19 Episode results for "Amy Hess"

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess, I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck me. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Carol Lam Leon Panetta Amy Hess Oklahoma City FBI NASA MSNBC CIA United States Attorney director
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Article II: Inside Impeachment

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy, Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully the risks. Risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I, remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck. Struck me former judge and United States attorney. Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger. Together? We live in an uncertain world, public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But, remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

director General Vivek Murthy secretary Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg Leon Panetta MSNBC FBI NASA CIA Oklahoma City Amy Hess United States attorney Kathy Sullivan
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Chuck ToddCast: Meet the Press

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that. Their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe, I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma. City on April, Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and united. States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season. Three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam secretary General Vivek Murthy Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Leon Panetta NASA FBI CIA Kathy Sullivan Amy Hess Oklahoma director Attorney
Season 3: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Season 3: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do, the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I, speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I. Remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former. Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg secretary General Vivek Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta MSNBC NASA United States FBI CIA Oklahoma City Amy Hess Murthy Attorney director
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:59 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is chuck. Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA. Director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April, nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon general. Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the youth wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's. Hayes Seth Meyers from late night with Seth Meyers. Since you're already listening to a podcast, please consider adding late night podcast to your list. Our podcast is the best parts of our show like our closer look, which are deep dives into politics and the news the day plus we have incredible guests. The ranger movie stars politicians to authors to some of the funniest people ever. There's so much to cover. It's keeping me sane, so maybe it will do the same for you go to late night. Seth podcast dot, com and subscribe now.

Seth Meyers Carol Lam Vivek Murthy secretary Rosenberg Amy Hess Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta CIA NASA FBI MSNBC Oklahoma City United States Director Attorney
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Business Wars

03:22 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath. And MSNBC PODCAST hosted by former US attorneys, senior FBI official and acting head of the DA Chuck Rosenberg. The oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former secretary of Defense and CIA. Director Leon Panetta Kathy, Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space former US, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg. Hosts of the youth podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very. Very hard on families to stand. There know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe, I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would. Would all look at me. I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan FBI CIA US MSNBC Leon Panetta Kathy Leon Panetta MSNBC Amy Hess America Director Carol Lam acting head Oklahoma City NASA official director
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

WeCrashed: The Rise and Fall of WeWork

03:22 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorneys senior FBI official and acting head of the DA Chuck Rosenberg. The oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former Secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy, Sullivan. The first American woman to walk in space. Former US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more. These captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg of podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that. That promise and serve this amazing country. In various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on. On families to stand there know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April, nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door. They would all. All look at me. I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But. Remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy Secretary Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Kathy Sullivan US FBI CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy Leon Panetta Amy Hess America NASA Carol Lam acting head Oklahoma City official United States Attorney
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is chuck. Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma, city on April, Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol, Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy Lam FBI secretary Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Amy Hess MSNBC NASA CIA Oklahoma director United States Attorney Carol
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Bag Man

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is chuck. Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had as secretary of Defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe, I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam General Vivek Murthy secretary Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Oklahoma City MSNBC NASA FBI United States CIA Amy Hess director Attorney
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess, I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April Nineteenth Nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look. Look at me and I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Carol Lam MSNBC FBI Oklahoma City Amy Hess CIA NASA director United States Attorney
NPR News: 09-18-2020 11AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 4 d ago

NPR News: 09-18-2020 11AM ET

"Live from NPR news I'm Jeanine herbst president trump and democratic presidential nominee joe. Biden both making campaign stops in northern Minnesota today. If you're an amy hess more early voting begins today in Minnesota with recent polling suggesting nearly forty percent of residents plan to vote before November third trump is set to hold airport rally tonight in the city of Bemidji Minnesota. Estate. He narrowly Lost Hillary Clinton in two thousand, Sixteen Minnesota has not gone for a Republican in the presidential election since voting for Richard Nixon in nineteen, seventy two and NPR's latest electoral college analysis finds Minnesota is still leaning Democrat trump has sought to promote his tariffs on Chinese steel as boost for local mining. Biden touting his support of and by organized labor today, he's set to tour a union training center in Duluth before delivering a speech anyhow NPR news of federal judges ordering the US Postal, service to reverse recent operational changes. The critics say are slowing mail deliveries. NPR's Brian Naylor reports attorneys general in fourteen states sued the trump administration and the postal service arguing the changes would harm mail in voting. The attorney's general argued that the changes implemented by Postmaster General Louis Joy a major donor to president trump and other republicans were an attempt to disenfranchise voters. The Postal Service has cut back on extra trips by mail trucks and dismantled dozens of mail sorting machines across country it. Argued, those changes were simply to streamline the service and that it had suspended some of them but according to reports federal judge Stanley Bastion said the states have demonstrated. The defendants are involved in a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the postal service, and that the changes created a substantial possibility many voters will be disenfranchised Brian Naylor NPR news. Afghanistan's president has issued a decreasing women will now be listed on the identity cards of their children that's according to spokesman. NPR's Diaa. Hadid has more the new laws expected to make things easier for single off gone mothers in particular who struggle to do things like sign their kids at school or get them emergency medical. CARE. This is the CO director of the Women's Rights Division at Human Rights Watch. So this law is actually really important development, which is can have a lot of real world consequences bosses the new decree also shift the common notion Anistan that children are their father's property, and it comes at an important time, the government and the Taliban negotiating pace and feminists fear women's rights. We compromise to appease the insurgents. There's a sense that laws mandating women's equality have to be pushed through quickly Dea Dade, NPR News Islamabad Wall Street is trading lower at this hour. The Dow was down sixty six, the Nasdaq down ninety four s and P Five, hundred down nineteen. This is NPR. There's another named tropical storm in an already busy Atlantic Hurricane Season Wilfred has formed far away from Land Hurricane Teddy continues moving toward Bermuda and is forecast to make its closest approach to the island on Sunday or Monday. The storm has maximum sustained winds of one hundred, thirty miles an hour. Bolivia's interim president is pulling out of next month's presidential election. If here's Philip Rees reports. Is An. Attempt to prevent the return of a socialist. Government political tensions have been running high in. Bolivia. Since November when leftist President Evil Morales was pushed out of office amid still disputed allegations of electoral fraud, he was replaced by an unelected interim government led by Christian Conservative shutting Yanez though a nationwide protests recently after the election was postponed several times because of the pandemic, it's now slated for October eighteen. A survey. This week showed the candidate for Morales his socialist. Party could win in the first round and yes, was trailing badly now she's dropped out saying she doesn't want to split the vote and allow socialism to return that breathes NPR news apple says, it will launch its first online store in India next week trying to grab sales in one of the world's fastest growing smartphone markets. Right now, apple uses third party online and offline retailers to sell its products in the country with nearly one point, four billion people including millions of new Internet users. Every month India has become a key focus of tech giant's over the past few years. Apple's online launch comes ahead of a major Hindu festival season that starts next month I'm Janine Herbst, and you're listening to NPR news.

NPR Postal Service Minnesota president NPR Biden President Evil Morales Brian Naylor Bolivia apple Jeanine herbst Bemidji India amy hess Hillary Clinton Taliban interim president Afghanistan Philip Rees
Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

AM Joy

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess. I remember, he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Carol Lam Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Leon Panetta NASA MSNBC Oklahoma City FBI CIA Amy Hess Sullivan United States Attorney director
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Legal Wars

03:20 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the Da Chuck Rosenberg the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America interviews include former Secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan, the first American woman. Woman to walk in space former US. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories reveal what shape these leaders and exemplify what is best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoyed this preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, air every Wednesday. We need to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg hosts of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta the toughest job. I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping nature. The pieces are coming together that unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved ones riding bombs, living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five. ninety-five struck me former judge and United States attorney. Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes every everyone's.

director Secretary Vivek Murthy Chuck Rosenberg General Vivek Murthy MSNBC Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan FBI Carol Lam CIA Kathy Sullivan US Leon Panetta US attorney Oklahoma City America NASA acting head United States attorney Amy Hess
Emma., Clueless, And What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

25:39 min | 6 months ago

Emma., Clueless, And What's Making Us Happy

"Jane Austen's Emma tells the story of a young woman who knows what's right for everyone else and knows very little about herself in a new film. Adaptation Emma is foolish and as endearing as ever. Even if you don't know Emma you might know clueless the nineteen ninety-five Amy Hess Film. That's now twenty five years old Glen Wilton and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about Emma and clueless on this episode of Pop Culture Happy Hour from NPR here with me and Glenn coming to us from W. X. Pin in Philadelphia is Christina. Tucker of the unfriendly black hotties podcast. Hello Christina. Hello Hello Friends and joining us from. Wb You are in. Boston is Margaret Willison. Who is one half too bossy? Dame's and one third of the appointment. Television podcast Hello Margaret. Hi Guys Hi so good to have both of you guys with me and Glenn so Glenn. I want to talk a little bit about the new Emma I. The director is autumn to wild and there is an adaptation from Nineteen ninety-six at had Gwyneth paltrow. And it's interesting to me because this is not a in some way wildly different Emma from that. They're both kind of trying to be. I think period authentic as they can being as authentic to the languages they can smell like one of them is like the set in Modern Day Brooklyn adaptation or whatever. What did you think of this adaptation of Emma? It's always interesting coming to these things because I didn't grow up reading. Austin I still haven't read Austin I think the most interesting thing for me about this particular film is how determined it is to paint Emma as both a sympathetic empathetic person. And a truly repellent monster and and really delights in walking that line from the first minute we see her. She is picking flowers while she's not picking flowers. She's directing her servants to pick flowers. And she's doing it and kind of snotty way. But then she turns around and takes those flowers to somebody and a very nice gesture so the movie knows what it's doing here she's handsome. Clever enriches as the first opening line of the book goes with very little to distress or vector. I was really only interested in this film The more she got distressed and vexed and not in the whole heterosexual hand-wringing stuff. That is the kind of plot. Churn here Kinda lost me there. But whenever she would say insult a well-meaning if basic acquaintance or treat Harriet character. Barry played by me a goth whose this person she's trying to set up in a in a kind of unkind way. That was like okay. This is interesting. And the physicality of the actress Mia Gov playing. Harriet the so fun to see because in any scene where they share on your Taylor Joy. Playing Emma is just still an precise and MIA goths head is just kinda jerk and all around the place. She is just a not poise. Wayne and my theory. We're GONNA come back to this and we talked about coolest. Is that the more you feel for the Harriet character. The better the adaptation become. I would much rather have been called. Harriet because they didn't really care about Emma Christina. What did you think about This Anna Adaptation. I was thoroughly charmed by it. I was not clamoring for another adaptation of Emma When I was thinking about what we need in this current movie landscape but I was fully bought into the world of the characters. Everything was so lushly realized and just like looking at it is such a delight. Also that score absolutely bangs was a great experience for me And I think I do agree with Glenn on some level of like the heterosexual hand-wringing. I'm not interested but I do love those moments where they lean into kind of the barb and worst parts of Emma. I think that makes the film a lot more interesting and I think the film is I had a great time. Yeah I will say about that score one of the things I really like is it's a mix of the kind of Instrumental light stuff that you might expect in a movie like this but there are also these appearances of this very kind of throaty coral music. It really reminds you of kind of the human energy vibrating under this very proper story. Yet I was very very grateful for that Margaret. What did you think so? I'm probably the like Austin nastiest of the people participating in this podcast. And what I would say about. This adaptation is that it had incredible and engrossing visual style like to look at. It's really remarkable. I just wish it had had as much of a point of view emotionally on the characters as it does visually on the world that it's presenting and there are so many interesting veins in this story that could be investigated more speaking of heterosexual nonsense. One of the most interesting one is. Is there a homosexual context to the relationship between Emma and Harriet? Is it a one way thing does have a crush on? Harriet does have a crush on Emma or do we have a crash on each other. They don't know what to do about. I have yet to see an adaptation. That approaches that question and I think it is very pertinent to the text and trusting as the person on this panel probably most inclined toward heterosexual. I will leave. One brave outnumber. I mean one of the things that I liked about. This is that I will say as to both Emma and Knightley. The the guy who is her kind of potential love interest with both of those characters had the same reaction. Which is that. When I first saw the character presented I was like no no and in the first opening moments of seeing On you Taylor Joys Emma Portrayal of Emma. I sort of thought like I don't think this is GonNa work because I'm not gonNA come around on her she's imperious. She's actually like to mean and she's to snotty and I'm GonNa come around on her but I will be darned. I did come around on her and when they first were showing nightly I sort of thought like I hope this isn't because you see him as a man getting dressed and I was like I gotta hope this is a nightline because I don't think so because I'm Jeremy Northam nightly either is a much more kind of classically. It's kind of what they were. Doing with austen adaptations at that time. He's a little more kind of the classic British you know. I don't know Glenn Likes Employees. They're making fun of Churchill for like being a fine young gentleman and writing all the way to London to get his haircut and I was like man. I wish I wish we would follow suit. Yeah and here's the thing about that. I thought was so interesting about it I think. Now in retrospect that the Gwyneth paltrow. Emma was afraid to really lean into the fact that Emma is a bit monster. I agree and I think this one is a little more willing to make her. Not just an innocent. Who's very young and needs to learn to be more careful with her words but really that she needs to correct the way she approaches other human beings and that makes the emotional turns of that character more resonant for me because to me. The most important scene in Ama- is the Picnic Zia where she has. Glenn alluded to lashes out at this in not lashes out. Maybe that's wrong but really kind of cuts deeply this woman who is sort of obnoxious to her and woman who is extraordinarily well meaning right but boring exactly and played by Miranda Hart who is wonderful way love and it's always Miranda so good in. That scene is so important because nightly really delivers a dressing down to her and simultaneously. You need that dressing down for her character and you also need it because in a film that is so devoid of emotional expressive nece in terms of romance for most of the run of the movie. It is oddly. That scene where you realize how much he cares about her and is invested in her and his disappointment in her behavior speaks to the fact that he loves her. Yeah and that is a very hard thing to pull off right. It's very hard to pull off that like. I love you so much that I'm here to tell you that you need to change. I think they make it work here and I very much appreciated that right. And what about the scene at the dance? I saw this film four days ago and I feel like that scene is still going on so much in a two hour. Movie was just off forever. Sexual Monson is that it is also important character moment because you have to feel the weight of the humiliation that. Harriet is going through to understand how highly she values nightly so. She's like scorned by this Guy Amazon. Trying to set her up with and very publicly and the nightly comes over in league dances with her and she feels very saved. And if you don't have the longevity of that dance you don't necessarily feel the depth of that lake discomfort and humiliation down. I would like to test that theory shorter version. Because I'm Bet I would've still felt the same way I think Christina and Glenn are on the same page virtual high five so one of the things we mentioned the intro. Is that even? If you're not familiar with Emma itself. You might be familiar with clueless. The nineteen ninety-five Amy Heckling Film. Which is very much an adaptation although it wanders from the structure a few ways This is Alicia Silverstone as share. I love so much the fact that Emma is kind of this central name around which the whole story rotates and then they named her share. I just there's something about anything is so smart and then Paul Rudd as her ex stepbrother. Josh and a cast of many the wonderful Brittany Murphy tie the sort of equivalent of your Harriet character. Donald Saisons exactly donald phase on Brechin Meyer. Who is the high point of trying to make and break and Meyer happen in a lot of that lasted for a couple more years? I can say as someone who was a teen I. I'm for sure and like Wallace Shawn an actress. Named twinkie. Kaplan buckling playing to the teacher. Who who share tries to set up with the wall Sean character. We could probably do a full like hour and a half on everything about clueless. You WanNa talk about clueless a little bit as an Emma Adaptation Glenn. Where do you come down on clueless as a version of Emma as I said before Brittany Murphy is so much the beating heart of this film? She is so charming and that's going out sporadically. It's so necessary for you to kind of feel her and when you have an actress Brittany Murphy. Of course you do because Herod is again the thing around which the whole film pivots now. I forgotten so much this film. I'd forgotten all the plot. I just knew iconography. I knew the yellow plaid outfit share starts off the film in. I knew as if which turns out not to be like a one off thing. It's like a catchphrase comes back a hell of a lot. Yeah and I kept waiting as was watching it for the toothpastes. And when did they do the toothpaste scene where they're spit the sink? And it's like. Oh No that's that's not silverstone and road that's Dunston Bradford and bring it on five years later but you know it all kind of mix it up. I think service donors fine here but man. It wasn't if it wasn't for Brittany Murphy. I don't think you're GONNA film here. I disagree so strongly. I think everyone does a good job. But I also think silverstone I mean. It's not much to say that it's the best worker for career because she hasn't had much of a career after this but it's an exceptional performance Christina and I were texting about this last night furiously texting seriously texting. Yes at one point. She says a line in Slang. That should be absolutely ridiculous and she manages to imbue it with like. Oh she says I'm totally bugging here. And that's when she found out that the boy she has a crush on his gay and to say the line. I'm totally bugging here and imbue. It with complete naturalism insincere. Meaning is really hard and she nails it. I just think she does such a good job. With the role. Her sunny warmth does so much to establish sympathy for the character that there's space in the sides and then how she sort of presented within the movie them to be like much meaner to her than they might. Otherwise be right. They were working with less sympathetic actress. Well right and I think the interesting thing about this to me when I watched it was realizing that this is another one where they do not give much weight to her being a mean person what they what they rely on instead is her being kind of an empty headed person. They make fun a lot of her silliness and her flightiness and her unserious nece. The closest thing that clueless has to that wonderful important picnic. Scene isn't a series of kind of much lighter Much lighter scoldings from Josh. That make her feel bad. But it's not the same and it's partly because she's sixteen and they're treating her much more as a younger teenager kind of still in the process of being formed so I think they don't WanNa come down on that character too hard and it's more of a straight forward comedy. I do like the way that they map. Certain kinds of high school characters onto Emma. Yes I very much love that just maddening. Jeremy Sisto performance as Elton out. This this he so good at just being this drip but cool sweaters doing a lot of that work. Yeah but like the decision to have him exchange that little role in with the homeys thing with. Yes it's so dumb and yet you understand that it's like smarmy Christina. Help me out. It's smarmy but it's also something that could would in that moment where you in high school catcher. I like. He's one of those guys that you see and you recognize not out of. Oh this is something I enjoy but oh this is something that I really wish. I'd seen all the red flags for when I was watching this movie. Last night was the first time I'd watch in a long time and I had not realized how much of it was just straight up imprinted on my soul. I couldn't tell you the last time I watched it but I knew every line. Every plot point was still with me and the chemistry. Between at least you're silverstone and Paul Ryan is so perfect his reading of come on you know you're gorgeous has stuck for my whole life. I think yeah. People say read has aged but the good thing is like when you look at this like no. That was baby rudd. He's he's aged aged very well. Congrats to you Paul Rod. Yeah just really delightful film. And I fully agree with Margaret that. At least you silverstone at her absolute best here she makes some of those ridiculous lined all for little winds and sound that she makes so perfect in. A lot of as Margaret said a lot of very silly slang in her mouth and then I think she mostly is able to carry off. Yeah as is true of many nineteen ninety-five films. You do catch like. It's the middle of the nineties. There is language that people use that you would not use now that you kind of will stumble over a little bit when you hit it if you do a rewatch I don't think the story with Christian the Guy Turns out to be gay really works at all I I I've never really cared that much about the equivalent. Emma storyline either though. So maybe I just don't care about that. But I do think silverstone I'm on I'm on team Silverstone with this movie. I think it's a performance. It's harder than it looks. The characterization of every individual in this movie is so good at every moment your interacting with them. I think you are feeling about them. Exactly the way Amy. Hecker laying wants you to feel and given how fine some of these characterizations can be an how much nuance there is to them where you're supposed to perceive sweetness and idiocy and live misplaced confidence almost all simultaneously. That happens so consistently. I think is just incredible. I think it's I think it's a perfect piece of filmmaking. I'll just go ahead and say it yet. Well and I think that when you want to properly credit this movie you also have to acknowledge how easily it could have been. Totally expendable and Franco Ball. I'm trying to sort of say something about teenagers. And any time you know. Grown people try to make a movie about teenagers that uses a lot of teenage slang and sort of makes fun of them but also empathizes with them. It's a really hard balance to strike to kind of make fun of the way that the kids are dressing and yet somehow still. It's clear that you love them. Numb from from a story perspective when I'm Writing Perspective so taking on Austin at adapt is a very popular thing to do. Because it gives you this. Easy sort of marketing peg but adaptations are also really hard to do it and to create something. That is so perfect and complete in and of itself. Like you would never need to read emma to understand clueless and when you do read. Emma will you come away with is not like Oh man. It's a shame that clues didn't manage this but it's just like a whole new level of respect for the thoroughness of what she accomplished. And like the completeness of the Social Miyoshi captures which is a part of Austin. That is often overlooked right. Exactly all right. Well you can find the new Autumn dwelled Emma in your local probably art house theater and it will stream before you know it so I do recommend it and clueless. Of course you can find in your In your streaming stores when we come back it's going to be time for our favorite segments. What's making us happy this week? So come right back. Change is hard transitions can be even harder. But they're also an opportunity to explore and discover and reimagined things. You THOUGHT YOU BILL. Roedy the new host of NPR's Ted Radio Hour and with all this in mind we've decided to make my entire first episode about re invention subscribe. Listen right now. Welcome back to pop culture happy hour. It's time for our favorite segments of this weekend every week. What's making us happy this week? Glen Weldon what's making you happy this week. Six the musical recently opened on Broadway. But I feel like I've been hearing about it for a long time. It certainly feels like a idea. Whose time was overdue. So the basic idea. Six wives of Henry. The eighth are Rian visioned as pop divas who perform a concert where they basically step forward and sing you their story in their own words from their perspective. So there's a beyonce. There's Nicky Ricky that Arianna Ref. There's lots of riffs but it's more than that and there are moments. I'M GONNA be honest here. There are moments. Certain Chord progressions where you will feel certain at the whole thing's about to stop because Linneman Mullah RENTA's lawyers about the storm infamous seeks this letter. The songs are all great. I have recently taken to crawling inside the song. Get down which is sung by. Henry's fourth wife. The German of Cleves who Henry married so the story goes after seeing a painting of her by Hans Holbein but it turned out. He was disappointed when she actually showed up looking different. This version of the song is from the arts theatre production in London where was played by Genesis Linnea. Let's hear clip. No criticism can lutheranism shot. Okay Ladies Let's get an reformation okay so if you're scoring at home that is to solid pieces of business in the same verse Lutheranism Restoration. I cannot wait to see this musical on Broadway. You can get a cast album now. But that is six musical on Broadway right now. I think Mike told me that. In a unprecedented I pop culture happy hour and not only did I select this exact musical but also this exact song a hint this specific clip. Luckily I've got a backup happy about which equally enthused but you can consider this one at double verified. And if you're interested in Morris six experiences there was a great feature done by the New York Times with the two young creators on the process of taking this from a small show at the Edinburgh fringe to Broadway. And it's a superfund read. All right. Thank you very much to to Glen. And of course to Margaret. I'm going to get back to you in a second but first Christina Tucker. What is making you happy this week friends? We are in the fourth season of free forms the bold type. And I'm here to tell you. It's still slaps it is still a delightful way to spend forty five minutes of Your Day. It is Centered on a trio of best friends. Jane Cat and Sutton who work at the fictional scarlet magazine it follows their love lives. Their work lives there foolish and very special episode e. Type lives also their editor in chief. Jacqueline Carlisle played by the exquisite Minora. Harden it is just delightful. The three main actresses have such an easy and delightful chemistry that their friendship really feels real and lived and even if they are doing like a very special episode every single episode about their lives. And you know just in these days. We need a little bit happy. We a little bit of fun so go hang out with the ladies of the bowl type on all of your streaming friends all right. Thank you very much Christina. Tucker Margaret Wilson. What is making you happy this week? So my proper happy for this week is built on one of the most successful recommendations. I've made on the show to date like the thing I've had the greatest number of people come up to me and say I'm so glad you mentioned this on pop culture happy hour. I found it because of it and they really love it and so that popular recommendation is the book bellwether Rhapsody Kate. Requ Leah and my related recommendation. Today is the book. Tuesday mooney talks to ghosts also by Care Kula. That came up this October. I've just been saving it and I want to make sure that the people who really love bellwether new. Kate had a new book out and for people who hadn't found either if you are an adult to whom the game meant a lot as a child like these books are made for you on a cellular level and you deserve to have them in your life. Caveat Kate is a friend of mine but that is chiefly because of how long and publicly I have loved her writing so take that recommendation with the appropriate sized grain of salt but it is a perfectly sincere one and I hope you guys like them as much as I do all right. Thank you very much. What is making me happy? This week is a book that I have finally gotten to sit down and spend some time with. It's called the two lives of Lydia Bird. It's by Josie silver and it is about a woman who has a kind of a life changing events and then she kind of begins to her life kind of divides its little bit sliding doors ish to wear you know one version of her life where this event happened in one where it didn't happen and you know the thing that. I like about this book as not just the quality of the prose which I think is very good. I think the books just very charming but it also is really really humane and interested in questions about how people recover from trauma and how people move on with their lives when something very unexpected happened than their questions. That that I that I think about a lot also and in addition to being a book that I really like. It's a book that I got to the end and I was like I agree with everything. This book links about life and people it does come by the way from Ballantyne the same publisher as my book just to disclose that. But genuinely like you know. I really really enjoyed this one and enjoyed spending time with On a plane and at home and other things so again the two lives of Lydia Bird by choosy silver and brings us to the end of our show. You can find all of us on twitter. You can find me at Linda. Holmes you can find blind G H well. Then you can find Christina at sea underscore Grayson tea. And you can find Margaret at Mrs Friday next our producer Jessica Media Jessica Underscore Radi other producer. Might cats at Mike Captain of K. a. t. v. i. f. Mike's band. Hello come in provides the music. You're bobbing your head to right. Now thanks to you guys for being here thank you thanks so much and thank you for listening to pop culture happy hour from NPR. If you have a second subscribe to a newsletter it's over at NPR dot org slash pop culture newsletter. And we will see you all right back here next week.

Emma Christina Glenn Margaret Willison Harriet Gwyneth paltrow Brittany Murphy Christina Tucker Jane Austen NPR Paul Rudd Amy Hess Linda Holmes Boston Austin Alicia Silverstone Josh London Mike Captain Modern Day Brooklyn Dame
Amy Hess: Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

1:19:11 hr | 2 months ago

Amy Hess: Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity

"I do solemnly swear that I will support defend the constitution of the United. States against all enemies foreign investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I. Take this obligation freely about any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and fully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God help me God so God. Welcome to the youth I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with a fascinating guests from the world of public service this week. My guest is has the highest ranking woman in F. B. I. History. Amy Grew up in Jeffersonville Indiana a small town just across the Ohio River from Louisville Kentucky as a child. Amy Dreamed of being an astronaut. She studied `aeronautics astronautical engineering at purdue. Amy is a rocket scientist, but poor eyesight dashed her NASA dreams instead. Amy Got her start in the FBI as As a special agent in Kansas City working violent crime cases, she was one of the first agents in her office to be part of a new evidence response team, and won her first assignments as part of that team was to Oklahoma City, because of the horrific domestic terrorism attack on the Murrah Federal. Building in Nineteen ninety-five. Amy Rose through. FBI RANKS TO RUN THE MEMPHIS AND LOUISVILLE field offices, and to run to large divisions at headquarters where she oversaw FBI technology in one job and the FBI's criminal and cyber work in another. Today she is back home as the Chief of Public Safety for Louisville Kentucky where she manages several vital city agencies and they'll retired from the FBI. Amy Continues to serve Amy Hess welcome to the oath. Thank you great to be here well. It's great to be Anura. Town Louisville Kentucky welcomed local. You grew up right across the Ohio River in Jeffersonville Indiana now. I did suburb of level located right across the Ohio. River, so tell me about that. Jeffersonville is a great place to grow up. I had a I think basically idyllic childhood. I went to Jeffersonville, high school public school. Yes I was fortunate enough to grow up on the end of cold sack, surrounded by neighborhood, full of boys who like to play football and baseball and basketball, and all those things and my dad was lawyer. My mom was a what they call a homemaker the time, but she was really a professional volunteer, and we had a great neighborhood neighbors looking out for each other. It was one of those. Essentially Norman Rockwell paintings. I think you're the youngest of five four older siblings. That's right. My Dad actually had four children by his prior marriage, and so my mother inherited for children between the ages of like three and eleven when they got together, growing up with a bunch of boys on the block became pretty good athlete. If I didn't learn how to play sports in clearly, I wasn't going to have friends or play outside, so I learned pretty quickly that if I wanted to have a social life than I should learn how to play these things, so in addition to sports, of course see we played army in. We played cowboys and COPS and robbers. This was how my childhood was spent older siblings. They're all athletes, and so that helped to. Mostly they were into swimming and track, so I decided growing up that I was. Was not going to do swimming or track, because they were really good at it and I wanted to at least build some self confidence by doing something completely different your own path that's right and that was volleyball tennis volleyball tennis, actually softball unfortunately. I couldn't do both tennis and softball the same time, so I picked tennis and volleyball is my team sport. Even before you got the high school? There's a story you tell about yourself when you were eleven year old girl visiting Washington DC with your mom. Mom and dad and they took you on a tour of the FBI. We used to have family vacations every year, and that particular summer we went to Washington DC. Of course there are lots of really cool things that I saw as an eleven year old including the Smithsonian I remember so much about that trip. He could tour the White House at the time without you know having to go through all of the things you go through now I always in awe of all of these things that I saw. saw in the nation's capital and I just thought that was really cool, but the coolest thing was. We got to tour. The J Edgar Hoover Building, which is the home of FBI headquarters in Washington, and at that time the FBI laboratory was located inside that building, so we walked through and watch behind the glass, the forensic scientists conducting their work, we also walked down to the level where they had the firearms range, and we got to watch behind the glass as they did some shooting in trick shooting and We got to see the museum artifacts and things along the way, and had a great tour guide, and just remember distinctly I thought. This is so cool. I WANNA BE AN FBI agent. How much cooler could it be? It would be really cool, but there was another thing that you aspire to be when you were an eleven year old girl. Yes, that was to be an astronaut. Because the space program was really taking off at that time, and as I went toward high school. That's when the space shuttle program really started to gear up. And around that same time as when Sally. Ride became the first. US Woman in space. It made an indelible impression on me. Here's a woman, a girl who like me, but she's an astronaut. I wanted to be an astronaut or FBI agent I know you went to purdue, one of the finest engineering programs in the nation and that you are let me make sure I get this right, an errand, nautical and astronautical engineer. That's right. You're a rocket scientist. Basically. Yes, that's really cool to. Tell me about the program at purdue and you studied and sounds like you're still pursuing the dream of becoming an astronaut. When I was growing up I was in school. I was a good student. Fortunate enough to have great teachers, people who just encouraged me and my parents, of course as a result I had this aptitude toward science and math I thought science math was pretty, neat, my guidance counselor suggested that I look into engineering. And of course like I said by the time I was thinking about this whole space, program and astronaut. Looked! Engineering schools and purdue is not only one of the top engineering schools in the country, but particularly in aerospace or aeronautical astronautical engineering, and it's the cradle of astronauts Neil Armstrong Gus Grissom, whole variety of astronauts have graduated from purdue I went up and visited the campus. My oldest sister went to purdue I went up there and visited her and I thought that was a pretty neat. NEAT place if I was going to go to school someplace in an engineering program of course, my dad was thrilled because it was in state tuition, but I was thrilled because I had everything at one place. It's everything I wanted to be and purdue as a phenomenal experience. Now you are wonderful, high school student, but I think you told me the engineering program at purdue hard very hard. How is it when you're a good student in high school? And you get your confidence up and you're thinking I can do this volleyball story or a tennis star. Your top ranked in your high school class academically bright, and then you go some place where? All the kids had those qualifications. They were all great students, and they all add exceptional backgrounds and Bona vp's and now all of a sudden. You're kind of average, and now you're surrounded by these people in you're thinking. Oh, my Gosh! Wow! Overnight eight now. All of a sudden gotta work at this I mean this is not easy, so what I learned in that experience. You can't rest on your laurels. No matter what you've done in the past, it doesn't matter. It's what you're doing looking forward and what you're doing in your current environment. Look at what you're surrounded by today. Don't think backwards, but you struggled in the program I did and as result I started to question myself and my choices because I thought. Wow, maybe this astronaut thing isn't GonNa work out or this engineering thing isn't GonNa work out I remember. My Dad visited campus. My Mom and dad visited campus one day. and. I told my dad I said I'm thinking about changing majors. And he said to what I said well I've been taking general educational electives in sociology and criminal justice and might switch to that because you're still thinking that perhaps you'll be an FBI special agent. Right as always in the back there. I thought actually that he was going to be mad I thought that you know he's sending me to one of the top engineering schools in the country. I'm supposed to get a degree in engineering. And thought he'd be upset. That I was suddenly changing that trajectory and he didn't. He just listened. and. He just said Oh. You do what you think is appropriate. When you stuck in the program, I did you graduated I did and through that process I, had at standing experience, because I after the first semester was selected for produce coop program. WHAT'S THE CO-OP program? So the co-op program is something. A lot of universities do and including purdue and the idea is you get to work a semester and then go to school semester so alternating semesters? You do this for about five. Semesters and about five school semesters extends the time that it takes you to graduate by about a year, but well worth it because you're gaining work experience at the same time. You're going to school, so I got to work every other semester. Go to school on the alternate semesters. And as part of my work, I went to Houston Texas and I got to work at a contractor for the NASA. Johnson Space Center is called. IBM Space Systems Division. And the program, the four of the five onboard shuttle computers for the space shuttle at the time. That's what you were working on. It was I was one of many many many coders, people programmers who were programming in checking and verifying that software do like that. Not Particularly, but it's not always bad to learn that there's something you don't like. That's true because. The space program was such a draw a magnet for me, and it was amazing to be part of that and to be right across the street from NASA Johnson Space Center. I got to go over to mission control a few times. And how cool is that? But my day job was in a windowless room. there was all of about maybe. Ten Foot by twelve foot with one other person, and all we did was sit in front of computer all day long and verify software and write code. And I thought. I don't know that I can do this for the rest of my life I. Don't know that this is really what I want to do. Where were you when the Challenger shuttle exploded? I was doing coop program I was in Houston. I was working at IBM space systems. Division and I remember we were doing our programming or coding. In that little office me and this other co-op student and all of a sudden, we heard people run past the door and we knew the shuttle had gone up that morning. Because well, actually, it became so routine that you didn't really even pay that much attention to it. It wasn't a special occasion necessarily other than the fact that Christa. McAuliffe was on that particular shuttle mission in New Hampshire schoolteacher and she was not an astronaut by trade, but that made it special, but in that sense, it was just another. Shuttle mission, and so while we were still programming, doing our thing. All of a sudden everyone runs by the door and we're thinking out. Something happened. And that's when we found out that the shuttle had exploded. And at that point, really every contractor in the area was scrambling to figure out what happened in really wasn't our fault. Are we the ones responsible for it. Days later, the memorial happened the service and President Reagan flew in and came down NASA road one right in front of our building. With motorcade. Do you remember that motorcade? Absolutely, it was one of the most vivid recollections. We all lined the street and so many contractors in that area. We were all lining that NASA road one while the motorcade passed us and drove into NASA Johnson Space Center for the memorial service and the flyover with the missing man formation. It was very impactful. You figured out at some point. Amy that you didn't want to be an engineer. You didn't want to sit in a small room and code. Yeah I did that pretty quickly. I think during my co OP program didn't want a minute to myself I. still wanted to play all this out, but I realized that this is not really what I wanted to do, and you also determined that you couldn't be an astronaut. Why So at the time as I found out while I was working in Houston. To be an astronaut. You had to have twenty twenty uncorrected vision. Old Problem was I couldn't see the big e on the charge and I could barely see my hand in front of my face, uncorrected corrected and I realized quickly that while that's GonNa be a problem if they don't allow correction. To get to twenty twenty how I going to do that unless they change the rules, this is not really a thing. I can't really do this. And so then in that case of my okay with being an engineer. And my answer and my head was no I didn't know really what else I was going to do. So you've graduated from purdue or you're about to graduate. You'll have a degree in aeronautical and astronautical, engineering. You can't be an astronaut, and you don't WanNa be an engineer. Right exactly a little bit of a dilemma, but there's this thing in your life from your tour of Washington DC. It's an eleven year old girl. Yes I wasn't hundred percent convinced that was really a possibility. But it was always in the back of my head, so in the meantime while I'm in the state of confusion. I decided to apply for the MBA program at Indiana University which had a great reputation. I went there to get my Mba that was my intent and try to figure it out. Sounds like a bit of stalling tack. It was yes, it was. And in that first semester, I thought why am I not looking into the FBI White? Why am I not pursuing that? Let me at least check into it. And turns out. They were looking for scientists and engineers. At the time they were specifically targeting. People with science and engineering backgrounds. What about the vision thing? Amy You have to have good vision to be enough the special agent that's true, not as good as an astronaut and even better, it could be corrected to twenty twenty, so you were fine. I don't know that I'd use the word fine as my story goes, went in for my medical, and the nurse was very nice to me when I went in or initial medical screening. And, I believe the qualification was like twenty, three, hundred correctable to twenty twenty for your eyesight well, I wasn't quite twenty three hundred, but the nurse who was administering this test. Essentially had me look at the chart and she kept asking me she said. Can you see that and I said? Sort of she said if you squint, can you see it? And I. I said I could see a better she has. What are those letters? Look like to you and I read them off as best as I thought, I could, and she said close enough. You're in I'm in or at least you've passed that part of the yeah, there's a whole battery of things of course that happened after that, but that was the initial test. When did you get to Quantico as a brand new FBI special agent that was January of Nineteen Ninety one. It took me a little less than a year to process, which is quick, it is yes, in retrospect. I realized that now. That was pretty quick especially at that time. I didn't finish my MBA if I could do one thing over again, I would've I would've completed that degree, but. I go to Quantico and I am the second youngest person in my class class of forty two women. There were twelve women which was a lot at the time. We lost one on the first night. She just decided. It's not for her, but that very first day January twenty seventh of Nineteen ninety-one, it Sunday and we all are summoned to our classroom. And in our business close and we fill out paperwork and we take the oath of office. was at the first time you had taken the oath. Yes, it was. It was impactful meaningful. It was I. I was in awe. That I'm even here I'm at the FBI any just like in the pictures. The second thing is i. have this class full of these people who are so accomplished and as it turns out tremendous athletes to I thought I was a pretty good athlete, but these people are really good. It was intimidating quite frankly, it was awesome an intimidating at the same time, and so that made it surreal. Did you feel that it was awesome and intimidating during all of your training at Quantico, did you get over that? Now I pretty much thought that the whole time I had to really pinch myself to remind myself I. was there I also? Wanted to find things that I was good at I figured the academics would come fairly easily to me and they did. I mean I had to work at it, but I they did, but the one thing that I found that I was particularly good at that I wasn't expecting was firearms. You were the top gun in your graduating class at Quantico among the new special agents. What is that? Break Eight, so the top gun award is given to the. Top shooter, the person with the highest scores in Byrom string so everything from I from pistols to the machine pistols, rifles, other shotgun, and they take your scores, and all of those things, and they add them all up, and at the end of your experience there they see who has the highest score. The highest score gets the top gun award which is. A little ironic because I grew up in a household where we didn't have guns, I had no in my family that was in law, enforcement or the military before actually my sister. Who is six years older than I am? She went to the State Police Academy, but before that we had nobody in our class so before you got to Quantico to the FBI Training Academy. Had you ever handled a firearm? One time sisters firearm. She took me to range and I got to fire that weapon. What I was told later is that if you have bad habits to break your more trainable? So a lot of the people in my class, who had military or law, enforcement backgrounds had developed apparently some habits that were not easy to break them of and as a result of me, being more of a blank slate, and it probably wasn't hurt by the fact that in high school I had a propensity for going to the arcade when we had. Had Video Arcades. My mother gave me rolls of quarters. I think to keep me busy between the end of school in the beginning of practice, and so during that interim period I would spend a lot of time on these games that taught me hand eye coordination. What were you good at particularly the video arcade? Yeah, my favorites were Glagah. I liked centipede. Liked to joust. Those were some of my favorite games, and so you're attributing some of that to your marksmanship at the FBI. Academy I think so. It's a hand eye coordination thing when you graduate. Where are you assigned? I was assigned to Kansas City Missouri. How did that happen at that time? When you went through the new agents class, they gave you a list of just ten out of the fifty six field offices in the FBI. You had a wish list of ten topped in places. You want to go being from Jeffersonville Indiana, the area of Louisville. Louisville Kentucky I wanted to go to the beach because I enjoyed our beach vacations when I was growing up, so I thought that would be a coolest I meant, so you listed beach cities? Yeah, absolutely I listed are field offices in Jacksonville and Tampa and Miami and San Diego, and all these places along the beach I thought it'd be pretty cool. Unfortunately, whoever was making the assignments that day for the FBI totally ignored my list, and that happened it does it does they decided for whatever reason that they had a need in Kansas City Missouri that date. And I had never been to Kansas. City Missouri and up to the front of the Class Open my envelope to say where I'm going. And that's sort of the protocol at the protocol was walk up in front of the class, and you have a thumb tack with. Basically that's representing you. And there's a big map on the wall behind you. And, the idea was you. Put your thumb tack in the city where you're assigned and so as I'm reading this, it's big surprise. You Open the envelope and you say. Your Office of assignment is changed from which your process through Indianapolis because I was going to school in Indiana University in nap was Indiana to Kansas City Missouri, and then I took my thumb tack and I started at the Atlantic Ocean on the east coast and win across. Sorry going to the left and before I, knew it I was actually in the Pacific Ocean and I thought. How did I Miss Kansas City Missouri? Where is Kansas City? Missouri and I looked at. It was directly in the staple, and at that time it occurred to me. That law is equidistant from all beaches. These FBI people got to be pretty smart. This way I can get to any beach i. want the same amount of time or another way to look at it. They put you as far from every beach. Possibly could. They did do like it in Kansas City It was phenomenal. I couldn't ask for better assignment first of all, I thought that back to the science and engineering thing is going to be working something technical or I be working government fraud. There was a Boeing plant at that time in Wichita Kansas the Kansas City field office is responsible for half of Missouri, and all of Kansas. I thought while they'll have me working something. Government fraud technical related. Instead I was put on the violent crime squad. It was called the reactive squad. Reacts the crimes that have occurred. and. That's everything from bank robberies, fugitives, kidnappings, extortions I actually thought I. Hit the lottery. This is just like it is in the brochure I thought. This is really obviously i. have arrived where you still in all of the FBI. Absolutely, honestly I am still off the FBI. We're still intimidated, yes. Now. All of a sudden I, did pretty well in class, and my new agents class the Bung all these super stars I did I held my own, but now all of a sudden I'm a real field office with real FBI agents that have been doing this some of them a long time. And they're good at it. Now every new FBI agent gets a training agent. Who Was Yours? My trainee agent was a man by the name of Raja rates. He reminded me of Buford pusher and the movies walking tall other people say they remind him of John Wayne, but this is a guy who he referred to himself as the Sheriff at that tells you anything. He took this job really seriously. He loved the FBI, but he took the job of being a training agent very seriously. which by the way you don't get extra money for it's an ancillary duty it's it's something that's assigned you in addition to your caseload, and you're usually volunteered for it. You don't volunteer. He was assigned as my training Asian, and he had trained many others before me and after me. You told me he was a great mentor. He was why. He was a great mentor. Because first of all, he actually wanted to be a training Asian he cared. That I learned he cared that I became good at my job. He wanted me to be a good FBI agent and he wanted me to reflect well on the organization that he loved. And so as a result he took the time and the attention to do everything from creating my paperwork a lot i. don't know how many red pins he went through, but he corrected my paperwork and let's be clear. There's a lot of paperwork in the FBI tons of paperwork FBI. It is definitely paperwork heavy. He introduced me to. He introduced me to people inside the office outside the office. He taught me the basics even though I just gone to new agents class. It's not the same thing as actually conducting interviews when you're out in the real world and people react in ways. They're totally unpredictable to the way you think they may react and making arrests and writing up. Search warrants basically putting cases together following leads, and what steps to take in investigation. He coached me through each one of those things nickname. He did he called me Kermit? As, he did actually all of his trainees because. You're green. I was green I was new, and so his nickname for me for the first year I don't think he called me by my name. It was Kermit as in Kermit, the frog, Kermit, the frog, the famous muppet correct and after a year. You're no longer kermit. You became amy somewhere in that timeframe I transitioned graduated from Kermit Day my real name. Yes, there's a story about Roger the sheriff introducing. Introducing you not only to your FBI special agent colleagues and local law, enforcement, officers and judges and prosecutors, but to every professional staff employee of the Kansas City field office of the FBI. Yeah I, remember this David -Ly FBI has about thirty seven thousand employs about one third of which are agents. The other two thirds are professional, staff and analysts, and so the vast majority of the FBI are not special agents. They're all the people who are working behind the scenes to support investigations and to make those investigations happen. So the conclusion of taking me around to visit with all of the professional staff, we ended up in the management section. And the second highest ranking professional staff person in any field offices referred to as the supervisory administrative specialist or the SAS. When we walked into her office I noticed that she had a poster up on her wall, and it was that that famous picture of entitled the scream by monk. That's right. Above that she had a quote by Eleanor Roosevelt, which goes something like? No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. And above that someone had written in except agents. and. That struck me as Wow, why? Why would that be? Why? How can agents make you feel inferior? Why would agents make you feel inferior? Why would they want to? And it indicated to me that perhaps there's some kind of divide or some some kind of of cultural issue here. That I hadn't previously I hadn't thought about it was bracing. I think to me to see that and so I asked Roger about it. After we walked out of the room and I said what's up with the comment the edition on that quote? I remember distinctly. He said Kermit, he said. Let me tell you somethin'. Says Ucla's people just introduced you to today? All these professional staff employs. He's as these people. Can make sure you're successful in this job. And they can make sure you're not. You remember that FBI. Is A team sport. You don't accomplish anything by yourself. Do you think there are some agents who don't understand that. Unfortunately, a few, but very few I think the vast majority of the people in the FBI. Absolutely recognize it's team sport. You can't be successful without the cooperation coordination of your entire team on your tenure in the Kansas City field office on the violent crime squad. You had a remarkable case. Remarkable experience a defendant by the name of take. Beyer with you tell us that story. I was about three months in to my new job through still kermit I'm still kermit. Oh Yeah, Roger, for some reason I was not around that. We believe that he had taken some time off. I had pre scheduled vacation. And as a result, one evening, a call came in saying that there was kidnapped child. A man had visited his friend in Colorado from Rural Kansas during that trip, he had decided that the friend who had a daughter and that daughter had just had a child. He decided to take that baby because he and his wife wanted a baby, but they couldn't have one NACHOS. Take Baby. There's something else. He killed the mother, the young woman, the daughter of his friend. And he kidnapped the baby. It was an essentially a newborn just came home from the hospital and took the baby to his wife in rural Kansas. And at that point, we of course were notified. That this was the situation that was unfolding, our SWAT team had deployed first, and they had camped out surrounding the house, so still covert, not showing themselves. Just watch it just watching. And they determined that it appeared that only. Take. Meyer Ralph Take Meyer and his wife were the only occupants that they could tell inside that house, but they weren't hundred percent sure at this point. My squad was notified of course, and we were told to respond to this location, so one of the agents on that squad Bob Nevada. had been assigned to take me out to that location, so we were supposed to pair up and drive out to that location. We take the hour plus drive to get out to rural Kansan. We hatched this plan. where US and two other agents, we're going to make entry. We were going to go up to the door. We're going to knock and announce. And so the four of us now in the early morning hours go to approach the door. COURSE SWAT team is still surrounding US and providing. Cover your the entry team where the entry team. And so we're not sure what to expect because there's nobody around. There's no close neighbors or anything like that, so we're not sure if they know were coming to. They see us. Have they made our SWAT team? We don't know what to expect. Clearly, these people are desperate because he killed a woman and took her baby. Clearly he's not in his right mind to begin with. But as we approach the house, one of the other agents. Tall agent by the name Jerry. He he saw these puppies come out from around the corner of the House. And what we did know is Jerry was afraid of dogs. And so he pulls out the capstone. Which is pepper spray. He sprays it toward these puppies that are bounding toward us, and these are just puppies. Does they're just puppies? adorable sprays it toward these puppies, which unfortunately on a Windy Kansas morning. That blue right back in our faces, so all four of us now approaching this house gagging, coughing stuff was streaming out of our is explained for our listeners, who may never have been exposed to pepper sprayed just how powerful that is! Oh, it's awful in new agents class. What they would do at that time when I went through was, they would put us on a bus close all the windows I they've had us where gas masks, and then they would fill it with this chemical. And then the idea was that at the given time with the signal. You take the gas mask off and you take that first breath and all of a sudden. Everything shuts down. It's very physical visceral reaction. Your is slam shut now you're salivating. Your nose is running. Your eyes are watering. You can't breathe. You feel like you're gasping for breath and you just want out so as you're about to make entry into the Tig Meyer home. The entire entertain. The four of you are cupboard pepper spray. We are and as a result. Thank goodness there was. A lot of win that day so could have been worse. We could have been in an enclosed space, but still we are not in good condition to make entry to this house. Go in, we have to go in. We're already there already been exposed. They could have seen US right out the front window. Approaching by now we go up to the front door. We knock, announce ourselves and immediately as soon as we can get entry into that door, make entry. And I look over to the left, and there is his wife sitting on the couch with the baby. And so as much as I could see I walk toward the couch quickly with the other female agent, we ended up getting handcuffs on her arresting her, and then at that point I take the baby and I'm able to see that. She's covered in Lice. It was filthy. The whole house was it was covered in filth, took the baby, and then I was paired up with one of the SWAT agents, and we drove with the baby to Topeka Kansas where medical personnel rating for us and the media. Was the baby okay? She was thank goodness. One of the things that we. We're most concerned about was what kind of? Diseases or problems or even physical abuse that this baby hit endured, and as it turned out, she was fine. And when we got up to the courthouse in Topeka. The Assistant. Special Agent in charge of our field office told me he thought it would be idea if The baby for the cameras because the media was there to cover this recovery. This rescue of this kidnap baby. And so I didn't know how to do that. I was the youngest of five kids had not been around children, and so I actually had to ask the the court clerk's office to show me how to hold this baby. And once they did that I held the baby for the cameras to show that the baby was fine. She's been recovered. and. She was returned. To her family in Colorado. We get support from nets suite by Oracle. The world's number one cloud business system. America's ready to get back to work, but to win in the new economy. You need every advantage to succeed. SMART companies run on net sweet where they have visibility and control over their financials, hr inventory ecommerce more everything. You need all in one place. Whether you're doing a million or hundreds, millions in sales net sweet lets you manage every penny with precision. You'll have the agility to compete with anyone work from anywhere and run your whole company right from your phone. Net sweet surveyed hundreds of business leaders and assembled a playbook of the top strategies. They're using as America reopens for business. Get your free guide seven actions. Businesses need to take now and schedule your free product tour at nets dot com slash oath. Join over twenty thousand companies who trust net sweet to make it happen. Get Your Free Guide and schedule your free product to a right now at Netflix dot com slash oath OA, t, H, net, sweet dot com slash. You told me that as you look back on the recovery of that child that it was incredibly impactful in that invalidated for you why you wanted to be an FBI agent. That moment was one where I thought. This is why I joined the FBI. Because not only was it of course cool when I toured FBI headquarters when I was eleven years old. But it's because of what the F. B.. I. Represents to protect the American people to defend the innocent and to bring justice to the victims and to hold the perpetrators accountable. And here we had all those things and we had a perpetrator. Who Really I think for the first time for me? represented. True Evil. Up until that point I had in the first three months in my field office I had worked some other cases, bank robberies or extortions, but you could almost kind of see. These people were. It wasn't evil. They had made bad choices. They had done things for the wrong reasons, but a lot of times it was you know understandable. I suppose I'd always described it that most of the defendants I encountered as a federal prosecutor, greedy or reckless. Yes, but the see evil was extraordinarily rare. You would see it in the movies, but you didn't often see it in real life. Yes, that's exactly right and I think that was the first time that I was confronted. With? That wasn't the last. It wasn't unfortunately. There were other instances in. Not, only first office, but in all the wipe fill office. Simonsen headquarters assignments I'd had since then. And there's those cases that just when you hear about them, or you're involved in them. You stop and you think. How could somebody do that? There is no rationale. There is no justification. The only reason they would do that is because it's evil. Speaking of which in April of Nineteen, ninety five. You're still special agent in the Kansas. Field Office graduated from kermit status to amy status. And you're part of team called the evidence response team. Tell our listeners what. Evidence Response Team members do your it team members. Evidence response teams were sort of a newer concept new idea in the early nineteen nineties, because prior to that every agents. Essentially was trained in the basics of crime scene processing, but not given specialized training, and they more part of a team, a core group of people who had to undergo regular training and certification. And so the idea arose and started to populate all of our field offices, and the Kansas City field office formed. It's evidence response team in about nineteen, ninety to nineteen, ninety-three became a member I, did but. The main reason I became a member was not only because I thought it would be kind of neat to volunteer to take on these extra responsibilities, but also because I was dating the agent who was selected to lead the evidence response team for the Kansas City field office. Now your husband, that's right so as part of that are evidence, response team are little fledgling team. was still in the early stages when the Oklahoma City bombing happened our office of being one of the closest ones to Oklahoma. Was One of the first offices to be called to assist and I remember. We got that call early on the morning of April, nineteenth of nineteen five, the bombing occurred at. Nine. Oh Two am. We got the call within a few hours to say that we're going to need some down here and we need particularly your evidence response team, our team and the Dallas field office evidence response. Team were the first to to respond. Would you see? Well at first, we were told to stay away from the scene because they were a hundred percent. Sure what was going on a lot of things happening right then. Timothy McVeigh was ultimately stopped at a traffic. Stop a few miles north. Of there and there was a lot of confusion, and so they told US check into the hotel, and then go to the command post, the command post was located about a good ten blocks away. From the Alfred P Murrah Federal Building and so it wasn't until closer to that evening. When it became dusk, we were finally allowed to to approach the scene. We walked from his fairly cold, too, by the way was April, but and I didn't expect it to be that cold in Oklahoma in April, but it was. So, it was pretty brisk. We walked from the command post the ten or so blocks to the scene, and as we rounded the corner all of a sudden. The view up. And you're confronted with this large building, probably nine stories or more. And the whole front of it has been sheared off. It's gone. And you realize. The magnitude, the magnitude of what just happened and as you look around all these other buildings were in various stages of basically of being demolished, and you had cars that had been incinerated that were in the parking lot and it was. It was surreal. What about the smell? The first thing that struck me was arriving that evening was that. The smell of charred. Things of burnt vehicles or Or papers or buildings, or those types of things you smelled. You still feel the heat really from these things. And several days in continuous process. That's when the decay started his set in. And granted I had been on the evidence response team, and and we had done some for searches for some dead bodies. But it was nothing like that smell. That was an overwhelming smell of decay. that. We were faced with for that export days there was a daycare center in the mirror, federal building nineteen children were among the hundred and sixty eight. Victims. Yes. Back then they had daycares in federal buildings It was a change that was made after words that that was no longer the case, but. Our responsibilities was to search that location for evidence of responsibilities. The evidence response team looking for. Pieces of the barrels that were in the back of the Ryder truck that housed this ammonium nitrate fertilizer. You're looking for the bum for its components right or pieces of the truck. We're looking for little plastic pieces of the barrels wider blue plastic pieces of the barrel we had determined were in the back of this truck or pieces of the truck or pieces of fusing or anything that would help us put this together, and so as we gritted off the area, many many people were involved in the search and the recovery of victims, but then also the recovery evidence. And, so one of our areas that we had to search was the area of the daycare. And I remember we were searching that area. Is during the day, and you get very focused on what you're doing. You're looking at the ground. You're looking through blades of grass, or what's left of it? You're looking through rubble. You're looking through rebar. You're looking through concrete and artifacts for these little pieces of plastic or fusing pieces and I remember i. I looked up. At one point to see where ripe teammates were and what they were doing, and how he's getting a little too absorbed in what I was doing. Want to make sure that I checked up occasionally on status of everybody else. And I remember seeing one of our. Teammates who was actually also on the Swat team that time you could do, both of those things beyond the SWAT team in Ert. And I remember looking over at him. He was kneeling down on the ground and he was holding a baby's shoe. And I knew he had young children. And I watched as he just. Dissolved in tears. And it struck me at that point that. We're so engrossed in what we do. That, all of a sudden, it occurred to me that. What happened? The evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me at that moment. While, we were there to do a job and we were doing our job. There real people. Those were real people who are going about their daily activities of until nine. Oh Two a m. they were having a normal life. And, then that changed because? Of this evil that infiltrated. Their, said He. Where did you go from Kansas City Amy? From Kansas City I had the opportunity to come here local being from Jeffersonville I had always sort of wanted to be back home near my family, and so after nine years in Kansas City a gotten married by then agent on the squad, and what they did at that time was they would combine your time in an average it to put you on a seniority list. My husband accuses me of targeting him because. Because he had a lot more seniority than I did. And so as a result, it advanced us on the the list to get to my home of Louisville a lot faster. You're a squad supervisor I. was I actually transferred to level as an agent, and so did he use never in management, but we both came to Lowell, here as agents, and we worked cases, I worked domestic terrorism and then nine eleven happened. And every field office was impacted by that. Obviously, we all set up command posts. In charge of running our command post here in the local office and it was after that that. My supervisor was removed. And our executive management asked me to apply for the job. Their first job in management than the FBI it was. Not your less. It was not. It was interesting taking over the squad that I had just been a part of in that case, I was essentially asked to now supervise the people who I was previously colleagues with I was working alongside, so that was a little strange to be supervising by peers. That's hard. It was hard I did the same thing as a federal prosecutor freight? It feels. Like one day your buddies and you're going to lunch and you're talking to each other as colleagues and the next day. You're conducting their performance reviews. And puts you in a very awkward position, or at least made me feel awkward, because I felt like who am I to great their performance. Some people become very good leaders. Some people don't but if you become a very good leader, it's almost inevitable that you've had it really good mentors. That's true. That's true. I have been so fortunate in my FBI career to have had some amazing mentors, not just Roger as my training agent, but all these other people who gave me opportunities who supported me or lease made me believe that I could do the job. You told me about one gentleman named. Named John Lewis, who is the special agent in charge of the Phoenix field office the FBI later in your career, you went to Tucson part of the Phoenix Division and John was your boss I was really looking for Tucson to be a special experience for me because I had never been to the southwest before, and that particular field office was responsible for among other things. The FBI investigates border related issues whether it's corruption or human trafficking or human smuggling. And things that I had not experienced, and so I thought not only would that be unique, but also be unique in the sense that it's one of the few offices where you have a resident agency, a large resident agency which in this case was Tucson? And? There was an assistant special agent in charge position. There that was you that was me. That was not co located with the special agent in charge. The person responsible for the whole field explained that structure, the Resident Agency field office a headquarters structure sure in the FBI. Fifty, six field offices, and over three hundred fifty resident agencies are satellite offices out of every field office, and they range in size everywhere from could one person up through one hundred or more for many more in large cities. And so some of those offices, those resident agencies have satellite officer so large that you need multiple levels of management and as a result, the position I had in Tucson was the person supervising though supervisors what we call the assistant special agent in-charge, basically the deputy below the SAC, the agent in charge special agent in charge of that office. All offices have multiple ACE ax. We call them deputies, but most of them are located at the same place where the special agent in charge is in view offices like Phoenix, one of those assistant special agent charge is not co located with the SAC not in Phoenix, but in Tucson correct and was you. That was me if you like it. Oh absolutely, it was a fantastic experience, because not only did I got to learn about all these things that I had never previously experienced including not only border issues, but also what we refer to as Indian country crimes, so crimes on on native American reservations or among native American people but in addition to that. My supervisor was not like right down the hall. Is it was sort of like having the opportunity to run your own office, but you still have a safety net because your bosses two hours up the interstate. And, so he's accessible, but yet you're still sort of on your own on a day-to-day basis now. You told me that John Lewis who I didn't have the. Meeting was not a warm and fuzzy type, but then he was a great mentor. He was John could be. Polarizing to people, some people really liked him and some people really. Didn't, but he was very clear and confident in his direction. I appreciated that. He also was a man who knew what he wanted. And so I paid attention to that, and he didn't know me when he hired me as his deputy as his ASEC in Tucson. But we ought to know each other through that experience and of course. Being the new person I wanted to impress the boss so for his first visit when he came down to visit me a few weeks into my job, I had a whole agenda lined up for him I wanted to reassure him that he had made the right pick that he had selected of the right person for this job, and so I lined out this agenda where we were going to meet with. With this chief for this sheriff and we were going to receive this briefing, and this squad was going to tell them about this case, and we were going to do all of these things and I had a very structured agenda lined out for him and I remember distinctly that he came down that day, and I told him I showed him the agenda and he said that that's all great but the. The first thing we're going to do is visit Ruben and Ruben was. He was a linguist, a translator for the Office for the Phoenix Field Office located in Tucson, but he had not been at work for a while because he had a terminal illness, and you mentioned by the way earlier that about two thirds of F. B.. I. Employees are not special agents. Ruben was one of those people correct not. Not a special agent who is not a special agent. He was what we again term professional staff, but really important to the mission of the FBI critical to the mission of the FBI so his specific job is a member of our professional staff. cordray was as a translator as a linguist. Specifically a Spanish translator Ruben had a terminal illness after many hospitalizations he was sent home. He worked remotely. So he work on his translations from there. So in John said. We're going to visit Ruben I had heard of Ruben, but I hadn't yet. I only heard of him through other people in the office in passing I had A. A big learning curve ahead of me because this is all new to me I'm the assistant special agent in charge for Mississippi all southern Arizona. Have about one hundred people under me. In addition to my folks in Tucson, I've got three other locations with people in southern Arizona and actually up through the western side of Arizona that I'm responsible for so I didn't have a lot of time to get to know every single person, and nor did I have time to know and meet Ruben so John Lewis. The boss is coming down. You have a whole bunch of things that you want to show him to demonstrate your competency, and he just wants to go see Reuben as right. What happened? I tried to convince him that we could do that maybe later or at the end of the agenda. But, he was insistent he was insistent. We go see Rubin. And I gotta say. I was I was a little annoyed because it threw everything off I. Now had to make or have my staff. Have other people make multiple notifications to people who were expecting us at certain times? This is engineering you, amy, isn't it? It absolutely was so my OCD kicked in. And and now all of a sudden things rob schedule, and so we were we were, we were off script, and I had to change the plan for that day. Not that that's bad. It's just annoying. But I still was questioning why we couldn't do this later and so. We drove out to visit Ruben. And I remember we walked up to the door and his wife Mattis at the door. And she was just smiling and so welcoming. But she brought us in to see Reuben, and he was seated in the living room. And a chair. And he was clearly not in good health, but his eyes lit up. We walked in and here's this frail in his. His eyes just lit up that we were there to visit. Him and for the next hour and a half, he asks about his coworkers. He talks about work he's he's asking about. How is so and so and and how is How's their baby in? How is? How is so and so getting the new agent getting along in the office and he he's asking all these questions about other people and eventually takes us into his office area in he. He sort of hobbles into that room. And he shows all these transcripts. He's been working on the work of the. He's been doing and presents it to be too as the ace act to take it back to the office. This is work product. When you had not met him before I had never met him before and so I didn't know what kind of worker he was if he was even working you remotely. That's not a normal thing in the FBI. We don't have too many people who work remotely. especially not from home. Because we have a lot of closed systems, a lot of classified systems, and so that's that's said that's not a normal occurrence, and so I questioned it as to him working at home and yet here he produces all this work that he's been working on despite his clearly his ill health. And while he's doing all that all he cares about is. How's everybody at the office? And asking questions and he's so excited. That were there. And so the rest of the day we go on about our agenda. And this happened several other times every time. The Sec John Lewis would visit. He insisted we go visit with Rueben. About a year later, I am deployed deaf Ghanistan. And at the waypoint when we arrive at the way point in Doha in Cutter I get off the plane and I check my phone. And at that point I learned that. Rubin had died. I returned from Afghanistan several months later, and the family conveyed special it was. That, the SAC and I had visited with Rueben those times, and how thrilled he was to be connected to his FBI family, because it was important to him, not only was his real family important to him, but his bureau family. And it meant so much to him to be part of that and to be seen as part of that. It struck me that. This is the lesson that. John was teaching me. Is that the there's? A LOT! To be, said about the type of work for the FBI does. But the fact that we do it together the fact that we're part of a family the fact that were part of a team as Roger had taught me all those years before. That's the essential element the magic. In putting it together in in making it meaningful, and so John Lewis this man who could be. Difficult or ornery? Those are my words, not yours had the soft side to him. Some people would agree with those words. But yet here's. Someone! He had his priorities straight, he knew. He knew. How important that was, how important it was for us to see each other as people and he made some hard calls that some people were not. In favor of that therefore painted him in a different light to them, but yet I saw this side of him. Where I recognize that he understands what's truly important. Another thing strikes me about that story. I mean John. Lewis isn't visiting Ruben for praise or add elation, or because it's going to be publicized in some way. John Lewis Visiting Ruben because that's what leaders do. That's right. To that point, he didn't mention it. We didn't talk about it. We didn't go back to the office and he told other people. I told other people I told them that. The SEC had us go visit Reuben Reid. Talk about you know the SEC every time. He comes down here. He wants to visit Rubin in a positive way because I saw how impactful it was. But he. He didn't do it for any of those reasons he didn't do it to to gain the respect or the admiration of the people in the office. He did it because it was right thing to do a mess. WILL LEADERS DO? That's right. After appearing on Oprah, thousands flocked to seek the guidance of renowned Self Help Guru James Arthur Ray. He was a charismatic speaker whose unorthodox methods and philosophies promised his followers a clear path to wealth and happiness, but what many didn't know about were his more extreme nothing its. Methods that pushed his pupils to their limits, giving son the transformative experience they dreamed of. And killing others at the end of the show will be playing a preview of Guru the dark side of enlightenment subscribe on Apple podcasts or binge all six episodes and listen ad free on the wondering APP. What were you doing in Afghanistan me? I was the on scene commander for the FBI counterterrorism operations, but that means as I was responsible for about forty people in country. We had everything a range of I individuals doing different things everything from polygraph examiners to bomb techs to evidence response team members to a interviewers, and also we had people helping the military on special operations, Swat or rescue team members tactical operators who were actually on the battlefield. Would you like it? It was an amazing experience. It was something that I wouldn't trade for the world. I didn't have military background. My family didn't really have a military background I at least on my direct family. And so this is the first time I. Had truly been immersed in another culture I've been in the FBI at that point for about what's seventeen years, but yet I had never been immersed in someone else's culture, and so to see not only what we were doing in national security and counterterrorism on the ground on the battlefield. And how important was that? We get that information and we get back to. Our people in the United States are other agencies responsible for protecting America, but also how the military operates and the way they go about doing the things that they do and how meaningful that is. I was very meaningful work, and as part of that process. I also got to meet some. Amazing people, some people on my team who I had never met before, but yet we're so committed to the mission and understood why we were there and others who were like me. It was all nascent to them. They were over there for the first time, and it was enlightening and I'm watching them learn at the same time I am. There was incredible when you get back from Afghanistan aiming you continue to ascend through the ranks of FBI management. We'll talk about how high in FBI management ranks. You went a little bit later. But at one point, you are now running the Memphis field office. You're the agent in charge of Memphis for the FBI. And I know you told me a story once. About an incident that happened there. That also taught you lessons about leadership. I was hoping you might share that with us. Yeah, I was the special agent in charge of the M- field office, because I was looking for of course the next step in my logical progression. And the Memphis field office particularly interested me because then looking for experiences I had never really spent a lot of time in the south in someplace. Like Memphis I mean the the heart of the civil rights. Movement Civil Rights Museum Amazing Place to visit. This is where Dr Martin. Luther King Junior was shot and killed and so I thought this office has reputation for having some amazing work going on, and it had responsibility for not only Memphis but Nashville. And, so to really sort of very different cities. And two different really areas of responsibility, different threats different. Different crime problems to deal with. I thought it'd be an interesting challenge. I was selected fortunate enough to be selected as the special agent in charge of the field office. went out there, and and started along my job, and so as a result of being a new SAC. I made a lot of mistakes. And it was very formative time for me. I was only there unfortunately one year. During that time I had a lot of lessons learned. I, remember distinctly that one day I'm visiting Nashville visiting my folks over in the Nashville Resident Agency the Ra a supervisor comes to me and says hey. I, just got a call from the State Bureau of Investigation. The Tennessee State Bureau invest. That's right the TB. And the TB I wants. Me He's he's telling me the story. Wants us to summon a particular. Task Force. Officer WHO's assigned to one of our squats. We should explain that federal agencies have relationships with local partners throughout the country and local police departments, sheriffs offices will contribute task force officers to FBI or DA or ATF taskforce when you refer to a t.f Oh, you're talking about a man or woman from a local agency working in this case with the. The FBI. That's right could not do our job. Without the assistance of state and local departments, particularly those that assign these task force officers to work alongside us. They are embedded in our offices on these squads and be able to put these cases together. We treat them like agents like the investigators that are permanent employees of the FBI, and so as As a result, some of these task force officers they of course are treated like FBI employees and tend to think of them as colleagues. Your space have access to your systems, and they work with the men women of the FBI. That's correct. We develop lifelong relationships. I personally spent the majority of my agent. Time assigned task forces working with task, force officers and And so you developed very close relationships with them, but in this case the the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation had a concern about one of your task force officers. That's right, so they call the supervisor of that squad, and they said Hey, what we'd like you to do is call that Task Force officer end to make sure that he stays in the office today. And the reason was because they wanted to execute a search warrant on his residence. The explanation behind that that they provided was that the task force officers estranged wife. They were having some difficulty, and she had accused him of stealing property and having it at the residence. So the supervisor wasn't particularly comfortable with this request because he was concerned that this was a, he said she said situation because the t.f Oh and his wife. Were not on good terms, and a lot of accusations were being thrown around, and so he worried that she was making allegations were substantiated. and. He asked me he said. This is a very well liked. CFO as that everybody on the squad and likes this guy. And I'm not comfortable with this. Do we have to pull him in central? The FBI didn't want to accede to the request of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to bring the sky in as ruse, so they could search his house while he's sitting in FBI headquarters. That's right. And so I thought about that for just just a few seconds. Then I thought I came up with a reasonable middle ground. And so I got on the phone with the director of the TV I. And I told him I said look. We're not comfortable with doing this. Abiding by this request, however, how about if we get that T.f owes that Task Force Officers Parent Agency the Sheriff. In this case. He was from Sheriff's department. And get him to call him into their office to get him out of the way today. And so. Clearly the director of the TV I was not too happy. Little taken aback by this. I wasn't cooperating beget. I thought well. I think it's the right thing to do. I was trying to take people side, and at the same time still accomplish. The goal and I thought. Yeah I see another way about this. There's always multiple ways to skin the cat so unfortunately. It was not confined period of time and I I didn't ask enough questions. I didn't in retrospect. I made a decision quickly and I told the. Director that we weren't going to. We weren't going to cooperate. We're not going to help. You can help you. What ultimately happened? They did execute the search warrant by the way, and they did recover property. There was determined to be stolen, so you had a dirty office, so I had that at least less time past what we discovered was not only. was He accused of stealing this property, but also. He was accused of. Selling information to the subjects of a drug investigation. So we had a drug investigation that we were actually working in conjunction with. Several other agencies including the State Bureau. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. And come to find out that. One of the subjects said that he was receiving information about where our target locations were. The subjects are investigations are plans for operations and even worse personal information about the investigators about the agents in the task force officers, including personal information about their home residents, their families their families. And that they were being provided this information by a dirty cop, and we ultimately discovered it was him who's putting people's lives at risk absolutely. Force we ended up making the arrest and taking him into custody. And it was after that that I had reached out actually to the director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation and I I said you know. Can we talk about? Can we talk about what happened because clearly? Mistake was made clearly I made a bad decision on I. WanNa talk through it. You let them down and they were angry with you. Yes, they were to the point where. They had pulled other task force officers that they had Tennessee River investigation off of our task forces. That's how angry they were. To their own detriment, they were pulling task force officers. It severed the relationship between our agencies. And that affected not only just me personally that obviously affected all of the people who? Who reported to me all of FBI's operations in the state of Tennessee, as well as state law enforcement operated absolutely. So I wanted to talk about it. And so I I went to meet with the Director of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, and I thought we were going to have a one on one meeting, and instead he escorts me into a room where there was a table set out, they also pattern himself after the FBI, and you have a director, and you have special agents in charge, essentially the director, his top deputies correct, and so there were as I, recall four or five of his. SAC's. The table on the opposite side of the table. With the chair for me facing them. And then they proceeded to over the course of the next. About our basically, tell me how not only disappointed, but in no uncertain terms. How angry they were! The with elevated voices and Neil with exclamation points I mean they were clearly angry. Were you there by yourself? No, I had my assistant special agent in charge from the Nashville Office with me. But it's. Essentially I didn't expect him to say anything. I didn't want him to say anything. He essentially was just in the room as a witness during the course of this next hour I felt very much like being on a firing squad I received. Really the intensity of their frustration of their anger of all the things they felt that the FBI had not only in the instance where I had said No. We won't cooperate with you by pulling him in that day. But other things that have been for example when I explained what was happening to the rest of the office in an all office video teleconference during a regular meeting that I had I had meetings with all the whole office through video link, so that I get all my satellite offices in I had mentioned this case I'd mentioned that We had a task force. Force officer who you may have heard it was accused of stealing property and having it at his residence. We didn't know all this other stuff yet, but several the TI task force officers at sat in on that video tele. Link a teleconference and thought that the way I presented. It was skewed that it was still taking his side dismissive of the TI correct. I didn't feel I did it that way? But that was their interpretation, and so I got to hear about that I heard about does the clearly the bad call that I made on the front end, and about the relationships that I I suffered, and how essentially that I was unfit for office that I I was the worst sac that they had ever experienced. In the FBI being in their state. And it was damaging it was it was hurtful, but. It was a huge lesson for me. In the sense that there are impacts to your decisions. A decision that you think is maybe not that big of a deal where you think. Maybe I came up with a middle ground. You need to think through that a little bit more. If at all possible, you got to get more than one perspective. You've got ask more questions sometimes. There are long lasting repercussions. It took probably multiple SAC's after me to repair that relationship. Because of my decision that day while I absolutely believe you need to take your people side when appropriate I wouldn't trade, that began also ask more questions, and you got to be willing sometimes to make those hard calls, one of the difficulties is that when your leadership position your often making decisions almost always making decisions on imperfect information. Under stress and under pressure of deadlines on the phrases. I commonly used to keep things in perspective. In most of the day to day more mundane or routine things that I'm asked, side on just typical business matters. Is is anybody GONNA die. I mean is it. Is it really going to make a difference right now? If I don't make this decision right now this instant. Burger die if I don't make this decision right now, even though somebody may be just presented it to me as if it's a life or death, or as if it is the most important thing and I've got to have a decision right now. This instant and you don't have time to get other perspectives. What I learned over time is that? Ninety nine times out of one hundred you do is that regardless of how much of a sense of urgency somebody else tries to instill on? You asked lots of questions invite other perspectives. Get dissenting opinions. You still make the wrong decision. Those are unavoidable at times, but at least you're doing it with a better process exactly. Exactly Memphis wasn't the end of your management career. Amy I mean just so our listeners know when you retired from the FBI. You left as one of the highest ranking women in the FBI's history only. Six. Women counting. You have ever been promoted to the Executive Assistant Director Level Kathleen McChesney Janet Cameron Stephanie Douglas Valerie Parlay Maureen Begin ski and Amy Hess. Only six women in one hundred twelve years. To rise to the executive assistant director level. That's right, but that's because. In my view. I was very lucky that I was also very fortunate to have. People who believed in me? Great, mentors, great coaches, great supervisors, colleagues, people who not only. Supported me and it made me look good. But people who gave me a chance? You have a new job now. I? Do I am the director of public services for the Metro governments? So. It was a position that. Was presented to me. That just excited me because not only do I get to continue public service. But it's in my home. Of Louisville I. Love the city. Of being here, I'm comfortable here and the idea of being able to not only challenged myself with new things and learning new things, and about how how local government works after I've been involved in federal government for so long. That was exciting, but also just the idea of of being able to hopefully to do some good. To continue that. Public Service to give back to the. To help the community do miss the FBI oh every day. Every day and I always will. But. I think doing something that makes you feel like you're. Contributing. Giving your life meaning doing meaningful work I. Think whatever it is if you can do that, it's it's fulfilling. Has It's a real honor privileged. Sit Down with you I. have always admired a you and your work. And so thank you for taking the time to talk with me today and same to you. Jack, you're amazing. Thank you very much appreciate it. Thanks to amy, Hess in the wonderful folks that downtown recording in Louisville Kentucky for hosting our podcast. Amy Spent her entire professional life in public serves. Even after her retirement from the highest ranks of the FBI, she continues to serve in the community in which she grew up as Chief of Public Safety in Louisville Kentucky. Following the tragic March Thirteenth Shooting Brianna Taylor and Louisville this year, and after we recorded this episode, Amy was named to lead police reform efforts in that city to reduce use of force incidents to review police policies and training, and to make recommendations on police disciplinary matters by establishing an independent civilian review. If you like this episode, please let us know by leaving us. A five star rating whatever APP you used to listen and ask your friends to subscribe. We are available podcast. spotify tune in. Every major listening. As well as MSNBC DOT com slash the. If you're listening on a smartphone tap or swipe over the cover art of this podcast. You'll find the episode notes including some details. You might have missed. You have any thoughtful criticism. Feedback questions about this episode or others. Please email us the youth podcast gmail.com. That's all one word youth podcast gmail.com. No I cannot personally respond to every email. Please know that I. Read each one of them and I appreciate it. The oath is a production of NBC News and MSNBC HIS PODCAST was produced by PANICO. Fanny, Cohen, Nick, Bannon and Robbie. There are wonderful team. I I'm fortunate to work with them. Bolivia cruiser provided excellent production support as always. Our, associate producer is alison belly. And Steve Lick Tai is our executive producer. This is Youth Chuck Rosenberg. Thank you so very much for listening.

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Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

All In with Chris Hayes

02:29 min | 3 months ago

Introducing: The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this. This amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA Director Leon. Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA. Astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is palpable. Make the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children. And I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City. On April Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol. Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

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MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

One Plus One

03:20 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the DA Chuck Rosenberg. The oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America interviews include former Secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy, Sullivan, the first American woman to. To walk in space and former US, Surgeon General Vivek, Murthy and more these captivating stories reveal what shape these leaders and exemplify what is best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy this preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, air every Wednesday. We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta. The toughest job I had, as secretary of Defense, was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma, city on April. April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at me and I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC, podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

Secretary Chuck Rosenberg MSNBC Kathy Sullivan Carol Lam FBI Murthy CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy Hess US General Vivek Leon Panetta US attorney America NASA acting head Oklahoma United States Attorney
MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

Business Wars Daily

03:22 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorneys senior FBI official and acting head of the DA chuck, Rosenberg the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America. Interviews include former Secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan the first American woman to walk in space former US surgeon general. Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories about what shaped these leaders exemplify what's best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoy the preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes, drop every Wednesday. We choose to go to the mall and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg hosts of the youth podcast. I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People. Who took that oath? Oath made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very. Very, hard on families to stand, there know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding babies shoe I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma, city on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol, Lam when I walked through that door, they would. Would all look at me. I would think to myself I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else. And Former Surgeon General Vivek murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

General Vivek murthy Hess Chuck Rosenberg Secretary MSNBC US Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan FBI CIA Lam Kathy Sullivan director Leon Panetta DA America acting head NASA Oklahoma official Attorney
MSNBC presents The Oath With Chuck Rosenberg

American History Tellers

03:20 min | 3 months ago

MSNBC presents The Oath With Chuck Rosenberg

"You're about to hear a preview of the oath and MSNBC podcast hosted by former US attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the Da Chuck Rosenberg, the oath is a series of revealing one on one conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve America interviews include former Secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan, the first American woman. Woman to walk in space former US. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy and more these captivating stories reveal what shape these leaders and exemplify what is best about our country integrity, civility, service, humility and collective responsibility. Their stories feel more relevant than ever in these extraordinary times. If you enjoyed this preview search for the oath wherever you're listening right now to subscribe new episodes air every Wednesday. We need to. Do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg. PODCAST I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta the toughest job. I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way, former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping nature. The pieces are coming together that unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved ones riding bombs, living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show i. knew he had young children and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five. ninety-five struck me former judge and united. States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now. And by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's.

director Secretary Vivek Murthy Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan Chuck Rosenberg General Vivek Murthy MSNBC FBI CIA Carol Lam US Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan US attorney Hess official America NASA acting head Oklahoma City