24 Burst results for "Amy radel"

"amy radel" Discussed on Week In Review

Week In Review

04:29 min | Last month

"amy radel" Discussed on Week In Review

"Welcome to friday. Welcome to the week in review. I'm bill radke. It's good to have you along with us today. The next hour. We're going to figure out what happened this week. And what it means with our journalist to panel which today is seattle time senior reporter. Welcome back patrick malone. Thanks for having me great to be here. Also independent journalist. Jane see who welcome back to the show. Jane and now thanks for nominee are. We got the stranger editor chase burns. Good to see you again to chase nice to be back. I'm looking outside is it. Is it cloudy. Today is it. Misty is at foggy is at smoky. Is it hazy is. I think it's cloudy. I put on a sweater thinking it was like fall all of a sudden but now i'm sitting in my apartment's wedding so i might be wrong living in cloud today. Just kind kinda nice honestly. After all the hot weather it is kind of nice. We're gonna we're gonna talk smoke and fire a little bit later in the show by the way we are live streaming this thing. I can see my guests. You can see my guests. Because we're on youtube and facebook you can find a spice searching. Koa w public radio okay. Let's let's get at this week in review. We had a little election this week. A primary election before we get to seattle mayor. Kowoc's amy radel says seattle's city attorney. Pete holmes is currently running behind two challengers former public defender. Nicole thomas kennedy. She says if elected she would end the prosecution of most misdemeanors in seattle. The top vote getter for city. Attorney is an davison. She's a lawyer who previously ran for. Lieutenant governor as a republican davison says if elected she would put a special focus on high frequency offenders who don't respond to alternative programs. Patrick is me do we as a city. We want to put fewer people in jail. Do we wanna put more people in jail. What is your read so far. It looks like we might find that out in november. You know this for one thing. You turn out isn't ever expected to be very high in these things so it's a.

bill radke patrick malone chase burns seattle Jane Kowoc amy radel Pete holmes Nicole thomas kennedy davison youtube facebook Patrick
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:40 min | 2 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is komo. W i'm page browning tear-gas choked the air and loud. Bangs and rubber bullets rang out for days on end last summer in seattle as police responded to growing protests over racial injustices a new report suggests that the response by seattle police last may inflamed things further and they should handle future protests much differently. Kyw's amy radel has reported on this new analysis and joins us now. Hey amy page. So i we're did. The analysis of the spd's come from this report is called a sentinel review and it was created by a group of police and community members that were brought together by the city's office of inspector general and this particular report takes a really deep dive on that first weekend of protests we saw in seattle may twenty-ninth up to june. First lisa. judge is the inspector general for seattle. And so she told the city council today that she thought it was important that this group did include community members and police officers because at the end of the day. This report really is for. Spd to to take take the heart and to make those changes to keep this from happening again so amy. This analysis is of the first incidents of protests at the end of may early june and reviews how police handled it. What was happening during that time. That the inspector general reviewed. Yeah there was so much happening in just a few days span Just this weekend accounted for twenty percent of spd's use of force related to protests for the rest of twenty twenty. I mean you know all over. Different parts of the city One part of this report that to me was interesting was on may twenty ninth there were protests in the chinatown international district They didn't get as much attention. But the report says that this was really significant for what came on in the next few days. And that's because what. The report describes was well organized. Mostly white protesters That did some property damage through a neighborhood of asian american owned businesses and police who were watching that in their mind became really fearful about anarchists with criminal intent coming to seattle or participating like this community members in their version was the police were standing by and that they would have intervened more if it had been people of color doing this damage so there was anger and fear that was amping up on multiple sides As this happened and then the review goes on to look at what happened next Downtown you know the child who was hit by pepper spray. The destruction of police vehicles. The police rifles getting stolen. And then the confrontations outside the east precinct where police used tear gas on the demonstrators. And i heard you say amy that. These few days accounted for twenty percent of spd's use of force at protests for the rest of twenty twenty. What did this new analysis find. So this review found that a lot of the things that the police did in response actually inflamed the protests Telling people to leave when they had no way to get out of downtown for example using tear-gas on an entire crowd rather than focusing on the few people at the edges who were committing crimes Overall just not signaling that the police respected the right of those peaceful demonstrators to be there. Amy how could this change what we see at the next demonstrations in seattle. The report contains fifty four recommendations so dozens and dozens of things to do differently Lisa judge says she expects s. p. d. to formally respond to all of them. Some of them are things that spd's says they've already implemented on better communication. They have more of a pa system to make sure that people in the crowd can hear the instructions Try not to inflame anti police protests specifically by drying back a bit And they say they did get more effective at going after specific people committing crimes while protecting the rights of the larger crowd. Okay well what does the report call for that. Spd is not currently doing. Yeah they have several ideas and you know the inspector general admitted. This is a difficult moment for spd to take on anything additional They're confronting staffing shortages and increased gun violence in seattle. But one thing. The report highlights is the importance of officer wellness. You know that s pd in the city need to focus on preventing the exhaustion and the stress that could be a factor in decision. Making another idea is to have dialog officers at protests. Who talk to the protesters before and during these events just to make better more smooth communication as pd. Says they have done that in the past. Sometimes that wasn't something protesters wanted that weekend. But this would take that approach a bit farther and then one recommendation. That isn't something that costs money or staff would be just to change. Spd's policy which right now says they have to be neutral during demonstrations To allow them to show support of protestors right to be there in a way that the panel said might have diffused some of these tensions And they said at the very least. They need to make sure officers. Who are disrespectful to protesters know that that's unacceptable. Well that's all the time we have with. Amy radel who covers police reform and so many other things for k. Uaw thanks so much. Amy nail you're welcome..

seattle spd Kyw amy radel amy page komo office of inspector general amy Lisa judge lisa Amy Amy radel Uaw Amy nail
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

02:03 min | 2 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Some new and controversial laws governing police tactics and use of force are now in effect in washington state. You know w amy radel reports. The new laws require police to use de escalation tactics and the minimal force necessary. They prohibit the use of force and less people are committing crimes or pose an imminent threat of harm. The city of kent posted an interview with police chief. Rafael padilla in which he said. The laws may alter his department's response to calls my ask without is. Please be patient and please have some understanding that if we say we are not coming. And that's because it probably falls in the category of these new restrictions that we can't go but state representative jesse johnson who sponsored the legislation says. There's nothing in it to stop. Police from going to a scene republic expects them to arrive in. We expect them to arrive to. And so when. I hear that there's some law enforcement agencies that are saying their officers not to show up. That's that's a great concern. Johnson says in the vast majority of behavioral health crises officers will have the authority to detain someone or transport them to a hospital for involuntary commitment. The new law also raises the bar on when police can use force to detain someone. Who's running away. Chief padilla says it may allow suspects to flee if i just have suspicion that the person's Involved they run. I may not as a police officer. Now be able to chase that person. Representative johnson says the new probable cause standard applies to lower level crimes and is meant to prevent racial profiling. We just don't want the situation where the dispatcher calls and says there is a theft in the person had a red hat and the officer goes and finds anyone with red hat in uses physical force to detain them. He also says legislators plan to clarify that. The laws are not intended to ban any less lethal weapons like being backgrounds. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news..

amy radel Rafael padilla jesse johnson Chief padilla kent washington Representative johnson Johnson Amy radel
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

03:55 min | 2 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Over the past year we've spent a lot of time covering police shootings and the pro that result from those incidents but we haven't heard as much about how local law enforcement is responding to these headlines. So we asked. Kyw's amy radel to check in with local police departments to see what's changed and she started out in the south king. County city of tukwila. Amy welcome i can. So why did you choose to look at tukwila. Well i was asking around. And i wanted to find an agency that seemed like they were kind of engaging in and dealing with the concerns that were raised last year around community trust in police and to see what actual changes were taking place as a result of all these calls for reform so i spoke to people from different perspectives on a few of them pointed to took willa as a place that seemed to be taking this on. And did you find what's happening there while tukwila's a really racially diverse city. They've had a succession of chiefs. That seemed like they had a pretty good rapport with the community. So already kind of a good solid culture Eric dreaver is the current chief. And he's taken the interesting step of asking community representatives to review every use of force at the department So that could mean. Every time an officer puts hands on or restrain someone handcuffs them all the way up to deadly force And so these representatives watch all the videos and read all the reports. We're doing our best to minimize use of force on our end as well as build the relationships out so that when force is used there's an understanding behind. Why why was the force us chief. Dreaver says they're the only agency he knows of that has community members on this use of force review board and he said one reason they're doing this is that under. I nine forty which voters passed three years ago. Every police agency has to appoint community representatives that they keep informed and updated when they have a deadly force investigation so they have people ready to serve in this role and chief dreaver said deadly force. Incidents are really rare so he thought instead of calling these people just at those times. This is a way to have a more ongoing relationship interesting so these community members are taking a closer look at these use of force reports all of them and then what happens after that. This is a really new process so there were four community representatives who took part in this recent review for the tukwila pd And so far chiefs river says they mostly just had questions about what they saw But he says if they flag a use of force.

Kyw amy radel south king Eric dreaver tukwila willa Dreaver Amy dreaver us chiefs river
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

02:03 min | 5 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"The verdict in the derek. Chauvin trial is bringing up strong emotions for lots of people in. Kyw's amy rydell spoke to a group who've lost family members to police encounters in our state. And here's how they reacted to the news. I pulled over. I was driving. When i heard the news and i had a pullover because i was afraid of my yelling and screaming might get me pulled over and i cry and ice cream. I got my windows open in iran outside ice cream like a greedy and i say my nelly. We did it. It's really just the beginning. Hopefully this is a step forward. That juries now no. They can convict and officer. It almost seemed to pass like they were given instructions that no matter what. You can't convict this officer into everybody. This that's been discouraged along this journey. Like stay encouraged staying courage. This isn't over. We're just starting and we're renting for justice for all of us. But i'm very happy for the flight family. This has been happening. Everywhere in a lot of us have not gotten justice We won't ever get justice really and there will be no closure but this gives me hope. Hope that that now that the people know that this this is happening. That will stop. It will cost this to happen is not because you know we're we're we should be. Because there was such a pal outcry from a multi racial multi generational movement. There was such a powerful outcry that the courts in the system felt like. They had no other choice. So put that energy into our families that was elaine. simon's maria her own fred. Thomas po leah pie maryland covarrubias and casteel. Each of them has had a family member killed by police. Amy radel k. u. a. w. news..

Amy radel Chauvin Each Thomas maryland maria rydell elaine Kyw simon
Judge dismisses lawsuit that sought to block hazard pay for Seattle grocery workers

KUOW Newsroom

01:07 min | 6 months ago

Judge dismisses lawsuit that sought to block hazard pay for Seattle grocery workers

"Today. Federal judge threw out a lawsuit seeking to block hazard pay for seattle grocery workers. Seattle city attorney. Pete holmes is calling it a win for the city and those employees k. u. o. w. amy radel reports seattle's ordinance requires four dollars an hour in hazard pay for grocery workers during the pandemic in their federal lawsuit. The northwest grocery association and washington. Food industry association said. The ordinance was unconstitutional for singling out. Just one group of employees. They also said it was preempted by federal labor laws but u s district judge. John kuhn our said cities do have the power to enact minimum labour standards. He cited seattle's findings that supermarkets have earned record breaking profits during the pandemic and that grocery workers have a higher risk of contracting covid than the public at large buren. King county have also passed hazard pay requirements the grocery store chain. Qafac says it will close to stores in seattle partly in response to the law. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news.

Seattle City Pete Holmes Amy Radel Seattle Northwest Grocery Association Food Industry Association John Kuhn Washington Qafac King County
Six Seattle police officers at  Washington DC Capitol riot being investigated whilst their identity remains under wraps

KUOW Newsroom

00:54 sec | 6 months ago

Six Seattle police officers at Washington DC Capitol riot being investigated whilst their identity remains under wraps

"The identities of six seattle police officers who attended a pro-trump rally january sixth remain under wraps that's according to today's ruling from the washington state court of appeals. Kyw's emmy radio reports seattle's office of police. Accountability is investigating whether the six officers broke any laws or policies when they attended president trump. Stop the steel rally in washington. Dc the officers say they did not participate in storming the us capitol building. They argue that releasing their names will harm their privacy safety and constitutional rates. A law student has sought the officers names saying not knowing them erodes public trust in the department. The court says it's not clear how knowing officers names would resolve any cloud of controversy when the investigation is still ongoing. The appeals court scheduled. A hearing in the case for april second. Amy radel k. u. o. w.

Washington State Court Of Appe KYW Office Of Police Seattle Washington United States Amy Radel
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

01:43 min | 8 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"What kind of measures are okay for police to use against protestors when things get out of control last night police and community members met to discuss. Spd's plans to adopt more crowd control. Weapons kyw's amy radel reports. Braxton baker with the seattle group for police accountability says watching the riot in the us capital earlier this month he saw police being overrun says he could understand the need for them to be properly equipped user. Walk up whatever the case may be like. They're literally rioting breaking into apple. The different may be for me that that's not what happening here in seattle be. We're still being met with the same force in seattle. Police use of crowd control. Weapons has been very controversial. The courts of weighed in and the city council has banned them but the police department wants to continue to have blast balls which are small explosive devices and something new called pepper balls which emit pepper spray when crowds pose a substantial risk to safety or property baker and other community members. Object to that policy. Assistant chief tom. Mahaffey says the agency has greatly reduced. Its use of those weapons in recent months but he says seattle police also have to worry about people who want to harm them back. Remains it to my precinct surrounded by concrete barriers. Right now because they have been subject to having multiple cocktails thrown out attempts were made to murder police officers by cement getting a door closed while the rest of the building was lit on fire. Seattle police are taking public comments on the policy. Through the end of the month it will then have to be reviewed by a federal judge. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news..

Amy radel tom. Mahaffey last night earlier this month Spd Braxton Seattle seattle police seattle radel
Seattle Police Department investigating 5 officers for attending Jan. 6 rally in Washington DC

KUOW Newsroom

00:57 sec | 8 months ago

Seattle Police Department investigating 5 officers for attending Jan. 6 rally in Washington DC

"More seattle. Police officers are now admitting to attending the rally in washington. Dc that led to insurrection of the us capital k. o. w.'s. Amy radel reports the seattle police department. Says it's now investigating total of five officers for attending the rally. The investigation will determine whether they broke laws or violated. Spd policies at a meeting wednesday of the city's community police commission spd officer mark mullins black and a member of the commission said these allegations affect his trust in his own colleagues outwardly. To guard ourselves against people who mean to harm meaning whites permit and things of that nature is unsettling to think that someone might be dying. You backing you up. That's doing that as well. Commissioner said they're committed to probing issues of racial bias and right wing extremism within as

Amy Radel Seattle Police Department Mark Mullins Black Seattle Washington United States
Seattle police officers who were in DC during riot at US Capitol placed on administrative leave

KUOW Newsroom

01:11 min | 9 months ago

Seattle police officers who were in DC during riot at US Capitol placed on administrative leave

"Two seattle police officers are on paid. Leave while the agency investigates whether they participated in last wednesday's riot at the us capitol. Here's kyw's amy radel. The investigation began when a colleague saw a photo of the officers that appeared to be from the pro trump rally in washington. Dc andrew meyer. Berg directs police accountability. He says normally attending a political rally would be allowed under sp policies. I wanna be abundantly. Clear that officers don't abandon their first amendment rights just because they you know they become a police officer joined the seattle police department. That officers can't engage in activities that would undermine public trust even on their own time. Myer says many participants of last week's riot came with the intent to break the law by invading the building. Dude the officers involved engage in that were they actively planning they engage in. I'm pretty rally conversations that showed intensity so those are the things that we'd want to know. His investigation will determine whether the officers violated spd's policies on professionalism or discretion. He says it could take about two months. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news.

KYW Amy Radel Andrew Meyer Seattle Berg SPD Washington Myer United States
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

03:45 min | 9 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Amy radel house. Their story valerie. Kings quest for housing is unusual in some points but all too common and others. Her household consists of her daughter and her daughter's eight step siblings along with their mom. Ashley hedrick their children's father is incarcerated but king says the two moms have banded together to juggle child care work and school where a family were team. And we're blended family take pride in it and at this point we're stuck king has taken the lead on their fruitless search for rental housing. I have applied for over seventy five two hundred applications. That's at least a minimum of sixteen dollars to forty dollars an application fees. right now. The family is staying in a hotel and tom water and she says time is running out. King is alaska native and says she's grateful that the nisqually tribe is paying for the families. Current hotel stay. She says the tribe has also offered to pay their first and last month's rent if they can find a place to live she also has something called a rapid rehousing voucher from thurston county. Which would cover her rent if she could find a landlord who would accept it. I had a voucher for eleven months. And i couldn't find a place and what's rafted we housing. If you're not rapidly getting rehouse. Tom webster doesn't dispute this problem. He's the manager of housing and homelessness prevention in thurston county. They issue vouchers. That can pay someone's rent for up to two years the vouchers and just households south. Just go out and look for rental housing But it's a challenge to to find someone who's willing to rent to them and here's why it's even harder now. During the pandemic the state declared a moratorium on evictions to help people who can't pay rent stay in their homes but that also meant even less turnover in rental housing webster says the number of households able to use these vouchers in thurston county actually declined by fifteen percent over the past year at the same time he says the county has lost nearly a quarter of its shelter beds due to covid precautions. They've relied more heavily on hotel vouchers especially for families. Carrie graf is a staff attorney with the northwest justice project in olympia she says the pandemic is compounding problems that already existed in calling barriers to housing situations where people have a criminal record on addiction record or even just poor credit and it makes it almost impossible to find landlords willing to rent to them. King's family faces a perfect storm of those barriers. She says she's improved her credit score and worked to overcome a criminal record which includes a felony conviction for being a passenger in a stolen car but she says the size of their household has also made shelters and landlords reluctant to have them. She says they were forced to leave another time. Water hotel last may in the middle of the night for non-payment. We slept in the car outside in the parking lot. Actually and my significant other at that time he was actually side with all of our belongings because the children were in the car with me. The hotel couldn't confirmed that account. Meanwhile king is trying to cobble together money to extend their current hotel stay but she has no idea what's next and school is back in session have a hotspot from the school district. But are we gonna plug are the laptops in that. I've got sixty kids in sixty five grades. The kids are enrolled in schools in lacey and some water. That king says she's willing to go anywhere they could find housing. Amy radel k. u. o. w. news..

thurston county Amy radel Ashley hedrick valerie Tom webster Carrie graf northwest justice project King king alaska webster olympia
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

04:21 min | 10 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Advocates for women are watching carefully to see what impact the pandemic is having on domestic violence rates. Historically studies have shown an uptick in domestic violence cases following disasters. But now the courts in seattle are trying a new approach there providing more customized treatment to perpetrators and bringing the voice of their victim into the process k. u. o. w.'s. Amy radel has more in twenty. Eighteen neighbors called seattle police to report a loud argument between a young couple in their apartment. The man was arrested and faced a misdemeanor charge for assault against his partner. Who ended up with bruises on her arms right in jail. Obviously something's gone horribly wrong here. That's m who spoke to us on the condition that we not use his full name instead of facing prosecution. He was allowed to take part in. The new intervention program created by the seattle municipal court. He joined a group of about a dozen men meeting once a week. He says he expected the sessions to be as dry as traffic safety class but he says they really helped him learn to manage his anger. So basically if you can recognize these series of escalating and catch yourself you can stop it. And that's where a lot of waco They talk about. Mindfulness comes into play through the year. Long program 'em. He learned that confrontations don't come out of nowhere. There is a rising level of tension beforehand. He learned specific ways to monitor himself. And head off those escalations. Eventually so you know the devolved starts to rise and it's like wait what are we. What are we actually even arguing about. Let's just bring it down. Let's just listened to the song for a minute and you know what just. There's no reason this needs to turn into a thing now. Amazon a new relationship and says it's going well. The seattle municipal court created the domestic violence intervention program in two thousand eighteen. That's after a steady by the washington state institute for public policy concluded that standard domestic violence interventions weren't working according to judge adam eisenberg so after that study came out courts across the country but also particularly in our state. Where like we don't know what to do with domestic violence eisenberg says the new program is more tailored to each defendant specific issues like housing instability or addiction. Participants come to court to provide updates on how things going and whether they find the program useful and the goal is to give them tools so they don't come back to court and they don't continue to mistreat their loved ones so who needs another conviction if we can get them successfully through the program. The approach reflects a changing view of domestic violence offenders who were once regarded as less capable of rehabilitation many pressures issues that lead to violence and triggers violence. That's chris anderson with the seattle city attorney's office. He says this program tries to help people address those triggers. His office is now planning to use this program for most people who commit domestic violence misdemeanors. If participants completed and don't re-offend the charges against them will be dismissed. We want you to get better. We want you to engage in this treatment. And we'll and we'll just let this all go the end if you can do that for letting this all go seems like something that might go against the wishes of the victims or survivors of domestic violence but victims advocate. Julie huffman with the city attorney's office says that's not her experience and we hear most often from people you know. I don't want him to be in jail. I don't wanna conviction i just want. That behavior changed huffman. Says seattle's program is unique statewide in having a victim advocate at the table throughout his advocates are in contact with the victims and can raise their concerns next year. Huffman hopes to send out a not surveys to partners before during and after the intervention program to get their view of how the offenders so far the court finds fewer people who complete this program re-offend compared to those who don't take part judge eisenberg calls it encouraging but says they need more enrollment before drawing any conclusions. they have just over one hundred participants and about twenty graduates. so far. amy radel k. u. o. w. news..

seattle municipal court Amy radel seattle washington state institute for adam eisenberg waco seattle city eisenberg Amazon Julie huffman chris anderson huffman Huffman amy radel
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

04:44 min | 10 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is komo. W i'm kimmel com today. The seattle city council passed the twenty twenty one budget in eight to one vote. It includes new tiny house villages and an expansion of the program that sends firefighters and social workers to people in crisis but a central focus in the budget discussions. This fall has been whether this summer's protests calling for massive changes to police budgets and practices would affect sp funding kyw's. Amy radel is here to tell us about the outcome. Amy take us back to the summer when activists i called on city leaders to cut as pd funding by fifty percent right and a majority of seattle city council members agreed to that principle council members did try to make immediate cuts in salaries and certain police units. You know we saw chief carmen. Best resigned over their methods but as discussion began on next year's budget it became clear. The council wasn't seeking a fifty percent cut right away to recent escape a chairs the budget committee. And here's where she says. They ultimately came down regarding our seattle police department. The seattle city council along with the mayor competent combination of both cuts out twenty percent twenty percent and that includes both cuts and transferring some functions outside of spd right twenty percent not fifty percents. So how significant is that reduction Well if you look at other cities it's very significant. Cancel member mosquito has pointed out. Seattle has gone farther in this effort than any other. Us city except maybe austin texas. A year ago cut like this would have been unthinkable but people supporting what they called. the solidarity. budget kept the pressure up rate until the end this week. The council rejected their call to cut another nine million dollars last week and councilmember shama sawant said that was a disappointment and because of that has been justifiable anger and disgust at the establishment over the weekend from thousands of ordinary. People who have been committed to black lives matter. There were car caravans of activists to city council members homes this weekend and today the council agreed to cut an additional two million dollars from. Spd's budget They say that cut should make it so there will be no net increase in police officers hired next year They expect a higher the same number as the number projected to leave which is one hundred and fourteen officers amy. This year we've seen teach-ins street protests everything in between it's been a tense climate around this issue that's right and the movement to abolish police or to defend police is a high energy. Youth led movement today council member. Deborah horace said. She agrees with many goals of the movement but she said that she will not go at the pace. This activists have called for and she said she doesn't approve of this climate of shaming people or calling them out we're going to slowly insistent manically as much as we can redirect funds from the seattle police department to upstream programs to meet the needs of what a police department we believe should look like within. The confines of the consent decree are bargaining responsibilities. And everything else. And we heard council member. Lisa herbal talk about assaults that seattle police officers had intervened in and stopped in the last couple of weeks. So we're seeing some council members signal support for the core functions of police but about one hundred and thirty officers have left. Spd's this year and due to the hiring freeze. Those officers won't be replaced. So amy what changes to policing will. We see in the year to come from this budget. Seattle will be awarding at least sixty million dollars to nonprofit community based organizations Over this next year to create new types of crisis response so we will see those efforts grow and they say that the council members may seek more cuts. sp as these efforts come online Imani dynamic is a researcher with king county equity now and he envisions hubs around the city with staff who would help respond to nine one one calls in their areas. If any event nine one is contacted and emergency personnel asked. Our team would simultaneously shortly thereafter. Be notified of the calls nature and deploy in lieu of or with your general known fire medical. Spd so he gives that vision of what people mean when they talk about new kinds of nine. One one responses. I'm he says these workers would also be in touch with people before and after the emergency situation to help address underlying needs like housing or mental health services k. o. w.'s. Amy radel telling us about the seattle city council vote today. Amy thank you for this. Yeah thank you..

seattle city council Seattle Amy radel Spd Deborah horace Us shama sawant texas Lisa researcher austin king county k. o. w.
Seattle City Council approves new budget in 8-1 vote

KUOW Newsroom

02:19 min | 10 months ago

Seattle City Council approves new budget in 8-1 vote

"Today. The seattle city council passed the twenty twenty one budget in eight to one vote. It includes new tiny house villages and an expansion of the program that sends firefighters and social workers to people in crisis but a central focus in the budget discussions. This fall has been whether this summer's protests calling for massive changes to police budgets and practices would affect sp funding kyw's. Amy radel is here to tell us about the outcome. Amy take us back to the summer when activists i called on city leaders to cut as pd funding by fifty percent right and a majority of seattle city council members agreed to that principle council members did try to make immediate cuts in salaries and certain police units. You know we saw chief carmen. Best resigned over their methods but as discussion began on next year's budget it became clear. The council wasn't seeking a fifty percent cut right away to recent escape a chairs the budget committee. And here's where she says. They ultimately came down regarding our seattle police department. The seattle city council along with the mayor competent combination of both cuts out twenty percent twenty percent and that includes both cuts and transferring some functions outside of spd right twenty percent not fifty percents. So how significant is that reduction Well if you look at other cities it's very significant. Cancel member mosquito has pointed out. Seattle has gone farther in this effort than any other. Us city except maybe austin texas. A year ago cut like this would have been unthinkable but people supporting what they called. the solidarity. budget kept the pressure up rate until the end this week. The council rejected their call to cut another nine million dollars last week and councilmember shama sawant said that was a disappointment and because of that has been justifiable anger and disgust at the establishment over the weekend from thousands of ordinary. People who have been committed to black lives matter. There were car caravans of activists to city council members homes this weekend and today the council agreed to cut an additional two million dollars from. Spd's budget They say that cut should make it so there will be no net increase in police officers hired next year They expect a higher the same number as the number projected to leave which is one hundred and fourteen officers

Seattle City Council Amy Radel Us City Seattle Police Department AMY Carmen Shama Sawant Cancel Seattle Austin Texas 'S City Council SPD
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

03:38 min | 11 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"After more than three days of holding their breath biden harris supporters in seattle took to the streets this weekend and president trump and his supporters continue to dispute the election results. Kyw's amy radel hence more in seattle and other parts of the country. The honking was immediate and it went all day. People waved flags formed car caravans fireworks on capitol hill. They held outdoor dance parties and handed out cans of rainier. Beer reverend leslie. Braxton expressed relief at the election results as he preached to his congregation at new beginnings christian fellowship. In kent on sunday morning they should at least half the nation at least almost fifty one percent of the nation is saying finally finally four years that seemed like an eternity is over. four years of disrespect denigration division. Braxton also celebrated the historic election of kamala harris as the first woman the first black person and the first indian american to be vice president. The strongest thing america ever made out of a need of survival was a black woman. You can almost hear the shouts and the echoes from the sojourner truth and the harriet tubman in tukwila outside a senior housing complex de hussein was working not partying. He was helping distribute safeway gift cards to people suffering in the current economy but he lit up with asked about the presidential race. I was out beautiful. The says this election felt personal to him. He came to the us in twenty-six many other somali refugees who were cleared to fly only to be blocked from coming because of the trump administration's travel ban affecting several muslim majority countries. The scene says biden's commitment to end. The travel ban has been greeted with joy there. Oh for some of them. Under a vin. They'll elect flew in saint says he couldn't vote in this election. He expects to become a citizen next year but he did his best to campaign for some in seattle. The celebration was tempered with caution. Some republicans called it. Premature trump supporters held demonstrations at the state capital in olympia meanwhile labor groups and other progressives gathered in west park saturday under the banner. Our work continues. Susan zemun is a nurse who says health care. Workers need the full support of the us government to confront the cove pandemic. She hopes protesters will keep calling for universal suffrage and justice and not become complacent under biden. He will do what he needs to do but we have to make him do that. This is not the end. Today is the beginning of our fight to create the america that we have dreamed up for two hundred and fifty years on sunday. A group of volunteers wave. Us flags and biden harris banners on a seattle overpass over. I five kathleen. warren says. She started the anti-trump group alphabet resistance. On inauguration day 2017 they've been waving signs on overpasses since then a mix very anti trump but also what we want the good things. Justice peace equality. We've we've done a lot of black lives matter. She says when president trump has gone though leave the overpasses and move on other forms of activism. Also she said. The debates under a democratic president might be more nuanced for her and not lend themselves as easily to simple banners. In the meantime they're just savoring this moment. Any radio k. u. o. w. news..

biden trump seattle president Susan zemun Braxton saint us america kamala harris harriet tubman vice president safeway Kyw olympia amy radel kent christian fellowship
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

02:29 min | 11 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is komo news camel. Kim amid the overwhelming focus on the presidential race this election here in king county there were also decisions on the ballot that will have long term ramifications when it comes to policing voters have overwhelmingly approved changes to how the sheriff's office will be run including having the sheriff appointed not elected anymore here to explain what this means is. Kyw's amy radel. Amy hi either all right. So why is the move to have the sheriff appointed rather than elected a big deal. Well it means that we're going to have some new players in public safety in king county you know. Typically our elected sheriffs have come up from inside the department but now the county executive and the council wants to do a national search as they appoint the next sheriff similar to the way a lot of cities higher. Their chief of police council member rod dembowski says he appreciates that voters were willing to make this change. I was a big ask of voters. We asked people to really give up power at the ballot box for a better system. And i think they looked at the arguments warned against and said let's give it a try right and not everyone was in favor of this. Of course police. Union supporters spent a lot of money to try to block this around two hundred thousand dollars but they were unsuccessful. Why are they so opposed to this idea. The king county police officers guild and the sheriffs. Say when you have an elected sheriff. The accountability for the public is clear. Councilmember kathy lambert opposed these charter amendments. She's worried that an appointed sheriff will get more caught up in political pressures as she thinks seattle was with the protests around the east precinct. He saw what happened. Carmen when things became political and that was not good for the department at its ultimately showing not to be good for the city of seattle blames that climate for the number of police officers who are leaving as pd and so we can king county residents expect to see with county policing in the next year. And and what's going to happen with the current sheriff. Mitzi johann sheriff to hank nick will serve out the remaining year of her term. It goes through two thousand. Twenty one Meanwhile council member gra miso says they will convene a group of community stakeholders including family members of people who died at the hands of king. County deputies to talk about what they hope to see next. He supported these amendments. And he says they are a direct response to the demonstrations calling for police accountability. Kyw's amy radel. Thank you so much for this. Yeah thank you..

king county amy radel Mitzi johann sheriff rod dembowski Councilmember kathy lambert Kyw komo seattle Kim executive Carmen hank nick
"amy radel" Discussed on Seattle Now

Seattle Now

09:48 min | 11 months ago

"amy radel" Discussed on Seattle Now

"But first let's get you caught on washington governor. Jay inslee won a third term. He received sixty percent of the vote in the initial results. And joe biden one. Washington's twelve electoral votes on election day there were demonstrations a few hundred black lives matter protesters shutdown intersections in downtown seattle and south lake union tuesday night speakers during the demonstration said the call for racial equality will go on no matter who wins the white house and take care. A third wave of the kobe. Pandemic is ruling over washington more than one hundred and ten thousand people have now been diagnosed in the state and new cases are increasing. We're now seeing nearly seven hundred cases every day. That's close to our previous record back in july. It was a big night for races. Up and down the ballot. Just under four million people cast votes here in washington. They'll decide everything from who represents them in congress to how the king county sheriff's department is run. Kenya ws amy. Radel spent election day reporting on all of it and is here to break it down. Hey amy thank you yeah. You're welcome all right well before we get started. I want to note and this is big duty for you. We're taping this episode at three. Am on wednesday. So i thanks a lot and if you're a listener later in the day things may have changed so you can check k. o. w. dot org for the most recent national and local election results. All right amy so as of right now there are few things we know for sure. We're going to go for five things in fact that people should know number. One governor. jay inslee has won. A third term. Inslee is leading republican challenger. Lauren cult by twenty points in initial returns. Amy it's the first time. Washington governor's won a third term in almost fifty years. The last time was republican. Dan evans in one. Thousand nine hundred. Seventy two most of injuries visibility. This year has been his response to the pandemic. Did this help him while he was certainly in the public eye with almost daily press conferences. starting last spring So i take these results to mean that most voters feel like he's been striking the right balance or the best he can with all the very agonizing choices that covert has brought around public health and the economy. Yup the seattle now team took to calling inslee. Washington's dad throughout this pandemic his challenger culpo was very critical of the lockdowns and the mask mandate any add a lot of buzz on the ground. Many yard outside of the city of seattle but it seems like ultimately his message didn't resonate. What are you take away from that. Well i think maybe it didn't resonate in northwest washington. You know he won almost all the counties in eastern and south western washington At least in these initial results. But he didn't win. In the region that carries the most votes speaking of governor us representative denny heck defeated marco. Leah's for the governor's second-in-command lieutenant governor with forty seven percent of the vote. Emmy i served in the state legislature in the seventies. He said he was going to retire from congress. And now he's back. What exactly will be doing as lieutenant governor. Well he'll be presiding over the state senate and he'll fill in for governor jay inslee If he's out of state or can't serve for any reason. I'm you know there had been a lot of speculation about inslee. Possibly taking post in a biden administration opening the way for the lieutenant governor to take his place Heck has said if that did happen and there was a special election he would not seek. The governor's job yet. A lot of chatter about inslee leaving for a new administration. Potentially all right. So the second thing i wanted to ask you about this morning. Amy is how democrats and republicans are doing in the state. It seemed like it was a pretty good night for democrats. It was a good night They kept their control of statewide offices from governor to attorney general They may have unseated. The republican state treasurer only. The secretary of state's race is too close to call right now. the democratic party chair teen public hausky says right now. The democrats are gaining strength in suburban districts. You see the changing demographics of washington state suburbs. And i think that's why you'll see us. Pick up at least to a state fantasies as forty six state house and republicans are recognizing the sheer numbers in urban and suburban king. County are a real barrier for them right now. Here's republican party chair. Caleb heimlich clearly. We've gotta do better in king county I think what i saw. There was Cope with about twenty three percent. We just can't be competitive state wi with that margin in king county. He says they're going to work to recruit better candidates. And do more outreach. In king county all right so king county. I'm glad you brought this up. Because the third thing we wanted to talk about this morning where the two really important charter. Amendments on the ballot and king county both related to the sheriff's office both are passing right now amendment five would allow the sheriff to be appointed by the king county executive council amendment. Six would allow the king county council to change the structure and duties of the sheriff's office. Amy these charter. Remembrance seem like they could before jd from the black lives matter protests and the demands to change policing are they While the move to appoint the sheriff is kind of an older political contest in king county. It has switched back and forth in the past. But i think the amendment giving the county council more power over the sheriff's office is a direct response to the protests. Some council members want to redirect functions of the sheriff's office in the same way that the seattle city council is transferring certain functions. Out of the police department. Amy i'm curious. What stood out to you in these results. here well. I think it's interesting that you know. There were seven charter amendments on the ballot and king county and the one to make the sheriff appointed instead of elected past with the narrowest margin. I'm still had a strong showing. But the king county police officers guild led the campaign to keep the sheriff elected. They spent a lot of money on that campaign. And maybe that had an impact because the amendment is definitely passing the with a thirteen point lead okay. Washington's tenth congressional district also a very interesting race democrat versus democrat. There and right now. Former tacoma mayor marilyn strickland is leading by fifteen points. And this is notable amy why yet if strickland winds she'd be the first black person elected to congress from the entire pacific northwest. She would also be the first korean. American woman ever elected to congress. Amy does this tell you anything about. We're washington stands on the different shades of blue. Well i guess it shows that some moderate democrats can prevail when they have a more progressive challenger. Who's also another democrat. You know strickland used ahead the seattle chamber of commerce. While her opponent beth dolio was climate activist endorsed by bernie sanders Often it goes the other way in the state senate race acquire. We have two democrats and the more liberal challenger ingrid anderson is slightly ahead As and in seattle city council races last year the more lefty candidates one in most cases fascinating. Okay final thing amy voter. Turnout was huge. In this election. People were really engaged. Just how high are we expecting. Turn out to be kim. Women says we may get to ninety percent. statewide king. County already has more than eighty percent of its ballots returned Where breaking records that were just set in two thousand eight and it's really been driven this time by the early voting. You know people have been passionate about this election. They've wanted to make sure their vote would get counted. Despite concerns about the postal service being delayed and other kinds of challenges. I love it. More voting is always better. Amy all right before. I let you go quick lightning round to cover some of the other initial results. First secretary of state is a close race. Just how close is it about. Three percentage points. Kim hyman at fifty one gael tarleton at forty eight okay. Referendum ninety which asked voters to approve or reject me tori sex. Ed in washington. School saw a lot about that. Where does that stand right now. Sex ed is happening. It's leading with sixty percent of the vote. Okay you can still out right. Yes that's croquet all right seattle's prop one. Which would increase sales tax to pay for bus transit related projects. Where are we there. That has been massively approved with eighty two percent of the vote all right. Accessibility stands. When will we know more about the results. Amy and what will you be watching for more when ballot counts get updated this afternoon. Around four p. m Personally i'll be curious to watch how the secretary of state's race turns out. You know kim. Wyman has been an advocate for the vote by mail system nationally this year but democrats say they expect later results from king county to maybe put gael tarleton over the top and then we had republican leaders predicting that they'll do well in later returns so i'll be curious whether that bears out as well. All right locks to watch k. u. o. w. reporter amy radio. Thank you for your hard work on the election and for staying up all night for us. Oh you're welcome trish just a reminder our colleagues covering the election results around the clock go to k. o. w..

king county amy radio Jay inslee democrats Washington seattle washington congress joe biden marilyn strickland senate Kenya Kim hyman kobe seattle city council Dan evans Radel
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"There have been thirty nine homicides in Seattle so far this year more than there were in all of two thousand, , nineteen many victims were killed by guns that's prompted community members to meet in a gun violence roundtable to seek solutions K. UAW's Amy Radel reports Alicia Dasa is apparent whose son was shot and killed in Seattle. . Last may she's struggling not only with her son's death, , but the deaths of so many other young people since then I feel like right now as a community and as. . As parents <hes> a metal lost four where we are what we can do. . It's so overwhelming in the last few months. . Dasa spoke at a roundtable organized by converged media and the South Seattle Emerald Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz told the community members that this year's gun violence statistics are a challenge we are at the highest level in eleven years <hes> we've had three hundred, , twenty nine shots fired this year. . Let me give that perspective. . We had three hundred and thirty two. . All last year Diaz says the victims of gun violence have been disproportionately young black and male but community members are not calling for more funding for police sean good with the youth intervention program choose one eighty, , one city leaders to divert funding from the police to violence prevention groups are we could begin to invest in alternatives but we have to do. . So aggressively chief D as says, , he has to maintain public safety until new types of emergency responders are ready to go. . Amy Radel K. U. O. W. News? ?

South Seattle Emerald Seattle Alicia Dasa Adrian Diaz Seattle Amy Radel Amy Radel K. U. O. UAW sean good
With gun deaths up in Seattle, leaders ask how 'to bring us together'

KUOW Newsroom

01:38 min | 1 year ago

With gun deaths up in Seattle, leaders ask how 'to bring us together'

"There have been thirty nine homicides in Seattle so far this year more than there were in all of two thousand, nineteen many victims were killed by guns that's prompted community members to meet in a gun violence roundtable to seek solutions K. UAW's Amy Radel reports Alicia Dasa is apparent whose son was shot and killed in Seattle. Last may she's struggling not only with her son's death, but the deaths of so many other young people since then I feel like right now as a community and as. As parents a metal lost four where we are what we can do. It's so overwhelming in the last few months. Dasa spoke at a roundtable organized by converged media and the South Seattle Emerald Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz told the community members that this year's gun violence statistics are a challenge we are at the highest level in eleven years we've had three hundred, twenty nine shots fired this year. Let me give that perspective. We had three hundred and thirty two. All last year Diaz says the victims of gun violence have been disproportionately young black and male but community members are not calling for more funding for police sean good with the youth intervention program choose one eighty, one city leaders to divert funding from the police to violence prevention groups are we could begin to invest in alternatives but we have to do. So aggressively chief D as says, he has to maintain public safety until new types of emergency responders are ready to go. Amy Radel K. U. O. W. News?

South Seattle Emerald Seattle Alicia Dasa Adrian Diaz Seattle Amy Radel Amy Radel K. U. O. UAW Sean Good
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"There have been thirty nine homicides in Seattle so far this year more than there were in all of two thousand, nineteen many victims were killed by guns that's prompted community members to meet in a gun violence roundtable to seek solutions K. UAW's Amy Radel reports Alicia Dasa is apparent whose son was shot and killed in Seattle. Last may she's struggling not only with her son's death, but the deaths of so many other young people since then I feel like right now as a community and as. As parents a metal lost four where we are what we can do. It's so overwhelming in the last few months. Dasa spoke at a roundtable organized by converged media and the South Seattle Emerald Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz told the community members that this year's gun violence statistics are a challenge we are at the highest level in eleven years we've had three hundred, twenty nine shots fired this year. Let me give that perspective. We had three hundred and thirty two. All last year Diaz says the victims of gun violence have been disproportionately young black and male but community members are not calling for more funding for police sean good with the youth intervention program choose one eighty, one city leaders to divert funding from the police to violence prevention groups are we could begin to invest in alternatives but we have to do. So aggressively chief D as says, he has to maintain public safety until new types of emergency responders are ready to go. Amy Radel K. U. O. W. News?.

South Seattle Emerald Seattle Alicia Dasa Adrian Diaz Seattle Amy Radel Amy Radel K. U. O. UAW sean good
Oversight group finds Seattle officer didn’t mean to pepper spray child at protest; family attorneys speak out

KUOW Newsroom

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Oversight group finds Seattle officer didn’t mean to pepper spray child at protest; family attorneys speak out

"Attorneys for the father and child who were pepper sprayed by Seattle police say the result of the department's internal. Investigation. Are Not Enough K. you wo W's Amy Radel reports Mondo Avery and his son were pepper sprayed during protests against police violence in May. Their attorneys say they are disappointed but not surprised by the determination that the use of pepper spray did not violate Seattle Police Department policies the investigation by the Office of Police Accountability said the boy suffered a wrong but it was inadvertent and the. Officer did not commit misconduct. The statement from attorney David on behalf of the family says, if SPD policy allows an innocent child to be struck by pepper spray, that policy should be changed. It adds that OPA's investigation did not address whether the officers could've taken steps to prevent what happened Owens an attorney. James Bible say they intend to file a lawsuit since that incident, the city council and the federal courts have both acted to constrain SPD's of crowd control. Weapons Amy Radel K. U. O. W. News.

Seattle Police Department Attorney Office Of Police Accountabilit Amy Radel K. U. O. Amy Radel Seattle Mondo Avery Officer OPA James Bible Owens David
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"The Seattle symphony kicked off its new concert season this weekend and as well. W Amy Radel tells us it was an opening light like no other. You know to play light music again times is so important. So thank you for being here. That Seattle Symphony Guest Artist Whitney Mon- J.. There was no one in the seats at Benaroya Hall and just a third of the usual musicians on stage to comply with health regulations but the symphony streamed the concert online and to a drive in movie theater in Mary Moorpark. That's where Kathy capers was. She's the symphonies head of human resources. She says it's been a joy to hear rehearsals start up again I found myself mesmerized because we can actually observe the rehearsals on television. It was lovely concert Goer Linda. Cohen says, normally, she'd go see the symphony once a month she played violin growing up and likes to observe the string players up close and liked to see their interactions with each other I watch them some always at the front row. So that's what I miss the most Cristiano Garage and is the symphonies president and CEO he says it's mutual. I'm not going to lie it's been a really stressful time musicians need an audience Pam Johnson Seattle says there has been at least one upside I think the livestream, all the things they've done. They now have a worldwide audience. With so much uncertainty symphony will announce just six weeks of programming at a time but. says. They're committed to offering what he calls clean. Good. Careful Fund. Any Radel K. U. O. W. News..

Kathy capers Seattle Amy Radel Benaroya Hall Whitney Mon- J Cohen Cristiano Garage Mary Moorpark Pam Johnson Radel K. U. O. head of human resources president and CEO
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"This is K. U. O. W.. I'm page Browning. The Seattle City Council took a big steps today toward making major changes at the Seattle Police Department they say they're making these changes in response weeks of protests calling for transformation around the issue of Public Safety Kyw's Amy Radel is here with the latest amy either. Amy Things are starting to shift what are the biggest changes that the city council approved today. they approved a lot of processes that show their intent to do away with current staffing. It S PD they want to shrink department by about one hundred officers through layoffs. In part, they want chief best to try to spare the newer more diverse officers and they want to grant money to community groups that work on restorative justice in violence prevention. So those groups can start to expand their reach and they want to get rid of certain SPD's units like the mounted patrol or shrink their size these changes for this year's budget add up to maybe. A few million dollars but what was striking to me was these were unanimous votes by the Council on we knew that seven council members had already committed to cutting police funding by fifty percent on to council members hadn't explicitly signed onto that. One of them was Alex Peterson who represents northeast Seattle but he voted for these measures today and said, he really supports the goals of these protests. While the communications I received for constituents offer a variety of US I see common ground for rethinking and revamping what effective and equitable public safety means as we strive to achieve healthy communities. An council member Theresa Mosquito said if this weren't a virtual meeting, she would have given him a standing ovation for those remarks. Wow. I mean just just a real change in policing and budget decisions today how much power does the council have to actually make these changes? Amy. I'm well, we've heard some back and forth this week with the chief and the mayor on this council members say these are essentially pointed recommendations. They know it's up to the chief to run her department. I'm she made clear yesterday she feels very sidelined by these proposals. This is council member Lisa Herb Old, Bell know that she best ultimately hold the authority or how to make decisions about how and where these reductions might occur through the process of delivering a layoff notices. And a lot of these changes will have to be negotiated with the Seattle police officers guild. So it could take a lot of time and we'll just keep watching that amy it sounds like the council's trying to pare down not just the number of officers but how much they earn. Yeah, a lot of people saw a Forbes article on in recent weeks that showed some of the patrol officers earning more than three, hundred, thousand dollars at SPD because of all the overtime they accrue and so councilmember. Kashima. Solomon says the Council has the Authority to Lower Command staff salaries. So not the salaries of these patrol officers but the command staff they can kind of take them down to the minimum of their salaries zone and this could add up to five hundred thousand dollars across the command staff including the chief. That are thirteen executives in the police departments command structure making between around two hundred, thousand, three, hundred, thousand dollars a year. This is a classic example of the bloated Seattle police budget. So. The council acted on that idea today of you know lowering command staff salaries and then the council's going to look ask for monthly reports on all officers that earn more than one hundred and fifty thousand kind of trying to press on the union positions as well. Amy I know that there was discussion as well about the navigation team today, which is the group that does outreach to homeless people and also clears homeless camps. What action did the council ultimately take on funding for the navigation team? they eliminated the navigation teams as they're currently constructed and the funding for the sweeps or the encampment removals if I understand correctly and as Council councilmember Deborah Juarez tried to clarify here it looks like it's going to be a pretty big transition. So, amy receiving a lot happening today and here's what here's what warez had to say that this is the navigation team with police officers there redirecting as a failed experiment. Then I'd rather just say that. and so basically a narrow, a narrow majority of council members. This was the vote that was not unanimous. It was five to four, but they said, yes, it is a failed experiment. They don't think the police and Human Services Employees are getting the best outcomes when they go to these encampments So the Council will fund outreach grants to nonprofits instead and the parks department will continue to do trash pickup. Okay. So a lot happening today amy was next. Yes, there was. On Monday, the council will approve their entire rebalancing package. That's all the changes they're making this year's budget to address the funding shortfalls that have been caused by the pandemic on, and then within just several weeks they and the mayor will start work on next year's budget and right now they the council says, they have plans to cut about forty percent of SPD's funding next year but that's partly by moving some functions like nine one, one outside of the department. Okay. A lot to follow here kyw's Amy Radel. Thanks so much. Yeah. Thanks..

Council Amy Radel Seattle City Council Seattle Police Department Seattle police officers guild Seattle SPD Alex Peterson Theresa Mosquito Lower Command Solomon Lisa Herb Old Forbes kyw Deborah Juarez Bell
"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

KUOW Newsroom

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"amy radel" Discussed on KUOW Newsroom

"Do appreciate you joining us for morning edition on Komo w ninety, four, nine I'm Angela King. Jasmine Jerrell is a former foster child from Seattle she says, she was arrested and placed in King County's youth detention center several times for running away from her foster care placements. This was in the late nineties and early two thousands and last month King County Executive Dow Constantine announced he's going to seek to phase out all youth detention in the county by the year twenty, twenty, five and Jerrell says quote this brings me to tears. kyw's Amy Radel spoke to Jerrell about the impact of juvenile detention in her life and she joins us right now. Amy, thanks so much for your time Hi Angela. So. Why did Jasmine Jerrell wind up going to youth detention so many times. Her experience shines a light into how the state handled kids in foster care until just the last several years Gerald grew up in Seattle. But when she was eight years old, she was taken from her mother's custody and it's typically police and social workers who come to the home in those situations. So she says, foster kids associate police with those traumatic incidents She says, she asked to stay in. SEATTLE, and keep in contact with her family. But a lot of times that didn't happen she was moved around she couldn't call them and she started running away a warrant would get issued and when police found her, she'd be arrested and placed in youth detention at least overnight until she was given another placement by point is I wasn't a criminal. You know I wasn't somebody who was doing anything wrong. I was violent or anything like that. I was just therefore just run reports. But when you're a foster child, it's a warrant and amy of kids aren't wards of the state things could get handled differently. Yeah. Journal said one time a police officer by mistake took her to a place near the detention center. It's called Spruce Street and at that time they cared for kids who are not. In foster care but had run away from home and she said she couldn't believe the difference in the atmosphere. It was like a community center instead of jail and she said it was even more painful to feel like foster youth were just not valued as much as other kids. So did Gerald keep running or where did she go eventually she kept running and ultimately she says, she dropped out. Of High, school because police officers were coming there to look for her she says, she was never physically or sexually abused in foster care but she just founded dehumanizing. She felt like no one really cared about her. She's actually kind of darkly funny about some of the things she experienced. She said, some foster homes gave the foster kids kinda off brand food while they ate you know regular. Food they had locks on their fridges. They would tell the foster kids not to talk to their biological kids. In some cases there were all these stringent rules I'm she said, group homes for teens were a bit better but ultimately, she chose to live on the streets around the U. District in Seattle until she was about to age out of the system and then right before my eighth birthday. Actually. Went Back in contacted them and I will I went to the police station I said ever went. And they said okay it. Took me in one last time and unless social worker met with me I said, well, I, wanted to do this before eighteen because I wanted to see if you guys have any help and she says that social worker said, they had nothing to offer her that day since then she's learned that there are programs to support foster kids as they age out and that's even more. So these days. So how did foster care and all of these experiences youth detention ultimately shape her as a person she became very opposed to youth detention she doesn't think any youth should. Be In jail if they have mental health needs that require a lot of supervision. She thinks there should be other ways to accomplish that and we're about to see what that looks like in. King County. There's a new state law that forbids placing foster youth in detention for running away that provisions took effect just July first this year in King. County we have about twenty youth in detention. Currently, those numbers have been dropping and I want to come back to Gerald Story. She says for her finally something made a difference in her life I was diagnosed with severe depression. When I was young, that would I was twenty two I became preg- of my son. And it was like. Finally, like I MATT She has encountered all the barriers that people face when they're trying to get some stability. She had an addiction when she was just nineteen you know an age when a lot of young people are still living at home. She had terrible bus commutes taking three buses to get to her retail job. But she's been able to buy a home she's in school and she. Has Two. Young Children Gerald is white and she says, she did experience privilege compared to children of color around her on her older son is black and is developmentally disabled, and now journal says she's telling her story and trying to work for a safer world for him and for her daughter now right Kyw's Amy Radel, thank you so much for joining us. Oh, you're welcome. And you can read more about Gerald's journey at K. U. O. W. Dot Org..

Gerald Story Amy Radel Seattle King County MATT She Angela King Jasmine Jerrell Journal officer Dow Constantine Jerrell Executive K. U. O. W. Dot Org King Kyw U. District