expectations in spite of their identities to be clear this nomination should not be taken as an endorsement of the deal seat. Ubisoft has publicly apologized for the for the acknowledgement steak instance last week Gladys men and direct contact with saw in an effort to work together. Improve aspects of this deal seen future content releases the forthcoming updates the shadow heritage nets by just yesterday are positive step. And we applaud them for working to mitigate the damage. Let's while we're drilling into this statement off of one story drill into another story with another statement. So what happened if you remember when we were talking about this last week shadow airdrop episode to the deal as they've said here, you get put into a heterosexual relationship at the end, the idea being you need to further the bloodline that way, they can keep the continuity of assassin's creed going, they would've out people are acting like that's not cool. That's totally against what you said. We could do with the character and the character Bill and somebody who built my. Freedom of the entire game. The exactly very weird thing to use off said, you know, what you're right sorry. We were heads down. We didn't make we didn't think this through. We're going to in the next episode three put in a choice that and dialogue that lets you get out of it. And let it makes bulb on crafted that way, right that however has already been changed because the idea was that we can't we can't do anything. So to we're going to do some of three yesterday after we went off the air. We saw this statement after hearing player feedback in Cussing within the development team. We are making changes to a cut scene and some dialogue in shadow heritage to better reflect the nature of the relationship for player selecting a non-romantic storyline. These changes along with renaming trophy slash achievement are being made now and we'll be implemented upcoming patch. We've also been carefully looking at the next episode bloodline to ensure the paths that players experience mirror. The choices. They make in the game. So to be clear bloodlines bloodline episode three shadow heritage is number. Two they were going to screw stuff. Screw chain stuff in bloodline to reflect the reaction to two. But now because reactions been loud enough amd because they worked with glad they're actually going back and fixing episode to patching out to change it all so I think that's a better choice in the end.

Cassandra Helio Ubisoft Greece AMD Gladys Bill Development Team Alexi Alexis
Brooklyn, Kevin and Jason Schreier discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Brooklyn, Kevin and Jason Schreier discussed on Kinda Funny Games Daily

"Oh and we're also brought to you by sticks in brooklyn but i'll tell you about that later because we got another meaty what is always will be the rope report did it did it did it for some new six items on the rope report bakers does it he's doing an accent over there the way you said new oh okay cool i liked it i just like to experiment zest everybody knows kevin is via actress you can play a legal marvel superheroes to pisa tinkerer in there i'm so jealous of that oh yeah being a voice actor and a game that that's like a dream come true so just happens meals i know i know i know i know it it does does getting to use those tentacles ev influence pull me into one of these okay maybe you know maybe start playing ball around here what do you what do you want never wanna the rope report assassin's creed guess what there's another one coming it's been leaked in jason schreier has the full report of course because he's amazing that's all he does the next this acids creed is called odyssey and we'll take place in ancient greece according to a new report from french site jibbidy live which adds that odyssey is a sequel to last year's assassin's creed origin period ca talk you can confirm this report we've heard the same details from three people who've played the game and several more have heard about it hand well origins added which rpg elements honestly we'll take things even further those people said bringing dialogue options to the series for the first time you'll be able to play as either a male or female protagonist although the builds we've heard about did not feature origins main characters bike or i say that right i think so andrea is always wanted correct me i always wanted to play more of origins because every love.

Brooklyn Kevin Jason Schreier Greece Pisa Andrea