17 Burst results for "Amy Sewing"

"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let's get back to my interview with Amy sewn her new book. The Man Who Hated Women is about Anthony Comstock, the man behind the law named after him, the 18 73 Comstock Act. Which made it a crime to distribute, sell, possess or male obscene material as well as contraception. The book is also about eight women charged with violating the law. Before you wrote this book when you were starting your career. When you were in your twenties, you wrote columns about dating and relationships. Wondering if there's a connection between what you were writing about then and your interest in the subject of, you know, birth control, abortion, the laws against it. The connection of the free love movement. To the kind of radical writing that Anthony Comstock went after. Absolutely When I was in my twenties, writing about dating downtown and being frustrated in my quest to find a boyfriend. I think I had a lot of rage and the rage was that the men were setting the rules around commitment and behavior. And I was in a lot of situations in which I didn't feel I was being treated with respect. And yet I didn't really see any other model for doing things. Now. Some of that has to do with being in one's twenties. But it seemed to me if I had the benefit of being born in 1973. The year recovery way It was Decided. The fact that I should still be having to struggle to say, you know, it's really not not nice when you don't call somebody back was having to educate these guys in the nineties. This is very frustrating. And I also found that that writing provocatively about sex makes you a lot of enemies and makes you very dangerous. I got a lot of hate mail when I was writing my column. Female trouble at the New York Press, and the things that the men would say in in their hate mail were so misogynist and cruel. It struck me that they had to be very angry at women in general, they couldn't just be angry at me. Became kind of a stand in And I realized that there's still just terrible, terrible. Miscommunication. Particularly between young men and young women. About sexual intimacy and sexual pleasure. And as I've watched The Sexual assault conversation evolve over 25 years since I Left college. I'm always interested in and why we hear so little about. The opposite of coercion, which is pleasure. And are we educating young women about what they should want? And what should feel good as much as we're educating them about what to be afraid of. Can you think of an example of a column that you wrote that got a really big negative reaction? Well, The very first calm I wrote was called the blow up boyfriend, and it was about if you could have a boyfriend. Who as soon as he started talking about his band. And got really boring. You could just deflate him. Why did that get such a negative reaction? What was really just kind of a rant about my frustration with men in general, and at that time, it was 1996 that I published it. Saying, You know all these 20 something guys that think they're so cool with their artistic projects. Maybe they're just self important, narcissistic jerks. And of course, what I wasn't saying explicitly Was that my own writing was a form of art, and I wanted that to be evaluated and looked at with the same seriousness. That these guys wanted their music and art to be looked at. Having gone through the experience of getting all this like angry mail for expressing your experiences and what you thought about them how you interpreted your experiences. And now after writing this book about the early birth control movement, and the early advocates of what was then called free Love, which is different from what we now call free Love. Did it make you want to become an activist, as well as a writer to like, be on the front lines of the, uh of the reproductive rights movement. Certainly, now that we see these These rights already being chipped away. And I'm lucky to live in a state like New York, which is trying to protect abortion access, no matter what happens with Ro But yes, I think the biggest thing, though, is is that I have a teenage daughter. And so I think about the generations. Into the future. And what you know what is a post roe landscape going to look like And From what I understand, We're going to have it even more so than we already do. Today. A real two tiered system where your access to abortion is going to rely heavily on where you happen to live. And the reason that Saddens me is Roe was decided precisely. To stop that from happening. And the other reason it fills me with dread is That was essentially what Anthony come star created a two tiered system, which was that even after the passage of the Comstock law. You could get what was called a medical exemption or therapeutic exemption. If you were wealthy, and you could find your way to having abortions. But women who didn't have that kind of access couldn't And no, we're facing the possibility. Well, we already have. We already have a system in which abortions are really hard to get. Abortion clinics are really hard to find in some areas of the country and much. There's much easier access in other areas, and a lot of women don't have the time or the money. To go to the places where abortion might be accessible to them. Yes and The statistics show that Abortions do decline. In places where women don't have clinics nearby. And the reason that's so chilling is We have to wonder. Are they Getting dangerous abortions and we're not hearing about them. I'm sure some of them are and there are some of them carrying these pregnancies to term. And what are the long term implications of that? How? How young are the women? What are the circumstances of They're getting pregnant. What are the reasons that they want an abortion in the first place? So the Comstock law definitely worked. And overturning Roe will work it will it will change behavior. And We just know too much by now. We know How dangerous that is to women's bodies. We know that women will die. And so the fact that we're still Talking about this after 100 years, 120 some odd years. Is.

Anthony Comstock Amy 1996 New York New York Press 18 73 Comstock Act 1973 Anthony Today 120 100 years Roe 20 something guys first over 25 years eight women one's twenties twenties Comstock law two tiered system
"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Wasn't a good was not going to be a good way to go. So frequently. Women have been left out of histories of free love because there were many prominent men, but she was an absolute co equal with her husband and really was one of the first women to advocate For the use of plain English terms as a way of Democratizing sex and making sex information available to young people and strengthening marriages and making them more egalitarian. Anthony Comstock died in 1915. But the law lived on. When did the Comstock law in? Well, because the Comstock law included obscenity components and what was then called birth control components. The term birth control didn't come around until around 1911. It was dismantled. At different times in history in terms of the birth control provisions of the Comstock law. The first major blow came in the 19 thirties with a case that has a very long name. But that Margaret Sanger took involving pass Aries sent from Japan. And the case was called United States versus one package containing 120 more or less rubber pass Aries to prevent conception. It was 1936. And that was the second Circuit court decision that found that doctors could send contraception to their patients through the mail. And what were the other aspects of the law that ended Well, this is what's just so astounding. It wasn't until Griswald vs Connecticut 1965, which was a Supreme case. That invalidated the Connecticut Comstock law on the grounds that it violated the right to marital privacy. It was in Griswald vs Connecticut that married women. Could finally have the right to receive contraception from their doctors. Well, you might wonder what about single women? It was not until 1972. That single woman could That was 99 years after the Comstock law was passed. My guest is Amy Sewn, author of the new book, The Man who hated women, sex, censorship and Civil liberties. In the Gilded Age, We'll talk more after a break. This is fresh.

Amy Sewn Anthony Comstock Margaret Sanger 1915 1936 1972 19 thirties Japan first English one one package 1965 single women United States 1911 Gilded Age 120 more or less rubber pass A Connecticut Comstock
"amy sewing" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on KPCC

"The knife throwing hitman hired to take out El Mariachi. His on screen presence was electrifying, and it put him on the map. Since then, I've seen him in countless movies and shows. Eventually he needs to join the Marvel cinematic universe. We'll hear more from Danny Trejo and From you. In just a moment. This is one a Oh, You. On the next fresh air. A turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The 18 73 Comstock Act virtually outlawed contraception. We'll talk about the man behind the law, Anti vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the women prosecuted under that statute through the subject of a new book by Amy Sewn. Who will be our guest. Join us now on weeknights at 8 89.3 kpcc shows are so informative and interesting. I listen all the time while driving and often stay in my car in order to hear the end of.

Amy Sewn Anthony Comstock Marvel Danny Trejo 18 73 Comstock Act From you El Mariachi 8 89.3 kpcc
"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:48 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

"That women were emotionally empowered and should marry just and righteous men and she was a happily married mother and wife. they had Four children and we're lifelong companions and their marriage ended only after his death. Why did you actually want to be prosecuted. She wanted her words to be indicted so that she could defend the thinking behind them. Did you feel like she was discriminated against because they only one after her husband when she she was the writer to yeah. This was the strange thing about anthony. Comstock is that he pursued far far more men than women and when it came to this kind of group of intellectual women i think he understood on some level the The issues at hand and having a woman in the stands for example at one point it looked like she was going to be able to testify on her own behalf but the trial of ezra kept being delayed because she had a baby anthony stock. I think imagine this you know either pregnant or more likely a woman who had just given birth being on the stand and he said that this wasn't a good was not going to be a good way to go so frequently women have been left out of histories of free love because there were many prominent men but she was an absolute co equal with her husband and really was one of the first women to advocate for the use of plain english terms as a way of democratizing sex and making sex information available to young people and strengthening marriages and making them more egalitarian. Anthony comstock died in nineteen fifteen but the law lived on. When did the comstock law in well. Because the comstock law included obscenity components and what was then called birth control components. The term birth control didn't come around till around nineteen eleven. It was dismantled at different times in history in terms of the birth control provisions of the comstock law. The first major blow came in the nineteen thirties with a case. That has a very long name. But that margaret sanger took involving pessaries sent from japan and the case was called united states. One package containing one hundred twenty more or less rubber pessaries to prevent conception it was nineteen thirty six and that was the second circuit court decision that found that doctors could send contraception to their patients through the mail. And what were the other aspects of the law that ended. Well this is what's just so astounding. It wasn't until griswold versus connecticut. Nineteen sixty five which was a supreme case that invalidated the connecticut comstock law on the grounds that had violated the right to marital privacy. It was in griswold versus connecticut. That married women could finally have the right to receive contraception from their doctors. Well you might wonder what about single women. It was not until nineteen seventy two. That single woman could. That was ninety nine years after the comstock law was passed. My guest is. Amy sewn author of the new book the man who hated women sex censorship and civil liberties in the gilded age. We'll.

Anthony comstock Comstock ezra anthony margaret sanger connecticut griswold japan united states Amy sewn
"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:09 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

"He was associated with the why in a way that probably no other leader was because of his anti-vice work and so and comstock worked for the new york society for the suppression of vice. What was it and what was he able to accomplish through that. It was a privately incorporated society that came out of a y committee that had been organized to suppress vice and it was a marriage of public and private because the officers of the society were able to arrest people but they were also able to use the police to help them so it was an an incredibly well-funded society whose primary purpose was to root out obscenity. My guest is. Amy sewn author of the new book the man who hated women sex censorship and civil liberties in the gilded age. We'll talk more after a break. I'm terry gross and this is fresh. Air comedian tiffany. Haddish is busy. She's acting producing but she says she's not just doing it for herself. How much generation that you create and when you get to tell us flory and give other people opportunity to tell that story with you. Tiffany haddish on her power in. Listen now to the. It's been a minute. Podcast from npr. Let's get back to my interview with. Amy sewn author of the new book the man who hated women the men referred to in the title as anthony comstock and anti-vice crusader who lobbied for the law. That was named after him. The eighteen seventy three com comstock act. Which made it a crime to distribute sell possess or mail obscene material as well as contraception. The book is also about eight women including margaret sanger and emma goldman charged with violating that law. So several of the women who you write about in the book women who were targeted by anthony. Comstock nominally supported Birth control and and for some of them abortion they were part of the free love movement of the tell us a little bit about what the the free love movement was like back in the late. Eighteen hundred well. The free love movement. Was this idea that there should be equality in romantic relationships. A lot of people here free love and they think of like woodstock and the summer of love. It was not about having sex with as many partners as you could. Most free lovers were monogamous. The heart of it was better equality better division of domestic tasks and the idea of abolishing marriage laws. That two people should be able to enter into their own romantic contracts which should not be legal. Most tree lovers were opposed to abortion except in extreme cases regarding contraception many of them practiced a technique called quotas reservoir office which was a form of withdrawal intended to limit pregnancy later on some of the more radical women that i write about began to talk about female continents. But what's interesting about the free lovers is they were civil libertarians. And many of them were also extremely leftist in their ideas about economics so for example they felt the too many men and women were marrying for economic reasons. You know women needed money and then they would marry men that they didn't love. They wanted all relationships to be based on love and mutual respect the most radical thing that they believed is that if a man and a woman really loved each other they would give birth to superior children to that's eugenics enters the picture. Yeah though that that word wasn't used quite then it. Was this idea that we needed more righteous thinking and justice. And when you know these so called enlightened people many of whom lived in.

Amy sewn new york society for the suppr comstock Haddish Tiffany haddish anthony comstock terry gross flory emma goldman margaret sanger tiffany npr Comstock anthony
"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:12 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on Fresh Air

"This is fresh air. I'm terry gross. We're going to talk about a dramatic turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The women who fought for it and the man behind the law that stood in their way my guest. Amy sewn is the author of the new nonfiction book. The man who hated women sex censorship and civil liberties in the gilded age the man referred to in the title as anthony comstock who sewn describes as one of the most important man in the lives of nineteenth century women and she doesn't mean that in a good way he was an anti-vice crusader who fiercely lobbied for an eighteen seventy three law which became known as the comstock act it made the distribution sale possession and mailing of obscene material as well as contraception punishable with fines and prison sentences. Shortly after the bill was signed comstock was appointed as a special agent to the. Us post office giving him the power to enforce. The law sewn writes about comstock and eight women charged with violating the comstock. Act the eight included margaret sanger. The periods most famous advocate for birth control. Emma goldman the famous anarchist as well as nurses and health practitioners spiritualists and women in the free love movement. Free love meant something different than so and says these women laid the groundwork for the eventual legalization of birth control and the protection of women's abortion rights. Amy sewn is the author of five novels and a former columnist at new york magazine. A heads up to parents. This is an adult conversation. Amy sewn welcome to fresh air. It's a really fascinating book. So let's start with the basics. What was the comstock act. The stock act was a federal law passed in march of eighteen seventy three that criminalized the mailing of contraception and contraception information abortion advertising and information with very steep penalties and sentences. So what was already criminalised. Before that. In terms of obscenity and birth control in terms of pornography and birth control and abortion before the comstock act. It was it was obscene materials. Which would be things like stereoscopic view postcards and you know smaller roddick books and that kind of thing. Not specifically related to birth control or abortion information and it certainly didn't include things like medical works to describe anatomy and things that a couple could do to try to prevent pregnancy. Because with the comstock. I you couldn't even send through the mail books by physicians about sexuality. Yeah they they basically went underground and they became harder and harder for people to find so one of the quote. Innovations of the comstock law was to add. You couldn't send these things through the mail and to add contraception to what was previously outlawed. Yes and it also included the term newspaper because there was a case in eighteen seventy to eighteen seventy three involving these radical. Publishers victoria woodhall and her sister tennessee. Claflin who had written what he considered to be obscene things in a newspaper. So were you allowed to sell contraception. If if you didn't get it through the mail. Well there were bought. If occasions made over time related to hand selling the initial one in eighteen seventy three was only concerned with the male but one of the reasons his law had such sticking power is over the decades it came to include speaking about birth control distributing leaflets information. Meaning for example if you were giving a political speech Like emma goldman did and Wanted to give out material. Birth control afterwards..

Amy sewn comstock anthony comstock terry gross emma goldman margaret sanger new york magazine Amy victoria woodhall Us Claflin tennessee
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

06:15 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Let's get back to my interview with Amy sewn her new book. The Man Who Hated Women is about Anthony Comstock, the man behind the law named after him, the 18 73 Comstock Act, which made it a crime to distribute, sell, possess or male obscene material as well as contraception. The book is also about eight women charged with violating the law. Before you You wrote this book when you were starting your career. When you were in your twenties, you wrote columns about dating and relationships. I'm wondering if there's a connection between what you were writing about then and your interest in the subject of, you know, birth control, abortion, the laws against it. The connection of the free love movement. To the kind of radical writing that Anthony Comstock went after. Absolutely. When I was in my twenties, writing about dating downtown and being frustrated in my quest to find a boyfriend. I think I had a lot of rage and the rage was that the men were setting the rules around commitment and behavior. And I was in a lot of situations in which I didn't feel I was being treated with respect. And yet I didn't really see any other model for doing things. Now. Some of that has to do with being in one's twenties. But it seemed to me if I had the benefit of being born in 1973. The year Roe v. Wade was Decided. The fact that I should still be having to struggle to say, you know, it's really not not nice When you don't call somebody back. I was having to educate these guys in the nineties. This is very frustrating. And I also found that that writing provocatively about sex. Makes you a lot of enemies and makes you very dangerous. I got a lot of hate mail when I was writing my column. Female trouble at the New York Press, and the things that the men would say in in their hate mail were so misogynist and cruel. That it struck me that they had to be very angry at women in general, they couldn't just be angry at me. Became kind of a stand in And I realized that there's still just terrible, terrible. Miscommunication. Particularly between young men and young women. About sexual intimacy and sexual pleasure. And as I've watched The Sexual assault conversation evolve over 25 years since I Left college. I'm always interested in and why we hear so little about. The opposite of coercion, which is pleasure. And are we educating young women about what they should want? And what should feel good as much as we're educating them about what to be afraid of. Can you think of when I example of a column that you wrote that got a really big negative reaction? Oh, well, The very first column I wrote was called the blow up boyfriend. And it was about if you could have a a boyfriend who, as soon as he started talking about his band And got really boring. You could just deflate him. Why did that get such a negative reaction? What was really just kind of a rant about my frustration with men in general, and at that time, it was 1996 that I published it. Saying, You know all these 20 something guys that think they're so cool with their artistic projects. Maybe they're just self important, narcissistic jerks. And of course, what I wasn't saying explicitly Was that my own writing was a form of art, and I wanted that to be evaluated and looked at with the same seriousness. That these guys wanted their music and art to be looked at. Having gone through the experience of getting all this like angry mail for expressing your experiences and what you thought about them how you interpreted your experiences. And now after writing this book About the early birth control movement and the early advocates of what was then called Free love, Um, which is different from what we now call free free Love didn't make you want to become an activist, as well as a writer to like, Be on the front lines of the Uh, of the reproductive rights movement. Certainly, now that we see these These rights already being chipped away. And I'm lucky to live in a state like New York, which is trying to protect abortion access, no matter what happens with Ro But yes, I think the biggest thing, though, is is that I have a teenage daughter. And so I think about the generations. Into the future. And what you know what is a post roe landscape going to look like And From what I understand, We're going to have it even more so than we already do. Today. A real two tiered system where your access to abortion is going to rely heavily on where you happen to live. And the reason that Saddens me is Roe was decided precisely. To stop that from happening. And the other reason it fills me with dread is That was essentially what Anthony come star created a two tiered system, which was that even after the passage of the Comstock law. You could get what was called a medical exemption or therapeutic exemption. If you were wealthy, and you could find your way to having abortions. But women who didn't have that kind of access couldn't And now we're facing the possibility. Well,.

Anthony Comstock Amy New York 1996 1973 New York Press 18 73 Comstock Act Anthony Today 25 years first column eight women Wade two tiered twenties 20 something guys Roe one's twenties Comstock law two tiered system
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"D U The deadliest wildfire in American history wasn't in California or Colorado or Montana. It just took off like a tornado. Cinders were moving through the air. It was in Wisconsin. Peshtigo was called the forgotten fire because It was. I'm Ari Shapiro. What It can tell us about the changing map of wildfire danger on the next. All things considered from NPR News. That's this afternoon after three o'clock on WBZ Chicago This is fresh air. I'm Terry Gross. Let's get back to my interview with Amy Sewn, author of the new book. The Man who Hated Women. The man referred to in the title is Anthony Comstock and anti vice crusader who lobbied for the law that was named after him. The 18 73 Comstock Act. Which made it a crime to distribute, sell, possess or male obscene material as well as contraception. The book is also about eight women, including Margaret Sanger and Emma Goldman, charged with violating that law. So several of the women who you write about in the book women who were targeted by Anthony Comstock not only supported in, uh, birth control and for some of them abortion. They were part of the free love movement of the time. Tell us a little bit about what the free love movement was like back in the late 18 hundreds. Well, the free love movement was this idea that there should be equality in romantic relationships. A lot of people here free love and they think of like Woodstock and you know, the summer of love. It was not about having sex with as many partners as you could. Most free lovers were monogamous. The heart of it was better equality, better division of domestic tasks. And the idea of abolishing marriage laws that two people should be able to enter into their own romantic contracts, which should not be legal. Most tree lovers were opposed to abortion except in extreme cases and regarding contraception. Many of them practiced a technique called coitus reservations, which was a form of withdrawal. Intended to limit pregnancy later on some of the more radical women that I write about began to talk about female continents. But what's interesting about the free lovers is they were civil libertarians. And.

Margaret Sanger Emma Goldman Terry Gross Amy Sewn California Anthony Comstock Wisconsin Ari Shapiro Colorado Montana two people NPR News late 18 hundreds Woodstock 18 73 Comstock Act this afternoon The Man who Hated Women after three o'clock eight women Peshtigo
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

02:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Amy Sewn, author of the new book, The Men who hated women, sex, censorship and Civil liberties in the Gilded Age. It's about Anthony Comstock, the man behind the law named after him. The 18 73 Comstock Act, which made it a crime to distribute, sell, possess or male obscene material as well as contraception. The book is also about eight women charged with violating the law. Anthony Comstock was made a special agent of the post office. By Congress. What? What does that mean? What power did that? Give him And why did they give him that title? Well, he would write people from mailboxes all over the country so that he could get Interstate mailing of obscenity and contraception. He decoy people. He was given that title so that he could have the power to inspect the male and over time. It was expanded to be able to come into people's houses and seize items. It was a very broad definition of what someone affiliated with the post office could do with regards. To individual civil liberties. How many times I did He frequently become the person who went in and raided a home or a a bar or the store. He used pseudonyms. He would have these clever pseudonyms like his wife's maiden name was Hamilton. So one of his Pseudonyms was M. Hamilton. Um, he frequently called himself Mr Farnsworth and he would come in and asked to buy Fortifications or contraceptive pills. And then return on another day and say I am Anthony Comstock, and he would wave a handkerchief across the street at police officers and some of them into sees the house. He was a very Very strange guy. He carried a revolver and he hit a pornographer in the head on the way to the Newark jail, and they got into this tussle. In the carriage. For a guy who was raised incredibly devout and.

Amy Sewn Anthony Comstock Congress Hamilton Newark Farnsworth 18 73 Comstock Act M. Hamilton Gilded Age eight women in the Men
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:49 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Is fresh air. I'm Terry Gross. We're going to talk about a dramatic turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The women who fought for it and the man behind the law that stood in their way. My guest, Amy Sewn, is the author of the new nonfiction book, The Man who hated women, sex, censorship and Civil liberties in the Gilded Age. The man referred to in the title as Anthony Comstock, who soon describes as one of the most important men in the lives of 19th century women. And she doesn't mean that in a good way he was an anti vice crusader who fiercely lobbied for an 18 73 law, which became known as the Comstock Act. It made the distribution, sale possession and mailing of obscene material as well as contraception. Punishable with fines and prison sentences. Shortly after the bill was signed, Comstock was appointed as a special agent to the U. S post office, giving him the power to enforce the law. Zone writes about Comstock and eight women charged with violating the Comstock Act. The eight included Margaret Sanger, the periods most famous advocate for birth control. Emma Goldman, the famous anarchist as well as nurses and health practitioners, Spiritualists and women in the Free love movement. Free Love meant something different than Someone says these women laid the groundwork for the eventual legalization of birth control and the protection of women's abortion rights. Amy Sewn is the author of five novels and a former columnist at New York magazine. Heads up to parents. This is an adult conversation. Amy Stone. Welcome to fresh air. It's a really fascinating book. So let's start with the basics. What was the Comstock Act? The Comstock Act was a federal law passed in March of 18 73 that criminalized the mailing of contraception and contraception information. Abortion, advertising and information. With very steep Penalties and sentences. So what was already criminalized before that in terms of obscenity and birth control in terms of pornography and birth control and abortion? Yes. Before the Comstock Act, it was it was obscene materials, which would be things like Stereoscopic view postcards and you know small, erotic books and that kind of thing not specifically related to birth control or abortion information. And it certainly didn't include things like medical works to describe anatomy and things that a couple could do to try to prevent pregnancy because with the Comstock act you couldn't even send through the mail. Uh, books by physicians about sexuality. Yeah, they they basically went underground, and they became harder and harder for people to find. So one of the quote innovations of the Comstock law was to add. You couldn't send these things through the mail and to add contraception to what was previously outlawed. Yes, And it also included the term newspaper because there was a case in 18 72 and 18 73 involving these radical publishers, Victoria Wood Hall and her sister, Tennessee, Claflin. Who had written what he considered to be obscene things in a newspaper. So, um, were you allowed to sell contraception if he didn't get it through the mail. Well, there were modifications made over time related to hand selling. The initial one in 18. 73 was only concerned with the mail, but one of the reasons His law had such sticking power is over the decades it came to include speaking about birth control. Distributing leaflets, information meaning, for example, if you were giving a political speech, uh, like Emma Goldman did and, uh, wanted to give out material about birth control afterwards. So it's heart was in the mail, but over time it became much broader than that and so even oral information which reasonable people Believed was constitutionally protected. Turned out that it wasn't was this their modifications of the Comstock law? Yeah, revisions And then at the same time, of course you had state You had these little Comstock laws, the estate laws, which all looked a little bit different from each other. But for example, you know different states at different periods and Three or four decades following the 18 seventies would prohibit quote unquote hand selling. So they added to the Comstock law. Yes, made it even stricter. Yes, they kept adding to it and and one of the things I was so fascinated to discover in my book. Is that during the first decade of the 20th century, when the government decided it wanted to prohibit those with unconventional political ideas From immigrating into the United States. Um, the Law that they used to criminalize certain forms of speech was the Comstock law, so obscenity first was what you and I would consider to be smart or pornography. Then it was expanded to include birth control. And then it was expanded to include language that would incite Treason. And What That means is that It.

Emma Goldman Terry Gross Anthony Comstock Margaret Sanger United States Amy Sewn Victoria Wood Hall Amy Stone March of 18 73 Comstock Comstock act Comstock Act five novels Claflin 18 73 19th century eight 18 seventies eight women one
"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hot. White Heights repeatedly leans in the fourth wall, drawing attention to the artifice typically involved in audio dramas trying to convey changes in times and locations where some podcasts would often rely on a character verbalizing how long it's been since the last scene. The showplace of this using an amusing device that involves the playwright Tony Kushner, who is deployed to fill the space of academic double as a way to mark a big time jump in the story. Hi. It's Tony Kushner. They've asked me to step in here is a kind of narrator because at this point, there's a six months time jumping the story and the writer and director and the producer is probably got anxious that they couldn't address the time jump with, you know, exposition in the dialogue, which, by the way, I'm sure they could have managed But they didn't ask me for advice. They asked me to narrate. So here I am. I'm your narrator. And before I go, these are bits of technical playfulness that poke fun at how fiction podcasting as a genre still has to solve some problems that film and television have long figured out. It's no innovation. Of course, such fourth wall referencing moves aren't necessarily available to use by other fiction podcast that aren't as mischievous of its form. But as Judy learns throughout his journey, you make the best of what you've got. And hot white heist certainly does just that. Nick Watch this podcast critic for New York magazine and vulture. He also writes the Hot Pod newsletter on Tomorrow's show, writer Amy Sewn talks about a turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. 18 73 Comstock Act virtually outlawed contraception. She'll talk about the man behind the law, Anti vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the women prosecuted under that statute. Zones book is the man who hated women. I hope you can join us..

Amy Sewn Anthony Comstock Tony Kushner 18 73 Comstock Act Judy six months White Heights Nick fourth wall New York double Hot Pod Tomorrow Zones
"amy sewing" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Literally and non visual show. Hot White Heights repeatedly leans in the fourth wall, drawing attention to the art of his typically involved in audio dramas. Trying to convey changes in times and locations were some podcasts would often rely on each character verbalizing how long it's been since the last scene. The show plays with this using an amusing device that involves the playwright Tony Kushner, who is deployed to fill the space of academic double as a way to mark a big time jump in the story. Hi. It's Tony Kushner. They've asked me to step in here is a kind of narrator because at this point, there's a six month time jumping the story and the writer and director and the producer is probably got anxious that they couldn't address the time jump with, you know, exposition in the dialogue, which, by the way, I'm sure they could have managed But they didn't ask me for advice. They asked me to narrate. So here I am. I'm your narrator. And before I go, these are bits of technical playfulness that poke fun at how fiction podcasting as a genre still has to solve some problems that film and television have long figured out. It's no innovation. Of course, such fourth wall referencing moves aren't necessarily available to use by other fiction podcast that aren't as mischievous of its form. But as Judy learns throughout his journey, you make the best of what you've got. And hot white haste certainly does just that. Nick Watch this podcast critic for New York magazine and vulture. He also writes the Hot Pod newsletter on Tomorrow's Show. Writer Amy Sewn talks about a turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The 18 73 Comstock Act virtually outlawed contraception. We'll talk about the man behind the law, Anti vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the women prosecuted under that statute. Sones book is the man who hated women. I hope you can join us..

Amy Sewn Anthony Comstock Tony Kushner Judy Hot White Heights six month Nick 18 73 Comstock Act Tomorrow's Show each character New York fourth wall Sones fourth Hot Pod double
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

01:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Hot white heist repeatedly leans in the fourth wall, drawing attention to the artifice typically involved in audio dramas trying to convey changes in times and locations were some podcasts would often rely on each character verbalizing how long it's been since the last scene. The show plays with this using an amusing device that involves the playwright Tony Kushner, who is deployed to fill the space of academic babble as a way to mark a big time jump in the story. Hi. It's Tony Kushner. They've asked me to step in here is a kind of narrator because at this point, there's a six months time jumping the story and the writer and director and the producer is probably got anxious that they couldn't address the time jump with, you know, exposition in the dialogue, which, by the way, I'm sure they could have manage. But they didn't ask me for advice. They asked me to narrate. So here I am. I'm your narrator. And before I go, these are bits of technical playfulness that poke fun at how fiction podcasting as a genre still has to solve some problems that film and television have long figured out. It's no innovation. Of course, as such fourth wall referencing moves aren't necessarily available to use by other fiction podcast that aren't as mischievous of its form. But as Judy learns throughout his journey, you make the best of what you've got. And hot white heist certainly does just that. Nick Watt is podcast critic for New York magazine and vulture. He also writes the Hot Pod newsletter. On tomorrow's show Writer Amy Sewn talks about a turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The 18 73 Comstock Act virtually outlawed contraception. We'll talk about the man behind the law, Anti vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the women prosecuted under that statute. Sones book is the man who hated women. I hope you can join us..

Nick Watt Amy Sewn Tony Kushner Anthony Comstock Judy six months 18 73 Comstock Act tomorrow each character fourth wall Hot Pod Sones New York
"amy sewing" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

02:17 min | 2 weeks ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WBUR

"Hot white Heights repeatedly leans at 1/4 wall, drawing attention to the artifice typically involved in audio dramas trying to convey changes in times and locations were some podcasts would often rely on the character verbalizing how long it's been since the last scene. The show plays with this using an amusing device that involves the playwright Tony Kushner, who is deployed to fill the space of academic babble as a way to mark a big time jump in the story. Hi. It's Tony Kushner. They've asked me to step in here is a kind of narrator because at this point, there's a six month time jumping the story and the writer and director and the producer is probably got anxious that they couldn't address the time jump with, you know, exposition in the dialogue, which, by the way, I'm sure they could have managed But they didn't ask me for advice. They asked me to narrate. So here I am. I'm your narrator. And before I go, these are bits of technical playfulness that put fun at how fiction podcasting as a genre still has to solve some problems that film and television have long figured out. It's no innovation. Of course, as such fourth wall referencing moves aren't necessarily available to use by other fiction podcast that aren't as mischievous of its form. But as Judy learns throughout his journey, you make the best of what you've got. And hot white heist certainly does just that. Nick Watt is podcast critic for New York magazine and vulture. He also writes the Hot Pod newsletter on Tomorrow's show, writer Amy Sewn talks about a turning point in the fight for women's reproductive rights. The 18 73 Comstock Act virtually outlawed contraception. She'll talk about the man behind the law, Anti vice crusader Anthony Comstock and the women prosecuted under that statute. Zones book is the man who hated women. I hope you can join us. Oh, oh, Fresh Air's executive producer is Danny Miller, Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham with additional engineering support from Charlie Care. Our interviews and reviews are produced and edited by Amy Salit, Phyllis Myers, Sam Bricker, Lauren Krenzel, Heidi Saman, Theresa Madden and Marie Balda Nado. They a challenger, Seth Kelley, Paler Lattimore and Joel Wolfram, Our associate producer of digital media, is Molly. Seven. Esper. Robert Stroud's directs.

Amy Salit Danny Miller Lauren Krenzel Sam Bricker Amy Sewn Heidi Saman Theresa Madden Nick Watt Paler Lattimore Phyllis Myers Seth Kelley Audrey Bentham Marie Balda Nado Tony Kushner Joel Wolfram Molly Anthony Comstock Robert Stroud Judy 18 73 Comstock Act
"amy sewing" Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

The Glossy Beauty Podcast

05:01 min | 3 months ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on The Glossy Beauty Podcast

"Executive editor glossy and today's guest. Is jean alliance. The founder of love seeing welcome. Jenna thank you for having me hyper you hi jenna. It's so good to see you again. Jeddah i think our listeners. Probably don't need an introduction to who you are because you know your your career at j. crew and so what you've done in the last twenty years in fashion but for those out there who need a little motivation today. Tell us a little bit about how you got started in fashion and beauty and lifestyle. Oh sure i mean. I think it was kind of by accident. I was super tall. When i was little and at in seventh grade was six feet tall and that was hard especially with the boys and nothing that me there was no j brand jeans back then there was no nobody making tall close for young girls didn't exist and so i was constantly buying like really big close and i thought that was like the size fourteen because those are the pants. Were long enough for me. I just didn't even understand took a homework class. And i made myself a skirt and the teacher showed me how to measure myself. And i made a bias full length watermelon skirt and i walked into school. And darlene patterson who was like the most popular girl in class who sat next to me and social studies. Looked over at me inside. Where did you get that skirts. So cute and i was like it was the first time anyone had given me positive feedback about the way i looked and i had a genetic disorder so i had my teeth clinic dealer. Had bald spots in my head scarves. I would love stuff going on. That did not make me feel good about my visual presence to have someone give me positive feedback about the way i looked so altering and really think really emotionally like powerful and so i also had made that thing which was sort of the combination of two things really no. I enjoy the process. And i felt really proud at the end. So yeah a kind of. I got a subscription to vogue that christmas and my grandmother amy sewing machine and like i was hooked so jet. You also went to fashion school before starting at j. crew. What was that lake. I did i had. I had gone to parsons..

Jenna six feet jenna darlene patterson christmas today two things seventh grade first time parsons j brand jeans last twenty years Jeddah j. crew size fourteen
"amy sewing" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"In the political world right now is to have any database discussion with members left. Many of those members of the left will suggest that even talking about data is somehow offensive Jesse single, who's a very good writer on science is not of the political, right? But he happens to be rooted in reality, when he talks about things he has a piece in his newsletter about a New York Times article. So this New York Times article was published a week ago and they talked about chest binding. It talked about how chest binding may actually have risks it turns out that if you are a young woman who wishes to look like a man. And so you bind your chest back this may in fact damage or breasts, who would have thought just like foot by Nicole damage, or eat it turns out that if you bind, physical part of yourself down, this may damage you in some way. So this article by Amy sewed says he used to be the one of thirteen year old one, a binder for school events trip to Staples for. Today's tweens and teens identify gender, non conforming or transgender shopping for a binder may mean a compression, undergarment worn to flatten breasts made a spandex and nylon. Binders resemble tight undershirts creating a masculine profile. The academy the American Academy of pediatrics has estimated that zero point seven percent of thirteen to seventeen year olds in the United States, one hundred fifty thousand identify as transgender. Now, the truth is a huge number of these people will detrani mission as soon as they grow out of their addresses the number of young people identify as transgender or gender fluid or gender, non binary. It decreases radically overtime. Dr John, Steve, or assistant professor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai, adolescent health center in Manhattan and has valuated over five.

New York Times Nicole damage American Academy of pediatrics assistant professor of pediatr Amy sewed Jesse single Mount Sinai writer Dr John United States Manhattan Steve seventeen year seven percent thirteen year
"amy sewing" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"amy sewing" Discussed on WJR 760

"The most difficult things in the political world right now is to have any database discussion with members left. Many of those members of the left will suggest that even talking about data is somehow -fensive Jesse single, who's a very good writer on science is not of the political, right? But he happens to be rooted in reality, when he talks about things he has a piece in his newsletter about a New York Times article. So this New York Times article was published a week ago and talked about chest binding, it talked about how chest binding may actually have risks it turns out that if you are a young woman who wishes to look like a man. And so you bind your chest back this may in fact damage or breasts, who would have thought just like footbinding damage or feet. It turns out that if you bind a physical part of yourself down, this may damage you in some way. So this article by Amy sewn, says it used to be the one of thirteen year old one in a binder for school events trip. Staples for today's tweens and teens identify gender, non conforming or transgender shopping for binder may mean a compression, undergarment worn to flatten breasts made a fix spandex and nylon. Finders. Tight, undershirts, creating a masculine profile the academy. The American Academy of pediatrics has estimated that zero point seven percent of thirteen to seventeen year olds in the United States, one hundred fifty thousand identify as transgender. Now, the truth is a huge number of these people will Detroit mission as soon as they grow out of their adults, the number of young people identify as transgender or gender fluid or gender, non binary. It decreases radically overtime. Dr John Steve assistant professor of pediatrics at Mount Sinai, adolescent health center in Manhattan, and has.

New York Times Jesse American Academy of pediatrics assistant professor of pediatr Mount Sinai writer Dr John Steve Detroit Amy United States Manhattan seventeen year seven percent thirteen year