6 Burst results for "Amy Sarah"

"amy sarah" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"amy sarah" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Now panel Some more questions for you from this week's news Amy Sarah Palin is running for Alaska's one seat in the House of Representatives but despite her high name recognition there she might have a race in her hands as one of her opponents has even higher name recognition What is his name In Alaska In Alaska Is it a human being It is It's a real human being She lives in Alaska Specifically he lives in this is true in North Pole Alaska Santa Santa Claus Oh my God Santa Another candidate in the race is named Santa Claus and that is his legal name and yes he has ready cheeks and a big white beard He is also an avid This is true Bruni Sanders supporter which is just Which is just what you'd expect from someone who likes to give freeloading kids presents they didn't work That's right Oh that is very exciting It is exciting Yeah he's totally got my vote Yes first it was the Martians versus Santa Claus Now it's Sarah Palin It's great We can not wait though for the inevitable attack ad she's going to take out against him right And they're going to get one of those guys with like a gun Shooting shooting down the sleigh like skin He's a thief in the night Come back to your home Yeah They're going to get they're going to get one of those guys It's almost always a guy who specializes in like attack ads and as we like Santa Claus Says he puts alaskans first but why does he give presents first to kids in the Eastern Time zone Real men don't wear red velvet Also an alarming number of arachnid species finish the act of mating with a female devouring the male but a new study shows that the male orb spider has evolved a useful tactic to avoid being eaten What is it It's been spinner in a web Oh No she would see that coming Let me give you a hint It's a lot more obvious than you think They just run Yeah they jump the hell out of the way So female orb spiders traditionally devour their mates after managing you know we've all been there afterwards little hungry you wanna snack It's right there But this week scientists discovered that male orb spiders have apparently evolved a survival technique by getting the hell out of the way The spiders have been recorded jumping very far away very quickly to avoid this sexual cannibalism probably while yelling something like I have an early morning tomorrow I'll call you But imagine like the first spider that did that successfully Then goes back and tells the others It's probably how it happened Because they had to be like the first guy right And he's like I think I figured it out And what I really think is all the other guys all the other male spiders are like you know she's gonna eat you But you know men I'll chance it Yeah exactly The fellas were like yo weren't you just kicking it with elvira How are you still here I was like man let me tell you what I did.

Alaska Amy Sarah Palin Bruni Sanders Santa Claus House of Representatives Sarah Palin alaskans elvira
"amy sarah" Discussed on Bald Move TV

Bald Move TV

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"amy sarah" Discussed on Bald Move TV

"I guess at that point. It's not even like what happened here anymore. You realize oh there's been some time switcheroo thing here but like how did it happen right because they haven't even shown you anything about this alien yet. So yeah the idea that all this happened offscreen in the time that he was gone is is kind of impressive. I think for a kids movie from the eighty s. It's i dunno. They're doing a lot more heavy lifting here than i expected them to do. Yeah 'cause like usually see like these two disparate threads 'cause like so they they the first twenty minutes is all about that then they away to like a spaceship crashed And spatial looks amazing. All the physical props like rule really look cool like whoever designed. The spaceship is fucking. I khattak yeah. And there's a great like the special effects are so good because this one scene where like god. How are we going to get this back to base and the security guys like we'll get a load of this shoves it and like floats on the field. I mean you couldn't do a better job of having chroma spaceship hover on a field. The today i don't know what kind of invisible crane wire dolly tracking shot. They did it but it just like utterly convincing and then the way they weave that back together like you know. They're trying to figure out what happened. This kid you know like there's something wrong with his brain and you know they joined this this this brain scan on him and it generates this like three. Dimensional schematic of the starship which then of course national intelligence gets a hold of and gets nasa th they. These divergence storylines in a branch is back together and like you said out of nowhere to mid eighties or talking about time. Dilation and next time travel and that stuff is this cool like he's very modern the biggest flight of fancy here. I think is the idea that you could scan his brain and get some subconscious thought pattern out of. It would be readable by computer at the time right now. That's probably like the wildest thing they do. But the rest is pretty solid science. You know if there were an alien craft could go faster or near the speed of light. You would have time dilation. They figure that allowed and they use it in this movie. It's crazy. yeah there's a lotta great scenes too. 'cause like i you think nasa guys a friendly guy and you know he's given the kid all you know all this nasa gear and how cool would it be to be like Dorm room at nasa. You've got the space shuttle and your official astronaut had and all that stuff but then they lock him in that scary right. Oh yeah amy sarah jessica parker and she's nice and kind of like you know appropriately that kind of bedside manner nurses have worst. She's not flirting with them. But she's also like you know it's for a one scene as borderline isn't a little weird for me. But which one are you talking about the one in yes. She's standing at the door and she's about to leave and she says something to him like commenting on his. His looks. Like that was guarded. Yes and whenever as any woman ever. Yeah that's a little grooming i. It was a little weird but the rest of it is very wholesome. I enjoyed it very much. But then they should. They hook him up to the nasa brain scanner. And the nasa brain scanners able this guy like they say it's got higher bandwidth or whatever so it's like poland star charts and shit. I felt like kind of like that. The beginning of stargate were the realizing like true implications and the next right or contact. Oh my god. We're talking about vast interstellar distances year and then that the the scientists is like because they promised the kids like hey and forty. Where's want to keep for observation for forty eight hours and then we'll figure everything out and he's like you know ominously says forty eight hours isn't going to be enough and that's like i remember as a kid like you know like that scary. 'cause like god now's kids a hostage and delay bust out of that using like again. We haven't really gotten into spaceship much like we cut back a few times or nasr's trying to cut it open the blow torch it's indestructible or no seams in it This kids also being called by peewee. Herman like there's some kind of alien language in his head. That's kind of so. He talked. Sarah jessica parker in a using this male robot which you know those are we still. We just now are getting those types of robots but in the eighties. We didn't know how far away we were. Yeah remember that being cool like him being smuggled out by robots wallets. Isn't there a doctor who wrote it's a lot like.

nasa amy sarah jessica parker poland nasr Herman Sarah jessica parker
"amy sarah" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"amy sarah" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"And plus some new albums out today. Travis dinning dirt road. Down and billy carrington's intuition morgan number two. That's your skinny. So it might only be midsummer but macy's has a back to school on their mind and you know false going to be here before you know it. So start shopping. Now for all the essentials not only does macy's have all the clothing styles. You need shirts denim shoes and more but you can also shop for backpacks lunchboxes and all the things that are going to need. Plus if you're heading off to college macy's also has tons of betting sheets. Small appliances a coffeemaker is a must for dorm life by the way and all the rest of the things. You're going to need start shopping now so that you're all set come fall. Checkout macys dot com slash back to school summertime means backyard barbecues picnics at the beach and toasting the sun avon farewell as it slips into the west and summer is also wine time. Am i right the perfect season for mayo me. Weinstein mayo me. Winds are meant for savoring. Because they're carefully crafted beautifully balanced and incredibly complex. I just had a girls night. And we had the rosaiah pinot noir. And i'm telling you not person in the room didn't love both of them and if you're having the rosa try it with a lighter dish i promise you it's perfection. The cabernet-sauvignon is amazing with anything off the grill. This summer the pinot noir and chardonnay our deliciously drinkable and unique like all mayo me wines. Whatever mayo me wine you choose. It's sure to be a summertime crowd-pleaser you can discover more about meles flavor forward california wines in shop delivery or pick up at mayo me dot com. That's m. e. i. o. m. i. Dot cop please enjoy responsibly. Mayo me wines. A campo california kitchen that first-wave spending your first night camping under a starry sky. There is no better feeling. Which is why i'm excited for the first ever hyundai. Santa cruz built to help you on the journey to all your i as as i sport adventure vehicle. Santa cruz combines the comfort of an suv with the versatility of an open bed. It has useful features like an easy to use tailgate. Lockable bed cover and they built in cargo bed beverage cooler about that any adventure. You could imagine. Santa cruz delivers it's also packed with available tech like bose premium audio and hyundai digital key. Which lets you unlock the door. Just your phone all that with the available h. Track all wheel drive. And it's unlike anything on the road or off the road and don't forget like every day it's backed by america's best warranty and includes after three years of complimentary maintenance finding more i. It's your journey in the first ever hyundai santa cruz. You're gonna love it the hyundai santa cruz. I think it is perfectly made for you. It's time for the good news. A twenty four year old man was driving. Tesla the only problem is. He was drunk at the wheel. So you'd had so much drink driving swerving on the road. He passes out behind the wheel. Well luckily tesla's so smart it detected. he was unresponsive. Came to a stop and put the hazards on the over. It pulled over and knew that. Hey you know what something's wrong put the hazards on and saved. Everyone's life no one hurt. We're ten years away from cars being automated right now. We are already making these cars that can drive themselves like this to think hundreds of years. The horse was the main mode of transportation and within ten years thousands of years. The horse was the main mode of transportation within ten years is cars sco feet before that when may have found horse that we're like this week top of the same thing with the cars but it will be where we just do. All cars are taken care of. I think if you're sixteen right now by the time you're out of college most of it's going to be driving by computer and it's going to save a lot of lives because sometimes you see we're like a tesla or somebody hits somebody'll road but that's so rare and that's that person running out in front of that car so you're going to have you know five thousand of those but you're also going to have thirty thousand not even in a situation where they're able to have a wreck with the car. I think these. I'm excited about it because i want to get in in re twitter anyway. He's only get three hundred stoplights at this point but That's pretty cool. That did that. Those videos are creepy. Though whenever someone's like asleep at the wheel drives up beside california. Know how you're able to fall asleep. You must really i. I don't think i'm to that point yet. Where if i was in one thousand. I got a couple of stuff lebron drive. I don't know what point do you get comfortable enough Okay there you go is that that is eight. Tell me something good. Yeah that was bonehead for a second fell asleep. Then that is what it's all about. That was telling me something good. We're gonna play a game called the three name. Celeb- game the three name celeb- game all these celebrities have three names first names three names total games for example. The lead singer of the band that sings living on a prayer. God that would be john john. Greatest guns and roses not civil. That's not a person aiming true but that have been three words anyway guns n. Roses but she did it with four. Oddly nasa loss right schranz down. Oh boy three name celeb- game number one. He's best known for his portrayal of david. Silver on the television series. Beverly hills nine o. Two one o. And currently dating a dancing with the stars champion and did you guys write it down please in all right. Hold up your answers. Oh yeah that. Brian austin green box ryan austin green. Brian austin green nice job holding cleaned sheet of paper. This actress known for her role as carrie bradshaw on the hbo television series sex and the city. For what you want to emmy awards off the three name. Celeb- game can you name that. Celeb- amy sarah jessica parker sarah jessica parker eddie sarah jessica parker nice next up the actress who starred in halloween and also did commercials for activity yogurt. And i'm eddie. Jamie lee curtis lunchbox. Jamie lee curtis amy. Jamie lee curtis job. This actor slash musician was famously. Married to actress angelina. Jolie musician does actor. Also a musician and was famously. Married to angelina. Jolie.

macy Travis dinning billy carrington Weinstein mayo campo california hyundai digital Santa cruz hyundai hyundai santa cruz Tesla morgan Mayo california santa cruz america schranz john john Brian austin ryan austin green
"amy sarah" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:33 min | 2 years ago

"amy sarah" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To offer $2400 direct payments to American mothers for the unpaid labor of child care and home schooling. Working mothers aren't the only group that have been the focus of a campaign for cash payments. The concept of universal basic income has slowly gained support among some politicians across the country. Andrew Yang, a current candidate for mayor of New York City and a former presidential candidate, made the concept a key part of his campaign. If you would have put $1000 a month in their hands, they use it in the most positive and beneficial way possible and close to a dozen U. S. Mayors are experimenting with some type of income payment to constituents. I'm 10 Xena Vega and breaking down Universal basic income amid the pandemic is where we start today on the take away. Sarah Holder is a staff writer at City Lab covering local policy. Affordable housing, labor and technology. Sarah Great to have you with us. Thanks for having me And Dr Amy Castro Baker's an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the co director of the Center for Guaranteed Income Research. Amy, Welcome to the takeaway. Thanks for having me Sarah, let's start with you lot to terms floating around. Let's get a basic explainer. What is the difference between universal basic income and guaranteed income? Right? So there are a lot of terms right floating around to describe the concept that we're talking about, which is Money paid monthly. No strings attached to people in a community so universal basic income as you might expect, is paid out to everyone in the country in the city. On guaranteed basic income sort of follows along the lines of civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Junior who talked about having enough to pay your bills every month. Ah, lot of cities right now are talking about a guaranteed income to sort of Live on from that civil rights legacy of economic justice and moved away from some of the more automation focused. Concepts, and what we're seeing in a lot of cities right now is that the basic income payments are not universal. They're going specifically to low income families that need the additional support. S so that's that's a key difference that we're seeing right now. Maybe when we talk about these two philosophies guaranteed income versus universal basic income guaranteed, obviously, coming with some measures that one has to meet versus universal where everybody gets Ah based payment here, is there Difference in terms of the benefit of either one of these programs. That's a good question. I mean, it's hard to say if there's a benefit of one over the other because we haven't had a truly universal basic income experiment yet, So you know, I come at it from the perspective of a researcher. And what of the research questions we can answer, And how do we actually generate evidence based policy around this? So it's hard to say, I think the bigger question around universal basic income versus guaranteed income is which one is more politically palatable right now in United States. Number one and then number two figuring out if you were going to actually design it at scale. What would it cost? You know, in reality. So let's talk a little bit about that. Because this seems to be some. This isn't new. Amy. I mean, this is something that people have been talking about for decades. Correct? Yeah. No, it's not do it all. So Sara. How our city's looking to implement these different programs are most cities looking at universal basic income, the cities that we know that where mayors air really taking or like talking about it, like Andrew Yang Woz are our city's looking at this, where there's interest in doing it and looking at guaranteed income. Right, and Dr Baker talked about that that right now all we're really seeing in the United States are these guaranteed income experiments she was heavily involved with stopped in California's experiment, which was one of the first and sort of the biggest in the United States, which started With 125 families. The rest of the cities that we're seeing Come out, Sort of in this model are focusing on hundreds of families. So Compton California will be running one of the largest with 800 families. Huts in New York is running one with just 25 families, So there's there's a broad range, but most of them focus. Specifically on very low income families, either identified through documentation or through their census tract summer are focusing specifically on populations that have slipped the cracks. Traditionally. So in San Francisco, there's a pilot running Teofilo CAS on black and Pacific Islander mothers during pregnancy and six months thereafter. S so we're seeing a range of projects that are really targeted. But that honor sort of the basic goal of these projects, which is unconditional cash on another. Another thing that you know, sets them apart is that they typically have a sunset. Well, let me let me just stop you there, sir. Because unconditional cash would mean universal, right? That would mean anybody and everybody is eligible for this, but there are conditions for guaranteed basic income. Yeah, that's a That's a really good point. And I think it's it's sort of testing the idea of unconditional being There's no, you don't have to spend the money a specific way. You know, as opposed to other welfare programs where you might have to spend it on housing or on food or in specific kind of food. I guess the unconditional is more talking about The lack of strings attached to the cash once you get it Interesting. Amy. Sarah just mentioned that the W word right there. I grew up in the eighties and nineties and remember in a very low income community and remember the concept of welfare being something that was demonized in many areas and really sort of stereotyped and very negative ways. Does that transfer to the political will or lack thereof around Either one of these programs Amy, whether it's guaranteed income or universal basic income, particularly universal basic income. Yeah, That's a good question. I mean, and you're right. We have absolutely saddled Most safety net benefits United States with a lot of shame and blame and kind of the strong binary between who's deserving Who's undeserving and the real E thoughts behind Guaranteed income are basic income is saying you're deserving because you're human. There's this floor that we will not let you fall beneath because you are a citizen, and I think that there is a new way that people are talking about that idea of deserving nous. Simply because we've kind of reached a breaking point, right? And so we have the great recession. Most families have not recovered from the loss of wealth during the great recession, particularly homeowners in working class communities. And then, of course, we have the pandemic on top of that, right. So you have a growing number of families who are working more in making less, and that's basically pushing us away from sort of these. Where's that used to talk about things like Social safety Net social contract into new ways of reimagining how we want to take care of one another, given that the real dire economic strain that most U. S households are experiencing Amy. I want to dig a little deeper there because the concept I think for a lot of folks of these universal basic income or guaranteed income, it almost feels like it's emerging at a time as you mentioned the pandemic and not have people having not recovered from the great recession, But we also know that hourly wages have not kept pace with inflation and social Security is something that a lot of folks are not feeling that they're going to be able to rely on. So do those economic indicators also point towards the need for some sort of cash payment. Yeah. I mean, from my perspective without question, right is that you know when we look at people, you know, particularly millennials. They're the first generation U. S history to be projected to do worse off than your parents financially right? And that's just one quick indicator. But, yeah, these systems that we have set up for families toe be financially stable, achieve. Some degree of upper mobility are largely crumbling. And it's sort of demands a new way of thinking about it. And the thing I'd like to say, sort of that really differentiates guaranteed income for you the eye from some of these other programs like SS I or housing. That type of thing is the fact that it's flexible, right? And so the other marker of the economy right now is these other institutions are really under strain. Is that what people need really fluctuates from month to month? So one month of my pay housing Next month. It might be food the next month. It might be, you know, needs around transportation or child care. And so the idea is, if you have cash cash is flexible, and that can meet the needs of families which are flexible. But it doesn't necessarily mean that we get rid of all those other programs. Right. And so the other thing that I'm seeing with these cities that are designing new basic income experiments is their design them to work alongside the safety net, not in place of it. Sara, Let's talk. We talked a little bit about California. What's happening in L. A county. But what about what's happening in Jackson? Mississippi? How is that pilot program working out? Yes. So you're talking about the Magnolia mother's projects, and Jackson, Mississippi that started a couple years ago with just 20 women. Um mothers, and then it expanded. Tol reach 110 women women there were given $1000 a month and what they found was that you know, collectively, the mothers were able to pay off $10,000 in debt. Many of them slept better. We're less stressed again. This is a you know, a small a small project really, really targeted at a specific community. And you know, a lot of women were able to benefit from the projects. I mean, speaking about some of the The limitations of projects like these and knew a lot of women were you know, but wary of participating in a program like this, in the beginning, worried that it might kick them off of other specific benefits other welfare benefits because they could Make too much money to qualify..

Dr Amy Castro Baker United States Andrew Yang California Sarah Sara Sarah Great New York City Sarah Holder Mississippi Xena Vega City Lab University of Pennsylvania Jackson Martin Luther King staff writer San Francisco assistant professor director
"amy sarah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:40 min | 2 years ago

"amy sarah" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Lab covering local policy. Affordable housing, labor and technology. Sarah Great to have you with us. Thanks for having me And Dr Amy Castro Baker is an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the co director of the Center for Guaranteed Income Research. Amy, Welcome to the takeaway. Thanks for having me Sarah, let's start with you lot to terms floating around. Let's get a basic explainer. What is the difference between universal basic income and guaranteed income? Right? So there are a lot of terms right floating around to describe the concept that we're talking about, which is Money paid monthly. No strings attached. Two people in a community so universal basic income as you might expect, is paid out to everyone in the country in a city on guaranteed basic income sort of follows along the lines of civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Junior who talked about Having enough to pay your bills every month. Ah, lot of cities right now are talking about a guaranteed income to sort of live on from that civil rights, legacy of economic justice and move it away from some of the More automation focused. Concepts, and what we're seeing in a lot of cities right now is that the basic income payments are not universal. They're going specifically to low income families that need the additional support. S so that's that's the key difference that we're seeing right now. Maybe when we talk about these two philosophies, guaranteed income versus universal basic income guaranteed, Obviously, coming with some measures that one has to. Ah, meat versus universal where everybody gets. Ah, base payment here is there Difference in terms of the benefit of either one of these programs. That's a good question. I mean, it's hard to say if there's a benefit of one over the other because we haven't had a truly universal basic income experiment yet, So you know, I come at it from the perspective of a researcher. And what of the research questions we can answer, And how do we actually generate evidence based policy around this? So it's hard to say, I think the bigger question around universal basic income versus guaranteed income is which one is more politically palatable right now, the United States Number one and then number two figuring out if you were going to actually design yet at scale. What would it cost? You know, in reality. So let's talk a little bit about that. Because this seems to be some. This isn't new. Amy. I mean, this is something that people have been talking about for decades. Correct? Yeah. No, it's not do it all. So Sara. How our city's looking to implement these different programs are most cities looking at universal basic income, the cities that we know that where mayors air really taking or like talking about it, like Andrew Yang Woz are our city's looking at this, where there's interest in doing it and looking at guaranteed income. Right, and Dr Bigger talked about that that right now all we're really seeing in the United States are these guaranteed income experiments she was heavily involved with stopped in California's experiment, which was one of the first and sort of the biggest in the United States, which started With 125 families. The rest of the cities that we're seeing Come out, Sort of in this model are focusing on hundreds of families. So Compton California will be running one of the largest with 800 families. Huts in New York is running one with just 25 families, So there's there's a broad range, but most of them focus. Specifically on very low income families, either identified through Documentation or through you know, their census tract summer are focusing specifically on populations that have slipped the cracks. Traditionally. So in San Francisco, there's a pilot running Teofilo CAS on black and Pacific Islander mothers during pregnancy and six months thereafter. S so we're seeing a range of projects that are really targeted. But that honor sort of the basic goal of these projects, which is unconditional cash on another. Another thing that you know, sets them apart is that they typically have a sunset. Well, let me let me just stop you there, sir. Because unconditional cash would mean universal, right? That would mean anybody and everybody is eligible for this, but there are conditions for guaranteed basic income. Yeah, that's a That's a really good point. And I think it's it's sort of testing the idea of unconditional being There's no, you don't have to spend the money a specific way. You know, as opposed to other welfare programs where you might have to spend it on housing or on food or in specific kind of food. I guess the unconditional is more talking about The lack of strings attached to the cash once you get it Interesting. Amy. Sarah just mentioned that the W word right there. I grew up in the eighties and nineties and remember in a very low income community and remember the concept of welfare being something that was demonized in many areas and really sort of stereotyped and very negative ways. Does that transfer to the political will or lack thereof around Either one of these programs Amy, whether it's guaranteed income or universal basic income, particularly universal basic income. Yeah, That's a good question. I mean, and you're right. We have absolutely saddled Most safety net benefits United States with a lot of shame and blame and kind of the strong binary between who's deserving Who's undeserving and the real E thoughts behind Guaranteed income or basic income is saying you're deserving because you're human. There's this floor that we will not let you fall beneath because you are a citizen. And I think that there is a new way that people are talking about that idea of deserving nous simply because we've kind of reached a breaking point, right? And so we have the great recession. Most families have not recovered from the loss of wealth during the great recession, particularly homeowners in working class communities. And then, of course, we have the pandemic on top of that, right. So you have a growing number of families who are working more in making less, and that's basically Pushing us away from sort of these ways that used to talk about things like Social safety net social contract into new ways of reimagining how we want to take care of one another, given that the real dire economic strain that most U. S households are experiencing Amy. I want to dig a little deeper there because the concept I think for a lot of folks of these universal basic income or guaranteed income, it almost feels like it's emerging at a time as you mentioned the pandemic and not have people having not recovered from the great recession, But we also know that hourly wages have not kept pace with inflation and social Security is something that a lot of folks are not feeling that they're going to be able to rely on. So do those economic indicators also point towards the need for some sort of cash payment. Yeah. I mean, from my perspective without question, right is that when we look at people, you know particularly millennials. They're the first generation U. S history to be projected to do worse off than their parents financially right? And that's just one quick indicator. But, yeah, these systems that we have set up for families to be financially stable, achieve, some degree of upward mobility are largely crumbling. And it's sort of demands a new way of thinking about it. And the thing I'd like to say, sort of that really differentiates guaranteed income. A U P I from some of these other programs like SS I or housing. That type of thing is the fact that it's flexible, right? And so the other marker of the economy right now, as these other institutions are really under strain. Is that what people need really fluctuates from month to month? So one month of my pay housing Next month. It might be food the next month. It might be, you know, needs around transportation or child care. And so the idea is, if you have cash cash is flexible, and that can meet the needs of families which are flexible. But it doesn't necessarily mean that we get rid of all those other programs. Right. And so the other thing that I'm seeing with these cities that are designing new basic income experiments is they're designed them to work alongside the safety net, not in place of it. Sara, Let's talk. We talked a little bit about California. What's happening in L. A county. But what about what's happening in Jackson? Mississippi? How is that pilot program working out? Yes. So you're talking about the Magnolia mother's projects, and Jackson, Mississippi that started a couple years ago with just 20 women. Um mothers and then an expanded tol reach 110 women women there were given $1000 a month and what they found was that you know, collectively, the mothers were able to pay off $10,000 in debt. Many of them slept better. We're less stressed again. This was a you know, a small a small project really, really targeted at a specific community. And you know, a lot of women were able to benefit from the projects. I mean, speaking about some of the The limitations of projects like these and knew a lot of women were you know, but wary of participating in a program like this, in the beginning, worried that it might kick them off of other specific benefits other welfare benefits because they could Make too much money to qualify..

Dr Amy Castro Baker United States Sarah Great California Sara Mississippi University of Pennsylvania Jackson Martin Luther King assistant professor San Francisco director researcher Andrew Yang Dr Bigger New York Pacific Islander U. S
Who should replace Ellen?

Who? Weekly

08:22 min | 2 years ago

Who should replace Ellen?

"News is ongoing. Generous. Ongoing News that won't stop are one nemesis might be replaced by our other nemesis. On their talk show the Ellen show. Well, these are that this is them news, but I do feel like Ellen could be replaced with a WHO, if this all comes to fruition or like a WHO thinks so too person because I'm seeing a lot of people nominate various talk show e people although apparently the rumors are like James Corden is going to replace Ellen, but like he has a show so. That makes no sense to me on any. That's what blows my mind. Why he has eight hundred shows. He has just made another daily show like that doesn't make any sense to me at on. The also has carpool. Karaoke. And then he also has the cat sequel like he has plenty, oh. Yeah. Let's replace a supposedly nice person with another supposedly nice person like. Haven't. We learned anything from this thing. These people are Nice. They suck. I think always be wary of people who say their thing is being. I think the number, one person who should clearly replace Allen is Kiki Palmer. There's literally no. Better obvious. Getting a lot of a lot of traction and she showing up a lot of tweets because it's like she just had a talk show that got canceled for no reason on ABC. Well, it was like that one hour of Commerical Strahan. Michael? And Kiki Sarah? There was A. Third Sarah. Sarah. And Michael and Kiki It just give it to clean working it. Just everyone likes he. We Love Kiki. She's a great host. Who else do you think if if we're going if for skewing young? I think we to Kiki for skewing older, I think it should go to fucking the woman who should have gotten David Letterman, amy. Sedaris like give it to amy sedaris because people like her. She's silly. I don't know that, amy, the thing is I. Don't know that Amy Sarah's would want to do that I. Feel like. I don't need that. We're talking about this on the Patriot. If you WANNA. Go listen to that about how drew Barrymore also has daily, show a daytime show coming out, and I'm like who would want this job? Drew Barrymore wants this job since when like it's just to meal a a weird job that you wouldn't want that could turn you or probably. Turn you into a monster, right? Yes. but the to provide a context in case you've been under a rock people are like there. There have been the rumors for years and years and years, but specifically the past few months they've really you know the hit a critical mass and started being reported publicly like Ellen is an asshole to everyone. Ellen is an asshole. The people she works with Ellen makes people not talk to her ellen cruel. But now there are reports by like news and variety and insider that it wasn't just ellen being a to everyone and celebrities and not liking Ellen like being on Ellen show. It's that the executive producers were actually like being abusive like in sexually harassing the employees. So it's like a culture. Culture of toxicity. That is the sort of thing that I don't that Ellen is deciding up allegedly that she doesn't want to deal with anymore. So she's like this sucks like I just rather not do this anymore. Right. So but this rumor, this isn't this is in fact, this is rumor because people keep their keep going back and forth and saying some some sources say she's not leaving this show sums his sources as she's leaving the show. I. Can't imagine somebody as likely a annoyed with the whole situation who is known to be not a very nice person would want to continue to fake be nice and have to apologize and half to like kind of whatever because these rumors have been. Kind of like I for some reason I, keeping you Kevin Spacey Pre the abuse allegations like when everyone knew he was gay, but no one knew he was gay like it was weird thing where it was like if you knew, you knew if you didn't, you had no idea what be totally shocked it. Kind of feels like that type of Hollywood news where like everyone knew that Ellen was secretly mean except for Ellen fans who had no idea where living happily with ellen everyday of their life and like the show was wildly successful, right? very strange. A very strange thing. Do you think that this will happen because people are so bored in their craving, the Gospel, and then somebody just this is this is what I mean I, think it's I mean. It's a combination of a lot of things at one of is like the people finally speaking out about their employers. It's like finally like shutting down like the. The systemic issues and leg, not being corporate America and knowing that people will support them and believe them and believe them, and that like the media machine of Ellen isn't powerful enough to shut down. So many voices if enough come out and and we'll talk about it later in the episode, but it's like the it's similar to the. Vanessa. Morgan thing, it's it's shades of an ESA Morgan being like I'm going to speak up against the riverdale creators and the Riverdale producers because people are people are realizing that they can do that and they won't get like dumped on by the press or of their fans they will be seen as like heroes. But. It's also just like, I, Think Dakota Johnson had a tiny bit to do with it because Dakota Johnsons like Open crubaugh open open. Rudeness to Ellen SORTA. Gave People. I don't know permission to speak about rumors that she's an asshole more openly. They're like, it looks like that's what Dakota's referencing. So I didn't even know you liked me. Of course, I. Like you. You Knew I. Liked you. You've been on the show many times and don't I show like. But I did invite you and you didn't come. So this time you invited me, are you sure? How do you? I don't think. So ask everybody. Jonathan. Your producer. I was that, why didn't I go? I don't know that became a meme. You have people like Brad Garret and who else replied to him. Leah Tom's Tom's joins. She is mean she is. She. Yes. Now, I can't believe I just called the Thomson. So Deutsche US minor. That was obsessed the disease of this show right here. Yeah. Leah Thompson also respond to that and said Yep I mean, I just think that it's like no one was a true story note once you lose grip on the fear, you are the power you had over I mean, and it's funny because then you have scooter Braun coming out her being like Ellen is great. I. Love Allen is like so people still. Look at the people coming out and say L. Like scooters, hedging his bets at this, all go away and back to normal and Ellen will still be powerful and whatever, and then you have people speaking out i. just it's a fascinating reveal of a monolith almost kind of crumbling that you didn't think would ever. Be exposed like this. I didn't. It seems like Palmer is getting a lot of A lot of press over like a lot of tweets being could replace. Ellen is trending key Palmer got a lot. Tiffany haddish. Got A lot that woman who does the like trump impersonations? What's her name? Sarah? Cooper. She got a lot of people tweeting about her I mean, I think it's just bomber just someone who someone who actually. Got Some tweets booing reply Oh doodoo be from drag race also got A. Drag. Race. Got I. saw that. Yeah. But I think he palmer when you when you want someone who has like the resume as well like. You of don't WANNA, pick someone random like Sarah Cooper. As funny as she is on twitter, because like her her her skills as a as an interviewer, not proven whereas Kiki, Palmer is a link interviewer host. Yeah I mean I would say like the Ellen slots, big slot made we just move up the ladder. We get Kelly Clarkson in that slot. We get Drew Barrymore Kelly was and we get key. Palmer. Work. Curse, lot I know these are all people on different network. So it makes literally no sense but you. Better like we. We cannot confuse the audience. We must replace the Ellen show with someone named. Ellen. Ellen Ellen. Page's like don't look at me like another gay. Just like I will not I will. Zone POMPEO, she wouldn't do it. I. Don't I don't need Elon Pale. Ellen Page Ellen Popular, and Never Would Ellen Pompeo every interview Ellen Pao's ever done. It's been like I. Love Grey's Anatomy I. have nothing but free time like. She will never do that. You know who would do it. Who Ellen Barkin? Embark and all Ellen Barkin wants is a soapbox like did someone say soapbox?

Ellen Ellen Ellen Ellen Page Ellen Popular Ellen Barkin Kiki Palmer Ellen Pompeo Ellen Pao Kiki It Kiki Sarah Cooper Kiki Sarah Drew Barrymore Amy Sedaris Michael Allen James Corden Amy Sarah Sarah ABC Kevin Spacey