35 Burst results for "Amy Scott"

"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"Little. Just you know i'm here. What would you say is your biggest driving pet peeve. Oh yeah. I think it's people who drive with their blinker on like when they're not turning straight on the highway with their blinker on. Do you see that alive. Down there in mexico. Well the funny thing is. I'm you know i'm still figuring this out. But there's actually people used their blinkers kind of differently here and so sometimes. I'm not sure if. I'm just still learning what they mean by having their blinker on. Or if they're actually just you know they dropped the ball and didn't turn it off one thing is if you're if you're on the highway and you're in the left passing lane in someone comes speeding up behind you which is frequent people here on the highway. Drive really fast. They'll put blinker on which means. Hey you pullover move out of my way. at least that's how i interpret it because they'll come right up and get close to you and i'm passing somebody but i'm not going as fast as they are and they clearly are like you need to get over and so then i what i think people do and i'm like i said i'm kind of interpreting this as i go is like then. I put my blinker on. I see you. And i am gonna move over but obviously i can't write the second site passing a big truck or whatever and then the other weird thing that people do here that i've seen as a passenger. I haven't experienced it as a driver. Is that say you're gonna to lean like a more rural road with two lanes in each direction If someone is turned left instead of slowing down and actually blocking you know the main lane of traffic though put their left blinker on..

mexico
"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

04:36 min | 4 months ago

"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"I remember thinking that people were terrible drivers in florida. Sorry floridians we on heard that too. And then i remember thinking like well. Maybe it's because there's a lot of older people here like maybe they'd just drive slow. I don't know what it is. But i don't think it was just the older people. I think it was just kind of a not great. In general i also feel like there's some etiquette to like different highways and stuff right like i drove ninety five a lot. My parents were new jersey. I went to college in dc and then lived in philly for a while so like you know that ninety five stretch. I know very well and just kind of vibe on ninety five. But then i lived on the west coast and light driving up and down like highway. Five in in california feels different..

florida philly new jersey dc west coast california
"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

Drive with Us Podcast

05:47 min | 4 months ago

"amy scott" Discussed on Drive with Us Podcast

"I think we got all my stuff into the hotel room. Had to go to the hospital to get checked out and just kind of you know whiplash. And i my back was kinda messed up but they couldn't really diagnose anything specific anyway. I ended up stuck there and then they got me a rental car. And i was on my way to the kentucky derby and going to whisky distilleries with my cousin. And all this good stuff. And i was in no shape for it so i got the rental car i got like some of those like heating pad things stick on my back and i drove straight to new jersey just to get to my final destination so that was definitely crazy. Interesting that your insurance gave you that advice. I feel like there are certain companies that would take your money anyways and the fact that they were super helpful. That's awesome it was it was and i mean like i had no idea who could help me when i called them. I was like. I'm driving across the country. My car is full of stuff. Like what am i supposed to do. It wasn't even really about like the car itself. In that moment. I was just like like i'm stuck in the middle of nowhere. What do i do now. So yeah having that kind of advice from them was a huge help because they totally hooked me up and my car actually ended up being totaled. So i left my car in indiana at some junkyard and drove a rental car. The rest of the way affect your insurance rate or was it because it was covered by the other lady. Yeah good question. I actually did not get another car after that. So i don't don't miss you in fact i hadn't had a car since then until i bought a car in mexico about a year ago. One way to prevent instruments exactly. Just leave the country. So the last one so i was supposed to be made.

kentucky new jersey indiana mexico
When the Effects of the Climate Crisis Hit Home

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:31 min | 5 months ago

When the Effects of the Climate Crisis Hit Home

"Do you start with the economic effects of the weather and the climate in this country the past week or so hundreds of thousands of people without power along the gulf coast. They've had to evacuate and leave their property and their jobs behind the flooding last night along the east coast. More than twenty people killed in new york and new jersey and pennsylvania. The subway system the biggest and richest city in this country underwater literally. I'm sure you've seen the videos. The insurance claims shirley in the tens of billions of dollars the investment. That's going to be needed to manage and to adapt to the effects of climate. Change as we've seen this week. We're not ready sorting. As marketplace's amy scott reports with much of our housing stock nearly a third of homes in the us are at high risk of natural disasters. According to core logic and low income communities are especially vulnerable these homes haven't been updated haven't gotten consistent reinvestment rehabilitation retrofitting over the years khalil. Shaheed is a senior policy adviser with the natural resources defense council. He says there is federal funding. To help weather is homes by switching out single pane windows for sturdier double pane glass but shaheed says roof repair one of the most expensive and important fixes isn't eligible once the roof goes. And you know you get the wind damage and you get rain damage so it just really compounds. The severity of a storm. Like this one.

Amy Scott Gulf Coast East Coast Shirley New Jersey Pennsylvania New York Shaheed Khalil Natural Resources Defense Coun United States
Should You Take Your Company Public Now?

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:34 min | 1 year ago

Should You Take Your Company Public Now?

"Might reasonably ask as we're seeing virus counts rise and whatever the economic recovery has been so far. We're seeing it falter. A bid one might reasonably ask. Are you sure you want to take your company. Public now. all year and increasingly here in the waning weeks. The answer has been yes. The meal delivery service door dash start. Trading publicly on wednesday airbnb follows on thursday and the short term rental company is feeling pretty confident looking for a total valuation of something like forty two billion dollars which should be some kind of comeback. I'll tell you what from this spring. When the pandemic up ended airbnb is whole business model. Marketplace's amy scott gets going today. Airbnb was planning an ipo back in march. But we all know what happened. That month has global travel. Ground to a halt bookings fell by eighty percent and the company had to refund a billion dollars here. Ceo brian chessy on bloomberg. This summer i felt like a captain of ship in puteaux. Just hit side of the ship. The company laid off a quarter of its staff. Nearly two thousand people cut executive salaries and marketing and focused on the core short term rental business and by september airbnb was profitable again. Tahreek dough grew teaches hospitality management at florida state university. He says as domestic travel picked up airbnb offered something hotels. Didn't it's all yours. You are not going if you don't want to encounter with the host and some people really shifted. I think too Airbnb not everywhere. Jamie lane tracks the short term rental industry at air. Dna he says in big cities like new york and san francisco. Demand is still down forty to sixty percent from a year ago. But we're demand is up and it's up significantly is in small towns and destination markets throughout the country places in the mountains or at the beach. That are easy to drive to. For metro areas and with more people able to work or go to school remotely. They're staying longer to another reason to go public now. Investors are chasing returns in a hot stock market says kathleen smith with renaissance capital. It may be one of the worst years when comes to the pandemic but has been the one of the best years for ideas so far companies have raised more than one hundred forty billion dollars with several more big. Ipo's to go. I'm amy scott for

Airbnb Amy Scott Brian Chessy Puteaux Jamie Lane Bloomberg Florida State University Kathleen Smith San Francisco New York Renaissance Capital
"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. Let's recap here, shall we? The Congress is not talking about the state of this economy. The president is not talking about the state of this economy. You know, is talking and thinking about the state of this economy, the Federal Reserve and it's 12 regional banks. And on those 12, the New York Fed is first among equals. Yesterday I talked to the guy running. It is part of the conference. Put on by the society for Advanced Business Editing and writing. John Williams is his name. He is the president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Here you go. So look, John, the easy first softball question is what does your gut tell you about the state of this economy right now, So I'm not gonna ask that one. I'm gonna ask you a little differently. Um What is the state of this economy gonna be? If we go from today to inauguration day Or maybe till vaccine whatever that is, Let's say hopefully springtime. Without some kind of fiscal relief. What do you see? Yeah, And you know, of course, I would have not answered with my gut. I would have answered time, enormous amounts of data analysis and great work by my colleagues and others. On the on your question. You know, I go back to. I think fiscal support has been really critically important in 2020. The cares Act and other actions by Congress provided people with money. Small businesses for the P P p getting unemployment benefits and that's help people pay the rant. Put food on the table. So Answer your question. I think if when that money runs out, and some of these programs expired. I think that cuts off some of the support that small businesses and households were getting on. That's going to slow the economy because people won't have as much money to spend and again. I think the support has been really quickly important. I'm sure you're sick and tired of people asking you about things that Jay Powell said. But he's the chair, so I kind of have to ask you about things, he says. He pointed out the other day in a video conference he was doing, I think with Christine Lagarde and European bankers Yes, The economy is recovering, but we're covering to a different economy. We're recovering to a different future on by wonder how you took that. What you took that to mean? Well, you know, Like you said, I will let him speak for himself. I do think that the economy is always undergoing significant change. I have seen changes in the economy, the use of technology working from home changes. They're happy in the retail sector and entertainment. Those were happening already. And so what we've seen is just an acceleration in terms of how our economy works. I think those are fundamental changes. They were gonna affect the workforce Productivity. Global competitiveness is well. Let me let me go back to something we talk about on market place all the time. And it's a little bit of Ah, simple question with I think a really difficult answer. I wonder what you think of the idea that the easy part of this recovery is done that we have had our fiscal stimulus. We've had tools that the Fed has used. And now we're kind of heading into the unknown. You buy that. You know, I don't really know what that means. But I guess I don't buy it then because I was saying, I don't know what it means I'm back to, he said, And you can hold me to this. I will never use a letter to describe this recession about ever because every time I've done that I've been in this business. A long time is that it ended up being wrong. So I think that we just have to think about this is being a very unique situation. We've seen the economy bounced back far faster. Anyone could have expected at the same time. We've seen obviously severe hardship. We're still down 10 million jobs in the U. S economy relative in February. I mean, we're still in a severe recession, but it's so much driven by cove it in the fact that you know there are certain segments important segments of our economy that we, you know, don't interact with restaurants and And theaters and travel that we talked about. So I think that to me it is always unusual. The whole thing has been since since March on, we just need to adapt and use our tools to the best we can. Given the circumstances. I think you said in a speech a number of months ago made some oration that it's gonna be three years. Before we're close to normal. You sticking to that? Well, you know, since then, I think two things that made me a little bit more positive about that longer term outlook. Obviously right now, with the cases, you know, so high and all the challenges we've talked about already the short term issues. It's still very challenging. But I would say that my view over the next three years of anything has become somewhat more upbeat. What is we've seen our economy rebound more strongly than I expected. The other is the news on you know, like I said, the news on seven the medical breakthroughs. I think it's helpful in that regard. We will have to see how the economy of also next two years, But overall, I'm feeling somewhat more optimistic around that but still could take a few years to get to. I think they get full, full recovery. John Williams at the New York Fed a little bit more from that conversation later, the Fed and small businesses in this economy and how the central bank is thinking about diversity and inclusion as well. Very quick note on the politics of this economy. Vice President elect who he's actually the president elect. Now, Joe Biden anyway, said today he has decided who he wants to be his new Treasury secretary. Not going to tell us, though. Till next week. Or maybe the week after Thanksgiving on Wall Street. There's Thursday up just a little bit. We'll have the details when we do the numbers. One of the things you look for in a labor market to see.

Federal Reserve John Williams president Congress New York president and CEO Federal Reserve Bank of New Yo Amy Scott Christine Lagarde society for Advanced Business Jay Powell Vice President Joe Biden P P
Its about to get even harder for renters

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:49 min | 1 year ago

Its about to get even harder for renters

"We begin today with a pair of stories about two key parts of this economy. The first one's a quickie because it's something. We have covered every single week. Since march the number of people filing new claims for unemployment benefits seven hundred and forty. Two thousand was the number that came out this morning. That is people who've lost their jobs in the week ended saturday seven hundred and forty two thousand of big as that is it is lower than it has been overall. That is true but it's a week over week increase in that number for the first time in a month in other words. It's going the wrong way story. Number two is housing which just keeps chugging along pandemic well pandemic be darned. How about that. Because it's a family radio show. Sales of existing homes last month hit their highest level in fifteen years. That's according to the national association of realtors and yes prices were up again to more equity for those lucky enough to own now but meanwhile a report out today from harvard tells a different story about a different part of the housing market renters. Especially those with the lowest incomes. Marketplace's amy scott covers housing for us one in five renters. Earning less than twenty five thousand dollars. A year are behind on rent and chris. Herbert with harvard's joint center for housing studies says the racial and ethnic disparities are stark. While fifteen percent of white renters at that income level or behind twenty five percent of black and hispanic renters are behind and this reflects the fact that black and hispanic workers are more likely to be the sectors of the economy that have had a shutdown from the pandemic and so have lost wages meanwhile to policies that have helped renters stay in their homes. A national moratorium on evictions and extended unemployment benefits are set to expire next month so january. It could be a very difficult month for millions of renters and evictions haven't completely stopped. Carol ott with the fair housing action center of maryland says it's up to individual judges. We are seeing people being evicted through the courts. We're also seeing illegal evictions where the landlord will go and change. The locks on attendant widespread evictions could increase demand for homeless shelters. Emergency rooms and child welfare. Services says dan three a research analyst with the national low income housing coalition and the public costs to health and social services systems could range between sixty two and one hundred and twenty nine billion dollars. He says the solution is direct payments to help tenants cash up on billions of dollars in background. I'm amy scott for

Amy Scott Harvard National Association Of Realto Joint Center For Housing Studi Carol Ott Fair Housing Action Center Of Herbert Chris National Low Income Housing Co DAN
New home sales jumped more than 30% in the past year

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:08 min | 1 year ago

New home sales jumped more than 30% in the past year

"The housing market took a bit of a surprising turn last month sales of new homes fell. In September three and a half percent that's from the Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development Down we should say from August. So it's month on month from September a year ago though sales are actually up more than thirty percents low mortgage rates, not a lot of supply of existing homes and a whole lot of people looking for more space in this pandemic equals a whole lot of demand for new and bigger construction as marketplace's amy. Scott? Reports the average size of a new single family home peaked at two, thousand, six, hundred, eighty, nine, square feet, five years ago think maybe a two story house with four bedrooms and two and a half baths that average has been falling gradually ever since as more millennials have entered the market seeking affordable I homes. But now because of the pandemic, we're seeing data already that builders are getting more and more requests for larger homes because people want more space rose. Quint with the National Association of Home Builders predicts in the second half of this year average home size will start growing again as buyers look for space to work go to school an exercise at home a return to bigger holmes isn't great for the Environment Says Maury Cohen who teaches sustainability at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Clearly, it takes more energy to heat and cool larger spaces rather than than smaller spaces that even if people want bigger houses they. Can't necessarily afford them. Alley Wolf is chief economist at Zonda Housing Data and consulting firm and so builders are really struggling with should we build larger homes that may have to come with a larger price tag or find creative work arounds that buyers can afford one builder she knows took a bit of extra closet space and turned it into a zoom room. Just big enough for a desk and chair same square footage whole different vibe. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace.

Amy Scott National Association Of Home B Zonda Housing Data Department Of Housing Census Bureau New Jersey Institute Of Techno Chief Economist Alley Wolf Maury Cohen
Should robots have a gender or ethnicity? One roboticist says no

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

08:49 min | 1 year ago

Should robots have a gender or ethnicity? One roboticist says no

"In the past seven months or so we as a society have spent a lot more at home some in the company of family, maybe pets or maybe with some robots are computers, smartphones, smart devices, and even room buzz are taking on new significance in our lives as we're forced to stay away from other people, these robots and our relationships with them are the subject of a new audio book by a Ana Howard a robot assistant attack. The book is called sex race and robots. In the age of. We started with the danger of gendered digital assistance, most voice assistance at least in the US have a female voice. And so when we treat them and we bark at them and they're always giving us the answers are always on, we're starting to see that humans are then treating their human assistance in the same way. Why can't you? Why don't you know this and that's a problem. and. How do we? Unproven that I mean you talk about we have to. De Bug ourselves our own prejudices in order to to see this and to. to change that. Programming what should robot assists be doing? Well. So robotics and I claim that it's the developers is the robot is the specialist, but is also society have a responsibility to do this? So as developers it's a dollar ensuring that we do have diverse thinking on a team and when I say diverse thinking is not just all the robotics together. I'm a robot Asus right but let's bring in folks from the communities to work with you and identify if I'm designing a robot say a police robot I think I should bring in folks from like ACL. You to talk about what are the right ways to do this? If we should even do this I think as developers, we need to be more open to listening to people that aren't robot Asus to develop it and a society we need to stop just saying, yeah, I'm just GONNA use it. Oh. Yeah. They're smart. Of course, it's going to work it. That's not the case. Now, I should say you know despite concerns, you are pro robot. You actually think they have a valuable role to play in our lives. What how do you see that role in in? What's IT GONNA take to get us there. I am pro robotics I think that robots do fill a need they do. They can enhance our quality of life if they're done right for example, I would love it if my Alexa with literally tell me you're being rude I'm not doing that one. You know your mom or your dad you you get a little bit of home training. I think we can have systems that make us start thinking about our own biases and basically allow us to learn about ourselves to them. Be Better humans. I think that Hey, I can do that but we're we're still far from that because we don't have that path and we're not thinking about it that way. But I think it makes our lives better. I just want to make sure that it doesn't also harm communities while it's doing it. So you say you know it would be good. If Alexa interrupted and said, you know you're being rude I'm not GonNa do that how do we get to that point? Well. So the technique is actually fairly straightforward. As an example in our voice inflections, we can identify for when we're angry we can identify when we're frustrated and we have such good language models. We know what route is like. We can understand when someone says something rude. So the technology to do that and figure that out is actually been done. The question is, how do you get the companies that are releasing these applications? The ability to do that, and also give us the freedom to cut it off. There are cut it on right because we don't necessarily always WANNA rude, rude Syria relax. And so I think one of things is having people start talking about it and start demanding it of their products like we do with everything else. Green we went something that's green in a company will decide okay. We're GONNA go green right we have the power as consumers to change companies as well. So on one hand, you're arguing that robots should be more humanlike person would never allow you to talk to it like. Many of us. Do. To Alexa and Siri, but I'm interested if you could say more about why you think they should not have ethnicity and how that can be achieved. If you look at the developers and you look at the individuals, they don't represent the various racial and ethnic groups that are in the world. So in the US, we would say going to have a US folks and Silicon Valley define what the ethnic culture aspects are of someone in India right so I think fundamentally wrong and so I don't think that a robot can embody those various nuances that you have when you do belong to. One or another ethnic group. At the same time I wonder how people's perceptions of neutral and ethnicity less might. Play into that and might actually create ethnicity without intending to I mean in our country majority white many white people see their experience as neutral and everything else says other. So how do we ensure that that doesn't creep into the process? Yes. This is the interesting thing. If we do it, right people will assign robots AI with the gender even if it's if it doesn't necessarily program with the gender doesn't have gender voice. Because what we do is we try to make these systems you know part of our our family part of our environment and so what's comfortable to us, right. So if I'm female I may be more comfortable with someone who's female and so I'm going to call my robot a she what that does though it gives me the right, right. It gives me the power to then incorporate and interact with this system as I would with someone in my family. So we're not going to get away from that we are still going to. Define, gender are define ethnicity, but is not the developers that are doing it. And you say Silicon Valley should really incorporate more people from the communities that may be interacting with these products as part of making them more representative, less biased. How would that actually work? Expense one barrier to that yet. So there, there's always an expense and one of these things is if companies don't do this. Government will right and so I think is in the best interest of companies to think about how to do this before that happens and if they don't, then we have think about all kinds of regulations we have on companies right now. So if you are taking federal dollars, you have to disclose things about you know your impact on the environment. For example, you have to disclose would is your your balance in terms of your gender workforce and things like that you have. To report this, and if you're not complying or your quote, unquote a monopoly, you can get in trouble and so I think it's really imperative that companies do this even though it's more of an expense because one regulations come which they will. If this isn't resolve it's going to be even more expensive and at that point, there's no turning back a on Howard's new audio book is called sex race and robots, how to be human in the age of AI. Now, for some related links last year, the United Nations released a report examining how the default female voices of virtual assistance like Siri and Alexa reflect a lack of diversity in the tech industry. The report is called I. Blush if I could, which used to be the standard response from the IPHONE, Siri whenever a user said something inappropriate to it. The report CITES research predicting people will soon have more conversations with digital assistance than with their own spouses and warns that as these assistance become more common the way we interact with them could affect the way we talk to real women and even encourage some people to treat women as assistance. The report RECOMMENDS TECH COMPANIES MAKE MORE GENDER neutral default voices as they create assistance in the future and include more women in the creating. I'm Amy Scott and that's marketplace tech.

Alexa United States Siri Ana Howard Asus United Nations Cites Amy Scott Syria Representative India
The pandemic is putting electronic medical records to the test

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:07 min | 1 year ago

The pandemic is putting electronic medical records to the test

"To slow the spread of the coronavirus testing is hugely important, not just getting a test but getting the results back as quickly as possible. A recent survey found that the average wait time for results is four days with ten percent of the people surveyed waiting ten days or more a shortage of the equipment and chemicals needed to perform the test is part of the problem but the country. Also lacks bust electric medical records system which would allow information to be shared seamlessly. We wondered how much is that slowing everything down Julia? Adler. Milstein is a professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco where her research focuses on electronic health records. I asked her if part of the problem is all the different software providers, companies like epic and Care Cloud and Athena health not. Playing nicely together I do think there's a roadblock there I mean that's really been an Achilles heel of the past decade where we've seen so much more digitisation of health information but not as much of an effort put on making sure that that information can move around seamlessly where it's needed and I think in an ideal world. Yes. Those large companies would have cooperated and figured out how You. Build their systems in a way that we're more compatible but we also didn't really create strong incentives for them to do that, and now we're working to try to correct that and I think covert has shown a really bright spotlight on the need to do that. But but it wasn't there from the start and I think we're really paying the price for that. Now What about privacy concerns? With information being shared more widely in more places I. Wonder if patients sort of opting out may be part of the the hurdle here. It is and I mean privacy concerns. You know go go hand in hand with greater ability to move and share information because you want to be sure that it does end up in the hands and not the wrong hands and that and that the patients are involved in that in the way that you know is appropriate until I think one of the issues that that is hard to know is sort of in what what level of of detail or granularity patient want to be involved in managing. You know who sees their information and for what purposes. into do that at scale is really hard because we know different people have different preferences over all and for specific types of information, as well as for whether it's a payoff for example, like what they might want to share with health insurer versus their doctor. So it gets very complex very quickly. So I think everyone agrees we should have the privacy protection, but actually implementing that privacy protection control is is where it gets pretty pretty complicated. I'm also wondering about the cost of all this I know the federal government has already spent tens of billions of dollars to encourage the adoption of electronic medical records. Do you have a sense of the price tag on what this effort could cost to get it? Right I don't think we've really seen good cost estimates because part of it is sort of what are we paying for I don't think at this point we're really paying for the infrastructure. This is really about linking up all of the digital entities and writing down rules of the road. I. Don't think anyone really has a sense of the Price Tag. You know my personal sense is that it would be lower than the investment that we've made so far because there's so much cost just the digitisation itself. But there's also some real costs in in in trying to figure out how to make all the different systems talk to each other, but potentially lots of savings to I imagine. Oh absolutely there have been some estimates of that and they've been in this sort of seventy to eighty billion dollars. A Year of potential savings if we really were to get to sort of fully standardize seamless information sharing a fact that hospitals are filling out spreadsheets with their covid testing data and sending it to the federal government, it's staggering to think that we're still doing that you know in the year twenty twenty. But then also to think about all the costs of all the people in those hospitals who are manually entering data into a spreadsheet, it's sort of hard to believe. Yeah, and if I never have to try to remember when my knee surgery was when I see a new doctor. It'll be too soon. How many of those health questionnaires if we all filled out again and again? Yeah. No. On the patient side exactly I mean, we haven't even addressed those costs and also just I think that the stress that we put on patients when it's clear that their doctor doesn't know their medical history and so if you were to show up today and you know tell your doctor that you've had cova test and then for that doctor to say, Oh, well, I don't have any way to access that information at his not delivering patient centered. CARE. Julia Adler Milstein is a professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco. And now for some related links, another wrinkle in all this, just because you're test results are in the system doesn't mean your doctor we'll see them right away. These are busy people with lots of patients counting on them. Adler Milstein says so far. The solution is just hanging doctors with lots of alerts, which if you've ever had to mute a group text chat, you know can create notification fatigue, and while most hospitals now have some kind of electronic health records system public health departments are still far behind relying on. Phones and even fax machines to share information. That's the subject of an episode of the health podcast trade-offs from my former marketplace colleague Dan. Guerrero tiene molly had him on this show awhile back Dan found that technology and data gaps key public health officials dangerously out of the loop, the fight, the spread of Corona virus. We have a link at marketplace tech DOT ORG along with results from a survey from the Pew. Charitable trusts found that most Americans support to improve how medical records are shared between providers but have since. Concerns about privacy and accuracy and respondents were generally less comfortable with the sharing of sensitive information like Substance Abuse Mental, Health Issues and homelessness factors that can influence health but also potentially how patients are treated I'm Amy Scott and that's marketplace tech.

Julia Adler Milstein Federal Government University Of California San F Professor Of Medicine Adler Milstein DAN Amy Scott Guerrero Molly
"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"Situation, whether you're working from home or Essential and can't or if you're not working at all, because recession or if you're a college student who's not actually at school right now, or if you're trying to get your kids through their school on zoom from the dining room table. These are stressful days, but What about the nights? Those eight giver take hours when we're supposed to be restoring ourselves so we can get up and be refreshed in our stress tomorrow. Marketplaces Amy Scott looks with the rise of a product that is meant to help Long before we became a nation of budding insomniacs. Cat hazard was well acquainted with the quest for a good night's sleep, stress and anxiety frequently kept her up a night. Then her dad got sick and one day I got home from being at the hospital all day and I saw on Instagram ad for a weighted blanket and I was just like that's it. I'm getting one. What she got was £18 of tiny glass beads sewn into a queen size quilt. When the box arrived, she could barely get it in the door. I sort of had to firemen carry it up the stairs on my back. But my first night sleeping under it, Wass a game changer. An uninterrupted ate our game changer hazard. Now 49 book up feeling calm for the first time in months calm. That's the selling proposition for what seems like a gazillion brands have waited blankets..

Long Amy Scott Instagram Wass
"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"Baltimore and Amy Scott for Marketplace. We've got a map of West Baltimore is vacant buildings and the pictures that he took while she was out reporting that story. Check it all out at marketplace. Couple of months ago, Back in the age of round one of PPP loans we heard from early NASA Bova She's the owner of Gelateria two locations here in Los Angeles. Should you have a craving? She was talking about how she was going to be able to hang on ages feels like it's too soon that I have to mourn the loss of my business and hopefully add on half too. But there's a very pretty big possibility that you know in a couple of months and might not be able to keep it up. Here we are. Then a couple of months on we called about the cheque back. Turns out she gotta pee Pee pee alone in the second round and an economic injury disaster alone as well. Because of those two loans. I'm in a much better place mentally today than I was when I first talked to you. It's it's day and night. I actually I actually have the recording on my phone and I listened to it. And I just remember my voice was so like low and I was holding back tears and At the time I went through the whole five step process of Grief except at the time I thought it was from my business, but it wasn't for my business. It was for the old way of doing business. You know the landscape, it's still shifting. Now it's about driving more traffic to the website about premeditated orders, as opposed to impulse buys. Before. You know, being a woman in immigrant. You're always comparing yourself to other business owners to what you think they are, and you say, Okay? I can't seem like I need how I have to look like I have It all figured out. I'm strong. One thing that I started doing, especially at my lowest, I started calling people asking for help and saying, How do I do this? How do I implement this vivid and ah lot of what I'm doing today? Not of it is my invention. It's It's mostly just me taken advice from people that said, Hey, have you thought about a subscription model? Have you thought about E commerce Have you thought about curbside pickup? We launched our subscription box model on June 24th. I'm going to the customer and saying, Hey, he used to have to think about it. Now I will bring this to you. Moreover, I will do it every months. Just commit for six months and I will also take the thinking out of it. I will do a curated subscription. Off season of flavors. I'm really excited because my goal is to reach 1000 subscriptions. That's $45,000 a month off. Revenue that I can rely on as opposed to applying for loans. Just relying on these outside sources for revenue, and it's very stressful or having to face the decision of dough. I lay off my entire staff, so that's basically the idea is how do I make it so that it's a little more predictable, and it's not all impulse buy generated revenue. It's It's not something I would have ever thought of before. That was Solina. So Bova, owner of Gelateria really here in Los Angeles. Let us know Would you What's going on in your own personal economy? Ice cream or not gelato, I suppose or not, You could do that at marketplace. His final note on the way out.

Los Angeles Baltimore Gelateria NASA Amy Scott Bova Solina
"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Appreciate more slowly. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. One of the challenges of this quarantine life for a whole lot of people. Bet yours truly included. Has been quieting the mind turning away from the day to day finding other ways to occupy yourself. Art is a really good way to do that. Even if the museums are closed, there is painting and drawing photography. Also movies and music and television. The contributions that artist make to this economy or riel, and in a pandemic, they come in different forms. Here's today's installment of our Siri's My economy. My name is a tier Jones and I am a visual and multimedia artist living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the start of the pandemic. I really I wasn't comfortable with the idea, especially if the man in my family A CZ black men going out into Public spaces wearing bandannas on their face on DSO became a mask maker. You know, my friends call them luxury mask in the interest of helping my family on DH. That quickly snowballed into a more public effort, and it quickly turned into something bigger for me, but it also felt really strange to be Abel Tio sustained my livelihood on the effects of a pandemic just as I was, you know. Gaining stride in mass making and really kind of nailing down that schedule. Um, you know, the first week of June happened and George Floyd's murder happened in Briana Taylor's murder happened, and so I really started to look at what I could do from the couch. And I.

Amy Scott murder Abel Tio George Floyd Briana Taylor Jones Siri Pittsburgh Pennsylvania
"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Tend to appreciate more slowly. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. One of the challenges of this quarantine life for a whole lot of people. Bet yours truly included. Has been quieting the mind turning away from the day to day finding other ways to occupy yourself. Art is a really good way to do that. Even if the museums are closed, there is painting and drawing photography. Also movies and music and television. The contributions that artist make to this economy or riel, and in a pandemic, they come in different forms. Here's today's installment of our Siri's My economy. My name is Attea Jones, and I am a visual and multimedia artist living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the start of the pandemic. I really I wasn't comfortable with the idea, especially if the man in my family a cz black men going out into Public spaces wearing bandannas on their face on DSO became a mask maker. You know, my friends call them luxury mask in the interest of helping my family on DH. That quickly snowballed into a more public effort, and it quickly turned into something bigger for me, but it also felt really strange to be Abel Tio sustain my livelihood on the effects of a pandemic. Just as I was, you know, gaining stride in mass making and really kind of nailing down that schedule. Um, you know, the first week of June happened and George Floyd's murder happened in Briana Taylor's murder happened, and so I really started to look at what I could do from the couch. And.

Amy Scott Attea Jones murder Abel Tio George Floyd Briana Taylor Siri Pittsburgh Pennsylvania
"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 1 year ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Appreciate more slowly. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. One of the challenges of this quarantine life for a whole lot of people. Bet yours truly included. Has been quieting the mind turning away from the day to day finding other ways to occupy yourself. Art is a really good way to do that. Even if the museums or closers, painting and drawing photography, also movies and music and television. The contributions that artist make to this economy or riel, and in a pandemic, they come in different forms. Here's today's installment of our Siri's My economy. My name is a tier Jones and I am a visual and multimedia artist living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. At the start of the pandemic. I really I wasn't comfortable with the idea, especially as the man in my family Assed black men going out into Public spaces wearing bandannas on their face on DSO became a mask maker. You know, my friends call them luxury mask in the interest of helping my family on DH. That quickly snowballed into a more public effort, and it quickly turned into something bigger for me, but it also felt really strange to be Abel Tio sustained my livelihood on the effects of a pandemic. Just as I was, you know, gaining stride in mass making and really kind of nailing down that schedule. Um, you know, the first week of June happened and George Floyd's murder happens in Briana Taylor's murder happened, and so I really started to look at what I could do from the couch. And I.

Amy Scott murder Abel Tio George Floyd Briana Taylor Jones Siri Pittsburgh Pennsylvania
How the Federal Reserve’s “discount window” works

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:35 min | 2 years ago

How the Federal Reserve’s “discount window” works

"I'm thinking the best way for us to frame things today. When just how different things are has now? Become so clear is do what we've done a couple of times. The past couple of weeks macro micro big picture to actual people in an economy that is coming to a very sudden stop. You don't get much more big picture of course than the Federal Reserve on a Sunday afternoon pulling out. Maybe not all but certainly a whole lot of the stops that had has that huge cut in their short-term interest rate that you have heard about Shirley and other big bond buying program echoes of the financial crisis to be sure also a cut in something called the discount rate short-term emergency loans dispensed through what is known as the discount window sounds a tad. We D I know but in reality it is so big picture because what we're talking about here is the Fed making some really big moves to keep credit flowing to households and businesses marketplace's. Amy Scott gets us going with what the discount window is and why it is so important in a crisis. Think of the discount window as a shot of. Wd Forty if advanced is short on cash to cover customer withdrawals or make loans it can borrow money short-term directly from the Fed in effect it's kind of keeping the finances lubricated during a stressful time banking consultant. Burt Ely says the problem is banks are reluctant to reach for the Kellyanne. Borrowing from the Fed is usually more expensive than borrowing from other banks and Joe Gagnon with the Peterson Institute for International Economics says that looks bad. I mean if a bank has to pay a higher rate to get credit it's usually because other banks are leery of landing to it so it looks like it might be in trouble. The Fed is trying to reduce that stigma by slashing the discount rate and by urging banks to use it and not add. Mahdi teaches finance and economics at Stanford. If they say well please come. Please come which they also did during the financial crisis. Then it's like everybody's doing it and it's okay and it's legitimate. It could help the J. P. Morgan Chase recently said it plans to use the discount window to help break that stigma. Gerard Cassidy an analyst with RBC capital markets says bank balance sheets are really strong right now partly because of nervous customers. There's been an influx of deposits for the safety of the FDIC deposit insurance. So I don't think the banks are going to be forced to go to the discount window but he says better to get them comfortable with the idea before. There's a real

Federal Reserve Gerard Cassidy Rbc Capital Markets Peterson Institute For Interna Fdic Burt Ely Amy Scott Shirley Joe Gagnon Mahdi J. P. Morgan Chase Stanford Kellyanne Analyst Consultant
What China wants with Equifax data

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:02 min | 2 years ago

What China wants with Equifax data

"That big Equifax data breach couple years back. Hackers got hold of the names birthdates and social security numbers of one hundred forty five five million of US federal prosecutors announced charges in that case today charges against four members of the Chinese People's Liberation Army. This is the latest. If by far the largest in a string of hacks that American officials have tied to Beijing. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more now on how China might use that trove of data. It's got in a press conference attorney. General William Bar described the equifax breach as more evidence of China's voracious appetite for Americans personal data including the theft of personnel records from the Office of personnel management the intrusion into Marriott hotels anthem health insurance companies and and now the wholesale theft of credit and other information from Equifax. Chinese officials have denied any connection to previous hacks but cybersecurity. I security experts say there are lots of reasons China might want that data priscilla more. Ut is a researcher with the security intelligence firm recorded future richer. She says sensitive financial information like debts could be used by Chinese spies to target potentially vulnerable Americans so building thank profiles of individuals that could be susceptible to recruitment by Chinese intelligence services. Georgetown Professor Ben Buchanan wrote a book about Cybersecurity. Called the hacker and the state he says the data could also help China identify Americans operating undercover in Beijing. But my guess is the biggest determining factor. Here Why the Chinese did this is they could and Why not take it and why not see what might be useful down the line Buchanan? You can and says it's exceptionally unlikely. Chinese hackers will see the inside of an American courtroom but the charges do send a message that the US government is trying trying to track and deter foreign hacking. I'm AMY SCOTT FOR

China Chinese People's Liberation Ar Amy Scott United States Equifax Beijing Professor Ben Buchanan Theft Marriott UT Office Of Personnel General William Bar Attorney Georgetown Researcher
"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Market place I'm Amy Scott one of our podcasts this is uncomfortable as been digging into some money horror stories you know the financial decisions that still haunts you like that credit card funded trip to Europe after college just for instance most of the stories have been about people buying things they eventually came to regret but this excerpt from the latest episode is less about regrets and more about let's call it self discovery here's the host of this is uncomfortable rima Crace earlier this year hating Aldrin a twenty three year old college student from Idaho started taking the sleeping pill really powerful one if I could look out on laughing gas to the to a source which I'm I'm a Mormon so I've never been high before but I imagine this is what it feels like for years and he didn't had trouble sleeping and this pill felt like a god send he could finally get a full night's sleep there was just one tiny drop back when he didn't take the sleeping held he does things he has zero recollection of when he talks about it he refers to his night time self as subconscious hate and so not only does he like know what things you want to keep secret but some conscious Hayden also likes to buy things for conscious Hayden in the past year it sub conscious Hayden has bought a week Kate in a nice sweater black socks a huge bag of air heads and a five pound bag of jelly beans just to name a few things it's been mostly trivial stuff then one evening earlier this summer this email pops up in Hayden's and box I got a notification that said your Billboard is live I said my Billboard is what no and I went I went to the confirmation link and I had had ordered a Billboard in Louisville Kentucky we do have any connection to Louisville not at all so a Billboard depending on the location can cost thousands of dollars he didn't was panicking what if you're completely wiped out his bank account he looks more closely at that confirmation email and it turns out he bought a digital Billboard for relatively cheap a hundred Bucks saying that it was only a hundred dollars just kinda like who okay thank goodness okay so now he just has to find out what in the world is on that Billboard he can't find any trace of it on his computer there's no mock up or Photoshop file so he goes to the company's website so I don't know that much for the website and is just a bunch of clouds with my face on it my face is cut out terribly by the way and then there was a little tiny airplane pulling a banner then on the Tanner said hash tag and chronic fatigue tomorrow what heads which is so interesting because any call to action you've ever heard is like let's do something about this today mine is like let's and chronic fatigue room tomorrow let's figure it out later we I need to see this image I can set you right now actually okay old thank god yeah it's pretty much how he described it it looks like something a middle school kids slap together using Microsoft paint in Hayden has no memory of ever making it you have a kind of us like a I'm looking into your soul kind of look on your bike I understand you Hayden says he knows that sleeping pills can have serious side effects there's been warnings from the FDA about people doing things like driving or getting injured sleepwalking he hasn't consulted his doctor about it but he has told his parents and they aren't too worried Hayden says the real tipping point would be if he wakes up one day and sees that sub conscious Hayden has spent beyond our means and he can't return it but he doesn't see that happening I know that he knows all of my anxieties about money and you know he knows that I have these accruing student loans and so I think she is more of a not as much of a prankster but more of a gift giver to me he's got your back yeah for he says at least for now he does I.

Amy Scott
Remembering Paul Volcker

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

05:39 min | 2 years ago

Remembering Paul Volcker

"Here's the thing about Paul Volcker the former chairman of the Federal Reserve arguably one of the most influential of Fed shares. Who died it yesterday at the age of ninety two? Yeah it's kind of an amazing story that's author and New York Times editorial board member beaming Applebaum on this show about a month or two ago. He used to cover the Fed for the Times. When Paul Volcker I started at the Federal Reserve he worked basically as a human calculator in an office deep inside the Federal Reserve? There Have Bank of New York in the early nineteen fifties and he told his wife one night that he didn't think he had a future at the Fed that as an economist he was always going to be consigned to being essentially. Actually you know A worker bee at this institution that was run by financial market types businessmen. Those even a Iowa Hog farmer there and he didn't think that he had much chance of getting ahead. Suffice it to say Paul Volcker got way ahead at the Federal Reserve. Jimmy Carter picked him to run the Central Bank in nineteen seventy nine with inflation and this is important headed toward almost fifteen percent. I ask Carter about that about the economic and political fallout from picking Volker when I interviewed the former president in two thousand ten so I went looking as I Picked up this book. I went looking for the name. Paul Volcker who You pointed to the Fed in nineteen seventy nine. You don't come across crosses name until page three hundred and forty something and it's really funny because it is dismissed in a sentence. Paul Volcker came in We decided we could work with him. And then the the next day bang you name to defend that was really the one of the most hotly debated things. I did because a lot of my political advisor. Said don't appoint Paul Volcker because he's going to tighten up on everything and you will have no control at all over the Fed anymore. You won't even have communication with him when Paul Volcker came. I was seeing the prospect of enormous inflation rates. And so I agreed with Paul Volcker in conversation that I would not interfere in what he did. I was prepared for him. To tighten up tremendously and drive interest rates and so forth up in order to control rampant in. It's funny actually because a little bit later in the book you basically say in this passage that you dictated at the time Volcker says he's going to have to tighten interest rates. And it's GonNa hurt me politically. I mean. You knew it was coming. I knew it was coming but I was prepared to take it. I thought that I could be reelected in spite of that as it turns out. Of course things didn't work out for President Carter about which I asked Paul Volcker in two thousand twelve if I read the see the recounting of that job interview correctly in this book. You basically said I want independence and I gotta do what I gotTa do. It was obvious why he wanted to see me. But I MR president and if you're thinking of appointing me Germany Federal Reserve. You have to know that I believe in somewhat entitled Monetary Policy and we have been following and my predecessor followed. Yeah you know I the next question I asked the president actually was Did you mind when he raised interest. He's like that and he said Oh no I I thought it was going to be good for the next presidential term. I thought that term was going to be mine. Not Raking No. He asked him why said I cost him the election. There's some people said and he had kind of Ri- smiled and he said well I think there were a few other factors as well after he left the Fed in nineteen eighty seven. Paul Volcker worked on on Wall Street for a while. Got Drafted back into government service every now and then most. Recently as the chairman of President Obama's economic recovery advisory board and as the namesake for the Volcker Carulli. The part of the Dodd Frank Financial Reform Bill that limited some of the kinds of trades. The Big Wall Street banks could make. But really when you think Paul Volcker. It's those years in the late nineteen seventies early nineteen eighties when the Fed pushed short-term interest rates up to a record twenty percent to get inflation back under control twenty percent went today the Fed's current short-term target rate is between one and a half percent and one and three quarters percent and it hasn't over five in more than a decade which makes double digit interest rates hard for most Americans below a certain age to even fathom so marketplace's Amy Scott takes us back in the early nineteen eighties and Owen managed a bank branch Boston to remember telling customers. They'd have to pay twenty one percent interest for a car loan today. The average is just over for four percent. They would get mad at the bank and many times they would just basically say I can't afford that. Oh and went on to become an economist at the Fed and now teaches at Hamilton College. She says those high interest rates had a purpose volcker was trying to slow down demand by making borrowing more expensive give. It made it difficult for people to buy houses by cars Credit card interest rates. Were extremely high. The economy did slowdown slowdown falling into two recessions. In one thousand nine hundred eighty two unemployment topped ten percent in protest homebuilders mailed. Chunks of two by fours is to Volker and members of Congress. Fred Napolitano is former president of the National Association of homebuilders. Just make a point to say this is what we do is is what we build you know with. The interest rate is hurting us. That pain eventually paid off. Robert King is a professor of economics at Boston University. Ultimately once people began to believe that inflation was gonNA come down it came down and interest rates tumbled and the economy recovered and and it's viewed as a major triumph at triumph. Nobody wants to have to repeat. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. Paul Volcker did yesterday at at the age of ninety

Paul Volcker Federal Reserve President Trump Volcker President Carter Chairman Of The Federal Reserv Have Bank Of New York Times New York Times Volker Amy Scott Germany Federal Reserve Applebaum Editorial Board Member Political Advisor Robert King Iowa
Kylie Jenner sells majority stake in beauty brand for $600 million

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Kylie Jenner sells majority stake in beauty brand for $600 million

"Arguably the corporate story of the day besides Ford Lord is cosmetic specifically the fate of Kylie cosmetics founded in two thousand fifteen by then eighteen year old reality TV star Kylie. Jenner cody cody which owns covergirl. And Max factor among a bunch of more established brands announced. Today is taking a major stake in Kylie cosmetics majority stake in fact four six six hundred million dollars which works out to a little bit more than two bucks for every social media. Follow that Kylie Jenner as as of today anyway and had values the company at one point take two billion dollars as marketplace's Amy Scott reports company known for its shall we say older brands would love to tap into that young. Following cody was founded in nineteen. Oh four and owns legacy favorites like covergirl Wella and Clairol Kylie. Cosmetics launched on social media. Yeah in two thousand fifteen. I'm just obsessed with liners sex in general and I can't leave the house without just decided to take matters into my own hands and and when she did Kylie Jenner had such a following her first lip kit sold out within seconds Lauren. Good Sid is a beauty analyst with mental. She says influencers influencers are a growing force in the cosmetics industry. Another success story is glossy a makeup and skin care company founded by beauty blogger. Emily Weiss in what they do when they're generating any new type of product. Is They really look at the comments that their consumers are posting on their instagram on their social media and they take into account what consumers are asking for but can establish brands just by their way into that relationship. Good sit says land comes collaboration and with influence or Kiara. Barani has been working well but attaching to a name can be risky to says Linda Bolton wiser an analyst with Da Davidson Kylie at age twenty is likely different than what she'll be like at age thirty. So what are the issues is what happens to the brand and once the person under those changes in their life stars can fade to take the cosmetics company co founded by celebrity makeup artists. Bobby Brown down in one thousand nine hundred ninety one wiser says today. Bobby Brown is one of estee. Lauder is weakest brands. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace.

Kylie Cosmetics Kylie Jenner Cody Cody Da Davidson Kylie Amy Scott Bobby Brown Analyst Covergirl SID Lauder Emily Weiss Barani Linda Bolton Lauren Four Six Six Hundred Million D Two Billion Dollars Eighteen Year
Another Election in Spain Threatens to Deepen the Political Deadlock

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

01:17 min | 2 years ago

Another Election in Spain Threatens to Deepen the Political Deadlock

"This Sunday Spain. We'll hold its fourth general election four years though. The Socialist Party picked up the most seats in parliament. Last April its leader. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez has not been unable to form. A coalition to pass anything into law and political divisions are mounting. Marketplace's Amy Scott reports. Three big issues loom mm over Sunday's election in Spain. One is the deadlock itself. It's you know. Let's get somebody who can govern that's Gayle Allard an economics professor at the I.. E. Business School in Madrid she says to is Catalonia where violent protests erupted last month over the imprisonment of separatist leaders. The far right party vox has been gaining gaining ground with its tough stance against separatists and then the third issue is the economy slowing down to about a two percent growth rate which is fine but high unemployment employment and government debt are also weighing on the country says Heather Conley with the Center for Strategic and International Studies. It really still has struggled with the type of good quality jobs that provide meaningful benefits and employment. And that's in part what's driving voters frustration with the current political l.. Stalemate a stalemate that if it continues after this election could be a further drag on

Spain Gayle Allard Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez Socialist Party Center For Strategic And Inter Heather Conley Amy Scott Madrid Catalonia Professor E. Business School Two Percent Four Years
Some ways to keep the power on in Californias fire season

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:44 min | 2 years ago

Some ways to keep the power on in Californias fire season

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by aqua the open source digital experience company brands often struggle to find a comprehensive solution to power their DRUBEL websites and applications aqueous Asturian of how does the rest of the system interconnect if everybody has their own rooftop solar array for instance that creates new challenges for out more of these alternatives yet the key word there is more so we can roll out this technology right now but there's sort of Heck demystifying the digital economy I'm Amy Scott in for Molly would the electric grid that we already have the legacy one that we all rely on in addition to that one reason that utilities often look at these kinds of distributed generation as even entire communities or the other thing that we've seen develop is what we typically refer to as rooftop solar which is basically solar arrays and now often with storage part of planned blackouts aimed at reducing the risk of wildfires the state's largest utility Pacific gas and electric has been blamed for sparking previous deadly fire last week more than seven hundred thousand people and businesses in northern California lost power lose power was cut off and even the utility itself marketplace's Ben Bradford has covered California wildfires in their aftermath extensively he said is there are alternatives that could prevent this kind of disruption in the future two options are microbes which are instead of having this kind of vast so the company cut power to areas it's is most vulnerable during a period of dry windy weather the overall effort was chaotic. According to P tax compliance dun-rite better tech change the wildfire scenario in California from American public media this is marketplace to upkeep that transmission system that the rest of us rely on then Bradford is a reporter at marketplace air that could be invested in these kinds of alternatives well you know the rooftop solar industry and some environmental groups they have goals that are anywhere from realistic but we're already seeing companies market off of this opportunity I got a press release from a rooftop solar company almost as soon as the first power shut offs were announced this or their own gas their own storage to be able to power either you know starting off with where we are right now critical functions like fire stations and hospitals and eventually Brett is because the more people that have a rooftop solar array and aren't paying for their electricity from the utility or aren't paying as much the less money there is couldn't be easier and they have experts in fifteen countries around the world to help as you grow learn more at Avi A. L. A. R. A. Dot Com Slash Tech avalon ray of electricity connections and power generation that a from miles away their communities that have their own generation our own solar that can go onto people's homes and provide power to them directly well all this seems like a potentially huge business opportunity I mean how much money are we talking about here. SIMPLIFIES SALES TAX WITH REAL TIME TAX RATE CALCULATIONS AUTOMATIC RETURN Filing Avalanche software seamlessly integrates with your accounting e commerce and point of sales systems so up to I would say about a quarter of the entire generation in California technically there are reports that California could power just every home and business that had the right kind of roof for it and write access to Sun that as much as seventy five percent of the state could be powered by them. I mean that's probably not and now for some related links another reason rooftop solar panels aren't a perfect solution they don't necessarily work during a blackout

California Ben Bradford Amy Scott Avalanche Software Reporter Brett Avi A. L. A. R. Molly Seventy Five Percent
How networking can lead to more diversity in tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:21 min | 2 years ago

How networking can lead to more diversity in tech

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed. You can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard and get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace and by click share an award-winning wireless presentation system with with click share and you're meeting you can share your screen instantly from any device no more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait for tech problems to be fixed click share instantly projects any speakers laptop tablet or phone onto a presentation screen so everyone can work together share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect visit. Click sheriff retrial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free. Trial diversity in tech could start with diversity in tech meet ups from american in public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm amy scott in from hollywood. There's been more attention lately on who's part of the tech boom and who's not at facebook google and apple about three and four technical employers are men. Those are the coders engineers engineers developers african americans make up a tiny share of that workforce just one and a half percent at facebook two percent at google and six percent at what apple that's data from the companies themselves. One place companies find new talent is at tech meet ups. These are casual networking events where people go to learn the latest trends and connect with collaborators and who's there often looks like the tech world itself. That's what andy sell donya found out. He's executive director. The nonprofit new york tech alliance for our series evenly distributed looking at different elements of the digital divide. He told us how aims to change the scene. I actually went to new york. Tech meet up before. I was hired to see what the event was all about and i felt very out of place. I was one of the very few brown people in the room and that is really what has driven a lot of our work and my work specifically to make that community more representative of new york as a whole. Let's i'm a gay man in new york city and so my network is very full of gay men in new york city.

New York City Executive Director Facebook Apple Google Amy Scott Representative Andy Hollywood Six Percent Two Percent
"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"This is market place I'm Amy Scott it's no secret that some of the places in the country with the most economic opportunity like Silicon Valley New York DC are also some of the most expensive places to live but now that may be convincing a certain kind of worker members of the so called creative class to consider living in other parts of the country Richard Florida is author of the two thousand to book the rise of the creative class and publish some new research about this demographic at city lab it's good to have you back up Joe thanks for having me back but first a definition what do you mean when you talk about the creative class well this is something identified nearly twenty years ago and really what I was trying to figure out was the people who drive aren't you innovation knowledge economy so that's people who work in science and technology who do research for entrepreneurs but also artists designers musician and cultural creatives add them all up and it's more than a third of our workforce in probably in excess of forty million Americans working these jobs we tend to think of these workers these creative class workers as clustered in the big expensive cities you know mostly on the coasts but you decided to look at what you call that geography of talent what did you find I think it is true that the creative class per se is massively concentrated in the closed superstar cities and tech carbs but you also see big clusters in Baltimore and the Philadelphia and then finally I think which was kind of the most eye opening thing for me when I look at the new geography of the creative class is this surge in the creative class in places like Pittsburgh Salt Lake City St Louis in fact when I look at the top ten fastest growing creative class centers only one established hi tech mattress Seattle made that group I think that's a change that I didn't expect and was kind of a good news I think what do you think's going on there are these cities just doing a better job of attracting these workers or is part is story that people are just getting priced out of the the sort of superstar cities I think both things are going on you know Cincinnati Detroit has made a great effort to make themselves more appealing to talent but also at accurately say of a expensive proposition to try to make a go of it as a young person in San Francisco and it's no longer a gaping difference you know between the quality of life for amenities you know Pittsburgh Detroit or Cincinnati or Cleveland off you pretty much a similar bucket of lifestyle amenities that you would get one of the expensive places so I think it makes sense for people to say the heck with this I'm going I'm going to one of these other so called rise of the rest places but with that rise to these cities then start to experience some of the problems we've seen in San Francisco and Boston and Denver with you know increased inequality gentrification the things that have come along with the rise of the creative class yes one hundred percent what I think that was in places like Philadelphia or Denver you have the opportunity to learn from what has happened in San Francisco in in plan to become more affordable or to provide more housing to cope a little bit better within a quality that's been almost twenty years since your book the rise of the creative class came out I which encourage cities to to attract these creative class workers then you received some criticism for that for allegedly fueling gentrification and and a quality how is your own thinking changed since then I think I certainly underestimated the velocity and ferocity of this change which really kicks into high gear you know after twenty ten and we begin to see this kind of hyper gentrification this this divide if you will is getting worse so I think it's time that we as cities and as a country begin to become more vigilant in in both recognizing this and working to counter it one last thing but I think it's very important to point out people see the state and sometimes a bill every city is doing better you know if there were a half dozen or a dozen original tech hubs there's now another dozen places that are beginning to improve their status but that still means there's hundreds of US small and medium sized mattress that are suffering and we need to take seriously Richard Florida F. co founder and editor at large for city lab also a professor at the university of Toronto thank you so much I very much appreciated.

Amy Scott twenty years one hundred percent
By blacklisting Huawei, the US could be shooting itself in the foot

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

07:53 min | 2 years ago

By blacklisting Huawei, the US could be shooting itself in the foot

"There's an interesting observation to be made here about the global economy, things that usually happened really, really slowly. Until they happen. Really, really fast. Oh, explain from American public media. This is marketplace. In Los Angeles. I'm KAI Ryssdal. It is Thursday. Today, the sixteenth of mega is always to have you along, everybody. We begin today with this ten days ago, Amir week and a half. Every indication was that the trade mad disagreements between the United States and China were all but solved couple more meetings, a quick Trump's, she phone call done and done. Now. It's tariffs as far as the I can see. And as of yesterday quite possibly a breakdown in the heavily, integrated and extremely globalized technology supply chain, we refer here, of course, to the Trump administration, effectively blacklisting, the Chinese technology, giant hallway, which will cut that company off from its American suppliers, chips, from Qualcomm and phone software from Google to name. Just a couple. You're all that in with bands on while way in other countries. And as marketplace's Scott Tong reports now from Washington, there does seem to be something of a digital iron curtain descending if the US shoe. Hallway, it also hits its own foot inside while we gadgets are innards from firms, like Intel, oracle and Western Digital but tech firms sensing the crossfire are trying to get out of the way and avoid partnering with companies subject to bands in retaliation says Linley Gwen app of the Linley group. I think that companies are trying to reduce their exposure to the band, and by fewer components from countries that could be affected the word decoupling is being whispered in the US and China that is each country may develop its own separate supply, chain, while we has long been on Washington's hitlist and is trying to make parts semiconductors in house. Business professor at ten Wong judge young university has a new book on wall way. He says the company can be self sufficient that can make it south. Maybe he's not as good as the US components, but it's not much worse. They still can't sell products so that prepare for these more than ten years, while ways, DIY project. Could accelerate Chinese innovation? And in areas like wireless, five G many see hallway as already ahead. So the US might not want to cut itself off says, political scientists Abraham Newman at Georgetown, France in the nineteen eighties tried to develop its own internet, and it was kind of ridiculous, and the risk is that we end up with a new version of that a lesser. They un-filed g network. He says the US is weaponising interdependence and could unravel a global tech supply chain that took a generation to come together. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. You can argue till the cows come home about tariffs who wins who loses who pays wait. No, you can't consumers pay and nobody wins. But there is at least one agreed upon reality. When it comes to what tariffs due to an economy, the way things normally work don't work anymore. Marketplace's refinish your explains that one I don't know if you've ever grown plants in a terrarium they love it in there because they're protect. But when you take them, out and expose them to the outside world, they don't always do out there, not strong. It breeds a kind of laziness here Simon Lester is with the Cato Institute and he's not talking about terrariums. He's talking about tariffs tariffs that protect some US businesses from foreign competition. You don't have to compete with the best in the world, just sort of relax. You don't have to work that hard, you're not gonna face any competition. US steel companies, for example, don't face as much pressure to upgrade plants now they can in our raising prices without competition from foreign steel producers. Ultimately, I think if you want to sessile businesses, you want them competing in order to, you know me as a fishing has possible Chinese goods. Don't usually compete with US goods head on. We don't make a lot of the same stuff, but many goods that are made in America are made with Chinese parts tariffs. Make those parts more expensive Tim Keough teaches economics at the university of Minnesota gonna make things to the US shell the rest of the world. Be more expensive than we're gonna lose market share because of that. But the. Disadvantages go beyond that, take the tariffs on steel aluminum. The metal that would be going into the US now goes to global markets increasing supply and depressing prices outside the US Rufus York's is president of the national Foreign Trade Council. Many of my manufacturers say that this has a direct impact on their competitiveness. Not only because their costs go up, but actually their foreign competitors costs. Go down your says the morn industries protected the less productive, it's likely to become in New York. I'm Sabrina sure for marketplace. In higher education news on this Thursday, three much reviled letters. S A N, t the college board purveyor of the aforementioned exam is adding a new score to it math, reading, and writing the optional essay and now adversity as in the hurdles like neighborhood crime, and poverty, that students might have dealt with getting into college. It's yet another attempt by the college board to keep its core product, the SAT, relevant as the idea. Of who gets in wear gets more attention. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more on that when Scott vers, I'll was weighing student applications. This college admission season he had another tool to consider. He's dean of undergraduate admissions at the university of South Carolina, along with grades and essays and test scores and environmental context. Dashboard. Offer details like family and housing stability access to AP classes and neighborhood poverty, and crime. And that did help us find some students that we would probably would otherwise not considered the university was one of fifty testing out the dashboard. This year, the college board will roll it out to all schools next year, and it'll be free, but SAT critic Robert Shafer with fair test says it's a business move with selective colleges under pressure to admit more students of color and low income students. More of them are making standardized tests. Optional people have long known that head scores were a excellent. Mega of accumulated advantage. And now, the college board is going to admit it by thing. You can't use raw scores. You have to examine them in context. The college board has tried something like this, in the past in the late nineteen nineties, it's so-called strivers program aimed to take socioeconomic factors including race into account. But Shaffer says critics accused the college board of back door affirmative action, and the program was dropped Tiffany Jones directs higher, Ed policy at the education trust advocacy group. She says the dashboard doesn't include race without looking at race explicitly. It's very difficult to try to account for racial inequality. Students also won't know their scores adding another layer of mystery to the college admissions process. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. There was a fairly brief, but all important announcement from Boeing today, a quick four paragraphs, the first sentence of which read Boeing has completed development of the updated software for the seven. Thirty seven max, which is big the company says it's working with the FAA to get the planes back in the air. Investors were reassured Boeing shares up two point three percent day. The broader markets up as well. Not as much though. We'll have the details when we do the numbers.

United States Scott Tong Amy Scott Kai Ryssdal Los Angeles Boeing China FAA Qualcomm Amir University Of Minnesota New York Google Cato Institute Abraham Newman Intel Linley Gwen America
"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"According to Moody's analytics there about fifteen million more people with FICO score of seven forty today than they were before the great recession. Marketplace's Amy Scott reports if you apply for a loan or credit card, most lenders will take your FICO score into account. The number was created by the fair Isaac corporation back in nineteen eighty one in a nutshell. The FICO score is a number that predicts how likely you are to pay back a loan or other credit applications in a timely fashion. That's video from psychos credit education series at last count. The average score was a record seven hundred four out of eight fifty that's about twenty points higher than a decade ago. Ethan dornam is vice president of scores FICO. He says with unemployment low and wages rising. People are in better shape. They have lower debt fewer instances of delinquencies. They're searching for credit that sort of under lying improvement in financial health. Is really what's driving the improve scores. Chris Doritos and economist at Moody's analytics says the strong economy may actually be masking some risk especially at the lower end of the credit scale six hundred credit score very low credit score back in two thousand nine that reflected perhaps the external economic environment right for cultures were rising unemployment was high. But six hundred today that might indicate some higher risk and help. Explain why missed payments on auto loans, for example, have been rising. Even though he says lenders, haven't relaxed their standards chichi. Woo is an attorney with the national consumer Law Center. She says lenders shouldn't put so much weight on credit scores of credit score isn't some sort of magical shield that says this person's never going to default. I mean, if you have a high credit score, but something bad happens to you. You are likely to have problems paying bills by the same token, take that person with the..

Moody Woo Amy Scott Ethan dornam Chris Doritos Isaac corporation vice president national consumer Law Center attorney
Sometimes it takes a big prize to solve big tech problems

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

07:02 min | 3 years ago

Sometimes it takes a big prize to solve big tech problems

"This And marketplace podcast is brought to you by pinata for businesses. And universities Panatta was everything YouTube isn't with enterprise grade security Bilton recording and live streaming and a unique search engine that finds any words spoken in any video Panatta was how professionals share knowledge and by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more and sign up for your free trial. Sometimes what it takes to solve big problems is a big prize from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Amy Scott in for Molly would. It's been called American idol for science geeks. The George barley water prize will award ten million dollars to the team that develops the most promising technology to remove excess phosphorus from freshwater lakes and streams phosphorus pollution from chemical fertilizers and septic tanks has led to the growth of toxic blue green algae in the Florida Everglades. And elsewhere, Lauren par is director of the George barley water prize. She says the goal is to spark innovation the way that we've previously been looking at the issue or sometimes is reported on is attempting to remove the blue-green algae. And so while you can probably effectively skim off blue-green algae, you're not really tending to the root cause of the problem, which is excess phosphorus and so kind of like an it to the algae being a symptom of the flu. And so you might be able to sue the cough, but unless you actually attack the root cause of the. Thickness. You're not really going to affect the overall wellbeing of the system. What are some of the ideas? The teams have come up with so far. We've had a great showing from all around the world from the beginning of this program. We had over a hundred applicants from thirteen different countries. And so again, it just really drove home. The fact that this problem is not specific to Florida or the Everglades. It's a global issue. And so we've got, you know, a number of different technologies a number of different approaches one that I really love talking about. We actually have a US Geological Survey agency team participating in the program and they've essentially decided to use a local byproduct in iron ochre, which is really specific to the industries in West Virginia where this group is out of and they've decided to use that waste product as the filter to help remove phosphorus from water. And so they're taking this essentially waste products and transforming it. Into a technology that could affect in clean the waterways. Why do you think we need a prize to solve a big, social and environmental problem like this? I mean, obviously Americans love could competition, but why shouldn't you know, the companies that caused this problem be solving it sure. So, you know, I think part of why we've been so successful in garnering stakeholders is because our prize in our program, again, president general are just really solutions oriented programs and around the world, there's such a rich rich history with the global implementation of prizes. They've been using the past to solve problems that the free market simply wasn't addressing quickly enough on its own. And so this infrastructure of rewards and prizes has historically helped catalyze significant accomplishments certainly were hoping to do that with the barley prize. But things like the artigue prize in nineteen twenty seven which spur. For Charles Lindbergh's. First transatlantic flight from New York to Paris that reward at the time in nineteen twenty-seven was twenty five thousand dollars, which today is all of three hundred thousand I think, but it was that flight that led to today's three hundred billion dollar aviation industry, which is something basically impossible to imagine at that time. And so what we know is that historically this prizes can help catalyze massive changes in huge technological breakthroughs. And we're really hopeful that the Varley price can do the same has the competition actually, spurred those breakthroughs new ideas to remove phosphorus, or they ideas that were being developed prior. And they're just getting a boost from this. Now, you know, I think that we collected a number of ideas that were in different stages of development. But certainly none of these were being implemented on a commercial scale yet. And so we've definitely. Moved the needle without doubt on research and development, but I would go so far as to say that our third stage which was an actual field test in Canada really did manage to move the needle on the economics of phosphorus removal here in Florida. The most typical way to address the phosphorus pollution issue is through storm water treatment areas, which are STA's, but the problem with TA's as while they're remotely effective, they're incredibly land intensive and so with each of our teams to get as far as they've gotten this competition, they were given pretty strict land constraints because we want to be able to do is implement these types of technologies any in the world, regardless of available land. And so that alone the shown efficacy of being able to remove phosphorus from water and removing the massive land component necessary here in Florida is a huge win for us to if we don't solve this problem soon. What are the stakes the stakes get higher? Hire every year. So we know with global warming with sea level rise. What we're seeing is not only more frequent algal blooms, but they're more intense. They're more damaging on their more harmful not only to human health, but ecosystem health, and so certainly in Florida. What's at stake is the drinking water supply for a third of the state and our state here in Florida relies so heavily on tourism. And so without clean waterways. Without pristine beaches were missing out on the number one driver of the state's economy. Lauren par is director of the George barley water prize. It's sponsored by the Everglades foundation and the Scots miracle. Grow foundation. Scott's the company still uses phosphorus and some of its fertilizers, but dropped it from lawn products several years ago the competition is now down to five final teams. They'll spend the next year testing and refining their technology that ten million. Dollar grand prize will be awarded next year.

Florida George Barley Lauren Par Florida Everglades Amy Scott Director Everglades Foundation Youtube Panatta Charles Lindbergh United States Grow Foundation West Virginia Canada STA Varley President Trump
What does it mean to be "employed" in the gig economy?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:47 min | 3 years ago

What does it mean to be "employed" in the gig economy?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by ultimate software dedicated to putting people first with innovative solutions for HR payroll and talent management. Learn more at ultimate software dot com. Ultimate software people first and by click share with click share, and you're meeting, you can share your screen instantly from any device, click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation screen. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com and learn more and sign up for your free trial. What does it mean to be employed in the gig economy? A new European law. Tries to answer that question from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I may me Scott in for Molly would. This week the European parliament passed a law establishing basic rights for workers in the gig economy that could apply to some three million. People from Uber drivers to careers for the UK's delivery, the law requires companies to pay when work is cancelled last minute or for mandatory training, it also bans exclusivity clauses, which prevent freelancers from gigging for other companies. It's supposed to make working short-term gigs a little more stable. Joe Miller is a business and tech reporter with the BBC who's been following this law. It was mainly targeted at the biz of this. Well, and things like toss grab it essentially at based services that supply on demand sevices such as transport to delivery in reality. The legislation encompasses a fob ruled a section of the economy people who clean offices. Includes people who work for possible delivery companies. So the legislation could apply to a fall fall brought a sector than just those big tech foams that we've all come to know, why are these changes needed? What kinds of abuses were workers talking about that? This law is trying to address. Yes. The range of abuses require massive from people who being booked for work, and then never been given that work, you know, just being left in the lurch with no work, and no pay to people who have worked hundreds of days a year without any holiday pay people not being offered any compensation when they're sick despite working for the same company as intially for many, many months a weeks. So there's been an awful lot of activism around this and an awful lot of legal challenges around this of people coming forward with all sorts of employment concerns, these Member States have up to three years to begin to enforce this seems like a long time with a lot. Out of room for maneuvering, it is a long time. But critics would also point out that this only applies to people who are employed now that tightening up definition of who's employed the saying if you work three hours a week for a company that is considered employment. But of course, the big battlefield between the likes of Uber left and deliver around the weld and various authorities has been they've always claimed that they are just the facilitator between a customer and a self employed contractor now that is not covered by this legislation 'cause this legislation narrowly only applies to people who are employed, and you can expect that to be many many challenges on the definition of who is employed. This doesn't really solve anything in the immediate future. It's just a blueprint of how things may look the BBC's Joe Miller what could this year opean law mean for American workers? Well, Miller says think about what happened with the GDP are. The European privacy regulation that took effect last year. It led a lot of tech companies to change their practices here too. And now for some related links here in the US the rise of the gig economy may be distorting some economic data over at axios frequent marketplace guests Dion Ribaut and wrote about a new paper from the Dallas fed. It says the headline unemployment rate now at three point eight percent may low ball the number of gig workers who are unemployed or under employed because contract workers aren't on the payroll. They aren't counted as unemployed even when they're not working we've got links to John's piece and the Dallas fed paper at marketplace, tech dot org. Also, while you're there, check out another story from the ethica times Cornell University surveyed New Yorkers who use platforms like Uber post mates and grub hub to make a living among the two hundred seventy people surveyed only thirteen percent said they could get by by working for those apps alone, many relied on public assistance and juggled several apps at once to make ends meet Matt Purdy produced this. Tweaks marketplace tech along with Stephanie Hughes eve tro is our senior producer, Dan Powell is our engineer, I'm Amy Scott. And that's marketplace tech. This is a PM. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by click share, an award winning wireless presentation system with click share, and you're meeting you can share your screen instantly from any device. No more awkward small talk or wasted time as you wait. For tech problems to be fixed. Click share instantly projects any speakers laptop, tablet or phone onto a presentation scream. So everyone can work together. Share their ideas and create something great. That's the click share effect. Visit click share free trial dot com to learn more and sign up for your free trial.

Joe Miller BBC Amy Scott Dallas Self Employed Tech Reporter European Parliament UK United States Cornell University Dion Ribaut Stephanie Hughes John Molly Matt Purdy Dan Powell Engineer Producer
"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Denver, Amy Scott in for KAI Ryssdal. It's Thursday, April fourth good to have you with us. The government is out with a preliminary report on an airline crash last month that killed all one hundred fifty seven people on board. It was the second crash involving a Boeing seven thirty seven max in five months. The report finds that the crew on the EC. Opium airlines flight followed all the procedures provided by Boeing but still weren't able to control the plane. Marketplace's Jack Stewart has been looking into what comes next for Boeing as it continues to work on a fix and try to restore the faith of the flying public beef yoke and investigators looked at data from flight E T three twos on border quotas. The data shows the plane dove hod several times before hitting the ground. This doesn't look good for Bellaigue. I think this hurts them even more show impression Icke is at the center for aviation studies at a higher state univers-. City. He says the findings renew the focus on Boeing's 'em caste system a flight control program designed to push the nose of the big engines seven three seven max down to prevent a disastrous stole full investigations of both Boeing seven three seven. Max crashes could take a year. Investigators are also looking at physical evidence from recovered wreckage. That's a skill. That's taught in Los Angeles warehouse filled with twisted metal broken gloss and torn cables in here, we have the wreckage of twelve crashed airplanes Thomas Anthony at the university of southern California uses these wrecks to train investigators from around the world to look at the positions of flack to read broken gauges. Stick a look at this central control column here Anthony is.

Boeing Thomas Anthony KAI Ryssdal Jack Stewart Amy Scott Opium Denver Los Angeles Icke university of southern Califor Bellaigue five months
"amy scott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Denver. I'm Amy Scott in for Kyra stall. It's Thursday, April fourth good to have you with us. The government is out with a preliminary report on an airline crash last month that killed all one hundred fifty seven people on board. It was the second crash involving a Boeing seven thirty-seven max in five months. The report finds that the crew on the airlines flight followed all the procedures provided by Boeing but still weren't able to control the plane. Marketplace's Jack Stewart has been looking into what comes next for Boeing as it continues to work on a fix and try to restore the faith of the flying public. And investigators looked at data from flight BT three oh two's on board or quotas. The data shows the plane Jove hod several times before hitting the ground. This doesn't look good for Bill. I think this hurts them even more shoe impression Icke is at the center for aviation studies at a higher state univers-. City. He says the findings renew the focus on Boeing's 'em caste system a flight control program designed to push the nose of the big engines seven three seven max down to prevent a disastrous stole full investigations of both Boeing seven three seven. Max crashes could take a year. Investigators are also looking at physical evidence from recovered wreckage. That's a skill. That's taught in this. Los Angeles warehouse filled with twisted metal broken glass and torn cables in here, we have the wreckage of twelve crashed airplanes Thomas Anthony at the university of southern California uses these wrecks to train investigators from around the world to look at the positions of flack to read broken.

Boeing Kyra stall Jack Stewart Amy Scott Los Angeles university of southern Califor Bill Denver. Thomas Anthony five months
"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"They ever will in Denver? I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. This final note on the way out you remember how I said yesterday that if you're planning a trip to Europe anytime soon, you're in luck continent's economic troubles that Lynette and Steve and I were talking about have driven the euro to a two year low. And if you don't remember me saying it, well, I did. Anyway, the economy might favor you, but politics and global security is most definitely not the EU announced today that starting in twenty twenty one American citizens are going to have to have a visa to visit. It's an online application thing. Probably not too big a deal in the overall picture. But I guarantee you somebody who's going to get off the plane in Paris or Rome one day a couple of years from now. NBN for really big surprise. Marketplace is supported by mcgee's online test prep for the ACT SAT GRE and G Matt that's designed to improve scores students can get video lessons. Practice questions and experts support.

Lynette Amy Scott EU Denver mcgee Europe G Matt Rome Paris Steve two year one day
Danaher agrees to buy GE's biopharma business for $21.4 billion

All Things Considered

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Danaher agrees to buy GE's biopharma business for $21.4 billion

"There's another entry today in the what is going on. With General Electric file GE announced deal this morning to sell bio pharma business for more than twenty one billion dollars. The buyer is Danaher which just so happens to be the company that GE's newish CEO Larry Culp rand before coming to General Electric, so all part of a bigger restructuring plan ended paying down GE's massive debt load the company also, by the way closed a different deal today. Merging its transportation division with railway equipment maker wab tech bringing in another two point nine billion dollars. Marketplace's Amy Scott has more now on the original American industrial conglomerates efforts to become less conglomerate, it GE has been trying to recover from deals that went bad questionable accounting and leadership turmoil. Today's deal helps pay down the more

General Electric Larry Culp Rand Wab Tech Danaher Amy Scott CEO Twenty One Billion Dollars Nine Billion Dollars
LA homeless advocates have a new tech tool for affordable housing

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

06:05 min | 3 years ago

LA homeless advocates have a new tech tool for affordable housing

"This marketplace podcast is brought to you by. Indeed, are you hiring with? Indeed, you can post a job in minutes set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist of qualified candidates using an online dashboard get started today at indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace. And by send pro from Pitney Bowes, send pro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit PB dot com slash tech. That's PB dot com slash tech. How LA housing agencies are trying to use tech to match homeless people with homes from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. If you need a ride somewhere Uber or lift will match you with a car, and a driver enough, you go if you're a landlord renting, a house you posted on Zillow and renters can find you tech has made it really easy for most of us to get matched up with what we need with just a few clicks or swipes. But this like so much technology is not evenly distributed nonprofit housing agencies work to help homeless and low income people. Find a place to live a lot of the time the agencies may even have funding to help pay for that housing. But right now, a caseworker looking for a house for someone still has to do a ton of analog work. Lot of phone calls a lot of even just driving around in general communities and looking for rent. It's a lot of beating the pavement that Sherry Weaver. She directs homeless outreach at harbor interfaith services in Los Angeles. She says that's all time that case workers don't get to spend helping there. In other ways like with medical care or other services. I've been working in HAMAs services for the past seventeen years, and I can remember back in my days of case management. Always kinda wishing and hoping that there was just this one place that I could go to in my search to find this listing of housing units, and that's even more. So in this day and age with just the really low vacancy rate in LA. There's a new tech tool to help a new platform called lease up is a website that makes it easier for landlords to list, affordable housing units. And for nonprofits to find those homes. Jennifer heartbeats is executive director of the large housing nonprofit path or people assisting the homeless. That's the agency that created lease up. It works just like Zillow or Craigslist online or a mobile phone and case workers can shop for housing with their clients. They can see pictures of the units, they can see all of the specifics, like number of budge rooms know, whether it's first floor second floor. And that can really streamline the process then on the back end they can request to see the unit through one of our staff who's gonna contact the landlord directly heartbeats says that last part is huge. There's such a shortage of low income housing the right now landlords get flooded with calls on a single unit from lots of different agencies or individuals. Lisa is designed to encourage landlords to list their properties because it make sure they just talked to one person right now there are about six hundred landlords on the Lisa platform. Heartbeats would like to get two thousand units on lease up in the next year. And more importantly, she says they want to get people into homes faster the longer and individuals out on the street, the more that it taxes are emergency departments are first responders. And personally, the more that it taxes the individual or family, you know, they're in survival mode and trying to do the best they can on a day-to-day basis. So the faster that we can get them into a permanent home the better for the entire commune. Unity. Lisa is funded by a sales tax increase passed in LA county in twenty-six teen that set aside money to help the homeless, but heartbeat says, the model of a simple platform for connecting agencies to landlords is expanding to Santa Barbara already and should be a model for the rest of California and even the country. And now for some related links. We actually just had a story on marketplace. The other day interviewing New York Times reporter on the history of tech companies trying to solve the housing crisis. Spoiler alert hasn't gone that well, the upshots Emily badger talked to Amy Scott about how even though there are billions of dollars invested in making it easier to find a home. None of that has made the housing any cheaper. You can find that story and the link to the upshot piece at marketplace, tech dot org. But that story doesn't mean the tech won't keep trying especially since the industry. Get so much blame for the high salaries and the big stock option payouts that cause housing prices to pop out of reach of people who don't have the money to throw around. So now, you're seeing venture capital funds and exceleron or is looking to invest in companies that somehow address affordable housing issues. There's one called meta prop, for example in New York City. And in fact, there's a wave of investment in real estate related technology overall because let's be honest. There's also. Money to be made whether it's in residential or co working or construction, and of course, it wouldn't be a tech investment trend without a fun little name for it. I there was fintech for financial stuff ensure tech for insurance. And now, there's prop tech like for property. Nobody kidding. Look it up. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

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"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:46 min | 3 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KCRW

"And rent this one out for income in Houston. I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. The Spanish fast fashion companies Zara gave itself a little bit of a makeover this week. It's got a new logo the new ones more compact than the old one the letters are closer together. The font is fancier to as consumers today tend to do people have been weighing in on social media. They love it. They hate it. A whole lot of emotion for you know, a logo. But as marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports fashion is not the only thing that goes out of fashion. Zara is well known for keeping pace with the latest in fashion. And there's nothing last season about its new logo. Stephen jumper is with the ghost note agency, a branding firm here in DC SARS, new logo is a pretty stark pivot away from design trends that we've been seeing brands embrace over the past several years, he says the new logo leans more towards the look of luxury brands like Gucci and Chanel other companies, especially some of the tech firms that have rebranded recently thinks slack or Spotify have gone. For a simpler, look logos. That were at one point a little quirky or or a little bit more stylized, and they've really now kind of become much more streamlined and simplified Marlene Morris towns teaches advertising at Georgetown, she says changing logo can help accompany create a different impression recognize a merger or a policy change. And then there's also the consideration about how brand logos are going to look on people's smartphones and in small technology spaces, ipads, smartphones and things like that. And it certainly doesn't hurt when a new logo generates a lot of buzz of any kind says, Stephen jumper. It goes note. I think in many ways Zara has already accomplished what they set out to do. They have people talking about the new logo, good, bad or indifferent. We're not for those new scrunched up letters. We probably wouldn't be talking about Zara today in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for marketplace. Coming up right now, we're working on ways to say the big game party.

Zara Kimberly Adams Stephen jumper Amy Scott Houston SARS Marlene Morris Chanel Spotify Georgetown Washington
"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"amy scott" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Amy Scott for marketplace. Coming up tomorrow on the marketplace morning report Brexit, yet shutdown yet also how small and medium-sized businesses are feeling about the year to come. Spoiler alert. Not so great. Coming up. I phone growth is slowing. So they need to rely on these other growing revenue streams like apps store fees. Apple's app store dilemma, but first let's do the numbers. Drills up six tenths percent today about one hundred fifty five points twenty four thousand sixty five. The NASDAQ grew one point seven percent hundred seventeen point seven thousand twenty three the s&p five hundred one percent of the positive twenty seven points twenty six there as we told you earlier looking like a volatile fourth quarter for the big banks JP Morgan Chase announced it missed expectations as I told you. But here's the answer. The question. Shares up seven tenths of one percent. Netflix. Got a nice bump off the news. It's going to raise prices shares tacked on six and a half percent bonds fell yield on the ten year treasury note, rose two point seven one percents. You're listening to marketplace. Marketplace is supported by Charles Schwab, when it comes to wealth management Schwab believes in asking questions and being engaged. So investors can better own their tomorrow. Learn more at Schwab dot com. And by USB technology found in billions of devices. USB implementers forum reminds consumers that USB.

Charles Schwab Schwab dot Amy Scott JP Morgan Chase Brexit Apple Netflix five hundred one percent seven percent one percent ten year