17 Episode results for "Amodio"

Australia regresa a Facebook  NTX

Daily Tech News Show

06:25 min | 2 months ago

Australia regresa a Facebook NTX

"The middle eastern three pieces little. He expressed calling for much important but is the dan. Campbell's these part. The gardner report killers winters. Everyone's casino capacity Compatible ceuta mr mrs altos movement. Uganda's it in that has been divas. Calmness don't lower samsung komo mature smart phones. Look what. Gravity does not say also participated as mentors samsung new year and also torture. And pretty all you can losses in seventh us. Does marcus bent roussy. that's influencing caputo quattro porsche and enemies cuarto trimester than does maintain. Who says what's up this is what can this not necessarily show you the rest of the university. We know yemen. Let's not want us to manas. Dispossessed burn when vietnamese his application. What's up implemented. Us was politics battles using netflix boost. Boracay use can look implica- kayla's quintas board said eliminate us this post. The yes facebook. I'll continued platform is wasn't nicholas units on. Just fry them back pace party. In mandela's ladies. Sean amodio spiracy w facebook equitable's communication analysts yahtzee. Almost the needle platform called located era with rafi. Nella and kazan is still those misses acres of yoga cola. Euro interests part of this year rank the music comunicacion. There's even piles for part of the plataforma technology. Microsoft leopardi's orlando neuropathy implemented similar argue. Coronel stra by tablets tally. Fuskus continued on autism. Some some complement your nba police as university. That i may not. What do i news. This is probably correct. Positively unsettles new. Took telefonica back act. Police units manera three mistrial facebook muster up one can take one released by laura that's union funding and the consequences of is the continental our and as soon as it is beautiful delinquencies luckily format. So we'll skip compatibility manila normally. There's another may miss or content profession. The minorities continental promotion ceremony. Me nervous. Most la the gentle cookies innovation options as a fire. Fox like what they get us. Courtesy of as and killing formation dallas cookies compared to enter cities la protection. Totally cookies in the receptionist passages can infamous como cuando thi this but only as young not laying the eunice ballots platform as web in on the letter of this socialist at solicitude as we are not padalino. Continue opportunity of antigua compl- consolidate through skis nominate developing competitive to continue of resist the streaming. Are they an ingredient classification. Knievel as almost can that was put in tallies overdose classifications paramedic i want to join the transcription automatic. I m like wanna stay at least one will treat us apart appeal donyo. It's the. Sean is solar panels and script. I said i suppose you're and this. Not for me. They will buy com. 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Pontiac says we'll continue to all these children in democracy on twitter thrown employed on the super power what was put on a to z. Use promo on this. This quintas own personal. Not accessible newsletters yonakuni. That was at twittercom rapper. Sean hooper follow understand studies peninsula but as owner the in represent anderson was david cicilline unit public. Ken buck this career on honesty. Puzzles for my productivity people the victim in the implicitly nora here and there was a spectacles is still lamentably finance me into this i wanted corporate particular commission for the commercial. You'll they come into the lab on the portability that interoperability that but alas platform this format like the schedules of genre company s. Vdi kills participants in western. Qin wiper. limousine monopole you. I can't is the nicosia investigate that party there will be discussion fondue. Elliot's not just technology to screw it. The daily tech news show onto calm in london. 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Episode 75, Beirut: Jade George

The Trip

51:08 min | 21 hrs ago

Episode 75, Beirut: Jade George

"Only own only The rain is coming down in hamra. Beirut on a wednesday and j j. words. And i are head out to drink. We are going to drink. Let's we're going to drink manhattans and we are going to drink new brownies. Because you drink in lebanon for the same reason. Drink in lima ohio. You can cope in those cups. You get that conviviality that extra five percent burden melting off your shoulders okay. It's maybe a bit of a maintenance high. But you're in beirut. There is an urgency to the drinking. Jade tells me that during the revolution in the fall of twenty nineteen. Everybody's been smoking and drinking more and you know. They can despite the call to prayer ringing from every mosque. Despite hama being the old muslim quarter this is a live and let drink city with the deep bar culture and history of interfaith intoxication. Fast forward all these months later through. Covert and the devastating blast and there's more fatigue and fatalism than ever in beirut but the revolution is still very much needed and also every once in awhile so is a stiff drink so drink like a revolutionary drink like you're spilling out of the stonewall and ready to fight back for good drink like our american founding fathers who were both revolutionaries and drinkers and distillers as well. I will have updates on jade for work during covid after this interview. But for now as deny march out to bar ferdinand and then back to the studio to talk about food and life and publishing in beirut just remember that you can't spell barricade without bar and this is a drinking podcast that is still an forever. One thousand percent behind the lebanese revolution. And everything it stood for. This is nathan thornburgh and from roads and kingdoms. You're listening to the trip drinking with exceptional people around the world. Okay we are on a street called monsoon about streets right behind. This is the old They root lighthouse for black. And white lighthouse. Which is no longer functional. Okay it's pretty across the street to avoid the garbage then Sure i'm still learning the the pedestrian ways in beirut but it seems like courage is An important ingredient plus. Yeah and where we walk into. Now we're walking to further end So this place used to be owned by a different guy than the one that owns it right now. I used to go here When i was in college but then riyadh's would taste bought it from mark And shocking we left the same name And the kind of the same decor as well although they tell you that's lethal when it comes to an and you knew management and the first thing you do is you change the name and you change the core and everything else j. hangouts in college algebra us and very high. I don't think that's the reason we cannot change a monument heritage when we came he he. He's an architect by profession and he came in was dabbling with the whole cooking thing. Do good by james major sweet. I feel like places in beirut because they often the fact that there are places that are staples to the city As part of why also like i. I know what they do Behind the bar in the kitchen. So i really trust general so you tell me the spit. Scott sweet. Solar drive to just started a journey. I like that. Here's a long descent into madness. calcium. Offend as i i don podcasts. Jin chen did on the giving of ferdinand gimblett lebanese rugby. Calling the breakfast so you used to go straight canal you're into cocktail. I feel like my during straight It's just when i feel like when i'm out of order anything addict especially if you feel like somehow the moralists abolitionist will come for this. Life should underground bacon bliss tenable. I mean I hope i'm not wrong. But i would say lightest. I mean lebanon gone through so much and said vars thrive under such condition. And i feel like it's so so much part of our culture to go out and to drain to invite people over to drink. Oh it's really a big part of our culture mean at least for the drinking's part of the club relation. I always said beirut's will put itself on the map for its drinking before it's aided although we have a huge poacher But i think that the drinking culture is is that attractive. I think for for people for people visiting viable pillar society to think about a a nation. That's always you know. Always a hamster wheel. The second gets head out on the surface of the water. It feels like it's johnny again. I mean i think coping mechanism right and we are very social. Mission you love. It doesn't matter what wednesday look wrong. Wednesday seven thirty master onto the afternoon is barely getting started. So tell me where we are now So we're in my house. It is in las paid roots. Which is what in an area called amodio in beirut i recently moved in After i kind of glad to romantic after releasing the cartons sixteenth edition which is titled extinction and it was a three volume set and one of the volumes was covered all these beautiful houses and mansions Around the country mostly in two of the biggest cities in the country. So beirut and tripoli and we talked to these different families own. These houses there they used to be really wealthy but then kind of inherited house and couldn't afford to maintain it and at the same time So calais which is where the carton shop Openness first location was looking for a second location for the coffee. Row street They and they happen to find the ground floor of this house as a location and the second floor was Vacant and i think we got a little over excited and decided to restore the house and move into it It was unrealistic to just move in. Pay that kind of a rent and that kind of fee on restoration so we decided to you know think of how we can afford to stay in it and still take it up And that's how up the idea of hosting friends and friends of friends came about does feel like your romance. Sensors might be like switched up somehow when you say well. We got a little too romantic after. We published our three part issue about extinction. But but i guess that's the romance part is like these are buildings. These apartments these kind of ways of living that are going just out of style but out of existence thought. God damnit like we're going to be the wall against the flood but what is romance. I mean romance by definition comes from. Like an oregon. That's not your brain friend recently. Asked me are you. Romantic about lebanon. And i said what do you mean are my romantic about lebanon. He's like so. Do you feel things about the country that your brain can't exactly explain why you particularly tolerate them and you still go on and on and doing so and i said hell yeah. I'm romantic about levin talking to morning. Yeah i mean it's like you do these things that you would not do. Otherwise i think that's like it in a nutshell right. It's rationality in a way to create some sort of reality in your mind where you should definitely take over the entire second floor and with these kind of high ceilings and a desire to create this unusual living space above a coffee shop. That's going to hold a retail store for your magazine. God what did i do here. Played back to yourself like what are you. What have you got yourself into well. Let's let's Let's go back to the beginning of the cartons. How did it get started. Why felt like maybe perhaps another romantic moment in your life. So i come from a journalism slash food background of work in both industries And then in two thousand ten. I left a publishing And kind of went on a soul searching trip in the us Typical you know wondering what do i want to do next. I knew that. I wanted to write about not burton lebanon but the middle east And why why have a soul searching trip in the us. Did you find any soul was it. It was it was just like i happened. Booked the trip. And i left my job and just coincided and it was like basically working super hardcore and then just going on a trip with no purpose no financial worries and just like a month travelling around I came back to lebanon after that. And i sat with a good friend of mine At the time. And i told her i would like to publish a print publication that talks about the middle east using food as a vehicle to tell stories. That are kind of on the serious sides. So she's like you know. I don't know what you're talking about but i kind of like the sound of that How can i help. This is ron jubran. Who is the creative director of the carton. And so i had five thousand dollars in the bank and I'm like you know what the hell emmy like. Just investigate the process. How do you do it. Like just illegal stuff and setting up the company and and it's actually more difficult in lebanon than it is at a no probably in the us but i'm familiar with the uk and in europe I mean you can publish anything you can go to printing press in berlin let's say And just hand them a file and they'll print it for you. it doesn't work that way in lebanon. You have to have a very specific permits to be able to any printing press. Show them this permit to be able to publish literally anything So we had to go through that whole the barco and Eventually we managed to do so and published our first edition with contributors. Only so i contacted different. People had worked within the publishing industry in food and they really excited. They're like oh we're happier like kind of back in the game Yes sure you know. We'll take photos for you will illustrate will right and so it literally started that way. By the second and third edition people started to see the the product and they were excited because they felt was really honest. You know Writers that usually get commission to do something in the very specific way where like what we have creative freedom we can do whatever the hell we want. As long as we stick to. Obviously a few guidelines and it snowballed from there and at a given time so at a given edition we have to three Waiting lists of contributors willing to for free to this publication. Just for the schwab draw to create. I guess. I mean did food. Media exists in in lebanon in a very specific way before then. Or what did it look like not really. It was just like really cookbooks And i always used to say lebanon or the middle east kind of always lags behind. Let's say the west in different industries at a time. It was like an eighth year. Lag before i mean before social media exploded but with independent publishing slow journalism particularly it was actually not so far behind I remember at the time I was working on the first edition of the cartoon. And one of my writing mentors. He's a british journalist. His name is James montague he had published a book about a soccer and the middle east and he warned us. Like um best new author award in the uk He contacted me. He told me he he was passing through beirut for a night. Sorry i know it's like Short notice if you're around. Let's grab a drink so i told him. Yeah you know actually working on love to run by you. And i showed it to him. And he was like whoa. How do you guys know. But slow journalism. I'm working with these guys on a publication. we've launched a few issues and it's actually delayed gratification. That publishes out of the uk and he uses like damn. You should definitely do it. I cannot believe. I didn't think of this before you did and for me. I mean like. I really respect the sky and he taught me a lot in the writing area. And i was like yeah. You know. we're trying our best to do it. And now it's like seven years later we've published sixteen editions And that's it. That's it not. Shell out say hey listeners. Look it is no secret that i am dying to get back in the skies full-time and you know that when i go i will be doing so fast and friction list with clear. You've seen the kiosks in the terminal. Maybe even the cheerful ambassadors waiting to sign you up for way through. I am a longtime user and an early adopter and a big fan. Clear is the absolute best way to help you. Get back to what you love. They have locations in over thirty five airports across the country making it safer easier and faster to reunite with loved ones or take. That much needed vacation works. Great with project to and right now for a limited time. You can get your first two months of clear for free. Go to clear me dot com slash the trip and use code the trip. That's c. l. b. a. r. m. e. dot com slash. The trip code the trip for your first two months of clear for free clear me dot com slash the trip code the trip now back to the show. What is the carton refer to. What is the name so. At the time. I was me. It was me and three ladies. Were working with me. And we kind of wanted like to autonomously neck think of names and just kind of vote we don't want to. We don't want to stress too much about the first edition because we knew if we obsessed too much it was never going to come out so we said okay. We want something that one works in three different languages in lebanon so french english and arabic sounds kind of similar in those languages. Something that is re that refers to food but is not food in a direct way and that is kind of tactile something that you that is more like you touch you like handle rather than you consume and Something that is essential like it's part of your life but it's it's not there to pretend to be anything and so we all voted for. They were like there was a list. And then we all voted for the cartoon because of cartoons cartons carton of milk carton of eggs It's paper. It's something that is in your life but you don't pay too much attention to and carton in all these different languages sounds kind of the same and we didn't give it much attention and it just like went on from there toby the most carton cartons story that you've ever published so this story one of the stories that always comes to mind is The story of a journalist who got arrested for shoplifting in beirut she was just at a supermarket she kind of just pocketed a lipstick and immediately arrested and thrown into jail with all sorts of people from domestic workers that were accused of doing something they hadn't done to like proper criminals And she was there for weeks with no cord they know phone calls or lawyers or anything to bail out absolutely not because people didn't even know i mean she was married at the time her husband and even know where she was like where they actually had locked her up and the only way she would keep track of anything like the days and hours passing was to this notebook she had she just kept a food journal of when people walked in like time that sort of thing And when she came out we had a chat and then we decided to publish this This journal Like in a visual way but then also a bit about her experience and clearly. It's not about the food journal or the food. It's i mean we have a very Unjust a judicial system in lebanon. Were things like that can easily happen. And people can go like can be locked up for six years with no court date. They could be people that are foreigners and people their families back home. Don't know anything about where they are. Why they haven't heard from them so it was kind of like tackle this whole situation. Jesus you leave for milk in the morning you get a little light fingered then suddenly. Nobody knows where you are for weeks and weeks on end. Yeah well that's good to know. I'll keep my hands in my pocket. Time i'm shopping here in beirut but it's an incredible you know that mentality about this is a food store is quite interesting and as you were putting in the context of james montague. It's it's quite ahead of your time like you. It's not a retrograde feeling about the way to use food as a way to talk about society right that's a it feels very much on the on the cutting edge of what international media trying to do. But you've also worked in high cuisine and like sort of straight up fine dining. What how did you get into that. And what was your. What was your experience there. So i worked in food concept building for a while and then moved around and publishing one of the publishing houses. I worked for Own the timeout. In the in the country and I was food editor and senior editor. Kind of worked my way up the ladder. What is food concept. So it's basically working in a company that designs restaurants From eight azad And then i mean i was. Food was kind of always something that i worked in. Even when i was in college i was a mystery shopper. Just to kind of like free meals and nice restaurants you would just tell stories about what they done in how the service was. Yeah yeah one hundred percent so bad and then hanging out at the college existence yes so basically after that The thing that kind of opened up the world of finding to me was Getting involved in the world's fifty best restaurants awards so Seven years ago. I got a phone call from that. Kademi telling me that. Few people had mentioned my name after The old Chairperson of the middle east stepping down. Because he had moved the moved from the region And then it sort of went on from there. I was appointed as chairperson of the middle east in the kademi. And i think it's just like the world kind of gets you to meet different really interesting people in the food world and you start to see in a different way. I mean i was never into you know critiquing restaurants. I always feel like food should be a constructive thing And for me. It's more more about like the culture and the socio politics behind a restaurant or project but the plus side of being in something like this is that you meet really interesting. People that are doing great things for the industry for the world and for food in general. What does it mean to cover or be the chairperson of the middle east for the world's fifty best. If you're lucky you get a couple restaurants on that top fifty list right mean minutes. not a. they're notorious for having somewhat unequal distribution across the globe. Does that make you a fighter for this region. Does it make you have have to explain. Why certain restaurants should get inclusion. And how do you deal with the region that is also importing so many of these big brands restaurant tour brands to the gulf. Basically which is very different from your middle east like. How does that all work. So i try not to look at it. As like trying to push the region that i represent so much as just you know like trying to use food as a way to push for social change essentially That's a personal. That's a personal agenda The thing is the middle east. I don't need to explain why it's it's really behind on making it to topless When it comes to things like fine dining. Because i mean part of the region is like suffers on growing produce that matches like high-grade restaurants which mostly is in the gulf and then countries like in the levant like in lebanon are going through political turmoil nonstop that you know maybe this is not the highest priority economies never stable. But i think it's just getting voice from the region because part of what a chairperson does is to put together a panel. It's your hired to have the knowledge to be able to put put together a panel that rotates every year split into restaurant tours a food critics journalists broadcasters and just simple gastronomes that travel the world to eat that have the knowledge and experience kind of understand food and then just having these people from the region have a voice and kind of be part part of that pile of voters from around the world. Eventually of course. I'd love for restaurant to make it to the list if it deserves to. It's still kind of behind. I would say if i had to if a had to you know assess that. But that's i don't think a problem like right now. It's not the biggest problem. The region's facing yes. Chief among problems in the middle east is facing. It's probably not their lack of inclusion in the world's fifty best. But so it's interesting though. You're you're not saying that there needs to you. Know evolve fifty best member you really just want to have arab middle eastern voices in the selection of the fifty best wherever they reside. And that's somewhere else and you'll be surprised as to how many people from this region are actually extremely well. Travelled extremely developed on the palate area. And i'm less surprised. Because it's it's all you do humming lebanese famously everywhere on earth you know except perhaps for eleven hundred right of and there's like this. Huge lebanese have always been going outward in kind of creating stardom wherever they go so. It's trying to harness some of that just like how people from the middle east are traveling eating knowledgeable in those things and making sure that they have a voice at the table and the more they're exposed to things like this. The more they get excited about you know. How am i gonna get on this list You know what how. Where do i need to apply game. And it's just. I mean it's a it's a competition in a sense you know but the idea is to look beyond that. I think it's like it's when you look at it from like from a surface of perspective. I don't think you capture the whole of it. I mean it's like everything i think. What makes it are the people involved and then you get to meet and interact and collaborate with people along the way that are just really incredible. Human beings And i think this is what makes mike more makes it. How do you guys do with israel in the context of fifty best middle east so that that used to be considered part of the region but then for the last few years had been discussing the fact that a people from the rest of the middle east and from israel like they're kind of banned from visiting each other countries slow trouble. They can't travel a hundred percent. I mean i. As a chairperson can't even visit the country and people from their can't visit the countries in the rest of the middle east and the people the voters from the middle east of this says i mean this side of the middle east cannot visit there and for the last few years i tried to tackle this point. I mean just to be representative really and then recently. The verdict was To to join israel with the balkans and turkey region because there there aren't bans on traveling. There and the chairperson of that region was kind enough to you know accept and things really's as as part of the no except the join i mean to add one more of country to her region and because it makes sense i mean i mean it doesn't mean it's not like the way divide. The world into regions is creating borders. Right like what is the logic behind it. You need to create a set of rules. Sometimes they don't make any sense but do borders really. That is true. Although there is a combined pallet there's kind of a you know there there could be a shared vocabulary between israel and the rest of molise. It's it's obviously insane. Like are you going to do. Google hangouts with israelis and never actually meet in person and show them the piece of food and you know how are you going to actually experience something on a sensory level with out having the freedom to travel on either side That's crazy all right so you you had spent part of your childhood in the gulf. What was it like for you as a lebanese child is a child of the city to go to the gulf and and go to high school and be a teenager out there So it was like in. This is the ninety s right so it was a pretty close community. I would i be did not look like up w today i mean i literally spent my childhood cycling around to go to my friends houses. You would not even imagine that but it's bourbon experience in what is now the the glitzy metropolis of the desert. Yeah i mean. I had friends from all over north africa. The us all over europe Southeast asia from all over. So i think it kind of helped shape how i view people in the world and and then i think food i mean my my interest in food kind of developed than i had and realize it until people started asking me like what is it with you and food really you know. Ruin the fixed or tell me about the real story. Yeah my mom was a terrible cook. And i realized that that that actually helped it kind of accelerated mine desire to have good food. I remember like every time i got. I got invited to a birthday party. I was really mostly excited about the food that was going to be there. Then like the like the whatever movable chairs or the whatever you call a musical chairs the musical so you were basically like somebody besides my going to be cooking a meal so fired up. Is that like do you lose a lot of face as a as a middle eastern woman. If you're just shit cook or can you take some pride and just being like listen. I've got other interests. Oh yeah my mom still tries to cook for till this day and we're like mom you really don't need to cook great food. I mean you're a terrible cook. I mean I'll just cook for you. You know for change. Yeah and i mean. I think also growing up with different friends from different nationalities means that we got to eat really diverse food over and over again so for some would eat it. We wouldn't enjoy and then like anything that's acquired and so you know here. We are now like eating iranian food and indian food and at a nigerian food. And you know feeling like it's comfort food although it's not really our foods you know but that's a food of your childhood is kind of epcot center in the gulf. A bunch of different bite somehow. Yeah where'd you learn how to cook just from experience. I mean i think Eating around a lot Kind of explains to you. What your expression of food and cooking is i. I would say i i. I like good ingredients. it's a very cheesy to say. And i think any chef or anyone that cooks we'll tell you. Yeah like sure if you get good carrots you're going to make something good but i like this purist approach the cooking when it comes to me not when it comes to what i want to eat i mean. Of course i'd like to eat that. But i i like i like my senses to be challenged at this point Equally as much as i would like. I mean you know typically with someone that works with food per like oh. I'm sorry when they invite you over. Like i'm just cooking a humble mean meal and i'm like what that's exactly what i want a humble meal. That's exactly what i want. So i can enjoy a minutiae. I don't know if you had a minutia i mean it's like the you know the flat bread kind of like a the lebanese pizza as cheesy as sounds like with deserted on top. And it's just like though like like like kind of like a pizza oven and it's baked and consumed as a breakfast here. So if you make me an kick-ass manuchehr. I will enjoy just as much as eating at. I don't know eleven madison. A lot you bring a lot of heat though as a dinner guest people are like oh shit. She's she chairs the board for world's fifty best. And i got this woman some food. Yeah but i mean what is good food right. It's it's it's just like a feel good. Think right it can be. It can be anything like you can get me like a really amazing lou amazingly grown celery and just like salted and we just grill it and eat it. It's not black and white wrote that it does have so much to do with like the context of people who were serving you. How much they. This is the thing about ferdinand. It's great barr. Obviously they're serving delicious things but they're doing it honestly and earnestly a they were bound for hospitality. Clearly so if riyadh and soko or treating you well you're going to. It's like a five x factor on whatever they serve you. That's that's you as a dinner guest. Just don't be a dick about it. Be somebody who. I enjoy being served by and eating with and then suddenly it's a it's an elevated experience. Be honest about it. Like if i go to someone's home. They're like sorry you know. I've got this thing that i could three days ago. I'm just gonna pop like in the oven and heated For me like honest you know. So how do you think about media and publishing in that in that context now because we are in a time of crisis and he's talking with someone else who wanted to start an independent media company and was not able to access their own money from their bank because there's such a hole done funds and he's like i. I guess. I have to wait to which i say. There's plenty of time to lose your money and media like you could start all your money very quickly like you don't have to wait too long to to experience the joy of losing money on independent media but why why why do media and in why stick with it through all of these crises. I don't know maybe it's just like It's like this freedom to include as many voices that are unheard as possible And and this creative freedom for me is always really exciting You know like we've worked with photographers. That have worked for the new york times that that come to us and they're like okay. What are you working on. Let's do it you know we're doing it. We're doing it for free. We don't care and putting them in putting their work in the portfolio just as they do for any huge publication for them. It's just like remembering the fact that they work through this process the way they wanted to work through this process the way they believed they should. And you know to be proud of this piece of work that you know like that feeling when that publication comes out of the printers and you're like whoa you know it's like this feeling that no matter what happens before the second you get in your hands. You're like yeah. This is what i why i do it. You know. it's problematic because it costs a lot of money. It does cause a lot of money you have to print it. You got to pay up front. You have to get the license to be able to print things on paper in lebanon and lebanon is very tricky and every single industry almost because we have such a small population. It's like this big heart community with very small population so unless you end up exporting most of what you do it will not make financial sense and export is a very political thing so unless you have facilities to help you. Export and different like Treaties with different countries and nations and that are willing to import or products whatever. The product is is very difficult and so the second. They don't even facilitate even if you kind of find Channels the cost of exporting is so high that you know you really need to get on your excel sheets and try to make sense of it. And it often doesn't doesn't make any sense to you're talking about printing physically here sending out 'cause it's an english language publication which theoretically can and is sold around the world but just getting it out in numbers enough outside of lebanon that would be meaningful to you is is essentially. Yeah five million people in lebanon. Yeah that's what they say. I mean he goes up and down depends on how how many of the refugees are included in the discount rate It's it's a very small market size for the work that you're trying to do and not all of them are english speakers and we've been asked whether it would make sense. I publish in arabic but at the same time. We're trying to talk about the region. We're trying to talk about the region to the biggest audience that we can talk to. And i think i mean english made sense not because not only because we're comfortable and fluent with english but we felt we can get to wider territories and i mean naturally our biggest audiences are in the us or australia the uk and in europe. And then you know diaspora round. It really is difficult to make financial sense of. I mean we still think we had big wins. I still believe the cartons have been a success. Even if it's not like a huge financial success hey listeners. This podcast is sponsored by better help. Is there something interfering with your happiness or eventing you from achieving your goal. So we're in the homestretch this pandemic or maybe we're not. It is a challenging time for everybody. That's where better help comes in. It is not a crisis line. It's not self help it's professional counseling done securely on line. The service is available for clients worldwide. Can log into your account anytime and send your message to your counselor directly. You'll get timely and thoughtful responses plus you can schedule weekly video or phone session so you'll never have to sit in uncomfortable. Waiting room as with traditional therapy visit better health dot com slash the trip. that's better h e l p special offer for the trip listeners. Get ten percent off your first month at better help dot com slash the trip. That's better h e l p dot com slash the trip now back to the show. What is your dream. What's your goal for the carton like. Would you like to see it become moved in the world that we all deserve. So i'm i think personally speaking i'm very passionate about exploring platforms like working So essentially the carton is as a medium to to explore an alternative narrative around the region. we use food as a vehicle. Different publications different entities used different ways to talk about the region. This i guess is like our language. Food is our language for me out. Really liked to explore different mediums in bringing this narrative to life and having people experience them that way but i would like to continue publishing imprint. My heart core passion. I think is just a you know. I could publish an issue. If it makes financial sense it remains my utmost desire. Well if people tell you to go digital you can tell him to fuck right off. It's a terrible idea. i don't i don't know the advertising market for digital english language content in the middle east. But it's not great you know in the seats. Yeah but i mean it would not be focused. I mean the the idea of going global sorry going digital is to go global right. It's just like this like no boundaries. We have on a very low fire. The idea of launching a digital membership. How that would come about where not one hundred percent convinced. We still debates. I mean let's see. Let's see what happens. But i feel like it's just like globalization. I keep saying especially these tough times that we're going through. I feel like the whole world. Not just lebanon is in this estate of figuring out a post globalization way of existing as they'll be this thing that comes after globalization. You know that doesn't eliminate it completely but kind of eliminates all these heavy downsides of it. I think people want to disconnect more still. I mean obviously in two thousand ten eleven when we're talking about the carton that was one of the things we had on the table like people want to read. They want disconnect they want to touch paper you flip like flick through pages but i think still seven years down the line i think even more so people just want something that is just. There's where they can keep happily put their phones down in a in a way. I feel like we can't make a decision. Until we see what this post globalization world will look like if there's one other place in beirut that people love now speaking in your role as esteemed chairwoman of the middle east region someone who knows who knows of the finer things of life. Listen beirut so calais is a. I'm very biased to kelly. I mean i'm involved with the business. And i also like kind of like an assist business of the cartoon shops actually exists on the premises of the to kelly's exists in the city. So it's easy for me to love it and say good things about it but really very fairly. I would say for a coffee roaster every like a specialty coffee history in beirut it is surprisingly shocking how good the cocktails and the drinks in general are i mean. Value really gets out of her way to put some of the best local wines on the menu. And you know to to just like us local products to explore You know what a estander coffee shop Offering as much as she can. So i'm like. I said i'm not a cocktail drinker but if i am going to go out for cocktails it better be a great experience and i think kelly takes these these boxes. I think to the drinks that come to mind are one that has miss cow based not local at all. But it's called izzy. Smokey legs And i really really liked that drink at calais and then a walk in the more which is made of the the carton and and that that one's got a great story because Is something that you have been drinking as an underaged individual here and this this process of trying to mask your breath after a long night out as a teenager. So how does this cocktail kind of speak to that delightful memory of your of your youth. So it's it's twofold. So when i was a kid and i we were living abroad every summer. We came here my brother and i we got sick because obviously the water changed. The environment changes the second we landed here. We used to get sick and then one summer distant suggested that we drank hot a sec. Just a shot. We were like five or six or seven years old and he promised this will be the cure and it actually worked for the first time like we every time we landed in beirut they gave us this shot of atta children and then it became dislike incredible cure for me so obviously he goes had diarrhea coming back from all and they were just like feeding you shots of hard alcohol so the second we had that shot it just. We never got sick again. I'm not even exaggerating. And so the idea of the the walk in the more. So kelly has a base cocktail and one day we sat down and we were discussing. What could be like a good cocktail without a especially for people. That don't like it. Because i noticed that people don't that don't like a generally don't like licorice because it has this licorice. Yeah so zoar rookie. Right yes so. So how can you get some people. That generally don't like that kind of flavor to you. Know just a digest it in a way and i remember that when i was a kid and we were like like you said we were underage and we go out drinking and we came back home and we didn't want our parents to know that we we'd been out drinking. We would pass by this vegetable store that opened late and pick up cucumbers and just eat them before we got home and because cucumbers are so fragrant. Add a mask the smell of alcohol. I'm so fascinated by this. Because i've never heard that before that. Somehow you know so many weird things that people would do to damascus smell of alcohol on the breath but just like pounding cucumbers shiloh and error nathan. I it's starting to be rude. Basically the the drink is great. It has it has cucumber. But i mean the idea is not just a mask atta it really is a combination of bidders that pops up the all the different layers of flavor in that In the car tonight. So yeah. I think this is what will be having tonight. It's just a little bit of that like that. Hit a fragrance to take it down. So if you're not a licorice lover but you know you can still get into this cocktail. So that's a promise. That's two cocktails. Are as he put it directly downstairs from where you live. You have lots of reasons to root for this place. So let's turn these fucking bikes and build a right. They jade the trip from roads and kingdoms is hosted by me nathan thornburgh. Alexa is our producer theme music by dan. The automaker episode illustration by daisy d sound mastering and composing by ricardo gutierrez. Show artwork by adele. Rodriguez executive producers are me and matt golding also and kingdoms an update on jade. She had to leave that beautiful townhouse where we recorded this episode worship hosted us during our time and beirut it was all just a dream i guess and she has been using one of the two carton locations to host pop ups for shops and other creatives were impacted by the port last so the cartoon lives but the focus for now was on solidarity and community and that is a beautiful with a bittersweet next week it is journalists and columnists gio corey takes us inside the heart of the revolution. The battle born concrete theater called the egg. We will meet you there.

beirut lebanon middle east hamra nathan thornburgh Scott sweet Jin chen ferdinand gimblett amodio ron jubran James montague uk riyadh ferdinand james montague Kademi hama israel
#191: Stopping a Lifetime of Dieting with Savala Trepczynski, Anti-Diet Writer and Social-Justice Lawyer

Food Psych

1:26:17 hr | 2 years ago

#191: Stopping a Lifetime of Dieting with Savala Trepczynski, Anti-Diet Writer and Social-Justice Lawyer

"The episode of food psych is brought to you by online course, intuitive eating fundamentals, if you're ready to break free from diet culture and reclaim the life at stole from you. Learn more and sign up at Christie, Harrison dot com, slash course. That's Christie Harrison dot com, slash course. Welcome to food psych a podcast about intuitive eating health at every size body, liberation and taking down diet culture. I'm your host Christie Harrison and an anti diet registered dietitian and certified intuitive eating counselor offering online courses and programs to help people all over the world make peace with food. Join me here every week as I talk with interesting people from all walks of life about their relationships with food and their bodies. He's. Hey there. Welcome to episode one one of food psych. I'm your host Christie Harrison. And today, I'm talking with the incredible writer and social Justice lawyers Sevala trip ski we talk about how she stopped a lifetime of dieting and started decolonizing her relationship with food. Why pathologising fatness and emotional eating is problematic. How different forms of oppression are interconnected. Why they're so little legal protection for discrimination based on body size and so much more. Can't we share a conversation with you in just a moment? I'm really excited about this one. But I will answer this week's listener question, which is from a listener named MacKenzie who writes, my job involves backpacking in the back country for several days at a time hiking anywhere from X miles to why miles per day, obviously food planning and bringing enough food as well. As consuming enough calories is very important. Even though I'm bringing enough food calorie-wise. I'm still having been Jeppe Assads where I feel like I need to eat everything in sight when I returned from being out in the back country. Do you have any tips on how it could reduce the? Benjamin Assads, given the unique context my job demands. So thanks MacKenzie for that great question. And before I answer, just my usual. Disclaimer that these answers and this podcast in general are for information on educational purposes, only an art a substitute for individual, medical or mental health advice. So yeah, this is a great example of how counting calories does not give us enough food. Right. Your body clearly needs a lot more food than you're consuming in these backcountry trips. If you're binging and binging is almost universally response to deprivation, which is why I say that there are of course, those rare cases where people binge solely as a self soothing mechanism in response to trauma, not in response to depreciation. But of course, because we live in diet culture, it quickly becomes wrapped up and deprivation too because you know, diet cultures telling people you shouldn't be eating so much. My God, you're going to gain weight. You're terrible, blah, blah, blah, right. All the things that dia culture instills in us. And so sometimes what might have started out in those, you know, much rare cases where there's. Not any deprivation to start where it's just purely as a self soothing mechanism quickly gets wrapped up into deprivation as well. And in your case MacKenzie. It sounds like it really is just solely because of deprivation here because you've been out there with a limited supply of food, and you're just not getting enough to fully satisfy your body's needs and desires, which is why your body's making up for it. When you get home by binging because it really is. So smart our bodies are. So smart, they know how to get what they need and they drive us to binge when we don't have enough. And so this really seems like a case where it's clear that you're not having enough. And even though you're paying attention and trying to have enough which is great and rare for people in diet culture, honestly to be prioritizing having enough it's still not working because even when you count your calories in an effort to have enough calorie counting actually doesn't give you enough because human bodies are not machines, and they need a lot more than what some diet culture based system like calorie counting says. They quote unquote, should because remember calorie counting only exists because of dia culture, it came out of the historical development of diet culture around the turn of the twentieth century, and we wouldn't have calorie counting. We wouldn't have this notion that bodies need a certain amount of calories. We would just eat until we were satisfied if it weren't for diet culture and so- calorie counting might seem like it's useful in context. Like this where you're like, let me try to plan out and calculate how much food I'll need because I can only carry so much in my backpack. But actually, we can see here too that it just wildly underestimates actual human's needs. So what I would recommend is packing. A lot more food on those backpacking trips than you have been lake quadruple the amount that you've been allotting yourself. I'm talking about like so much more just so you have an abundance and then eating as much as you feel like eating at every meal and snack and truly eating until you're satisfied and not feeling like you have to worry about having a limited ration of food for. The X number of days that you're out there on this trip. And I know practically speaking it might be tough to carry that additional food in your backpack. When you're on these trips because it takes up space, but it's really going to be so worth it to allow yourself to be more satisfied to bring more food with you. So that you can truly eat as much as you want a need and not feel deprived. And there are also special backpacking foods that you can get that are really full of energy, but packaged in such a way that it makes them easier to carry like, dehydrated foods, you just add water to and you're preparing and stuff like that. And so you can really pack an abundance of food and see if that helps with the binging which I have a hunch that it will because calorie counting again is just notorious for underestimating everyone's calorie needs. And so that goes everyone listening to this right now calorie counting, his underestimating your calorie needs, and it's also ended up estimating McKenzie's calorie needs to ask the question. So then MacKenzie if you're still binging consistently when bringing out additional food on your trips when you have. A real abundance of food on those trips. Then there are couple things that could be at play here. One is that you could be chronically deprived because you're actually restricting consistently in your overall life not just on the backpacking trips. And if that's the case, you really need to stop the restriction and consistently more in life, not just on trips. Although on the trips to write unlikely get some professional help for recovery as well. So I have a bunch of therapists and dieticians who've been on the podcast as I'm sure you've probably heard that I really recommend for eating disorder recovery work, and you can find that list at Christie Harrison dot com slash providers. That's Christie Harrison dot com slash providers. That's kind of a shortlist. It hasn't been updated recently. So it's not every single one who's been on the podcast, but it's like most of the therapists and dieticians who've been on the show who see individual clients for diet culture recovery. So yeah, that is a really good place to start for getting professional help. And then the other possibility for you MacKenzie is that if you start. Hacking like four or five times the amount of food you've been packing and you're still consistently binging when you get home. Some of that deprivation, you're experiencing on your hikes could be deprivation in terms of the variety of foods that you're eating and you might need to start bringing more fun foods, you know, more interesting foods more variety of foods like sweets and savory snacks that you really enjoy. In addition to the more utilitarian foods, like meal foods that you might be bringing now. And so just giving yourself a wider range of food. So that you're not feeling sort of emotionally deprived of the variety that you seek and then Finally I wanna pose a larger question and possibly as somewhat uncomfortable question, which is this are you doing this job because you genuinely love the outdoors and hiking, and that's the sole purpose of your job other than like to make money and live, or is there also a part of you that's doing it. Because you wanna keep your weight down or have over exercise be a part of your job. And I ask that because I've talked to a number of people over the years for whom. Working outdoors was a part of their disordered eating including a couple of guests on the podcast like Sonia. Renee Taylor who's episode. We just reared a few weeks ago and Christie Amodio who is in episode one twenty nine those guests both previously had jobs in outdoor education. And they both later admitted that one of their main motivations for taking those jobs was to try to lose weight and make sure they didn't gain weight and so- McKenzie. I would really invite you to explore that idea for yourself and look at whether this job is something that's serving to perpetuate your disordered eating, maybe. And if that's the case is there some other career path perhaps that you might want to explore that would be more beneficial to your recovery. That's just something to put in the hopper and think about I'm not saying like go out in change your job tomorrow. You might also love it. There might be a lot of really positive things about it. And maybe diet culture or disordered. Eating motivations aren't a part of it at all. But if you're constantly having to move, your body, and pack a limited amount of. Food for your job. It could be keeping you stuck in a place of deprivation and diet culture. And that's a specially true. If one of your motivations for doing it in the first place is coming from dia culture. So I hope that helps and if you want us to make your own question for a chance to have it answered on an upcoming episode, go to Kristie Harrison dot com slash questions. That's Christie Harrison dot com slash questions. And then if you want to ask me any question you want and have me answer at a lot more quickly than I can hear you can join my online course, intuitive eating fundamentals. The course has a wealth of audio and written content. Teaching you the principles of intuitive eating walking through them in depth. Plus, there's an exclusive monthly Q and A podcast where you get to ask your own questions and listened to hundreds of answers, I've given to other participants already so that you can work through all kinds of different sticking points and intuitive eating and really put it into practice in your own life. When you join you also get access to our private Facebook group, which is exclusively for course, participants. So that you can have real time guidance for me and my team as well as hundreds of other great people. Who are on this intuitive eating path, a participant with initials ammo wrote to me and said, I had been listening to food psych for a long time, and my relationship with food had improved but signing up for the course, helped me get to true and complete freedom from dieting and restriction. I'm so grateful. I decided to sign up. I didn't understand how good life could be until I began working on freeing myself from the restrictions. I had been self imposing for far too long. I never imagined. I would be able to answer this segment at the end of the courses. A true intuitive eater, totally free for moralizing food. But I did another participant named Emily said you are just an effing legend since starting. This course, I'm now making steps to starting a business, and that could not have happened without the freeing up of head space that your content has created if you're ready to break free from diet culture and reclaim a life at stole from us. So that you can do something like starting a business or whatever your dream is you can learn more and sign up for the course at Christie, Harrison dot com, slash course. That's Christie Harrison dot com, slash course. And by the way, now is a great time to sign up because. Next month. I'm going to be releasing a big update to the course and price will be going up accordingly. So this is a great time to get in there because you'll get all the content people are loving now from the course, and you'll also automatically get the updates as soon as they drop for free. So it's a great time to get in there. Kristie Harrison dot com slash cores is the place to go to sign up. A now without any further ado, let's go talk to Sevilla trip. Jansky sa-. Tell me about your relationship with food growing up. I think that my relationship with food growing up could be a five thousand page book because it was really complicated really early on probably one of the important background bits of information. Is that I come from a mixed race family. My mom's side is the white site of our family, and my dad's side is the black and Mexican side of the family, and I grew up mostly with my mom. And mostly with her. You know, my grandparents being her parents aunts and uncles on her side of the family, and that that comes into play kind of as things unfold for me as a child, but the most pronounced thing that would Mark my childhood experience of food was being on diets at a really really young age like two or three or four was when I was first aware that I was too fat, quote, unquote. And it's when my family my mom's side of the family started to kind of see that as a problem and attempts to help me manage that problem with dieting, basically, and I went on and off diets I mean, starting at that kind of preschool age definitely throughout my entire childhood. And really until I was like thirty seven thirty sixty her Holt. So anything that you would imagine an adult kind of experiencing who's who's going off. And on diets I experienced also as a kid it's a young kid. And it sounds like you were put on diets so young that you might not even remember what intuitive eating was like like, you probably don't have a conscious memory about. I don't. It's funny. You say that because my entree into this world of liberation or on my body and around food was precisely through intuitive eating which I heard about for a long time. And you know, like, so many people thought well that sounds really great once I'm thin. Yeah. Let me lose a lot of weight. And then I'll try intuitive eating, you know. So I put it off for a long time. But as you know, when you get into it, they often talk about childhood or early child as being a time when you're eating was sort of uninterrupted uninfluenced and really connected to just your own wisdom, and very matter of fact way, and I really don't remember that. I remember feeling like, oh shoot. Maybe there's no way out for me when I realized oh, I don't I don't have a touchstone for that, you know, as a child, but my first food memories are around not eating and saying I didn't want to eat because I didn't want to be fat. And that was when I was, you know, a really chubby maybe three or four year old and had learned from my family that I was fat. And that that was a problem. Wow. That is so pain. Nfl? It is. I mean, I can talk about it matter of factually, you know, this context, but over the years, I have shed many a tear and howled about it, you know, to myself and in therapy, and with my parents and all of that it was painful. Yeah. The sort of earliest reflections, we get of like who we are in other people's eyes come from our families. And when your family is telling you like there's the thing about you. That's wrong and bad, and like the way that you fix that is not eating, of course, they're going to do that. Of course, you're going to think. Okay. Let me like follow the rules. Let me be a good kid. Let me you know, like they want this for me. So let me do that. Yeah. I think the innocence of childhood is sort of heartbreaking in this kind of context because at that age. I I had no tools to analyze what I was being told about myself let. Alone to sort of stake out a different opinion about it. Our even to think about it. You know took question it in any way. So that early early food stuff for me. It was really deeply internalised. I think because I was a little kid, and what could I have done, but just kind of swallow it whole and assume it was true. But then it also had somewhat of a public or kind of performance aspect to it as I got a little bit older. I think when I was about seven years old, my mom, enrolled me in this program called shape up, and it was basically weight loss for kids and part of the program. It wasn't like a camp or anything. It was like, you know, a workbook and weekly sessions with a dietitian or something. Like that. So I just did it all year, basically. Cly year round. But one of the components of that involved, basically like telling people how much you wait and kind of soliciting. Their reaction and their feedback about it. Yeah. So youth is right. So when I was in second grade I remember on Monday. I would I'd have had my way in on the weekend and on Monday in second grade when we had the kind of I circle time of the week. I would tell everyone what I weighed and people would apply if I had lost weight. You know, these are these are my fellow seven year olds like they were just doing what seems right at the time. Or I think the year after that there were some sort of a thing where in the lunch line like through the program of shape up. I was supposed to tell the other kids to help me make good choices in the lunch line. Oh my God. Yes. So other kids would live like, oh, great jobs about Sofala. Like, you're choosing the salad or oh, don't get that hamburger. You know that kind of thing. So. It was simultaneously a deeply private interior experience. Because I was so young. But also something that left me feeling really on display and kind of unsheltered, and and seen in a way that was confusing and hurtful and cost a lot of issues as Holter, I can imagine. Because it's basically like that that program sounds like it was conditioning you to solicit public shaming for your size, and like solicit other people to be the food police. Yeah. I think that that was the idea that was kind of the way that the program understood creating a support system to have a network of your peers supporting you in this attempt to lose weight. I mean, it sounds so backwards and crazy and awful now. But this was the early eighties. Like, it was just a different a different era. I I should say. Because my mom can come off pretty badly in this kind of conversation as my primary caregiver while I definitely have at times been super angry. And then in so much pain around about aspect of how I was raised and her role in it. I've come to a place where I I just understand that she was doing her best, and it was misguided. And it was messed up, but she was trying to to parent me in a way that she thought made sense. And she herself learned all kinds of really really fat phobic things from her mother who learned them from her mother who learn them from her mother. I mean, literally, we have stories, you know, going back generations of this kind of behavior and mindset, so she didn't make all the same choices that I would have had her make, you know. But I don't want her to be Vilnai's. Sd either in this in this tale. Yeah. That makes total sense. And I think it is. That's just such a good illustration of why this is a systemic issue in a cultural issue and not just an individual issue. Yeah. Of course parents want to do right by their kids. Of course, they you know, she thought she was doing the best. She could because I mean, God to at the time like the early eighties was a heyday of dia culture. Like that was when everybody was doing aerobics, and like low calorie and low fat and everything was kind of in full swing. So that plus the generational transmission of basically, the trauma of dieting sounds like it sort of inevitably pushed are to push you in that direction too. Yeah. I think that's exactly right. And I would add to that the waspy -ness of her family wasp, white Anglo Saxon Protestant aspect of her her upbringing and her culture. There was an aspect in her. Family that was just extremely fat phobic in the way that you, you know, kind of imagine like an old New England moneyed families to be and that's the family that I was around most as a kid my dad's side of the family, you know, as I as I was saying earlier is black and Mexican and culturally in a painting with a broad brush because people are people, but culturally, there's much more acceptance and celebration, even of body weight and body size diversity and people who are fat. And I use that word just as a descript are about myself or other people in my family. So had I grown up on that side of the family. I think there would have been problems of some kind, but probably my body size, and my body weight wouldn't have been one of them. I'll never. Forget when I was like ten years old my dad, and I drove to LA to see his sisters and one of his sisters when she saw me get out of the car, and I was very tall. And big boned an fat at that time. She looked at me and her face lit up and her arms, you know, open up to give me a hug, and she said, oh, you beautiful Amazon. And it was like the first time someone had anything positive about my body. So I was coming off the holidays with my mom's side of the family where you know, I had to do the trampoline before dinner, and I couldn't eat certain food, and everyone they're very openly talked about how big I was getting to a really really different kind of embrace of who I physically was. So you know, it's something to reflect. On can't undo the past. But there was definitely a kind of ethnic or cultural or racial component to the dynamic as a as a child that I was experiencing too. Yeah. That makes so much sense. How was it for you to to have your aunt say that what did you experience in that moment of being given positive feedback for your body? Well, it's the only thing I remember from that trip. Except for peach cobbler that we made a little bit later. But you know, that says something in and of itself that it has stayed with me, I think it was just a revelation. It was I didn't quite know what to do with it. But I knew that it felt really really good. And there were no strings attached. You know, it was like somebody giving you like the keys to a brand new car with no strings attached. You know, like seriously. That's how you really feel and there's no foot. No, there's no parentheses there. No, he would be beautiful Amazon if you lost pounds. You know, it was just totally free. And because it was free. I think it was really freeing that auntie Renee just Saami away that I had never seen myself. And it didn't stop the cycle that I was in you know, because I went home. Then back into the to the routine in the grind of dieting that that I was on as a kid, but it was some kind of a little seed, you know, or like a little jewel that I kind of kept in my pocket. And I would definitely think about the fact that she had seen me that way all the time as I was younger, and you know, even now I think about it. And I think about it when I look at my daughter, who's a little one she's four years old almost and she definitely has my blueprint, you know, like from my dad's side of the family of just kind of a dense thick kind of build, you know, and and a big kind of build, and I see her, and I remember what my aunt said someone that way. It feels like it was just three seconds of time. But you know, it's really lasted decades for me. That's incredible. It makes me think of the research that just came out. We recently. I think showing if there's even one person in a child's life who gives them that kind of, you know, just glimmer of hope that like their body is okay. It can make a huge difference in their in. You know, maybe not keeping them from necessarily falling prey to diet culture. But maybe somehow helping them come out of it years later or just giving them a little more self esteem along the way. Yeah, I love that. I mean, it's it's just a little tiny tiny window of possibility. You know, or that's what it was at the time. And then as I grew up and started to pull my energy, and my time away from dieting it was like that little window was opening more and more and more and more, and I wouldn't say, I'm cured. And now I never ever ever think about these things anymore. But absolutely that moment was really meaningful for me. Yeah. I'm so curious to know how. How you got from there to where you are now. Like because it sounds like really dieting was all you knew for such a long time. And that was that really almost the word that comes to mind is like that colonized your relationship with food. Totally. Yeah. And so how did you kind of like decolonize that while I'm still decolonizing it? That's the first thing to say. And I think that I probably will be for the rest of my life. And I have a lot of peace around that, you know, maybe not maybe one day I'll wake up and really be like, oh, man. It's over I'm free. But I think I spent almost forty years in that place. And I just accept that. Whatever that road looks like over the next forty years is probably just part of what my experience on this planet will be and so I can bring some curiosity and kind of spacious snus to it. But the way that I really stopped dieting was sort of not by choice, actually. As I look back. It was it was really was not by choice. I mean, I had a baby and I gained weight and pregnancy big surprise. I did not lose any of the the weight that I gained and pregnancy partly because I think I tried but wasn't able to breastfeed. And so I switched to formula pretty early on. And you know, I don't know if this is always true. But a lot of women talk about breastfeeding helps them lose the baby weight helps them, you know. Yeah. Exactly. So I didn't breastfeed, and I also had intense post-partum issues that required medication. And as you may know any depressants in that class of medicine, they often caused people to gain weight or make it impossible to lose weight. So all of those things kind of stacked on top of each other put me in a place where I felt a really panicked desperate urgency to lose weight. Like, I mean. It felt like the walls were closing in, you know, and I was sort of scrambling with my nails trying to climb up them to get out of the room through a hole in the ceiling. That's my thoughts about my body size. You know, and I think when my daughter was about six or seven months old. I started really rapidly cycling through every diet. I could get my hands on all of them. I had already done at some earlier point in time. You know, like, I am a true that are in. And what I found was that I could do it for AB two weeks. And then I just couldn't do it anymore. So that's that's what happened with Weight Watchers. I was like, okay. Well, Weight Watchers that didn't work maybe I just need Atkins. Maybe there's too many choices on Weight Watchers, and I need something strict are so let me try. Atkins not lasted a couple of weeks. And then I was like, well, maybe I don't like eating all that meat. Maybe I should be vegan, you know, and on and on and on and over the course of I don't know, maybe two months it. God's will point where it was like I pick a diet, and I could be on it for like four hours. I would find myself like in the kitchen, you know, as as the bell FOX and Duke says like face down in a pan of brownies like it was like muscle fatigue. It was like I just can't this is so weird. I just can't I can't do it anymore. I don't understand what's wrong. And I had I guess, I guess you could say, you know, water heat, slowly and boils, suddenly so this was kind of the water slowly heating was me going through all these diets with like a shorter and shorter and shorter amount of time that I could comply with whatever the rules were and also increasing anxiety and fear and desperation, and then I was walking to school. I work at a school so walking to school one day. And I was wearing this foot boot like, you know, those little it's not like a cast, but it's like a gnarly black velcro moon than state. Is your foot yet like a walking cast? Yeah. I was wearing on those because I had injured my foot trying to get activity points Weight Watchers, and I injured it still badly that I had to wear this cast for I think it was two or three months and couldn't work out very ironic. But anyway, I I was googling as I very often. Did like I'm talking like several times a day. You know, whenever I was kinda standing in line with my phone doing nothing. I would do goal, you know, safest way to lose weight or best way to lose baby weight, or you know, whatever. And I pulled out my phone, and I started to type, and I I just couldn't do it. I don't know how else to describe it except to say that like my fingers just froze over the phone, and I had this feeling kind of slowly welled up, you know, and the thirty seconds or whatever that I was standing there. And I just had this feeling inside of me like. I cannot do it anymore. I just cannot do it any more. I mean the way that like true muscle fatigue. Feels you know when like you cannot do another sit up or lift that weight, you know, one more rep. And I had no idea what that meant. I mean, I had never even it had never occurred to me that I might have any time in my life ever that I wasn't dieting or trying to cling desperately to the weight that I had lost on my last i-it. So I had no idea. What that meant. I must have been kind of scary. Because it was it was like all you had known. Yeah. It was it was very scary. And I mean, it's kind of funny now. But one of the things that was so scary that I like the first, you know, one of the first thoughts I had was oh my God. If I stopped dieting, I'm going to gain weight. That was the real scary nece early on. It's like the God. I mean, all roads lead to this problem. Right. When you're in is so deeply wrapped up in it. But condensing the next few weeks eventually I stumbled back on onto intuitive eating, and I ended up signing up for a course with this. This place called be nourished in Oregon. I know, you know, them pass podcast guests and friends of the show. Yes. Indeed. So that was, but you know, what even that was really scary. Like I signed up, and then I couldn't do it. And I emailed the Adleman. And I was like I signed up for this course, and I've paid and it starts tomorrow. But I think I'm going to be going on a lot of business trips this summer tall lie. Could I possibly get my money back? And they were like, well, we won't give you your money back totally reasonable, you know, but you can have a credit for the next time. And I did that a couple times. Before actually being like, okay, I'm gonna take this friggin course. And see what happens. I've totally had people do the same thing with my intuitive. Eating course and Mike. I get it. You know, like this is this is scary. It's a big commitment. And and, you know, the ones who end up coming back and like actually doing it at the, you know, end up saying like, yeah, I really wasn't ready. And I just needed to like circle around this for a long time before actually realizing that, you know, this was the what the path that I needed to take and I get it. 'cause it's I mean when you haven't known anything else, and when you're desperately afraid of weight gain because of what you've been taught by diet, culture, and your family and all of it. It's like, it's terrifying. It's so terrifying. And I I've loved that idea of like circling it like. Exactly what I did and blessed them for letting me like eventually sign up and not just being like, okay? You're a problem customer go away. Because it was the beginning the the beginning of real real progress. And the very beginning followed that up with a lot of other stuff, and I've even done like, a refresher course. And I'm always on the lookout for you know, other things that can kind of bolster my skills or give me a new way to exist without dieting, you know, but that was kind of the first hand hold or foothold. I got into this kind of dark wilderness that was life without dieting. I'm curious how that even happened like where you just googling around this general area of like how to not diet in the in those couple of weeks and then stumbled onto nourished or like you. How did you sort of decide to take that first step into that world to begin? Well, so I found them at that point by googling intuitive eating and like going through various rabbit holes on the internet. And then stumbling upon the course that they have. But I had heard of intuitive eating, you know, way way before then like years and years before then but just felt like it, you know, there's no way I'm going to do this until I'm thin. And then maybe it's a good maintenance plan, you know. So I went back to that concept, and somehow, you know, their website popped up. Well, that's amazing. Very lucky. I know, and it's amazing to how many people have intuited like seed planted about intuitive eating and just aren't ready for it. You know? But like the the concept is out there. It's especially now, I think becoming sort of trendy for places to write about it, even though they don't get it. Correct. Because off. Sometimes it's like, oh, this is the great way to lose weight and like maintain a permanently or whatever. And it's like that's not what this is about. But there is some of that out there. I mean, right. Like, you will find people who have you know, that's their business is kind of intuitive eating for weight loss. Yup. So it's definitely out there. Be beware us. You're calling this listeners. That's out there for sure. And that's kind of what I think a lot of people who are first starting down at road. And don't really know what it looks like an are very much just coming right out of diet culture. I feel like that's almost the first step of intuitive eating a lot of people take is like getting into Janine Roth or like these other sort of iterations of intuitive eating that are geared towards weight loss, which isn't really intuitive eating. But like, you know, it's sort of like twisting intuitive eating in the service of diet culture. It is and I have to say with all due respect to Janine Roth and no shade to another woman who is trying to make it in the world. Even when I was in the throes of dieting, the kind of gospel Janine Roth. You know, it it really I did not like it. I really chafed against it. Because I mean, literally because I heard of her through Oprah. She was on the Oprah show at some point and Oprah maybe not anymore. I have no idea, but back then had a real she was really wedded to this idea that inside every fat woman is a thin woman. You know, like she said on her Weight Watchers commercial, and that fatness is a pathology. It's a sign of something. There's a reason for it. And the reason is dark in. Oh, and I just I chafe against that. I bristle it just made me really uncomfortable. And so I never really liked Janine. Roth. I bought the bucks. You know and thought maybe they'll work, but some part of me was like, oh, I don't like this. And I look back on that now. And what I think was happening was some part of me understood that my body is what it is because of my jeans. I am in the body. I'm in because this is the kind of body my dad had and the kind of body his whole side of the family has, and this is the genetic blueprint that I inherited so while I certainly had pathological quote unquote relationship with food at certain points in my life. It was because I was dieting because I was fighting who I actually naturally am. It wasn't. Because who I am is unnatural. You know, what I mean has that is so well sad while thank you. Thumb part of me. I couldn't put my finger on it at the time. Some part of me, I think knew that. And so I never really I never really really liked that message that she Oprah kind of had about the pathology of fat people. That's really great that you had that intuition. It sounds like there's a part of you. That was taking care of yourself actually by not getting sucked into that. That idea that, you know, you're fatness was because of some trauma or pathology in you while I knew I knew that it wasn't on some level. You know, you would hear stories of sort of very often in the kind of like we lost kind of issue of people magazine, or whatever they have a woman who is innocent body but used to have a fat body, and she's telling her story and very often. They're some kind of like moment of crisis after which she. Starts over eating. You know, somebody died or she suffered some kind of violent crime. There's something happened that was really awful dark and itself sort of traumatic and the way that she coped or covered up the pain was through eating am. I just knew that that wasn't that just wasn't me. Just just just had not been the facts of my life. So there had to be another way to understand fatness. 'cause I was fat. And that wasn't that wasn't why. Yeah. You just knew that that wasn't your story. Yeah. And I think those that story can be so toxic for people who feel like they do see themselves in that to some degree because it's like, I think a lot. I mean, I know from a lot of clients that I've had there's definitely sometimes an inciting incident for people where they're like this is when I feel like I started using food for comfort. This is when I. Started binge eating or whatever. But also when we sort of peel back the layers and look at what was going on for them before that happened. I would say in the vast majority of people that I've talked about this. There was always fat phobia. I yeah, that was predating and often. I mean, we know this from the research to like people who are dieting and who are deprived of food have heightened sensitivity to food as a stimulus and heightened sensitivity to the reward values of food and so- moments of trauma where you need some self soothing and like a reward value. You know, if you're already dieting, you're already deprived or already self stigmatizing about your size food is going to be very salient way of self soothing and those moments and also even if you're not doing it with any sort of history of restriction to start even if it's like in those sort of rarer cases from what I've seen of like people who just sort of turned to food as an emotional coping mechanism. From trauma in the absence of any fat phobia. I you're still living in diet culture. And so you're still getting the message from diet culture that like oh my God. You're what you're doing with food is really bad. It's making you gain weight, and that's bad. So we have to police your body. You know, usually like the hammer comes down pretty quickly after even the most innocent kind of turning to food for comfort. So that it just exacerbates the entire situation. You know, it's it makes a problem makes into a problem something that wasn't a problem. It was just like a coping mechanism. It turns that coping mechanism into something pathological when it isn't really a painted as pathological. Yeah. That's spot on. And I don't dispute any woman who says I started to you know, overeat or you know, whatever because of something traumatic. I mean, if that's someone story that's their story. I just knew that it wasn't the only story. But it was the only story we heard it was like there has to be more out there or more to this. But we at least in that time that was the only show in town. You something bad happen to you or your messed up. And that's why you eat too much, and if we can just fix it. Then you can be a thin person that you're meant to be right. And I think that really I mean, I've been doing some research on the history of diet culture for my book because I have a chapter on kind of like, how did we get here, whereas diet culture from what lies the thing, and that idea of emotional pathology causing people to gain weight seems to have roots in the sixties with like a psychologist named hill, the Brucke who was very popular at the like, you know, really sort of started the whole idea of quote, unquote, childhood obesity, and had this theory that people that mothers over feeding their children or substituting food for affection like with emotionally withholding mothers would like substitute food for a faction and the children would take the food as a substitute for the affection and therefore over consume at quote, unquote. And that's where fatness came from. And that that idea really of took hold because all ready, diet culture was had been in full swing for like seventy five years at that point and people were increasingly like any diet because diets don't work long term and more and more people were getting on board the diet culture train than it was like oh God. Why isn't this working? There must be. You know, there's there's something wrong with me, basically that I can't do this. And that that explanation was sort of like, an easy it just like dovetail nicely with the interests and the aims of the diet industry where it was like. Oh, yeah. It's because of because of you because you're emotionally broken because like you're addicted to food or you're an emotional eater. And was a really convenient way for diet culture to absolve itself of any responsibility rather than having people wake up and be like, wait. This doesn't work. I'm actually gonna stop doing this thing that has failed me. Yeah. I think that well for so I can't wait to read your buck. Why didn't know any of that? But like it's a one two punch, you know, because the the diet industry, you know, as you know, they tell you what's your problem? And they're also constantly kind of dangling, this vision of some future, you, you know, that's incredibly seductive. It's it's a really vicious cycle. You know that the different aspects of the Diane culture, diet, culture reinforce other aspects of it totally like the carrot and the stick. Yeah. Exactly. And I think I mean, it has been really really recently like in the last few months that I have stopped while I shouldn't say stopped. But that what I think about myself in the future. It's just me. What I look like now or I don't even really think about my body size in body weight because it may change in the future. You know? I mean who knows I may be heavier. I may be lighter in ten years. I don't know. But that sort of. Like a ghost or like an apparition or a promise of a thinner person. A thinner you is really really seductive. And I think that the diet culture like pushes so hard like every time you see a commercial for Weight Watchers, right or anything aimed at women, basically. Yeah. That it's really hard to let go of. I remember when I met the guy who I ended up marrying. I started Weight Watchers after we'd been dating a few months, and I remember telling him kind of like reassuring him, although he wasn't nervous about this. I was kind of reassuring him that. Yeah. He was dating a chubby girl. But really I was skinny girl and like I'm back on the wagon, and I'm gonna get there. You know? And he was kind of like, okay, whatever, you know. And then if like fast forward like ten years and like a year ago. I remember saying to him actually, Honey. I think you married a fat girl like straight up, and he was like all right. I down with that. But to me, it was like finally letting go of that idea that there was some person trapped inside me by my evil gluttonous appetites, you know, and instead just being a little more accepting and relaxed about what my body might look like or way or feel like at any given point in time. That's huge. And the also that's really nice that he was so accepting, and it he wasn't invested in your size at all. Like you found. Good one. I did find a good one. Thank god. I didn't ruin it. Because I used to quiz him early on. I was skeptical like well have you ever dated a really fat girl? Have you ever did a really thin girl? I was this way about race too. I was like have you ever dated other black women? I was simultaneously afraid of being a fetish, you know. But also distrustful that he actually found me attractive. I mean, it's like such a mess. Like, oh my God. I don't know how it worked out. We does. But me was always, you know, I don't wanna say neutral because of course, you want your partner to be maybe a little more of a neutral about your books. But he always found me attractive in the blah, blah, blah. But was very kind of like mystified about this weird obsession I had with kind of ferreting out whether something was wrong with him because he liked my body. You know, it's just man like they don't make it easy for. I don't think they've really don't. And that's I feel like that speaks to how like socialized. Unfortunately, so many women in films are to thinking that like if you're in a relationship with assist man that are, you know, a male person of any variety really like a masculine person that they are going to want you to be small. That's the line that we're given and just like in so many subtle ways to like, the princesses, and the Disney movies and all of everybody, you know, it's we're told that from birth, basically. And so like, I think when men and masculine folks have a different preference. And there are so many out there who do who just don't care don't give shit about the size of someone's body. It just sort of doesn't jibe at like does not compute in the brains of those of us who are socialized to think. Like, nobody you show at you're supposed to want me to be thin. You know, totally. It's very unstable ising. I think and it made me really nervous for a long time and occasionally. I still do feel nervous about it. Just because those neural pathways are like five lane highways for me, but it's so much softer than it used to be like, my grip on that has really softened. But I think I mean, what you said reminded me of another thing that was really crucial for me had to do with racism, and you know, the way that we kind of normalized and elevate whiteness in so many ways in our culture, and, you know, this idea that a man, and I use the words man and women inclusively that a man is supposed to like a thin woman. It's very white. You know in a lot of the Brown parts of the world or Brown cultures. That's just not the case. So something happened to me. I don't know exactly where it came from. But I began you know, maybe like six or seven. Months into my journey toward liberation around. Wait, I began to see how much of my fear of of my own body size in fear of fatness. And let's be honest. It's sort of disdain for fatness and others. I sometimes felt projected onto them was really really tied up in, you know, call it what you want racism white supremacy that they were cousins for me. And I started to see the lot of my fear of being fat was actually fear about being a fat black woman to be accurate. I needed the black woman to be part of it too. Because of stereotypes of like mammy and kind of the big Stasi tough workhorse black woman that are so flat, and dehumanized and sticky in our culture. And I saw that like. Like if my husband were black. He's white if he were black. I wouldn't have had the same concern about whether he genuinely liked, you know, my chunky fleshy legs, you know. And so I started to put these pieces of the puzzle together. And then it became like for me. Anyway, then it became like political. In addition to personally important for myself Asian at also became kind of like disgusting to me on a broader political level that it hadn't been before. And I became more committed and more tenacious to some how by Hooker crook, freeing, myself from diet, culture and all the stuff that comes along with it. I'm so glad that that you did you know like that that came to you because I feel like that connection between racism and body size has been. So obscured. And that's another thing like the history of diet culture of looked into is like really it did come out of this sort of eighteenth mid eighteenth century late eighteenth century like ideas about race, basically, and the sort of fake racial hierarchy that was created at that time to justify the pre existing oppression of people of color and black people already that existed. It was like, you know, now there was this supposed collusion airy. Justification of like, well here the more evolved races, and here are the less evolved races. And like those ideas started to get popularized and Sabrina strings who's a professor of sociology. I think I'm going to have her on the show soon too. But she talks about like fearing, the black body came kind of thing at that point in history. I can't wait for that interview to come out. But yeah, I mean, it's obscured. But then once you look at it, it becomes pretty clear. It's like, oh, wow. These things are really really connected, and I don't want to be part of it. You know, I just don't want to be part of that. I don't want to pass it to my kid. I don't want to do it to other human beings, especially women, although men deal that too. I just don't wanna I don't wanna do it anymore. And so the more reasons I have not to do it the better because the culture is always tried to kind of get you back in yet. It has all these sneaky ways that attracts to pull you in. Oh, it's not a diet. It's wellness like oh bane of my existence Weight Watchers with their like WW now or something, you know. Oh, fried chicken became KM. It's like, it's still fried chicken guys. I know. Yeah. That's that's just so cool that you're going to have on your show. That's amazing. I know I'm so excited. I've really it's just I mean, I think that's part of like the history of diet culture to that has not been explored enough, and that like another scholar, you know, maybe five or six years ago had written a book that included a lot of that stuff. But she'd Sabrina strings like really digs in like it's so detailed and such incredible history that I had never really read about anywhere else. And my blowing people are probably more ready for it to. Yeah. They were even five or six years ago. That's so true. I mean, I think one one thing about like, the Trump the post Trump era really is that it's like woken a lot of people look at a lot of white people up basically to the racism that has always existed in this country that I think a lot of white folks were able to just be like, oh, we had a black president. We're good now. You know? It's like, no. Yeah. Totally so now. Yeah. Now. The time that we're ready. That'd be talking about this stuff. Yeah. I think so too. It makes me hopeful, you know, for my daughter, like even just the fact that there's Instagram and anytime I want to I can go find images of fat people that sort of suit, my taste in my style and reflect me in some way that I like when I was younger when I was a teenager. It was literally impossible. It was just literally impossible. You know? I don't think I saw people with my body reflected back to me in a neutral or positive way on any kind of a regular basis until I joined like tumbler Instagram like five years ago. You know? Yeah. And I think like, oh, there's plenty about social media in the future that really scares the hell out of me. But you know, I think about my daughter, and that she she will have challenges with social media, but that will not be one of them. Hopefully, you now is she will be able to see herself reflected back to her from the world. And also to have you modeling a different way. Like 'cause you you've now broken the cycle. Not that it's like not that you're fully there and that anyone ever fully arrives anywhere. Really? But like, you know, but you you now have that awareness, and you're working toward not being invested in diet culture anymore, and like that's such a gift that so many people don't get in that you didn't get from your mom or that. She didn't get from her mom. And so that's pretty amazing. I wish I could say she was my inspiration. That would be kind of like the beautiful appropriate thing to say. But when I started this journey, it was it was just my own desperation and panic and sense of being like totally wrung out and worn out. Of course, it's a beautiful. Happy fact that I think it also makes me a more loving mom. You know, not that my mom left me less. But then I'm able to see my daughter and see myself around my daughter without those kind of fat phobic is, you know. Yeah. You can treat her in a more loving way with regard to her body. Yes. Exactly. And we follow this idea about the division responsibility with food. Have you is that ring a bell yet? Totally. We've talked about it a little on the podcast the Ellen sadder approach. Yeah. The Ellen sadder approach. Good old Ellen. Just great. You know what we do? We. We just don't comment on her food or her appetites. We might talk about like, oh, it's not crunchy or. Yeah, we're hungry. It's time for dinner, or you know, whatever, but we don't and anyway, police how much food she puts in her body. So we think of it as our responsibility is kind of to put the array of food on the table or in her lunch box or whatever. And then a terrorist bounce ability. What she's going to eat whether that's half a sandwich, or she's really hungry and she wants to sandwiches. I mean, no doubt. We're doing something wrong. I mean, all parents are I guess he us, but it's so it's so so so different from how I grow up in our our hope is that we just we reinforced her natural instincts in her body and her that as she gets older, she has a sense of trusting intuitively. There's that word again when to eat and how much to eat without attaching some kind of consequence or meaning to it. That's great. We'll see. Yeah. How's it going so far like how does she seem to be relating to food and her body now? Well, I think it's going, well, I don't wanna talk for her. But I will say that I do still struggle with my own judgments are instincts learned instincts that flare around eating so it's not effortless too. By the responsibilities. It's probably scary. When you see her eating something that you have maybe a reflexive like diet culture reaction to or you know, quote, unquote, eating too much or quote, unquote, not eating enough of particular things. Yes, am I know that that is my story. You know, like I am bringing that to the table because of how I grow up in my own exile. Zayed's? But I am I mean, I don't know maybe the pendulum has swung too far. I do not talk about dieting. I do not talk about you know. I just like we are a dry household when it's that kind of stuff like I do not subscribe to the same magazines. I used to. I mean, I'm pretty uptight about it. Like, I have even you know gotten kinda snippy with the members of the family about how they talk about her or her body or her food, and I make a point to be, you know, naked around her a fair amount. Hopefully, I can say that on the radio. Oh, yeah. Because like, you know, my body is just what it is. But I want her somewhere to have a memory or or just unconscious sense of like the normalcy of of a body, you know, with its lumps and bumps and the things that hang and the things that jiggle and all of that stuff. So and that's actually been really it's been healing for me. And it's been something that's helped me kind of stay on the path because I just I cannot model dieting for her. I just I cannot do it. I won't let myself to it. You know? Yeah. Totally. I'm sure it keeps you really committed because it's just like I don't want this for her. Yeah. I really don't. And I already see just in Mike bits and pieces how it's seeps in from the culture. I I already see it. You know, she's not even a new garden, and I hear her in her. Little friends talking about who's pretty they don't even really know what that Wien, you know. But it's like, it's all ready there. So it does keep me committed yet really is so insidious the little ways that it. Creeps in already. But it sounds like you're creating such good boundaries. In your household for that? Like, you're making a safe space that it's diet culture free for her. So that even though there's that stuff on the outside. And I'm sure it will get even more pronounced as she grows up. I can only imagine what it's like to be a teenager. Now, you know, like, I know God. But that you have this sort of like safe place to come home to I think it's gonna mean so much to her. I hope so I certainly hope so I know my mom didn't have it. And they know her mom didn't have it. I was talking about this stuff with my mom the other day, actually. And she told me how one of her memories of being a little girl all is of being at the beach with her mom, and her grand mom who was an old lady. And how. Every time they were at the beach her grandma with points. Other women and say am I thin or than her or fatter than her own now? Yeah. And like it was just kind of like the grandma at the beach game. So it's this stuff just runs really deep. And I think you said something about being colonized earlier. I think that's really the right word. So the as much as I can shelter my little one from it. You know, the more the better. Yeah. Absolutely. I really hope that the work that you're doing in raising her that way, plus the work that like were both doing in that this whole movement were part of his doing to destabilize larger bodies and to take down diet culture is going to help her generation grow up in a way. That's not as hamstrung by all this stuff as we were because you know, like, you said in one of your blog posts, how this just stole so much of your life. You know, and I always talk about dia culture as a life thief to like that it just takes us away from the pleasure and the little moments that we could be enjoying and like showing up to relate. Ships and just showing up for ourselves, you know, and like we'll never get that time back, but hopefully, we can give it back to the next generation or two people down the line. Yeah. I hope so too. I mean, that's partly why I do write about this stuff. And, you know, talk about it allowed is because hopefully when you do some of your own work allowed like it holds space for other people. And that's definitely one of my goals as a mom as to do that for my my child. Absolutely. And also just to I think like people really see themselves in. I mean, I know reading your stuff. I I really was like struck by the details, and the sort of little things that I was like, oh, yeah. Like, I remember doing that. My diet day is or I've had clients telling me that they do that, you know, like it's like so evocative just to tell your personal story and to see like how common and similar. Some of our struggles are. Thank you for saying that that's one of the tricks, right? That diet culture or patriarchy. Maybe plays on us is that it has kind of shut in these padded soundproof rooms thinking that all of our experiences are just our own. But when we start talking about them and seeing that the personal is political as the saying goes there is like momentum power there, and it's freeing to individuals. But I mean, hopefully, maybe this is one of the missing puzzles right in terms of baiting a more equitable world for women girls and for men too because with freedom like the more, we're free the better. It is for everyone abs- not to get too philosophical about it. But it's true. I totally agree. I think that's exactly right. And also to sort of recognize the because I think a lot of people in this day and age wanna be more woke, you know. Wanna be they wanna be doing the right thing. And they realized the sort of depths of how messed up things are in our society. But one of the ways that I think, you know, I think that like even people who are the most woke on different issues like race and sexual orientation or gender, whatever. Sometimes mis still is the stuff about body size and. You know, and like that is all a part of it. It's all part of the same struggle for liberation that people in all kinds of other bodies and identities are feeling that is so true. It's funny. You say that because sometimes I'll just be kind of going through my week and all kind of catalog the little fat phobic microaggressions, you might call them or just the little fat phobic things. I heard and I never really know how to address them, you know, maybe with someone who's really close to me, and I can kind of have a private moment with them. That's one thing. But like in a group setting, you know, and I had this fantasy of being able to go back in time and say to people like, can you imagine saying this about a different group of people like imagine saying this about black people or trans people or immigrants or whatever I was in a wedding recently, and it was a beautiful wedding. And. I wouldn't change a thing except the photographer are was trying to kind of as the women were lining up for pictures of target for was kind of getting people to look slimmer by putting their arm this way, or their chin that way or whatever. And then as we are want to do the women all kind of chirped in with like, oh, ho. Yeah. Gotta had a lot of bread yesterday or what bite like imagine if they were saying like just try to if you your skin will look lighter. If you if you stand this way, like just just try to Smith's your nose. So it's not as broad like just like we wouldn't tolerate it may slowly, but call it what it is. Right. And and I'm not saying that the experience of fatness is a quivalent to experience of any other marginalized or subordinated group, but they're connected. They're connected. And if you understand the idea of intersection -ality like, you know, that they're really. Connected that like for me as like a Brown black woman when I hear those things I can't separate them from might race because they aren't wholly separate from my race. So fat phobic comments are racial comments to me. And I think yeah. At some level, they they, you know, at least historically they kind of always were. And now, it's like, there's definitely obviously different ways that racism and fat phobia show up in the world, and for different people who may be have like one of the, you know, one identity, but not another or have both or multiple marginalized identities. Like, those experiences are also different. But yeah, I think it's inextricable like we can't look at. We can't say like, let's Aratu. Kate fat phobia everybody, no matter the size of their body should be accepted and respected. And now also say that about every other marginalized group, right? We see it's not like we can just target one form of oppression. And forget about all the others because they are all connected. And like, I forget who said it. And I think maybe maybe it was even someone on this podcast. But probably quoting someone else saying that all oppression is connected. You know that it's yeah. It's the system that the roots are sort of intertwining underground, even if the sprouts look different up top totally I couldn't have said it better myself. I wish I could remember who said that originally, it was you maybe the most me I do sometimes forget when I say I'm gonna I'll be like, oh, my I have a person who helps me out with like doing memes for social media. And she'll she'll sometimes put like one together that I'm like, oh my God. I completely forgot. I said that that's a really good quote. Ages ago. Oh, it's so good talking with you. And I one thing that I wanted to get into that we totally haven't really had time for, but maybe just have like a quick moment. At the end talk about is your experience being a lawyer. And some of the fat phobia, and racism and stuff that's come up for you in that field. And you know, you talked a little bit about that. In the Columbine Virjee Tovar that will link to in the show notes for this episode about your experience of being a a larger bodied woman in in the workplace in general, but also just curious sort of like from your perspective as a lawyer what it would look like to have Justice for and like protection for the class of protections for body size. The way that we do have legal protections for like race or gender or other forms of identity in terms of like not being allowed to discriminate in hiring, for example, or other. Housing or things like that. Well, I think in terms of my professional experience, it's a place where my body size, and my fatness are deeply deeply linked to my being a black woman. So anything I experienced is kind of a swipe or a job at one of those identities. I also experience with the other because at least in the professional context, they really merged for me. And I think that you know, there's a couple of reasons for that one supposedly America's a really fat country. But like there's not a lot of really fat, lawyers, and you could write a book about that like opportunity in class in all of that kind of stuff, but the same also goes for black women while black people generally, but also black women. So I think that in the kind of the pressure of otherness both of those aspects of myself. Release stand out. And in our culture, we have some really damaging kind of unconscious stereotypes about big black women. You know, like I was talking about earlier so professionally there, basically the opposite of professional. Let's put it that way. So if I'm going into court, and I'm in a suit, and I have my briefcase in my heels, or whatever I'm aware that I have I like, I am really really playing against type from sort of cultural bias perspective. So yeah, I can't really divorce the two for for myself as far as, you know, protections against discrimination and bias for fat people. I should preface this by saying that this is not my area of expertise. So there I'm sure that there are scholars out there who who know more about this than I do. But I mean, as you probably know those protections are almost non existent. I think Michigan maybe has some protections around fat discrimination in the workplace, but by and large, they just don't exist. And I think that that's you know, that's for a few different reasons may one is that the law usually. Grants. These types of protections two classes of people, and that class of people has to be able to you know, show that that as a whole class, they're likely to experience certain kinds of transformation are negative impacts. Right. And I think in a sense fatness is it's it's like a club. People don't want to join Gino. I mean like of all the fat people in the country. There's probably like a dozen who wanna go like lobbying congress. It'd be like we're in this group of fat people, and we all experience this kind of, you know, systemic hatred or whatever. So I think part of it is like fat people's own distaste, which is course is like a reflection of internalized oppression for fat people. You know what I mean? Totally. I think we also have a really really strong sense in our. Culture is at fatness is a choice and the law. It's always gonna protect classes if people more when we don't think it's a choice like you. Don't choose your race. At least for the most part, you know, or as the law understands that you don't choose your gender. They're called immutable traits in legal speak. And we just don't think fatness is something that you kind of are or are not we think of it as a choice and often as failing, and we're less likely to offer protection to any group of people where we think that the cause of their discrimination is partly their own failing to measure up. So I think we have a very very very long way to go. And most of it is not legal. You know? I think most of the work is like your podcast, and like this kind of stuff happening. Beginning, you know, like turning a huge ship. It's like slow will be shifting the way people think about body size. Right. And it sounds like maybe the law kind of lags behind that shift in the culture, at least in this case because yeah, like we have to turn the ship towards like understanding that body size is actually immutable in a sense in that like, yes, you can change at short term, you can suppress your weight short term, but long term that's not possible. And actually, you know, there's decades of good research showing that even though that research doesn't really get the airtime in the mainstream health perfect. You know? Yeah. Not yet. Not yet. Exactly. It's it's starting to pull out a BMI chart my doctors two year at my daughter's two year checkup. So I was like put that away. So it's not out there all the way yet. But, you know, little by little and I think, you know, I'm sure anyone can remember or. Think back to the sixties in NC pictures of like, you know, say it loud, I'm black. And I'm proud or black is beautiful. Like there has to be a sort of critical mass of the group who wanna band together and experience their identity and live it allowed and with pride. And I think that's growing, right. Yeah. Yeah. The more people are like screw this. I'm not dieting my body is going to be what it is the closer. We are to that. But I don't I don't think we're there quite yet. I also think like some people have made the legal argument like in lawsuits that they should have protection from some, you know, being fired because they're fat, for example, because fatness is a disability. And it's not for me to stay what's right or wrong for any plaintiff in a particular case. But to me that seems like a very troubling road. If we were to, you know, head down that and mass. Yeah. Of course, I'm not saying that this cannot be a disability for particular person or be related to a disability. But like on a public policy perspective that would seem to me like really doubling down kind of moving backwards on some of the fat, phobic diet culture stuff that we already are trying to undo right? Absolutely. Those are great points. And I think that probably goes a long way to explaining why it is such a tiny fraction of all the municipalities and states and stuff in this country that have any sort of protection because I think there's like a couple cities in California. Maybe Santa Cruz has some law on the books about this. And like, maybe a couple of other cities. But it's yeah, there's almost no government has has come down with legal protections for larger bodies. And I think that's that makes a lotta sense. You know, that we just don't have that critical mass yet of people who are willing to fight. But it it is getting there like it is. I mean every day I feel. Like, I'm seeing something new where I'm just like. Oh, wow. Like Samantha b just like talked about like a segment on her show about fat, positively, and why dieting doesn't work and like, yeah. It's awesome. I can send it to you. Yes. Please. I would love that. Yeah. She has two writers who are fat Ashley, Nicole black and forget the other one I listened to Ashley Nicole blacks podcast, and it's really good. But then she like talks about, you know, just sort of in passing talks about fat, positively. So I was like, oh, she's really cool. And then saw this segment was just like hell. Yeah. That is. That's awesome. And just another interview. I just saw with some author like a memoir S or something. I don't even know what she's famous for anything. But just like in that book. Apparently there was something about being stigmatized for her size. And she was being interviewed on like, some talk show, some well, you know, it's interesting that both of these people that you've played out are women right because that's actually eagerly another piece of the puzzle to. Extent that law really is about how we order society. It how we keep order in society. And we live in a society with a lot of hierarchy that's part of the order. Right. So today extent that fatness in fat. Discrimination are going to impact women who were lower on the hierarchy more intensely than it's harder to build that wave of change because it's not affecting someone who's at the top. Right. That's interesting. One more in any. No, it's just any identity at the bottom like who's going to experience fatness or discrimination or on fatness in a more severe way person of collar transgender person. Whatever it is immigrant native person. Like, it's gonna be deemed less important, basically. That's just the way hierarchy works. Totally yet sort of compounds the oppression. Yeah. And makes it less. Likely that the mainstream or that the people in positions of power are going to take the complaint seriously. Yes. That's exactly right. That's exactly right. Well, that is really interesting to know. And I hope that like just getting this idea out there that like legal protections. Probably are not gonna come until we have some social change at like, the more philosophical level, maybe can help, you know, push things in that direction. Because I do think we really need all of it. You know, we really need the cultural change in the philosophical change, and we need legal protections to for people because there is incontrovertible evidence that people in larger bodies have higher rates of discrimination in employment may. Yeah. Exactly more likely to be fired. I think to like just all of it. Yeah. Exactly. Little by little little. Yes. Well, I love your work. And I love what you're doing to help in this fight and making change. So thank you for being here. Q. This has been humbling and really fun and wonderful. You're very easy to talk to you. I'm sure you hear that all the time. Thank you. You are to your amazing. They had a good time on this conversation. Thank you. This is really been such a treat. I honestly when I saw your Instagram message, or whatever it was. I was pinching myself. I was like is this for gosh. So I can't thank you enough. I really can't. Oh, thank you so much. It's such a pleasure talking with you. So that's our show. Thanks again. So much to Savall tripton ski for joining us on this episode and thanks to you for listening. And by the way, you can find Sevala on her website at Sevilla T dot com. That's S A V A L A T dot com. I forgot to have her mentioned that in the end of the episode. So there you go now, you can find our online, and if you're looking for some practical guidance to help you get started on your own anti diet path. Grab my free audio guides seven simple strategies for finding peace and freedom with food. Just go to Kristie Harrison dot com. Tom slash strategies to get it. That's Krista Harrison dot com slash strategies. If you've gotten something out of this podcast, please help us reach more people who need to hear the anti diet. Message by sharing this episode on apple podcasts, or itunes or your favorite podcast platform. Whatever that may be sharing a one of the apple platforms is really helpful because it brings us up the podcast rankings. So that more people discover us, and so that we can continue to drown out the pro diet messages in the health category. And keep rising up through those ranks. We've recently reached the top twenty and top ten health podcast, which is so amazing. And I would love your help to stay there and really represent a new paradigm to people who are just browsing through the health charts, which may be how some of you all found the podcast. And you know, I think those are likely the folks who really need this message most. So if you're listening to this on apple podcast, click the three dots at the bottom right of the screen on your on his episode and then click share episode, and you can also go to Kristie Harrison dot com slash subscribe to find all the places that you can subscribe. And share the podcast to get full show notes from this episode, including all the resources we mentioned plus a full transcript just go to Kristie Harrison dot com slash one ninety one that's Christie Harrison dot com slash one nine one and to get the transcript to scroll down to the bottom of the page and enter your Email address. This episode was brought to you by online course, intuitive eating fundamentals, if you're ready to make peace with food break free from diet culture and reclaim a life at stole from you. Learn more and sign up at Christie, Harrison dot com, slash course. That's Christie Harrison dot com, slash course. A big thanks to our editor and engineer, Mike LaLonde and to my food psych programs team, including our community and content associate Vinci. Trae our administrative assistant Julianne what's Hasic, and our transcript assistant care McClellan for helping me out with all the moving parts that go into producing this show every week our album art was photographed by Abby more photography and designed by Meredith noble and our theme song was written and performed by. Caroline penny. Packer rigs thanks again for listening and until next time. Stay psyched.

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How Stress Can Make You a Millionaire with Puneet Nanda

Entrepreneur on FIRE

30:02 min | 3 months ago

How Stress Can Make You a Millionaire with Puneet Nanda

"Lates that sparked fire nation jail d. here with an audio masterclass on how stress can make you a millionaire to drop these value bombs brought puneet nanda on the mike puneet aka. Dr fresh is a serial entrepreneur innovator inventor writer and practicing yoga in two thousand fifteen he launched the essential oils brand guru nanda which promises to bring a one hundred percent pure natural therapeutic grade essential oils to the masses already picked up by large retail stores like walmart walgreens and big lots grew. Nanda is now one of the fastest growing non. Mlm essential oil companies in the world in today fire nation will be going over dr fresh journey. So you can see how you can solve a problem. That's a real pain point for people in be on your way to millions as soon as we get back from thinking our sponsors grow your business with online courses by jumping into kicks five day course challenged ten day over five days you'll hear from inspiring speakers including myself who will walk you through the whole process so you'll know exactly where you're headed. Sign up for this free challenged today at if dot com slash fire. That's t. h. i n. k. I. fic dot com slash fire. Hiring is challenging especially with everything else. You have to consider today. But there's one place where hiring is simple fast and smart that place zip recruiter try zip recruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash fire. That's ziprecruiter dot com slash fire ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire dr. Fresh say was up to fire nation and cher something interesting about yourself that most people don't know so john. Thank you for getting me on the show up. I would actually disclose something that actually not only most people don't now my family also. Interestingly enough you might have heard that I am originally from new delhi. I that russia from russia. I came to new york and los angeles and while i was a russia the it was early nineties everything was in shambles and everybody and their brother was trying to see up. There was like opportunities glow. I had originally gone there for medical college. And and i saw the opportunity where it was super high demand. I was a young kid. And i wanted to see how i could make enough money so that i could go back offered with the six and a half hour flight and and because i was very homesick so i met this friend of mine who was actually bringing in condoms because you could fit a lot of them in a bag and re women selling into the some people in the boarding school would come and take them all and pay them double the money or triple the money he said. Hey i made like three hundred dollars getting these in. Maybe it should do the same that way the ticket used to be on eto floor is two hundred and seventy eight dollars. I did that a couple of times. So this is something that nobody dr fresh smuggling condoms across the national lines. I love it. And i hope some people in your family right are laughing their little. Booties off hearing this story. Fire nation as we shared in the introduction. We're gonna talk about how stress can make you a millionaire. We'll heck it definitely made dr fresh a millionaire so let's start who needs with your entrepreneurial origin story. How the heck did you get started. As i told you i was in russia is there was a demand for anything. Consumer products and i got started in toothbrushes because my family had a business with toothbrushes and they were doing contract manufacturing for other companies. Which i hated. And i said if i'm gonna it's almost like doing. Contract manufacturing is like being in a loaded five job. Because you really can't do anything literally you get centerpiece. Let's say an you. Make millions of them the toothbrushes. But you really don't have any say in it. You can't increase or decrease. You can't do anything so i said if i'm gonna if i'm going to actually do business which my dad was really. Kill me when i when he knew that i'm gonna do it because he. He wanted me to be a doctor in an when he came to know he was very upset. Of course. but. I said if i'm gonna do my business i'm gonna do my own brand and dr fresh was my nickname in my medical college and I started with that brand. In russia originally and then. When things became really bad at russia i came to new york. Cab from new york. I finally came to. La and of. I got a big break with ninety nine cents stores. Because i saw corrugated proctor and gamble not paying attention to who are little ninety nine cents stores or dollar stores at that point so very before i knew i was the most popular product and dollar stores because i i had a very good idea how to make a very good quality. Do brush lecherous colgate Quality but make it at one four one fifth the cost which i introduced to the dollar stores in that time dollar tree started growing dollar mania daughter lad all these guys what they are that coming up wendy store cody store chain. I i used to get up in the morning. Six o'clock start dialing every person court calling in literally started to become extremely popular something that nobody else had done. And i literally innovated a market. That was not there. And that's how i grew but very quickly i knew if i have to go to mainstream i need in a and that's when i invented five fly which is a kids light up to rush which became the number one could stoop rushing the word today. So that's that's kind of my soy and then everything was easy after that. Because with the cash flow i bought benakka and then we added in private equity fund and we ended up buying reached crush from johnson and johnson. So before we knew we were two hundred plus People and Doing extremely well. I but one thing i did not do really right was that i did not. I forgot to take it on my own. South i did. I lost that work life balance. And i was working eighteen hour days. Eating mcdonalds injected a box of drinking cope sitting on a chair for more than eight. Ten twelve hours a day. Not moving enough in between literally always being on phone lost touch with a lot of friends and family always working and literally. My only goal was to grow dr fresh to a point where it could be successful and to a point where a i wanted to always reach be number three in the country and i i did go to that goal whether the point literally bud. My candle understand so I had gained a lot of weight. Started eating a lot of bopping. A lot of bills than i was a bane. Most of my hours of the day at the wedding of dr fresh. So that's that's where. I was so dr fresh. Thanks for breaking that down. Because i can tell you. Most entrepreneurs who have any form of success do go through that time in their life when they just don't have that work life balance. They don't have that focused on health that focus on family and relationships. And you know we learn. We learn in fire nation. That's why you're listening today. So hopefully you can learn from our mistakes. Because i've made the exact same one. So let's now talk about how that led you to developing the guru. Nanda brand ends cut a continue on with that to share with us. What's difference about guru nanda soaring trustingly. After i had this allom one day. Dr fresh layer. I actually had a big chest pain and my sector doesn't naturally called nine one one and at that point it was a just a fake bomb. It will attack. It wasn't a heart attack. Within thing i was like thirty nine or something that time and i said this lot of my friends came to meet me and he said you just you got to calm down and just focus on yourself because if you're not gonna be there everything else amodio so that's when i decided to sell the company incidentally We find that buyer. I had the time i took off and i went to ostrom india. I really focused on my health. I lost forty pounds. I became extremely healthy. I literally lost all the bills. That i was eating and by bloodwork came out great in the meanwhile i i decided to come back and open up a yellow studio. That's what i did. So i opened up a yoga studio in beverly hills. I taught i just teach the rest of my life and incidentally i started getting a lot of gigs. I ended up being on jay leno's garage in other. Subtlety abedin says and stuff started. But in the meanwhile i saw a lot of these young ladies using essential oils by this much level marketing company called the tara or young living and these are utah based multi level marketing companies that sell phenomenal quality essential oils but They are very very expensive like ten to twenty times more expensive than normal. So i saw that but then i meant to amazon and i saw essential loyal selling for a dollar a piece and a ordered some in than since. I'm a scientist. I'm a chemist background. I went ahead and analyze goes oil and i saw everything literally selling amazon was fake fragrances. And then i researched and found a lot of these. I started greeley work on it and as entrepreneur. You know. I saw immediately light where i said if i could become the detail of retail business that nobody else is absolutely nobody else to compete. Because everybody's eldest selling totally fake product which is not real essential is why is not an essential oils is because i used to have a lot of allergies and eating chatterton off and on almost every other day basis oil of oregano couple of drops. Actually let means since that they haven't ever had any energy bill like that was one thing that kind of restored my faith into essential oils and then one by one. I started reading it. I'm a person with biology background. So i started marrying my science background together. With aromatherapy therapy background. I enrolled myself into a couple of settlement therapy schools. Plus i ordered illegal combined. And i really got enrolled and then i ensured that i follow what debate in young living were doing because these two companies they were actually pretty amazing job fondue borrow kind of job which they call it seed to shelve and i called it from bottle and that's exactly what i did. I went all around the globe. I had the time. I had the money And i had the will. And now i had the motives and i literally that all around the globe Farmed afam created my own Necklace global ethical farmers and we Decided to bring the product. Pham do bottle. Nothing added nothing. They moved and then bring it to retail. And when i did that my whole plan was more to be a social entrepreneur. Where i'll help the farmers by helping the kids get educated. Plus i will bring the product to walmart's awards so that a lot of people who cannot afford multi level marketing products can still get the advantage of getting really good product although it was betty dopson because market is full of so many fake coils that And ninety nine point nine percent of them actually not direct funder bottle and that is what made me feel ready to fred and that is what helped me create a grand. That was different than i was able to take over i. I was able to the brand that used to be there. Before i was there was a big four. Five billion dollar wiedeman company that used to be there at walmart But when the buyers saw my fashion and the product and the quality he actually got rid of that other major billion several billion dollar company and give me the space in finance. And that's where. I hope you're really taken away from what dr fresh talking about right here. It's that you can build a moat around your business. How do you do that by doing things. Better by being the best by being the most pure by being the most real and that can be in a physical product that can be in a virtual part of that can be in a lot of different ways because bulimia fire nation. There's a lot of fake hollow on genuine stuff out there and when you can identify just like puneet was able to identify that. Hey there's just so much crap out there let me actually create something great and then you follow that. Through with passion with excitement with hearts things can happen and we have so much more to talk about when we get back from thinking. Our sponsors for a lot of us are home is now more than just our home for some of us. It has become a classroom for our kids and office for our work. Or yoga. Studio for our workouts. If you're a business owner or a people manager home else would be where you do your hiring. And that's ziprecruiter comes in ziprecruiter hiring faster and easier because you can do it all from one. Convenient place ziprecruiter dot com slash fire. No matter where you're hiring from ziprecruiter does the work for you how zip recruiter's matching technology scans thousands of resumes and profiles to identify the most qualified people for your job. If you're really interested in candidate you can even invite them to apply for your job with one click. Ziprecruiter sends an email from you helping you stand out from the competition. 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Is you know that products that really made you into an aromatherapy and essential oils household name. Actually heater product is of funny not us in. Which is it's it's not a big product line with me but it is something that got me into this business and that is a product that it's called oil pulling what oil pulling is. It is taking the oil off specific a mixture sunflower sesame coconut than a diplomat. And actually pulling it like swishing at ford about ten to fifteen minutes it. It has dad but it brought product that i consider that a heated product. Because that's how i started. Good i i. I was giving that out to my people in my year studio and some people started saying that we can't take it free. Why don't you put it on amazon. And i put it on amazon and and oil pulling the reason. I got into it as because i before i went to the ashram in india i had a infection my youth and the doctor said the dentist that you need to get out a route nada and when i was in chaman indiana's very scared he'd given me. Antibiotics is okay but as very scared that i don't get the pain back in this good who got me into oil pulling and while i was there and ever after i've been doing it i've never had a root canal ever since i all my be taught intact and that is what really had gotten me into okay. I'll i'll share it with the word and it's good one dollars polling. It's i introduced this product into the war because a lot of people were doing just coconut oil in the hippie culture the yoga culture but they don't understand coconut oil is very cooling so it nailed may not work the same way for a lot of caucasian african americans. The way it works for people in philippines may rain in parts of india. So that's what kind of got me into it but essential oils essential oils. I would say The top sellers that we have our Lavender d three and eucalyptus these four. But if it comes to myself. We don't sal because it's it's not oil that people understand how to use it. My favorite which. I use as soon as i get a little list of any kind of all. Flu allergy is the oil farrago fire nation. One thing that. I've definitely recognized over the years. Is that successful companies and successful entrepreneurs they're able to inject one product or one service into the market. They are just best in show for because they really identify a need. They really identify avoid in the marketplace. And then once they get that little traction that little momentum that they can expand out a cross that marketplace and really do great things just like dr fresh was able to do in the way that he described it so it obviously wasn't all smooth sailing. Dr fresh give us your number one challenge. The you faced along the way when you're trying to grew nanda into what it is today. Basically what i used to do as i would take the competent of got it. That was already there in the market in their retail stores. I would take them best them from third party. Best mind from third body in show that the retailers and ninety five percent of the retailers. Tell you all we don't care are you here to bash other companies so they would want to throw you out so i had a. I was just trying to make sure there is a level playing field and nobody really cares and all a lot of the buyers are keep changing their young. They are not that experienced than they don't care for them. It's the price and what rise in the market. That and they always wanna compare themselves to what is selling on amazon. A lot from that do they want to get into the history of science of anything. Ninety plus percent of the wives don't have energy to do that and that is a huge problem when i started the sheboygan Educate them so. I started to make radios and put them online on youtube. I started to educate the public because of that. I could actually at least try to do my doing that. Apart from that Essential oils is a growing business. But lately what you've seen as everybody including a detergent powder adjuster deduction Justin with essential essentials so big and that is a air fresh selling for ninety seven cents writing essential oils. The biggest part of their business. But if you go and look at it it says inspired by may small in almost negligible. These are billion dollar. Several billion dollars worth of companies and then the detergent guy has one off that product plus fragrance whenever you have fragrance and essential oil you can put one drop in lake hundred gallons in. You can still say you've put in something that doesn't mean it doesn't have what it doesn't have all and you know that fragrances. Three thousand plus chemicals are used to make fragrance and according to the backed between fragrance companies and fda other bodies they were not supposed to disclose what goes in the fragrance because most of the products that go in the fragrance industry of gaza genyk. So that is what made it a very difficult road. It's very diluted. Education to customer is the biggest challenge. I've faced fire nation. Educating the customer is a challenge but again as one that once you overcome it's the no the like the trust is with you the company or the individual. That's given them that. Trust has given them that value is given them that solution to that pain point so dr fresh as we closed down here. What's your plan for the future. My plan for the future is to keep keep my mission of bringing the best essential oils to the market also simultaneously. I plan to because earlier in the business. I did not realize that growth and profitability. The two most aspects of business. It's almost like breathing to a living. Being and i decided you know what i'm going to be. A social entrepreneur. Says not focused on that. So what happened is first few years. I kept on losing millions of dollar nonstop lately. Did i realize you know if i'm not around. How can i bring my message around. So i started to actually do profitable products and i'm starting of started to charge a little more aware. I have a profitable back again and I am going to continue to be profitable. So that i can use that money to educate more people to actually bring my best products onto them puny. What's your call to action for fire nation. Where can we connect with you. Where can we find out more about you. And your products share away so good nanda dot com which is good as deger g. You argue nanda is in nba dot com non as my last name. So i'd originally kept my yoga studios name as good on under which in lack of dying we just kept the same name And it linked on so well that because we saw every other brand was related to either nature and we said you know what we drift different enough and we need to continue to be that But i think it's actually worked out After years of hard work one call a as a go. Ondo dot com. Check us out. The other thing is we are in the white amon section in walmart and we we do not sell it to non vitamin section because is a lot of fake product called socal essential oil that is being sold in other areas like home and home decor and stuff so we focused on being in the whiteman area. So if you go to a walgreens or a walmart those are two stores that keep our chronic loss. We also have our products on amazon dot com. But you'll have to type in goodhue nanda because anything and everything with fifty thousand views that you see on amazon unique to be smart on the stand. That ninety percent of those fifty thousand reviews fake reviews. How many times have you actually gone written right page views. So you're if you're smart you'll get fire nation. You're the average of the five pew. Spend the most time with. You've been hanging out with dr fresh in jail today. So keep that heat and make sure to head over to e o fire dot com and type puneet p. u. n. e. e. t. in the search bar for the notes page which will pop up with everything we chat about here today links to all that jazz make sure to go and visit grew. Nanda dot com g. u. r. u. n. a. n. d. a. dot com look for him in the vitamin section in walmart and other places and of course on amazon directly type in guru. Nanda go right there. Those fifty thousand. Plus you've used the he's talking about. Those are all made up. Fake reviews at amazon. By the way they're tackling those but it's just too much it's slowly and surely for them so you know you're getting the right stuff from dr fresh. He wouldn't have it any way. So pu needs thank you so much for sharing your truth your knowledge your value with fire nation today for that we salute you and we'll catch you on the flip side. Thank you john. Thank you so much and every bram every name every product has my last name on it. Nanda you can be ensured that i'm putting my family name on the line. Every rob is destined redecorated and doubled tested so third party before we get about street fire. Thank you brother. Dr fresh mic drop. Hey fire nation. Today's value bomb content was brought to you by puneet ends. If you're ready to rock your very own podcast you should check out our podcast. Course because it's free. And i teach you how to create and launch your own podcast free. Podcast course dot com free. Podcast course com. I'll catch you there or catch you on the flip side. Grow your business with online courses by jumping into thinking affects five course challenge today over five days you'll hear from inspiring speakers including myself who will walk you through the whole process. So you'll know exactly where you're headed sign up for this free challenge today at think dot com slash fire. That's t h. I n fic dot com slash fire. Hiring is challenging especially with everything else. You have to consider today. But there's one place where hiring simple fast and smart that places zip recruiter try zip recruiter for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash fire. That's ziprecruiter dot com slash fire ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire.

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Life as a Lobby journalist

Coffee House Shots

29:41 min | 2 months ago

Life as a Lobby journalist

"The spectator magazine combines incisive political analysis with books and aunts reviews of unrivalled authority subscribed today for just twelve pounds. I'm receive twelve weeks subscription in print and online plus a twenty pound amazon gift voucher. Absolutely free go to spectator dot co dot uk forward slash voucher. kim to coffeehouse shots potatoes politics. Podcast i'm fraser nelson and in this episode. We're going to be talking not about the political news about those who bring it to you. The political journalists or as are no in the lobby. Francis elliott has been in lobby for almost twenty five years. The last eleven of them spent as political editor of the times. He's recently stepped down and has written an article in this week's magazine looking back over his experience. James kirk up is a former political editor of telegraph of bloomberg and like me of the scotsman. They both join me now. Francis in your piece you look at a fairly radical transformation in what is to be a political journalist in the time you were there. What do you think the biggest changes have been lots of different ways. I think the kind of the emergence of the jerseys are sort little soul trade. A talk with their own brand with their own twitter feed has essentially kind of transformed the relationship between papers highly think of themselves and when i joined the lobby ninety eight one of one of campbell's frequent runs wolves the blurring as he sort between editorial comment and news. Well that's just continued and being almost completely wiped out so that's rare now to find journalists. Who who don't feel the need to pine. I guess interesting is quite striking. I was in the lobby for almost ten years because at the time there was this sort of understanding really had commentators and you had political writers and there was quite a delineation between the two the political journalists were not particularly ideological not from my memory but then again they weren't supposed to be their job was to get stories what you're saying instance even if it don't have a call him. We do have a twitter feed and that encourages them to sort of take positions because twitter tends to give the most likes and re tweets to those who take an angle on his story. I think it's an ever present danger. I remember my my teenage son. Who's older for his years. Saying you realize that you've got a device that could injure career in your pocket. It really is that we all struggle continued to struggle in the sentence with with how to manage those boundaries. I wouldn't overdo it. I think they're all that way of being a warrior among cut in lots of different ways of being lobby hack but if it is very rare now think the funding appeal. A story gets who is actually equal opportunities. Who is down the line who you would struggle to what their politics were. But who isn't kind of therefore kind of cynical james kirk up. You were in the lobby for bloomberg than the scotsman. Then the telegraph now. Did you notice it changing during your time there. Yeah i totally. Relative covid francis joined the libyan hasn't worn. Give me passing twenty seventeen. I changed a lot those personnel shifts. I think it'll league. Younger will make a old. I mean when. I arrived at the difference of high rock goal tribe of journalists who were led by the the literal gray bids of community. Who'd been there for a very long time and huddleston begun careers amped in the regions. I wanna be a career shift that took place in front of the shift and so the that that shift towards political donors feeling free to comment on things which would have been prudent. Thinkable would only arrived and certainly a lot of journalists not generation. Some of them without naming names someone literally wouldn't vote in elections because he thought it wasn't right to be your reporting on something taking a position in politics even but that's why hasn't bulletin and sky told the parliamentary committee at once. He said i didn't vote. Because the moment you do you pick a side even subconsciously. And it's fundamentally wrong for epic records to pick a side so many if the definitely big shift going on we're just johnny generation a generation of journalist. Think it's it's okay to have easily but things on twitter. That's where we are. You probably reflective of society as a whole right. The james was interesting. Why please go to fuel. You need to go on twitter. Could it be not simply that they basically want to promote themselves selfishly but they think they are judged by their papers on how many twitter followers they've goes. Oh absolutely yeah talk about twitter. Twitter immense home. I think several good to to political journalism. I mean by the time. I was a particularly grumpy political. I spent a lot of time shouting at the reporters on my team to get twitter to leave the desks and get and get around the pulse of westminster and drink cups of coffee and eat lunches and get drunk with politicians and find. Those people were saying on twitter. But you because you know. There's an awful lot more even to business village than what goes on on twitter but because it's a media and it's quick and because actually you're often from the you are as a reporter. You are working under. News editors editors who were also looking at twitter and when they see your rival has dropped something on twitter that breathlessly announcing that. Something's about to happen or health. And the instinctive thing for them to do is how. Why am i learning about this from the twitter account of a rival newspapers water. I hear this from you and so you you will push to spend your insides on twitter. Trolling to be the first to tweet something. And that becomes. The currency not becomes the way by which your professionals stock rises and falls. Which again there are good things about it harder to hide on twitter. It's more there's more media. Scrutiny of what people do but equally it creates a lot of unknown unknowns in the stuff that's not on twitter doesn't often doesn't get recognized and talk about at all anymore francis how about actually meeting and talking to politicians. Did that happen a lot more when you started your political journalism career in the end i mean isn't an extent to which the whole lot being lobby is that you actually are in the houses of parliament. You've got access. You can pretty much walk anywhere you want in the house of commons. If you have a lovely pass you can go right outside. The chamber itself and there's a sort of division well was wasn't mighty anyway between political journalists who had lobby pass and can go into that chamber on those who didn't and we're merely afforded access to the cafes and whatnot. The point was that your job was to go around to meet people to sniff the air together sort of one to one intelligence wondering towards extent that changed towards the end. There is more emphasis on sitting in a desk and writing up copy from electronic devices that you could frankly. I've done pretty much anywhere. What's up is the lobby. Well first of all q sympathies to those who who are trying to do the job in the pandemic because that whole strand has gone on it is to be fervently hoped that let me get turned to one of the new normal that we get to but we get back to. The big shift was actually. You're right when i arrived. The thing too is. I should give away trade secrets but there are a couple of places to stand. There was members lobby itself immediately after pm cage. Because they all come towards you. You felt like a seal waiting for the salmon. Come through the lawyer do you would pass on. Whoever you need. Amodio was that you can approach them. Wasn't that was the idea that you stand. Call one out to them. The no no is that we're having engaged in conversation. You were as a fellow journalist. Then to come kind of bandit somebody else's butthole casper. Did every you ever see a copy over the lobby rules. This mythical document that we're supposed to exist with told us how to conduct yourselves. Yes had a copy was given a copy. Actually before i even anyway. Six sixteen years lobby journalist. I never saw copy rulebook. It's interesting what did they say. For instance we're off to the rules. It's an appalling kind of i think this is the version in the fifties. The lobby overhaul. Its rules and there isn't a current current document which i'm sure select committee could possibly kind of juice. Their whole philosophy seminar be done about the definition of talking on terms compensation between a politician. Agendas that is held onto lobby terms at all. Which conversation can then be reported and under what terms what well perhaps prizes you can give you this. This is what lots of people do. Wonder what would you regard as the various categories of conversation like. What would you regard off the record. Not for briefing lobby. Terms was into you. So as opposed to hierarchy is absolutely not use under no circumstances which is like the worst like. I hate it when people say that slot. Don't tell me then. I mean that's like saying here's a sweetie you don't have it. I mean just no just you wait a week and give it to. Somebody else doesn't seem any trade secrets here. James said not use was the next one. I would say background terms background which is iron type of that is attributed to a source with care or even you report that something is happening. But you can't necessarily say how you know it. Yes the mythical idea that you can go away and as report that the government will today announced that fish has been banned with no sourcing. You can't explain what you go to form. You can just say you know it baffling the reader. Even further was the telegraph quoted. French sources which i thought was all days these mayonnaise. Who knows anyway. They were and then off the record. What does that mean to. You runs off. The michael is close to background probably synonymous with it. I mean a particularly no. He knew in insight could say off the record and they may not use many folded into that trap. But they are big. Would you anonymously quote somebody. Give you something off the record and i guess your moral point would be that the minister could not be identified from the way the as journalists seeks to protect their source by using it in a way to not get in trouble robbing regret having spoken to you. Exactly i mean that's that would be the guiding principle on which on the whole i would conduct myself. Which was i won't i won't. I won't read it appropriate for this material. And i think that this is a relationship that that they could further profit from if i keep it alive a metal either there are rules and they're not actually completely code affordable but the thing is what you're saying. France is over the years these these conversations with their rules written or unwritten lobby coderre otherwise have given way to more electronic things where young journalists now starting their career is left to spend far more time over a computer than moment have done twenty years ago when i came back to the lobby because i had. I had three years ago behaviors of in delhi. When i came back. Remember i remember. I think it was at balls or somebody like that. So essentially concerning you don't realize everything's changed is becoming rabid. I can't trust anyone and i think there was. There was a sort of change at the tubs of tried. I've heard it said that the career structure either the journalists wanted to kind of make an inconsiderate quickly and then there are some who you know who who have no interest in in fostering long-term relationships in conduit do as little slash and burn thing. But i mean it was ever thus atlanta's thing that's railroad this one interesting aspect to that james oceanus certainly am. I think all of joined the lobby. Roughly at the same time francis you ninety eight. gmc year two thousand and one was. I and i was struck there that how many more people who'd been there for like ten years or more and it seemed to me that we're political. Journalism differed from other forms of journalism. Was that you had people whose power impotency as reporters was based on the fact that they had for several years built up contacts relationships with people. Who perhaps you might have befriended somebody. When they were and kept that relationship going they would rise up the ranks as would you and the only way of getting top flights context. It's political journalist with having had worked on them for for literally for years. And that wasn't something which you can just drop in perish it somebody in political editor and expect them to be able to do the job properly because you they wouldn't have the context so it seemed to me that political journalism was fundamentally different and that it would take you several years to be working in parliament. If you're going to be any good if you're going to have people pick up the phone and even by the way not for use can be useful because it can tell you if you're barking up the wrong tree or not yes. You're absolutely right now. As sort of the sense of being a trolleybus with elders was very very strong at the time you should point. I mean it was. The three of us are now saturday. You middle aged white men having this conversation when we will arrive at the logie that that was that was the only sort of journalists on the lobes and kirby unrepresentative place changing a little bit but not a lot but they were definitely people who were essentially they journalistic clears the to the lobi unto westminster. And they would go. There was a very small career track. There were people who just went from job to job over services from newspapers newspaper. Let let's but never left. Westminster and like domino did three jobs. I was mr so the cool sold about fifteen years. I moved jobs twice and my desk moved back ten yards during the same corridor and i spent my time with the same at the same people who happen to some no shifted newspaper so there was a definite definite group of people who belonged to westminster the best because the best way of getting a promotion with you brought with you your contacts. That was a large part of the capital and amazing. We believe we got so foggy becomes without talking about lunch. I mean when we arrived the only way you could really build a relationship with politicians was to get lunch with them and drink with them and that was. That was the null these massive bloomberg budgets. Let's bring in francis your francis. What were your recollections of lunches. I mean there is a it still happened. When did the three bottle lunch start to die a death because when i came along introduced to this three bottle lunch right you were three bottles to people and the idea was to stay a little bit less drunk when the person you are lunching could remember what this is. Hurrying focused phrase. You will know this great lunches we have known the wondering is how these now died out. I mean what point have you on the whole. Dennis are much better bet for that these days that nobody does to buffalo over lunch anymore. And maybe some sunday hacks cheesecake. I can think of a couple. I lost on lost to bought lunch somewhere in the early two thousands but dennis kept going and did as always look. It's horses for courses increasingly. Could only face dining with people i liked which was kinda knew that it was time to hang up like beaks but yes people who it's worth oiling. The wheels with with with a large amount of alcohol in it's worth becoming rob using this happens if at dinner and it's quite rare. Now where is ten fifteen years ago. It was a lot more common. You're you doing a least about level lunch at least three or four times. A week is a lot of it was not alcohol. I mean that kind of alluded to it in the piece there was a there was a functioning bar basically people conducted their entire journalistic career from the ball. They never left it. They dictated copied from the ball wall. Drinking right and james. Is it such a bad thing that this is sort of somebody listening to this thinking. This sounds like the city before the big bang. Is this really the proper way that you should be doing business being being drunk drunk the whole time right now when you think of what. Journalists did the number of words equal to turn out the way that we do now podcast number things. It's simply not possible under that was important connection was because the nature of the work change. It mean you could. You could go to lunch at one o'clock entering the too much. If you knew you didn't have to fall copa until six o'clock when it came about that you had to be on ready to fall at any point because the website needed feeding or you have to tweak that becomes less viable is that because the number of stories you have to file a day has gone up to the expectation you put of journalists roselawn so you couldn't just go off radar you spend the normal working day when we when we'll start you'd roll in about nine nine thirty. Ten o'clock have have a slightly hung over breakfast on the terrace ago. Go for the papers. Maybe ring the desk until you but some things that you think are going on loeb briefing. Eleven o'clock milovan. That might mean for the give. The story is not sure. Go to lunch back in for blunt about three o'clock and that point you you actually engages newsdesks and start talking about the store uniform. At six o'clock that all disappeared because there was a story running all the time and the news was on twitter. News was online. I am not defending drinking. Which runs in retrospect remarkable. If you think about you want at lunch pop the bar in the press gallery zone bar. And then you're an red line somewhere else. After you funneled ole strangers. After you felt as had to catch contacted there was an awful lot of routinely level drunkenness and our generation much less drunk than our full base. Some of whom we know literally passed away from an excess of drink. So i think the fact this is today's lean mean tweeting. Something corresponds of frankly. Better smarter is mater etiquette probably more useful to their readers than we were right. Surprises that one of the reasons you left and it wasn't as much fun anymore. Yes facebook but yeah. I mean the pandemic Brexit and the pandemic really did drink quite lov fund from the pandemic did it but i mentioned to waiting brexit was here is why was it dilitariness. Well it was just incredibly hard work. And i made a promise to myself in the midst of that. But i wouldn't adver to subjugate my family. Everything else to to this obsessional job. That just eats you alive. These were kind of seventy eighty hour weeks in and out. I mean and the place that was quite rancorous under a story that was cited unto so to try to kind of keep saying and safe actually in that in mal strom walls very wearing an eye full and i remember having a once she. This isn't worth the candle to my own kind of wellbeing. Essentially say for instance you saying that you were political editor of the times right one of the important jobs. Some say the most important political journalism. I guess what you're saying is job. Which absorbs everything about you and you can only do that for so many years. It's like being prime minister or something. I mean you you ruin you longer. Tiny tiny violin right because about that shit but it is just the case. That four steve's twin fruitful. Ben reilly smith for you know the stewart guardian on the mirror. Their day starts seven if they're lucky. Maybe you know with the Today headlines on it will finish when the tomorrow's papers today twitter account drops all that rivals front pages at ten ten ten thirty and they will not. They will have badly ten minutes themselves in between five days. We sometimes sometimes six. And i don't think desks. And editors have what caught up with. How absolutely kind of monstrous the job is and they all say. Oh we know it's turbie hall job. Only you must take some time off news time but be calm because if you're political you it's a bit like leaving the dinner party halfway through you got to be. You got to follow the threat of the conversation. All the time and the expectations on the churn is just so massive. And then if you've got into that kind of let some people feel that they need to to pine had a point profile and blah blah blah blah blah off. It's not good. It's not good for those people. It's funny jaiswal. francis has just described. Could not be further away from what we're discussing a few minutes ago. Which is somebody rox. Upper half past nine lift lobbies on data terms twenty fourteen. So i missed this of emotional intensity briggs but everything francis said your rings otley true you all consuming and ultimately harmful job because you do have to be on all the time on the phone rings all the time and Seven years since. I've stopped being a day to day. It'll be rivaldo floating floating compensated with louis passage nice experience. I'm very very glad to have stepped off that. Big push off that convey build when i walls because yeah it's tough. You look back to the days when the when we started there was less communication and therefore less pressure i point. This is the write-in viciously on fraser for the benefit of listeners. Fraser was my political editor. I was his subordinate an undulating. So while you were off enjoying your your three bottle lunches phrases shackled shackled s. That works that was i actually. I legally renamed myself on my Via deed poll as my name actually became frizz nelson and james gluco because all of my stories mysteriously you quite a name on between between my keyboard and getting the newspaper the next day but still it was a simple happy time than the one faces or all comrades these days right. It's a francis. Why should anybody be political journalist. Now what you've just described doesn't sound very attractive because it matters because it's fun because where else really loved quote in tunstall off question may say lobby says because it's the best show entire show entitlement is a thrill it's thrilled in those stuff even half an hour before everybody else does it when you win on it and you really really kind of. It's all working for you. It is just. It is just great to to see what's coming to know where the call is gonna come off the road right okay. That's going to be an actually car crashed. I'll just stand here. Oh we call crushes a you just know when things are happening so but also if you're willing to give the energy i imagine if you weren't in these new young people who first of all if you're in your twenties early thirties right. You don't have much of a social life family. Life was what you're talking about protecting francis journalists career. I've always been walked into newsrooms thinking. Hang on why is new to hear over forty years old. Where do the go the elephants graveyard well number. That not really big as you mentioned. You're your forty is just a lifestyle. Friends describing is difficult to to balance with the family and those who try that balance quite often fail and so it's something which imagine if you're willing to give your life to it it can be shusha filling fun but if you try to balance that with family really other interests that might be where you start to think. Well the balance work does that does not do us. Any service in terms of the sort of reporting that we we live in question really the francis you mentioned in your piece. How were you started off his regional journalist. You became a national political journalist. And what's happening to that relationship now. I mean we're now your predecessor. Philip webster he was originally reporter of and became a national and that was a fairly standard path and then journalism started to change. Got the graduate trainees coming in straight from university. And now sometimes they almost start on the political lobby team the first job in journalism. Now when i was at times as a business reporter was my dream to become joined. The times is lobby team. You want to webster's teams are and eventually left because they'd eventually promised on join it in two years and never happened. But you'd never go straight onto the lobby team. You'd have to cut your teeth somewhere else and then on the lobby and it seems as if the journey to lobby is significantly shorter now it shorter absolutely in nineteen sixty eight a quarter only a quarter of lobby. Journalists were university educated. Now that was partly because of the war and even then he was changing very fast and become professionalized and at the same time. The provincial price regional journalism has dolly d- it survives in in extreme attenuated forms. But it's pretty much don so so and has been replaced to some degree by new digital films. Which on the whole do better. I think have recruiting more creatively than oxbridge. We've got hurry. Call the police. Close your son. He starts his on fox block in our day. You would never have thought a blogger would end up good to lobby the political editor of a sun. But harry is somebody who is coming through that that digital training grounds. Yeah i mean it is changing but not not enough and it doesn't to my view it doesn't replace the kind of richness of experience. That's i think. I think the reason i think there is this little slightly modernise worldview and given the the lobby of an accused of creeps thing. I think you know there is a danger that people will think that the same there is danger of getting into the was best alday tennessee but one of the characteristics of the local in design will join. You had a group of journalists who had a very clear sense of patch who knew their local area that constituencies the towns and cities and villages. The cavuto used to cover when they were reporting for the press and journal and upper dean. All the you will. I will present star wherever it is and say they knew how life looked from a part of the country. Understood that life in hampton was different to life to life in westminster. Though there the country looked from band was different. And i do. I think the lack of regional regional provincial in the best way routes four political journalism is a bit of shoe so much for for the absence of people desma column. I in a who famously grumpy and seiko was he belltel. He's one of those belfast. He bought will kind of expertise we would gather around and find. This is off. See in the run up to the good friday agreement. I mean that guy had massive weight. The close closes equivalent now thunderstorms staunton. Who the times. Who james his next to in the libyan james foresight and i know values highly only do but they really wear to find people lila james. When you and i worked scotsman they were how many of us ms scottish room. In room to the scotsman had three political staff the glasgow herald three plus a secretary. Seven eight seven or eight of us. I'm david perry from the presidency in prison. Gentle who knew every every village in eastern scotland new every year any story that affected his local patch. You would know immediately how and now. They're probably i'd how many scottish political journalists were now but but but then again this is just what's happening to our industry over the twenty years behind that we're talking about. The sales of newspapers will have gone down by about two-thirds in some cases even some more so that is inevitable but one final thing. I'd just like to mention that. I remember going to lobby lunch. Once with the guest speaker was robert kilroy-silk kind of nigel farage precursor and he made points which i thought resonated you saying that people will tease me for being regressive nocco dragging borderline racists but have a look around this room. The only people of color in this room are the one serving you your lunch. And he was right. The room is chock full. It's the only non-white journalists were the waiters. Is that still lobby for a while. Is that still a problem francis. I mean it's got better gender but on payment presentation is absolutely pulling to funds. You get journalists. Criticizing the government for not being am representative enough very few lobby. Teams of his newspapers would pass the test that we set for the politicians know something to to the next time. We there's a sort of moral panic about the reshuffle. You okay and looking back francis. Are you pleased that you did it. Give them that. You sacrifice as much of your life as you. How'd you absolutely great. And i went to the politics today and wondered how would feel kind of walking back through that. But i think i'll help falling. I think is nice just to kind of nice to taking a show for a little bit. And it's also nice to go and do other things and james has your rehabilitation. I'm recovering. i'm really glad. I would never have done anything differently. I did wonderful things. It was fun it was it was interesting something can be important but on really does do a good thing for the world. It is vital and necessary in does hold politicians to account. We forget that. But i'm really glad that i do anymore. I would never want to do to gain on that note. Thank you very much for joining me. On this podcast.

twitter francis bloomberg The spectator magazine Francis elliott Amodio fraser nelson James kirk coderre james kirk james oceanus Thinkable huddleston francis your francis parliament james Francis
Ellen

Coming Out Stories

12:34 min | 2 years ago

Ellen

"On media. This is coming out stories. Isabel cost about one of the most important conversations your life. I'm Emma, gall swell. This is a. Like I kind of put it off. If I'm honest, I didn't come out of school when I was right up until I was sixteen. It was a very gradual process when my friends and then I guess you could sound of never really come out to my dad me and my dad have the kind of relationship where I does just topic of conversation. We just do not go that. I would never ask him about his relationships and like he doesn't offer me about mine. So that's the understanding there. So, yeah, never spoken about anything like this dont and then my mum, this is the most non coming out story. I think I've ever heard an I know, I know. I'm so lucky because EV, you know, people that speaking to gay of the people that work with who, or algebra identified as GB BT a know the other people have has such a tough time of it. And so mine was just such a gradual process of my, I, I, I never went out with wiza- goal and we start seeing children fifteen. We're both in school. I was in the year above shoes in the below. We saw it hanging out a then kissing, and then it kind of developed from there and she was hanging around at my house a lot, and I was going around to hers a lot and. This happened was is that we were kind of making out in my bedroom and it go hot and heavy. And so we were both quite flushed, and it came the point, a moment's gonna come pick her up. I walk as my mom in the corridor. What was the conversation? She says something like, oh, is it time for you to go home now? Okay. Lovely to see halfway through what she was saying. She looked at both of us and went, oh, like kind of like we could see it on a phase clog. Just like your head down, ran out to meet go. Yes, that was not. And then I think my mom assume the I was gay because momma gopher and saw each other for a year, but the conversation, the type of the type of relationship that I have with my parents is so middle-class differ lip, kind of don't talk about it, but then paradoxically, my mom is a really accepting kind of person. So the was no big conversation, and I feel like I was quite lucky in getting out to that because you know, quite private person. And that's kind of thing that I don't really want to be talking about with my parents anyway, my mom just accepted it. I'm was perfect about it right from the beginning. So it's the case that you know she knows, but yet talk about it. Yeah. She's my other friend since as well, you know. And I think I, she has Hsun that I was a lesbian and then and then I had a boyfriend for sunny about three months was seeing she found out about him. And so. I think at that point again, it was just kind of everything's works on a sumptuous does never really been any conversation. She's never come to a pride event women. I'd love it if she did, but no. And I feel like I've cheated the system low bit when I hear about other people who and that coming out stories, you know either. So embarrassing all so awkward, all, you know, really awful consequences. There's may on just kind of, you know, I was a bit flushed. She was like, oh, but you said you've got, surely I governor school. So did you never yesterday telling the people at school? I didn't. I didn't want to be diff'rent on a stick out and didn't even know what it meant. I didn't know anyone else. There was no role models was. Don't even think knew what it meant myself like, but anew anew, very natural to me like, this is how I feel. But no, I didn't want densify an head above the parapet school because of single me out as different. And I didn't know anyone else that I could have. So when you questioning sexuality, do you think straight away? Oh, I'm definitely bisexual. Was it confusing to know? I've never been confused. I never remember feeling of being confused. I, it's just something I never questioned. I, I found siege. There was a boy in new kids on the block, the quite fancy, but he was quite Femina. Right? And then and then go from came along. It was so natural to me. Never questioned it just when within an by then I knew fifteen. Well, I like boys and I like goes, I could have a relationship with either an it was felt very natural within me, but outwardly it was something just did not want to share with friends at school because I didn't want to different such coward's way out. No. And gradually, they found out if the is, do you think is easy to come out as sexual or guy, or. No? Different? Oh, goodness of question. I think it's probably harder to come out as gay because parents perhaps think, oh, well, that's means I can't. You know, I'm not going to have grandchildren, whereas I guess being bisexual, still Hoffa Johns. Even though it's really fancy having children myself it for me. At least I think if I had actually been lesbian, I think my mom would probably talk to me about at some point in a does this mean I don't get grandchildren kind of away, but you think there are many buses role models because it'd be less it seems to be quite under dental. And to be honest, the still underrepresented because I feel I really, this is going to be quite controversial, but I really question some pop stars out there who've who've sort of emerged onto the scene and used that label. I'm not sure if they use it as a way to sell records or to be quirky in a little bit different and identify differently to other posters. An does want to name anyone, but there are some out there that have gone. Oh yes, I was by, but now just decided I'm going to just eight boys. So it's really tough for bisexual people because it's almost as if they can make. That choice, you know? And I don't necessarily think that that's the case, I think, you know, just as you born gay or you know, transa- or whatever, however you your Denver. I don't think you can just switch off and go. I'm not gonna fancy goals. Anyone wanna finish boys anymore. Long time ago when I was at university, we used to lesbian gay society, and you know, fight to get it changed to lesbian gay, bisexual society. I'm sure now it will be LGBT, but you feel like the beep part they'll GT is a sort of afterthought is something that sort of forgotten. I think it's getting better. Now. Do you feel part of the community do do attend him prides? It's very much a part of me. It's always going to be a part of me. I feel very strongly about it, and I feel very strongly that people should be able to identify as want to identify and you know, not suffer any consequences because of that I enjoy today. Life is just seems to take this to me. So have you got any role models, bisexual role models? They just to me just not enough out there, the trouble being bisexual is the type of things that I hear are. And I've heard these. From people who identify themselves as gay of sesame things like I understand what it is about. Yeah. No, I understand, bisexual, you just really love sex. I don't like probably know more than you. All you know, does a connotation that bisexual people are more sexual. They get about all your slag off the phrase, greater years before greasy. It just really upsets me things like that because. Does such a misunderstanding of the the all is I, I might have a relationship with a woman or a man. I'm not greedy. I'm not. I, you know, I would annoy me if people said that about poly-amorous people, but to say that about bisexual, people is just it really grinds. My gears. Well, it's VIN relationship relationship. You're going to be with that one person. Exactly. But you feel there is lot by phobia. I think it's getting better. And I think the thing a lot of strides have been taken forwards in the last, you know, even the last ten years, I think still a lot to be done. I would love to see a bisexual person properly represented in a a mainstream soap like he sunders or Amodio. They never have. Know why know which just as valid and it would be just as valuable, definitely would have been for me as a young person growing up just to have that confirmation maybe had I had that I would have invested in coming out of school telling more friends, you know, and having a support network instead of just sort of, you know, bumbling along with my own for a long wall. Yeah, is really important. A con overemphasize enough and a friend of mine actually, Joe Lisette whose comedian, I absolutely love what he does. He does something that even I don't feel I could. He gets up on a stage most nights and he says, yes, I'm bisexual, and guys like, hey, who are busting myths busting understandings about bisexuality just by being his own fabulous self and saying, sometimes I, you know, get women. Sometimes, you know, like with women and he's doing a lot for me. For, you know what? For our community, I think at the moment. So there is at least one role model is, oh, you know. Joe liceu. And also I have a friend of mine who is a blogger who's trying to sort of push bisexual messages while and he's doing quite low in the community as well. But you know, the should be more of us definitely should be more. Okay. Does that one listening than the might within king? Oh, I'm done for his sexual Rover than Eljay, Laura j. What would you say to them to them? I think if you questioning or you think you might be bisexual and say, you're a little bit younger, all your in a situation that puts you vulnerable, sort of situation, I would say find somebody you know that you can talk to, whether that's on a help line, whether that set a meeting group, an algae BT society and try find an ally I wished I worked harder to find an ally to to speak to somebody about a lot earlier, and I think that's really important. And then from there they should give you the courage to come out and speak to other people about take forward. I think that's really important. Don't ever feel alone and don't ever feel like he'll different. Must've funky to Ellen for sharing her story with us. Please do subscribe wherever you get you poke cost. From what else I love to hear from you on Twitter. You can find us there that's come out stories. I'm swell and coming out stories is a wolf. Does on media production coming up next, it's Cain on grew up in the time when you know it was particularly difficult time to be good because it was the HIV aids crisis. So we portrayed as dangerous disease, copying sexual predators, who couldn't be trusted children. And a lot of the tones in the school playground reflected.

Isabel EV Twitter Hsun HIV Hoffa Johns Joe Lisette Ellen Joe liceu Cain Eljay Denver Amodio Laura j three months ten years
AM/FM

Everything Everywhere Daily

09:02 min | 3 months ago

AM/FM

"For over one hundred years radio has been one of the biggest mediums for communication information and entertainment it was the first true broadcast medium. However recent technical and demographic changes have made the future of radio or at least some of the band's doubtful learn more about am and fm radio. It's past present and future on this episode of everything everywhere daily. This episode is sponsored by audible dot com. My audiobook recommendation. Today is a history of the world in one hundred objects the landmark bbc radio four series by neil mcgregor in two thousand ten. The bbc in the british museum embarked on an ambitious project to tell the story of two million years of human history using one hundred objects selected from the museum's fast and renown collection presented by british museums. Then director neil macgregor. Each episode focuses on a single object from a stone stone-age tool to a solar powered lamp. And explains it significance in human history. A stone pillar tells us about a great indian emperor preaching tolerance to people. Spanish pieces of eight tells us about the beginning of global currency and an early victorian tea sets speaks to us about the impact of empire. You can get a free one-month trial audible and two free audio books by going to audible. Trial dot com slash everything everywhere or by clicking on the link in the show notes radio waves are amazing things. We can't see them. We can't feel them yet. Much of the world runs on electromagnetic radio waves. If you're listening to this on a smartphone you probably downloaded this podcast. Waves amazingly radio waves were predicted before they were discovered james clerk. Maxwell predicted the existence of electromagnetic waves beyond visible light german physicist heinrich hertz prove their existence and eighteen eighty six and just a decade later italian guglielmo marconi had developed a practical device for sending and receiving radio signals in nineteen. Oh six reginald fessing broadcast a message from ocean bluff. Brant rock massachusetts out to ships at sea. The broadcast was a version of oh holy night on the violin. This was the first use of amplitude modulation or will later became known as. Am radio amplitude. Modulation uses the height and strength of wave to encode information. when am radio was developed. It was just radio. Creation necessitated a host of laws and regulations. To make sure there wasn't chaos on the airwaves. If multiple sources are broadcasting on the same frequency. Radio would be a mess and no one would be able to listen to anything most commercial. Radio stations were allocated to what is known as the medium wave. Part of the spectrum lower frequencies were reserved for international radio transmissions. That meant that radio stations could only reach a certain local audience. Am was the technology used during the golden age of radio before television. This was the primary source of news and entertainment for most families. Technology wasn't standing still however as effective as am was it serious drawbacks. The quality of the audio wasn't very good. And you could only broadcast a single channel audio in one thousand nine hundred eighty three a new method descend audio transmissions over radio. Waves was developed by american edwin. Armstrong was known as frequency modulation or fm. Instead of increasing amplitude it would vary the frequency of the signal. This proved to be a far better way to transmit sound than. am it also allowed for multiplexing signals. Which allowed for music to be broadcast in stereo. Fm took much longer to take off and am. Radio did even though the first fm stations in the united states started in the late thirties. It took a while before caught on it required people to have. Fm capable radios which most people didn't have at launch. It wasn't until the late nineteen sixty one album orientated. Rock became a thing that fm really started to gain traction in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight fm radio. Finally passed am radio in terms of total listeners. In the united states through the seventies and eighties almost all major music stations regardless of musical genre eventually migrated over to fm. The quality for music was simply better as audiences and money gravitated towards fm. That made am stations shift their strategy the eighties and nineties saw the rise of more talk. Orientated stations. sports politics weather news and religion found homes on. Am radio as the modified signals and lower sound quality. Were a better fit for talking instead of music there are other problems with. Am beyond limitations of amplitude modulation if you were inside. A building am signals would be more difficult to receive. Most am stations have to reduce their power or turn off completely at night. This is due to the atmospheric propagation of am signals. Perhaps you've picked up some very distant. Am radio station in your car. At night. Once the sun sets am signals can bounce off the fear and travel much further if every am station. Were to keep broadcasting night stations. That were far apart would start to interfere with each other. That's why the federal communications commission designated certain stations as clear channel stations. Not to be confused with name of the radio company. These stations could broadcast at full power all night long. These stations are spaced out along the am radio band. so they don't conflict with each other and are located throughout the united states. Canada mexico and the bahamas things look even worse for am radio going forward. One of the side effects of electric cars is that even though they're quiet efficient they create electromagnetic interference with am radio frequencies that means amodio is all but impossible to listen to in electric car both bmw and tesla have already eliminated am radios in their vehicles for this reason. Considering that forty percent of all radio listening happens in cars. This is not insignificant and the fact that most new cars sold are expected to be electric by the year. Twenty thirty five. It could be the final straw for. Am radio moreover. The internet has caused a huge drop off in radio listening across the board. Both at home and in cars people are more likely to listen to streaming services digital music or like all of you podcasts. All over europe am medium. Wave radio stations are being shut down in several countries. Such stations have now been totally eliminated while there hasn't been public calls to eliminate. Am radio in the us. The future doesn't look very bright so what about. Fm radio the future for fm does seem better. Many successful am stations have already moved over to fm or are simulcasting on both bands while fm doesn't suffer the same technical problems as am. They're still dealing with the same issues of their audience. Moving online the big question is does radio have a future at all yes but it might be very different technology and than what we've been used to for the last one hundred years just like terrestrial. Television made a switch in two thousand nine to digital signals so to my radio move to all digital as well. Norway recently became the first country to eliminate all of its fm radio stations and move completely to digital radio. The united states has already adopted a format called hd radio as of october twenty twenty. The fcc has given permission for all am radio stations in the united states to convert to digital if they wish right. Now it's mostly a chicken and egg problem. Most people don't have digital radios yet but it's now being installed a standard in new vehicles by most auto manufacturers. It would be similar to satellite radio but with local stations and a much lower bit rate. Might only be a matter of time before the. Fcc announces a complete switch to digital radio in the united states. If that happens it'll probably go like the transition to digital television. Did with several years advanced warning for people to upgrade the radios there are still people who want to preserve. At least some of am radio. It's a very simple time-tested technology and it works with over centuries of radios which have been produced if there's ever a need for emergency broadcasting plain old. Am is still the best way to get the message out in an emergency am is so simple that it's possible to make your own. Am radio receiver out of just some wire in a cardboard tube. Whatever happens to radio going forward. The only thing we can probably be certain of is that the next hundred years. We'll look nothing like the first one hundred years executive producer of everything everywhere. Daily is james. Makhala associate producer is remember. Leave a five star review to get your review read on the show. They can laugh at apple. Podcasts podcast republic or wherever you listen to the show also you can help. Support the show over at patriot. Dot com patrons can get merchandise like t shirts and hoodies as well. As having direct access to provide suggestions for future episodes.

neil mcgregor neil macgregor james clerk heinrich hertz ocean bluff Brant rock bbc united states guglielmo marconi british museum Maxwell amodio Fcc massachusetts Armstrong bahamas tesla bmw mexico
Nanhe Hotho ki Muskan. Vibha Sharma. IINK Podcasts. Episode 85

IINK Podcasts HI

03:36 min | Last month

Nanhe Hotho ki Muskan. Vibha Sharma. IINK Podcasts. Episode 85

"Hello everyone this is. We brush meet good deal obsolete a to get matt okkas omni up iniquity which are plus took him. I shall not will upset. He could go of your by medica daca ship non-nato dokie was caught to sugar deal nominee. Hct would turn to me too. Damus gone nominee who dope were turned to me to deem wiscon- hot the me will connie kadora cut coty. Hoodie magan gooey Data go to the data the going down for takhar mar gum got any go ahead of going in. Go donna ahead. Gum got a knee. gahan In donna data by gubbay Mean darkwa delaney. Key gauche ak- but Be galaxy in school. Doug mean darkwa delaney Wash eager the hominy told me that car w-we genetic kato key homini in gay hoddle mean the guard the weight and the gate with a k. But koby guitar will say but it took on but it could be get the same But he asked the niquia hum. Don gajah call the hum. Donegal judah dicara got a sesame don vetoing their jock amodio within gambling in animus. Gano goes gold city in name was gone. Goes gore say they cou in a beacon he colome casado in he beacon. He galunggung sahara do romi in He beat mcconnell qatar romania. In case again he bid konadu. Machi gallini artsy nevada. Though we are near orlando and to me. Was it to hungry ozzy charter in keiko's yo could kurna a good too hard day who in geico's you'll gain a good kurna though. Should what could the cycle though should what could the saco those little bhartiya afford and bendigo you amara he sir you hamada. He he's in gorkhas savannah the girl in savannah bendigo. Thank you for listening. I hope you will like it. If you like it. Then please comment and share. Thank you everyone. Thank you so much.

matt okkas medica daca dokie connie kadora gubbay darkwa delaney darkwa delaney Wash donna koby guitar Don gajah Donegal judah dicara jock amodio gahan nato colome casado konadu Machi gallini Doug romi sahara
It Was Always White Supremacy

In The Thick

42:56 min | Last month

It Was Always White Supremacy

"Part of what we know. Is that in. these moments. Moderates are complicit there's no inbetween there's no position in between. Hey what's up. Welcome to end the thick podcast about politics race and culture from poc perspective. I'm i've got a little hop in my step muddy hosa and i'm he lorella. Very nice opened my step you know. We have to phenomenal. All-star guests yes from princeton. New jersey is dr eddie globe. Junior he is the james s mcdonnell distinguished university professor at princeton university. You know you don't get that introduction at msnbc. I should know but thank you very much and joining us from boston. Massachusetts is the renee graham. She's a columnist for the boston globe. Hey renee how are you good and you know reminding everybody that if you hear strange sounds in the background. It's because we are still at home and not in professional recording studios life continues on and on all right. So we're nearing the one year anniversary of george floyd murder. May he rest in peace. May his family be finding some kind of peace. Were thinking of them. All of the time and his friends is girlfriend with all watching the trial of derek. Chauvin the former police officer accused of murdering floyd and for many people the black community in particular people who live in minneapolis watching. This unfold has been really re traumatizing video footage of floyd's death of his murderer including video taken by witness. Darnell up frazier. Who was just seventeen years old at the time has become the centerpiece of the trial and there are so many layers to this from the police scene from the violence. The racism that this country is inflicted on black people for centuries to the testimonies of the people who will be you know again. I think they got a life sentence. Because of being present and dealing with their own guilt and trauma we're seeing the rehashing of what happened and the utter powerlessness of george floyd and so many people just watching this happen at the hands of the minneapolis police so democratic representative ilan omar of minnesota was on. Cnn's state of the union with. Jake tapper this past sunday. This she put it. It's been traumatizing. It's been really hard. I've tried to avoid Watching i know a lot of us here in minneapolis have done that But it's hard you also want to know the details and wanna hear from the witnesses. There's a lot we're learning. We learned that it wasn't just eight minutes and forty six seconds as we have been saying but it's was nine minutes and twenty six seconds and so it's been really hard. I think the one part that seat with me is the fact that everyone who took the witness stand said. They felt helpless. That is a feeling that we know really well here in minneapolis when it comes to police abuse and you know i remember feeling helpless. Twenty years ago. When i witnessed police officers on mode three dozen rounds on mentally ill somali men in the middle of the street and so it's been an earth so much trauma for for many of us but we have each other on. We're gonna get through it. You know eddie it brings up the question that many people white folk actually don't experience this and yet many of us we can all go back while there was this moment there was this moment there was this moment. There's a lot of this first of all eddie. Were happy that you're back with us. We want to know starting with you. How have you been taking this all in. And what do you think about how to handle retraumatize ation. That's happening Which is necessary sadly to build a case but it is re traumatizing. Absolutely it has been so hard. I was talking to a colleague. We were texting each other during charles. Mcmillan's oh yeah testimony. And when he broke down the sixty one year old man. Oh yes. I found myself here. I broke down. And i just said damn and the idea of having to then go on television and dispassionately you know analyze the trial. It's been hard or to look at charles martin. You know the young teenage clerk. He's nineteen now but he was eighteen and to see the image of him putting his hands on his head to see the sadness in his eyes. What to hear the nine year old girl. The nine year old you know describing the paramedics asking chauvin to pull his knee office neck. Maware and having to move him and then i started thinking about philander casteel. The young girl in the car who saw landau could still murder. Kim thinking about sterling's son grieving at the press conference. You know it's just the only thing i could say was damn and then go pull myself drink right. I mean that for me eddie. You brought up. So many names. I'm fixated on the coverage that i did in one thousand nine hundred ninety nine of the nypd police officers who were accused of killing amodio. Forty one bullets nineteen hitting him directly. They were all found not guilty. And it's like we're this is a movie we've all seen before rene going to go to school the renee. How are you handling things. How are you processing. It's funny after last year. We watched the video over and over and over again. And i can't even say it sweet traumatizing because the trauma never heal in the first place. Yeah it just feels like that. Wound keeps getting deeper and wider and bleeding. More used to be a cop reporter. I certainly saw my share of dead bodies. When i was doing that but i've never watched someone go from the flush of life to the stillness of death. And that's what you see with. George floyd and i think what also struck me were so many witnesses said the same thing. I wish i could have done something. I wish i could have done more. I've apologized to george floyd for not doing more. When there was nothing else that they could do they did everything. They were in a position to do which was to to say that what they were witnessing was wrong. And in some cases to call the police to call the police on the polling. That's the only recourse. They have even the nine one. One dispatcher called the police because she was watching the video she thought it had frozen because she couldn't fathom any of the way that that officers knee would have continued to be on batmans neck and so all of those things combined. It was a very heavy week. It was very hard and always that debate on you know. Can i take this. And she'll be watching this. But i keep thinking about george floyd family and loved ones and what this is doing to them and how they're watching again and again this man that they loved die be murdered really in front of their eyes. And it's so it's it's been really difficult and i think it was more difficult. I've been dreading the trial for weeks but it was. It was more difficult than i than i thought it would be. Yeah you know. I've watched every minute of it. Because i feel like this is such. It's such a monumental moment. I'm stuck on the whole. You gotta see this twenty times as the prosecution comedy more times. You have to prove this right but obviously because we live in a world where. There's this false assumption that everything you know has another side but there is another side and it's shaaban's defense team which is adding another layer to this trumpeters asian. You know his lawyer eric. Nelson essentially is using every racist trope in the book to make his claim look innocent. He's trying to defame. The character of george floyd blaming his death on his own health and drug use where you know. The doctor said no. The paramedic said no how many more times how many more witnesses have to say no. He didn't die from a drug overdose. But this is a moment that really hit me. Don williams who was one of the witnesses last week nelson questioning him and trying to paint him as an angry black man. He called them a thumb at least thirteen times. That's what you come into video. I counted she got thirteen and that was early. On those terms grew more and more angry you agree with that. They grew more more pleading for life and at one point you said that officer tau pushed as curriculum. Was he did. He put his hand in watch. Us is what and you observed. Officer tau push someone else right or feel like you push someone else anyone else. Do you recall saying. I dare you to touch me like that. I swear. Slap the fucking the fuck out of both of you need so again sir. It's fair to say that you grew angrier and angrier. I grew professional a professional stadium. My body can't payments to be angry. And yeah i mean. These tactics shouldn't surprise anyone because he's a lawyer defending someone accused of murder. Who's on trial but it still speaks to the dehumanizing and racial is language that has fueled police violence against black and brown communities since the origins of this country. So we also know that when it comes to justice. Police are rarely charged when they kill someone on duty. That's a fact. Rene wanna took call one of your pieces for my hometown newspaper the boston globe you know. I read all the time. Rene of my mother-in-law was talking about you at easter. Saying that renee graham. So you got the boston irish readers to so listen. Let me quote one of your excellent opinion pieces that you recently wrote. If shelvin is convicted on the most serious charge second degree murder it would not erase all systemic racism and it's traumas but it will be a small step toward justice yet. Black people also know that an acquittal like those received by the officers who assaulted rodney king would further codify racist tyranny. Give sanctuary to violent cops and again allow america to exonerate white supremacy. So here we are thirty years after we witness the police brutality of rodney king demanding the same justice for yet. Another black man renee. How can we expect to find justice for george floyd within the very same system that killed him. Well that's exactly the problem isn't it. I mean that's it's the same thing of people having to call the police on the police. There's no way to rectify these situations. When we watched rodney king thirty years ago everyone watched the video and thought oh this is a slam dunk. There's no way those officers can be acquitted. And they were acquitted. Yeah you know. We watched it again last summer. We thought this has got to be the one. And we're not even confident nevada because what erick. Nelson's doing exactly what you said. Julio all of the racist tropes. It's george floyd who's on drugs and who was out of control and was this big black man remember how big he was. How tall he was. We're hearing that then. He's trying to put down williams as the angry black man. He's got the people on the side as the angry mob. He's playing until all of these racist tropes that to feed into white supremacy and white fears of black people. And once you do that then you can justify what you do to black people while he was out of control so we had no choice vegas gaming on the side. They were distraction so they had no choice in the way that they behave in terms of the officers. It's the same thing over and over again. So the idea that justice is inevitable has never been the case for black people and certainly not the case in this trial anti. I want to get your thoughts on that but also you know this is america. He could get acquitted. There's a possibility i mean. Let's just be fucking real with that. I mean as obvious as we're seeing is there. He could get acquitted but me for minneapolis for the country in this ongoing movement for justice if that were the scenario well i think the country will explode. If he's acquitted. I think there is a palpable sense. That people a fed up. We're all on the edge. The mental health crisis in the country is what it is. And there's a sense at least in the community. That i move about that folk are tired. Not in a sense of exhaustion. Perhaps but tired of this tired of the way in which we're doing this work you know so you know from the gulf coast and a little bit about hurricanes. We're in the beginning of the tail of the storm and the tail is as dangerous as the front of the store So we need to understand that. The winds are only going to get stronger. But as as i was listening to rene in you. Julia is our talking. I was thinking about the two elements of doubt that are at work in this trial. There is the fact that the prosecution has to prove this case beyond a reasonable doubt and we see show wtn's defense team trying to so that doubt by appealing to standard racial ri- common sense are by definition of threat. That black men of of george floyd size by definition are dangerous. remember in the trayvon. Martin tastes you know. The defense attorney brought out a piece of sidewalk and said that martin had weaponized the environment You know so. There's a sense in which there's this appeal to these standard common sense assumptions. That have been some ways informed the carson of millions of black and brown people all over the country over the last decade or so right a more than a decade or so and then there's this other element of doubt and that is earned skepticism that the criminal justice system will do justice for black and brown people have so the prosecution has to prove beyond a reasonable doubt. And then there's the doubt. I think that circulates around the country that you know this criminal justice system is what it is that they very well may acquit this guy and even if we are in disbelief if they do it. Yeah there's a sense in which deep down in our gut. We know that they can do this. And that that skepticism. That doubt puts added weight on the proceedings as they move forward. There's something entering your brain. I know when you like this. I'm thinking about rodney king. Because i lived through that right i remember that video but then you think about what they did. In terms of the trial they relocated. They moved it to seamy valley. They had an all white jury essentially. And there's a lot of time that has passed. I don't know there's a part of me that thinks this might in fact as was his murder a turning point in this country that this trial also could be a turning point. Because i think that there's just a point where logic takes over and you're like yeah mother fuckers but you were on his neck for nine minutes and everybody was saying look. We're here we'll help you. He's not moving. He's not breathing. He needs cpr. He needs help if you think he was high on drugs. Deal with that. Of course none of that. None of that and so i don't know my silly to hold out hope. Oh no no no no. I don't think so. But i think it's what eddie's point and rene saints like. Let's not be surprised if it doesn't lead to a conviction of calvin no. I'm not going to be surprised. I'm gonna be horrified. Exactly and i'm going to be so sad and i don't want anybody else to lose their life but no i won't be surprised but something feels different and the difference for me. It's at tens of thousands of people across the country stood up and said no. And i think that you know unless you have your head in the sand and let me just say this real quickly because this juxtaposition between those tens of thousands of people in the street and january six that is to say that the country still is what it is so you know we have to be mindful of that which leads us perfectly to my next question because on friday you know here we are thinking about. I mean i'm also obsessed with the trial. I'm not watching the video of the murder per se. But i'm trying to watch as much as i can and then all of a sudden it's like you know the news is diverted. There's a second attack so far this year on the. Us capitol twenty five year. Old man drives his car into a barricade killing one police officer from the capitol police and injuring another official said after the crash that the suspect stepped out of his car with a knife in hand and like lunged and then was shot and killed by police. Okay i mean this to me. Sounds a little bit of death by police. It comes nearly three months after january. Six you know the assault on january six left capital. Police shaken the current chairman of the. Us capitol police labor committee gusts papathanassiou said in a statement. That many officers have signaled. They wanna leave the department which is already under staffed. I mean there's some real questions here on. Abc's this week with. George stephanopoulos retired lieutenant. General russel honore who led the review of the security at the us capital following. the january. Six insurrection spoke about the importance of protecting the nation's landmark building the capital but can attack like this really been prevented. The seems like a troubled loner. Well we've always worried about the lone wolf whether it's personally motivated are dominated by some ideology at the end of the day. Twenty four seven three sixty five to capitol. Police have to be ready to protect capital. This is the only police force in america that works for congress. There's no of command between that police forces. Congress that is their police force is designed and built to protect one building and yet air. Those who made snarky comments about well. They've got all. These police protect one building. Yup it is the most important building in america because it's a seat of our democracy at that building into people in it don't function we no longer have democracy and whatever price we have to pay to protect it. We need to george. So there's a lot of focus on protecting this symbol of democracy this building. And then you know the responses. Let's get more capital police eddie. You know we're dealing with the fact that police themselves are a threat in multiple ways. Hello trial of derek chauvin. But also how many law enforcement officers. Hello we're involved in the january six insurrection. So help us with this huge contradiction here. It's a contradiction that reflects our time in the sense that you have several officers who died. As a result of the insurrection january six one directly offer sick then we saw the images of officers leading insurrectionist through the gates officers walking people down the capital of the steps and we saw literally actions on the part of those within their ranks. Who said that folk had to be placed on leave right. We saw all of this right so it shows us that there is this complex embarkation of law enforcement and white supremacy white supremacism or however we want to describe it that made itself known january sixth. Yeah and at the same time here at the same time that combines with this this sense of folk just being hired and how that desperation that exhaustion will evidence itself. People are working hard to put food on the table to keep reuss over their heads folk have lost loved ones. And you have these people playing fast and loose with their lives who call themselves politicians right and so you got the combination of the complexity of the police force as we just laid out the kind of desperation of large numbers of folk in the country. And you have whatever we want to call the fuck. They're doing on capitol hill. So it's it's a deadly cocktail if that makes sense. Yeah what about you renee. I think for me the thing about what happened last week. At the capitol was it actually force people to again talk about what happened at the capitol three months ago. I have never seen something of that. Magnitude fade so quickly. Somehow josh hawley is still senate. Somehow ted cruz is still a senator. People acting like this never happened and a recent poll came out saying that half republicans believed that what happened. The capital was non violent and that this is being hyped up to hurt the former president. So let's have this conversation about capitol security but let's keep talking about what happened on january sixth when white supremacists tried to over. Throw the government. Let's be really clear about what happened. There it's astonishing to me that this is still not front page news every single day arrest being made. But it's not enough. This needs to be understood in a much deeper way. What happened and how it happened. Who was complicit. And no one's talking about that. I think it's great to talk about cap security fine but talk about what happened three months ago which somehow again has just been wiped off the face of the earth for a lot of people. Rene i think that if you and eddie gloved and julia were running the washington post where you editors in chief of the washington post the new york times the la times the awesome. We'd be like these people like we'd be like having drinks during the day. Yeah if you guys were like newspaper people we'd little you know and little notebooks and pencil. Yes but they would be being talked about because we would understand that it was about white supremacy alpha nine quintas when you strip it down. That is what we're talking about and fear and that's why we're so glad that you're joining us on the because we are the antithesis of that right and that's why we give this critical perspective because here we can stand back and look at this whereas white men who lead our media like oh shit no man we don't want to do. We have to talk about this shit now. We got a two sides at all and we're going to two sides at all exactly. Hey it's producer here. And today i wanna tell you about hellofresh. America's number one meal k. throughout quarantine. I've really struggled to come up with new creative recipes for my partner and i to cook every night but hellofresh is perfect with over twenty five recipes to choose from each week. 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Do dot com slash in the thick or use promo code in the thick at checkout and get twenty percent off your first order. That's native dao dot com slash in the thick or use promo code in the At checkout for twenty percent off your first order enjoy okay. Let's turn to the latest with voting rights in this country because that's also happening according to a report by the brennan center since march twenty fourth. Okay there have been three hundred. Sixty one voter restriction bills introduced across forty seven states and the report notes that there was a forty three percent increase in just one month. So obviously there's a lot of focus on georgia. Because in late march georgia republicans passed restrictive voting bill that includes a number of suppression tactics including making it illegal to hand out food or water. Okay voter standing in line you know. They didn't want the mexicans out. There selling stuff. You know georgia's notorious for its long voting lines especially for polling sites in being being being you guessed it feels majority neighborhoods. So this law will also require. Id's for absentee ballots and limits. The number of drop boxes so that was a big thing last year. But it's going to limit the number in response to the legislation and this is after it was voted so we got to look at it in that context. You have multiple organizations and companies pushing back including delta airlines coca-cola and major league baseball also known as the mlb which announced on friday that they were moving the all star game and the baseball draft out of georgia. Also last week we saw a voting bill advance in the texas senate and that bill has restrictions such as banning drive thru voting and limiting early voting hours so multiple texas based corporations like american airlines. They've already spoken out against the bill. And we're seeing similar voting restrictions coming up in other states including arizona iowa in tennessee so cliff albright co founder of black voters. Matter was on democracy now this past friday and he talked about the need for further action. So let's listen stand by the words that you said in the midst of the summer protests about black lives matter we had all these glowing statements about racial justice in enrichment equity imagine if these companies coca cola delta had made the statements that they came out with the other day if they had made those statements at hearings. When this bill was still being discussed then we wouldn't be having this conversation right now. Imagine if every fortune five hundred company came out with a statement that was as strong as what the black executives the seventy two black execs came out with the other day on wednesday in their full page ad in a major newspaper. Imagine if all fortune five hundred companies came out that unequivocally that passionate that clear about there is no middle ground. There is no both side ism and so. That's what we're saying to these companies. If they wanted to squash this legislation it would have been squashed so renee. Give me your thoughts on these latest voter suppression tactics in. I mean what do you think. The impact of these actions by companies are going to be. I think he made a really good point. We know corporate. America is risk adverse. But everybody can't with a little black box on instagram. Everybody put their little black lives matter signs up and all that it's now time to show improve. This is it you know. And they're waiting. They're waiting to see if they can get through this with doing as little as humanly possible. I think it's interesting. Julio when you're introducing the segment that you talked about there being three hundred bills in forty seven states a couple of weeks ago. It was two hundred fifty three bills in forty three states. This is expanding and the problem is. It's great that you had black executives come out but this is not really a black problem. This is a problem in america. This is the problem of democracy. And it's not just going to affect black and brown people and that's what these corporations need to understand. And that's a lot of white people standing on the sidelines. Need to understand. Because it's been proven people liked mail in voting people. Like you know some of the things that went on last year that allowed us to have the most people turn out for the election in modern history. Now you're hearing politicians in georgia and texas talking about. Oh we're going to tighten voting laws. The hell does that me. We know what that means. You're going to make it harder for people to vote and if you make it hard for people to vote you're compromising democracy. So these companies have decide what matters to them democracy or their bottom line because the two are going to be linked and so. Yeah if you're not going to stand on the side of democracy then you need to be boycotted you need to have people say you know what we're not gonna fly delta or we're not gonna buy coca cola because that's what it's coming down to because he's companies simply aren't doing enough. They can't be trusted to do this any other way. Yeah you know. I was also surprised by major league baseball. How quickly they reacted to that. Because they are of all the league's they're definitely not the nba. I mean of all the leagues are very newsy. More cautious in. I was surprised that they went. So fast eddie. Your thoughts about all this. What what are you thinking well my thinking about. Mlb is the players probably drove that That decision right. But you know. I'm thinking about you know these voter suppression laws as an extension of what happened on january six. We have to see this part of the insurrection right. The ongoing attempt to insist that america remain a white nation in the vein of old europe. Yep this is an extension of what happened on january six then. Let's be clear about corporations. We're in a global context right now where there is this belief. And we're seeing in places like hungary and in china that you can have capitalism without liberalism. But you can have capitalism without democracy that you can pursue prophet that markets can do their work without having any commitment to essential rights to order people having a say so in their government in how they're governed in the like and in this moment. Us corporations have to make a decision. Are you committed to democracy are not. Are you committed to your bottom line more than york democracy and what we saw in the early days as cliff made very clear i thought in in the segments you played right is that corporations were at a certain point right more interested in their bottom lines and they were in the democratic process. So i think at the end of the day. We need to understand this for what it is. There is a concerted effort afoot. I'm seeing it now. Jonathan turley nate cohn. Joe scarborough that they're trying to render what's happening in georgia in a particular sort of Right is deodorized. This is not jim crow. this is not a throw man. Let's compare what's happening in in georgia to what's happening in new york and i just had to ask myself. How many times has the state of georgia been sued for denying black folk in brownsville. The ability to vote compared to new york right. So part of what we're seeing is an attempt to deodorize these efforts. Yeah right and to see them not as attempts to disenfranchise americans to see it. Not as an extension of the insurrection january six and we have to stand in the breach and not let that happen the same way. They anti odorized. What happened on january exactly was an attempted coup and this is a voter suppression is a cook. Exactly exactly so it leads us to. I don't know one of eddy's favourite topics which is eight to monsieur democrat french. Mademoiselle democrats eighty two. What are the democrats doing. You know we see that. There's like this crazy division between like the moderate and the progressives so that the most ambitious laws like abolishing the filibuster gun control passing a new voting rights. Bill that they're all. I mean amazingly contested within the party. So any what are your thoughts about. What the democrats need to do now visit historical example that comes to mind and that is the collapse of radical reconstruction. And when we think about the collapse of radical reconstruction. What we know is this. When andrew johnson became the president after a lincoln was assassinated. There were members in the congress. They call themselves moderates who thought they could work with him as he was giving back the reins of power handing over the reins of power to southern elites who at just rebelled in caused over six hundred thousand people to be dead and these moderates thought that they could work with andrew. Johnson what happened you saw slaughter in the south in places like new orleans massacres in places like memphis right then of course we saw the consolidation of the racial regime. That would be jim crow right. So part of what we know is that in. These moments moderates are complicit There's no in between. There's no position between and so i think is really important for us to understand that when we hear joe manchin or kirstin cinema or we see democrats dragging their feet. They are complicit in voter suppression. They are by their actions. Engaged in disenfranchising us and here. We are in two thousand twenty one having to make that damn argument again Rene just bounce off. What eddie said you know to be wells. Left the nwa c. p. Near the turn of the century because she knew that white moderates were getting in the way of progress. We know what martin luther king said about white moderates being the greatest obstacle to progress not the clan white moderates. We've seen it through history and we're seeing it again if you talk about risk averse. That's the white moderate. Well we can wait or well. We can figure out a way to work with these people. And that's never the case. All it does is delay and cause more harm so yes something has to be done. I'm a little tired of people trying to water these things down and say well. It's not like jim crow. Exactly like jim crow. Actually you know. It might be dressed up with a suit and tie as abram said but it's still jim crow. It's still restricting. People's ability to fully participate in democracy. Which is kinda way. This country is always operate. So i'm not really interested in the woes of white moderates whether they're in congress or not. I'm interested in getting this country functioning in the way that it claims at wants to and that's just simply not going to happen. If you let someone like joe manchin have this kind of power all right. Let's move on to our final segment which we call covert coping. So you know the reality is that we're all freaking out right because it's just like we want to be happy because there are more vaccines now in new york. If you're sixteen or older you can get the vaccine. And then it's like not so fast motherfuckers. 'cause people are getting sick. And there's the new variant and we're seeing spikes globally india becoming the first country after united states to cross the threshold of more than a hundred thousand new cases on a single day as of monday in the united states. One hundred six million people. That's like thirty. Two percent of the population have received at least one dose of the vaccine. That's like kind of while amazing. We're administering an average of three million vaccines day. So you know it just feels like we're wavering between hope and then dread so it's a lot. I'm getting ready for my second shot on sunday. I gotta be honest. I'm freaking out. And i've been sharing that because i'm all about talking about my apprehension and my fear but we want to ask you a question so rene will start with you. And then eddie. How are you cova coping. Got my first shot. A couple of weeks ago was hesitant. Not because of the science. But because i am needle phobic. And i'm happy i did it and i'm hoping that it can bring me closer looking at it in the most narrow terms possible. I haven't seen my family in two years. And i miss them beyond all comprehension and we're also getting vaccinated. So that's the way i'm looking at. This can bring us little closer. Even as i realized that there are lots of problems with you know huge patches of people who aren't doing this whatever the reasons are but i think that's it it's just these sort of incremental steps to kind of getting back a little bit the parts of my life that have been on ice for the last year on ice. That's the way of thinking of it. Okay eddie how you covered copen so i got my first shot Week ago or so. And so i'm looking forward to april seventeenth for the second shot. So then i can go see my momma momma's boy. I can't wait to go home and just hug up on my mom. And they're getting their shots as well one of the ways in which i've been coping to be honest with you. One is unhealthy in the other somewhat. Healthy one is just being extraordinarily busy just working. It seems as if i'm working longer hours. I'm just in the house but i'm working longer. I'm in front of my computer longer. And that's not healthy but the other is that i've been in a reading group for over a year so every two weeks you know. It's a group of guys. I graduated with morehouse college. And cornell west. And others. Ron sullivan and paul taylor. And charles peterson. And charles mckinney and mark jefferson. And you know we read. We read last week. Virginia woolf's mark on the wall the week before that you know we were reading Tony moore's sit in how thurman and next week we're waiting jamaica kincaid place and we get together every two weeks in for three hours from six o'clock to nine o'clock we're drinking and just talking about books and not thinking about the world which is loving each other. How might god. I love that. That's awesome. We are so so happy to have both of our dear all-stars dr declawed junior. Yes here comes. Big old title through james as mcdonald distinguished university professor at princeton university columnist for the boston globe. Thank you so much for joining me on me and this episode of fake. We're so thankful as always thank. You love doing it being here. Thank you love. You guys take care. Now i'm marina wholesome and i'm who lorella now dear listener here some smart people like that. I know you're like oh my god. I just after. Go to apple. Podcasts this show yes so just do. It really helps us. Also you can listen to pandora spotify wherever you get your podcasts. On check us out on the web in the thick dot. Org follow us on twitter on instagram at in the thick show like us on facebook. And you know the we. Our audience is in fact by you telling your friends and family to listen. What's up groups and your whatsapp groups. We know you got your whatsapp group. Don't even try and pretend like you be telling them about us. All right in the figures produced by nicole rothwell newer saudi shahada and our new york. Lind's nation ignite fellow. Lisa selena's along with our intern nicole. Lino with editorial support from eric. Dill are audio engineering. Team is stephanie. Lebow julia crusoe endless. Shaw are digital editors luna thanks to that will perish for recording me. The music you heard his courtesy of captains easy k records. We'll see you at the end of the week. Dear listener take it easy. Find some time to breathe meditate. Look at sports. If you're like julio earth you're like me at birds by yeah look at sports bio another. I would look really damn good in a hat. Newspaper and attention. Walking around with and rene young people who are listening to us. They're like what the hell are they talking. I would be like the movie the front page. You have a front page. Hey let's call anyway so many people of color in those movies so yeah totally. Roll with eddie. And rene newspaper people. The opinions expressed by the guests and contributors in. This podcast are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of fujairah media or its employees.

george floyd eddie minneapolis renee graham rodney king united states renee dr eddie globe james s mcdonnell Chauvin the boston globe ilan omar chauvin Maware georgia philander casteel amodio floyd shaaban rene
Player Evaluations: Blake Lizotte & Michael Amadio

All the Kings Men | LA Kings

41:36 min | 9 months ago

Player Evaluations: Blake Lizotte & Michael Amadio

"You're listening to an LA kings podcast for more episodes of this and every other kings program visit L. A. Kings Dot com slash podcast. Absorbs the check from his coughs up the puck Brunson's pass knockdown wagner shots. Blake LOZAD FIRST NHL goal. Kings are winning. You're listening to all the king's men, the official todd cast of kings. Over the line that's not block second west. Now. Here's your host Jesse Cohen. Welcome making fans I am Jesse Cohen. This is all the king's men presented by Manscaping an official partner of your La. Kings thanks to this. Revolutionary Company manscaping accidents are a thing of the past just get yourself the manscaping perfect package three point no inside. You'll find products their lawn three point zero, which is advanced skin safe technology. So this trimmer won't cut you everything you need to keep trimmed and spelling nice is in the perfect pack three point Oh you can get twenty percent off plus free shipping with the Code King's men at Manscaping Dot Com always that's manscaping dot com use the word kingsman. We got a little behind schedule with our player evaluations, but we are back to talk about some center depth specifically. Blake Lozad and Michael Maggio, Jim Fox, and Sean Tierney. Join me again as we talk about expectation versus reality at the center position for the Kings. Heading, into twenty nine thousand nine twenty twenty. The ceiling of my expectations for Blake Lozad were role player for the Ontario Reign. What were your expectations for him heading into training camp at the beginning of the twentieth? Nineteen twenty twenty season. Expectations. Were based. Much on talking to people as opposed to watching them play because of the limited limited action, we had a chance to see him in or at least I did. Role Player. Fourth Line player who would always be fourth line player? How much work you put in is a big part of his. Identity. I did get a good feel from people that he was GonNa make team. So that wasn't a surprise to me having spoken to those people. But You know when he did make A-team, you could see why you can see why endeared himself to his teammates to a coaching staff. How he applies himself every day. And is a nonstop worker so. That was the expectation fourth line player. And work hard and he certainly did that. So he more than makes the team he plays sixty five game score six goals. Seventeen assists for twenty three points in a minus four. Now, twenty penalty minutes, and he winds up on a line that gets used as second most that even strength by the coaching staff with Adrian Kempe. And Austin Wagner. So you mentioned his work ethic. Obviously, he earned rave reviews. Let's talk about. The way he exceeded expectations in twenty, nine, hundred, twenty, twenty season. The Opposite end of the spectrum in my mind for Blake. Lozad. Our players like Jason Allison Angie copay Tar who are so much bigger than your average player that they may be appear to be working as hard as other players were his players like bike lozad you can see every escape stride that they're working hard. How much of that? Rave review process that fell on him has to do with how easily visible it is when he's working hard not not that he isn't working hard. He's obviously working incredibly hard all the time. You're. The skating style of a player many times can. You know get like you mentioned, give you that first impression factor that that never goes away. I think can the old Mac and my day in baseball? It was Darrell Strawberry in the outfield who would you know six five? Being stride never ever ever looked like he was working but yet he was covering a lot of ground. So Blake, when you see his stride, it's choppy it's journey it's nonstop its energy energizer bunny type just keep going keep going I. It does stand out I. think There is a quickness factor they are That he's able to dart in and out to get back and forth. I think and we see it because of his size and the battles he's willing to get into that he is knocked down quite a bit. But then again, jump back up doctor is right there and that that catches your more than anything I've caught. My attention was okay he's muscled there, but we'll look at them get back in it gets back up the proper angle he he's on his horse to wait to get to his spot so that energy is there enough to be part of his game that that is a mush. That will that will never go away and. Even at his size. My opinion if he is ever going to become more than a sign player and he can play Fourth Line Center in the NHL for ten years and have a great career. Fine career a career that anyone would be proud of. But I think he still has to get stronger and that's tough to say for you know a player with his size. So to me, it becomes A. You know a muscle mass ISU- issue it's more stocky he he will always be stocky but. Got Into, the battles that he did get into. But that's something that every player goes through every younger player goes through the understand the strength issues when they finally get a chance to it live in game then they go back and they go to the strength and conditioning coach and okay how can I get stronger? How can so his and by getting knocked down? It's not bad either. He doesn't lose a battle when that happens many times but I think finding a way to to create just a stronger base once again would go a long way to help him. He's listed five foot seven and there's a handful of plays throughout the season that I can remember where he goes into a corner or into a border. And avoids contact partially because of utilizing his size whether docs under a check or you know hops out of the way how much of that is you know being able to read the play and how much of that is opponents not knowing him not understanding how fast he is. Now elusive he can be will that get harder for him as his career progresses we've seen it seventeen million times where a player does have to make the adjustment when he gets to the NHL. But no, like I was saying earlier when he gets knocked down. But how quickly he gets to the he needs to get to me it's just a sense. It's something you pick up on maybe something he's had to learn individually because of his is you know I was the same type of size as far as a player. So you do understand certain things and body position becomes. So important. Getting an inside shoulder because if you if you're not getting that shoulder on the inside when you make contact with another player, they're just GonNa, kind of scuff you up you're gone. Because you don't have that strength to get there or that's just the overall mass. but he he he does have an understanding that again I think we'll keep them in the league I. Really Do I think you'll being there. It's just a matter of. Can he be a? Can't he be forced? His numbers are okay at six schools again, if he can get that to eleven or twelve, then you're talking about a very viable fourth line center. So he certainly has that understanding. It's very difficult to to talk about. Like skill level because he does have it it's just. I think it goes back to you were talking about earlier. Every single strategy takes looks like he just worked in hundred percent. All the time. So nothing really comes easy to him, but his skill level is okay to. He gets time on the power plant and also the penalty kill more time on the penalty kill amongst forwards. Short handed the and this is where we get into the sort of philosophical conversation that I am I anticipated not happening until we got to talking about Matt Roy but we're going to have it right now. There were nights during the season where I was sort of. You know incredulous at at how much effort Blake was odd appeared to be giving out and there were nights where I asked I don't know that I ever stated I. Asked is Blake Lozad. The kings quote unquote best player in this game. Now obviously, if you took on Jaco Dr Drew, doughty you know, Dustin. Brown. Jeff Carter and put them next Blake on I would never propose that Blake lozad skill level or or natural talent. Would exceed those players but is it possible that on certain nights? This season Blake Lozad was giving a better overall effort or playing a better overall game than the rest of the Kings Yeah I. I always think we've had this discussion before I struggle when term effort is used. because I think every player is giving an effort. I think sometimes players get distracted for different reasons and that is their fault You know you can throw the fault around many places. Again, it's the coach's job to make sure everyone understands the role and go there unencumbered to execute that rule on. You know there's no hesitation because you know exactly what you're supposed to do, and that's explain to you But. You get out for this I'm going off on a tangent here it's. It's a pet peeve of mine and and maybe I should have started doing it more so but. I, take it to the to the inverse of what we're talking about. Which is If a player is if How many times you here we got out work I tell me well, the other team worked somebody. Okay. Or if an announcer, my job says, they were at work tonight. That's not good enough for me. Tell me. Food. WAS NOT, working hard enough and telling me what circumstance or what example and give that example. If you're going to criticize someone for effort, you be specific you name that player and you give the example of when he was not working hard enough. And I think you would find yourself in a situation where. It's very, very difficult to do Having. said that I know what you're talking about with Blake that's that's he does stand out remember I said earlier than deers himself to his teammates coaching stuff and that's what he does because he just. He he is using. His talents to the ultimate I. Think every player is doing that sometimes you get lost sometimes you get confused sometimes for instance, joining a new team. And they're in that learn excuse me reading react phase where they're not necessarily playing and they're thinking. So then that can slow them down a little bit and then it's criticized as. And usually usually players that have, but we will call. A higher natural skill level Will be criticized for effort more than a player like break who? Never appears to not be trying a hundred percent again back to the thing I think every player is trying to press but I think your point is very well taken there I think that's. That's something that will keep blake around. It's because the trust factor is there with his teammates coaching staff that. When given a task? When given a responsibility? Like we'll go out there and accomplish it. It's hard to pinpoint any area where he didn't live up to expectations as we laid out earlier in this conversation. So I'll just ask what areas can he improve upon moving forward? Is it just maintaining his physical strength? I think it's it's getting stronger. I think his his. When he engages another player in the body contact situations still refining that to the point where he's using leverage and and body position even more so. I watch them I mean every day. He's out there after practice working around the net on some very highly skilled moves and he can do that he can execute. In practice. So that six goal again, I know as an abbreviated season and games played but. Can you get twelve goals? I think. It's a very interesting because again when I watch him after practice. The drills he's doing involve a very high level of skill with hand puck calendar stickhandling. And then you get to a game and I noticed some frustrated at times because she's not able to ask you the same move in the game as he didn't as. You, know there's that that. Word that is confidence. So you can pick up that confidence. I think you'll find himself improving the numbers and improving the skill level. It's I I don't as much as I want him to be I. Don't think he's ever going to be more than a player that gets. Or maybe maybe creeping third-line ice time. You mentioned he plays on the penalty kill plays on the power play. More minutes and that that helps there. And it makes them more. Useful. To the entire team. But I just. I think again, I think if he could be a year. Fourth Line Center in today's game where I think we realized they don't force line centers are relied upon way more. They were ten years ago. So it's still a very not an impact role. It's still a role play a role. But you know that's not to say so little bit stronger. Understand. The exact angles you need to take when you become engaged with another player and then hopefully taking that skill that you see them work on from practice taking into a game. We've talked a lot about bottom six forwards I? I don't really like the top six bottom six designation but I haven't yet found a better one. Boy We've talked about a lot of them who will be facing challenges from the pool of prospects that the kings have and I feel like Blake Lozad might be one of the hardest to knock out of the roster I. Think a lot of his opportunity came from a roster that you know is going through a reimagining phase. And that opened up that door for him to seize that opportunity but moving forward. Just. For the future season what are our expectations? Young? Lozada's he in the lineup on an game game basis. That's that's When I'm thinking about, we've touched on this many times before in our player evaluations. Let's take him from where is now and put him on a Stanley Cup contending team. Is he still there. There was a lot of players that are for you know bottom six forwards that when you. Raise the level of where the team gets to. There are no longer on roster. In all honesty I do not put Blake in that category I still put them in a category where he could be a fourth line or. Talking, Stanley Cup contenders so the kings team would have to improve dramatically over the next few years. you know some Louis younger players that have the higher skill level now because the kings have been drafting higher. maybe looking for a different type of player based on skill. Maybe. They surpass him. But I still go back to. To you know what? How US appreciated by his teammates and? Stuff and I think that goes a long way. To keeping him around I I really do natural. That's where I would expect them to be. again, we'll see hopefully three or four or five years down the road of kings can get back to contending again then we'll see. Know by then he'll have a a pretty good body of work as far as experience goes. To me I look I mean. This is I look at the Boston bruins right now. Are you know parentally contender for the cup? and. You get down to their bottom six and you know what? There's. There's no names there. But a lot of their bottom six floors remind me of blake a little bit. Around the ice how there's no hesitation how it's pointed to point B now again, surrounded by a group that. And then that makes their effectiveness. Maybe go up a little bit more so. I would expect Blake to be around for a long period of time. I I don't expect them to climb the levels to to move up. I just expect them to continue to. Make sure that he is in the lineup and And make it very difficult for coaches to pick them up. Now, the other center we're focusing on this week is blake. lasagna the surprise. I Dunno breakout star training camp for for the two thousand and nineteen twenty season I certainly zero expectations for this kid coming into the season. Sean. But what are the numbers tell us his season was like? Right to Lozad is another one of those seemingly dozen bottom six, four, hundred, fifty kings piled up that were you know reasonably responsible in the time they had a lot like a Mario who spoke about Earlier. wound up with a fifty five percent expected goals share really really positive looking at seven, hundred, forty, eight, five on five minutes again and so really similar to Amado. In terms of being really responsible bottom six forward, who could go up there and take a regular shift and somebody a coach can lean on sort of a bottom six roller and not be stressed about what kind of results you're going to get. offensively. Again. Sort of a similar profile to had one, hundred, twenty, one shots Lozad did scored his six goals on Tang expected goals did always work right in front of the crease area Kinda, shown a willingness to a fire away rhys shots from the faceoff dots on his shop plot, which is interesting for a guy that maybe isn't known for having a blistering shot, you don't manage to. Scored six goals in desert a few more getting to the right areas of the ice and then terms of line combinations sort of get him in a couple of different spots. One Line combination that was particularly positive was the Wagner Lozad campaign group that spent about three hundred minutes together at even strength plotted in the quadrant in my scatter plots with about two point eight. Goals for for sixty minutes in only one point eight again. So that's am very very positive. I expected goal share over the course of a year. So you know you're looking at another one of those. People are reliable low maintenance guys that can take a regular shift in your bottom six not her to we talked about. Michael. Oh this week and you know the number of minutes that he played huge difference between him and Lozad is it lasagna spent over seventy minutes on the penalty kill over the over the length of the season whereas audio hovered around ten minutes. Generally. Speaking, do you find that it helps or hurts bottom six players to get extra minutes on the? I think anytime you can get a player, a younger player time on ice that's development time, and so you liked it it's always with that understanding that you're putting a player a new player into the league into a tough spot. So you're going to get those growing pains but. In general anytime, you can find those minutes where you keep your top guys rested and you give a young guy a chance to show what he can do I like it and you know lozad showing the that kind responsible player committee get up and down the ice and put some pressure on the other teams power play. You know a nice way for him to build some momentum through the season two. So I like it going forward and maybe it's a blueprint they can follow some of the other younger players. The kings are going to be working in the lineup over the next year or two spent a lot of time as we've mentioned previously with campaign, Wagner? It seems Cambay improve the defensive numbers for any line he played on. Is there anything to suggest? Lozad may have benefited unduly from campaign or do we expect to continue to be this player in his career? Yet. I think you're sort of right on to say that Cambay POPs up with a couple of different combinations that wound up being good. Ultimately Carter Lozad. To, fully that was positive as well though so I think. There's enough glimmers here that. Is. Probably. Capable of doing this on his own. But I wouldn't be suspicious of you know a player with his lack of experience that maybe he was writing some coattails. Up to the line squirts oil from Roy Catholic, who what are you going another inch lost another turnover here comes the rookie Amati. ICON. We're going to do this one a little bit backwards because I spoke to. Sean Jeremy about. Before I spoke to you this time so I'm you know forearmed with the knowledge of what of what the analytics say about Mike Ahmadian sorry Michael I'm audio and you and I. Have previously, talked about him a little bit last week. But in the two, thousand eighteen twenty nineteen season, he plays forty three games with the La Kings Twenty eight. Games with the Ontario. Reign. Escorts Thirteen points with the Kings Twenty six points with the rain heading into the twenty. Nineteen twenty twenty season Jim what were your expectations for Michael? Amado. Expectations for me where to. Be a borderline NHL player to try to maintain his spot on the NHL Roster. I think due to contract situations and the rest of the roster and the you know phase the kings are in a group as a as an organization. he you know would have to stay around but I expected him to be certainly in the bottom sexual. If Not Fourth Line Center I would hope that the kings team was starting to establish their new system under Tom McClellan, and then you know maybe he could become a fixture there as far as. You know again, Fourth Line San that was it didn't expect any much more. Look at you. Know we we always you always go back and look at numbers. From previous. Leagues before you get to the NHL and with Michael I, think the numbers stand out as far as offensive production. and. Then it just always leads me to and I hope I'm not harshly critical here. This is just what I see. Some players are we call twitter's meaning there? At the American Hockey League level, they can be an impact player and you would hope that when they make it to the NHL, they can. They can carry somewhat the same amount of production. On from Michael Right now he has not been able to do that. So he's he's in between. He he's. You know highly productive H. L. But can't even now. I, think some of the. The number I that coaches put. A lot of weight into. have come to the forefront Michael and. He has established trust. Factor with the coaching stuff. The know what you're. GonNa get type of thing. and. I think that's the reason he's able to stay around. Not. The flashy. You know impact type of player, but you're talking about expectations I did not expect that. I expect them to be fighting for an HR job every single. Using, time on Isis. Is Probably, not a great reliable stat to start from but looking at his season starting to do some of the research for these evaluations I was stunned and I asked you about this last week off air. And I asked you how many minutes Without looking it up how many minutes you thought that he had played over the course of the season I told you that if you would ask me how many games I thought, Michael. amodio. Had played in for the Kings I would have put it but somewhere between twenty and forty. He played eleven, minutes and eight seconds per game at even strength with the LA. Kings sorry at five on five hundred even strike but total minutes played at five on five for the kings he six with seven hundred and fifty eight minutes and four seconds. He spends most of his time between Clifford and Louis Obviously Clifford no longer with the team. But tear point. He. He found a spot it was fourth line center and he was there i. mean he played sixty eight out of seventy games. He never really left the lineup and despite the fact that you know some people may criticize him for lack of production talking to Sean Tierney. The numbers tell us that he was maybe one of the most reliable defenders among the forward ranks you know as far as how many goals were scored against him when he was on the ice and how scoring chances there were I mean. How valuable is that? As you said, you know exactly what you're getting out of him back how did he exceed your expectations in this season? Well I. Again, I, I don't. You can criticize the numbers. It's okay. Now. I'm very critical I. Find Myself being very critical of Michael and that bothers me because. I get interact with them on a daily basis. I get to see him. As a person and. You know it's it's my job. To do that, but sometimes, certain players rub you the right way. Some players rub you the wrong way. He he rubs me the right way. He he's. He's a, he's just a solid. Person who who cares about what's going on? but again, I. I. It's tough with He's the type of player if I can answer it this way where. I would assume as the team gets better he then becomes. You know an American Hockey League player again, and he's a recall type of player he gets called back. Injuries happen and he's depth within organization type of player, all those types of things. But I I was aware of the numbers you're talking about they were pointed out to me. I think it goes and this is. A recently, we talked about Blake. Lozad. How his skating stride gives you the impression of something. Unfortunately, for Michael, it's the opposite, his screen, skating stride. Is a little bit com- cumbersome. It's it's. At times, it doesn't look like it involves a lot of energy in his game. And? There's kind of a float around. Type of. If you're talking about style how he skates. And I think that's unfortunately the NHL level which is. Made it difficult for Michael to get the same or not the same type of production. You get the HMO but bring that type. I. Just don't believe he has the ability to buy himself room. And as a distributor or as a producer of points at other levels. He gets out space and time, and then that allows him to them. His mind goes to work, and then you can see an up mind that really thinks the game well, who can find open men. Who can hold on long enough. For those men and his teammates and linemates to get open. But. When it gets to the NHL, he can't find that time. So when he enters the zone. Kenny can't put the other teams defenders on their heels to give him that time because he's not the type of player that's going to beat you one on one. So. That means he needs to use his there's more. So he needs to find the P. needs to find time and space. So they can get open. no different. No different than the quarterback in the pocket. The longer. He has time with that ball the longer the receivers have a better chance of getting open and it's well Michael struggles with that at the NHL and. That limits is production and that's why I think he has. Understood. Analyzed his own game and said, okay how do I stay around? The one thing when I talked to coach is about Michael, and is this has a good stick. Now where does that get ya? Well, it gets you into position where he's able to be defensively responsible. Does he ever hit anyone through the boards no. But because of the use of stick and he's strong on his stick is able to under sticks but also he takes away time and space defensively because of the use of the stick and what that does is. Make some spend less time in his own because usually makes the check and get the puck up. Or makes the check gets the puck and then distributed someone else in the puck leaves his own. So then your numbers in possession numbers and you know chances for and against they become. A little bit more positive. So, he has worked at that part of his game but something I know he was told to do. He worked at it, and that's where I haven't even mentioned on respect for Michael because. He was given a an objective and he he has worked on it hard enough that. The work he's doing is not the fun work right? If you're if you're. If you're a defensive player on your play offense Oh. That's great. That's fine. That's great. Oh, you wanted. If you're known as an offensive player, how you're asked to you know Improve Your Defensive Game Fund is not necessarily the word that comes to mind but he's been able to do that. He's been persistent enough and found a way to stay in the NHL because of how he's worked on that part of his game. He's twenty four right now he'll turn twenty five in May of two of twenty, twenty one. We talk a lot in these evaluations about the calendar being a weakness of not a weakness, but but you know a challenge for some of these bottom six players now that the kings have this deep prospect pool. At it seems like he's a lead candidate amongst the the fighting the calendar group. I mean twenty five he's right there with Trevor More all these not twenty five I shouldn't I shouldn't prematurely age but with a bunch of young players and you know possibly eleven more young players joining the organization at the draft this year at what is am audio have to do in the coming season to stave off this wave of prospects. He's going to have to continue to make sure that the. Strengths of his game that we just talked about don't drop off and all that they are fixture which I think he's proven. I think he could become. and. This is where it's tough because I'm talking about a personality factor. He has he. Not only be more confident. Make sure other people around you see that you're more confident. So step outside of your comfort zone a little bit not cocky but at the same time. Sh show me something here that you're gonNA be. Because again, I I've worked with them daily or I talk about he's he's he's he's a good teammate he really is. and. If there's anything that will keep him around professional hockey, it's that he is a really conscientious person. and. I see him as a veteran leader you know at at the HR level for sure. But you know we've we've how many times Jesse we talked about the exactly. We're talking about right now we're player gets you a certain age. And if it's not working and then you know the Kings. And they're. The stage they're in right now as if you know hopefully starting now starting the upward trend again, I still think it's Years down the road before they're contender again. But. You know the trend is GonNa Start Moving upward and then? Guys like Michael Get caught in that they get caught. The all there's a player that's two or three years younger that maybe it's time for him to to start getting the time. and. That's that's that'll be Michael's battle will be his battle. And it's just a adults for stay at the NHL level. So make sure as you know what he's known for doesn't drop off I if if for some way and sometimes it does happen or that twitter type of player I was talking about. It's normally it's a read of the play. If that improves all of a sudden, you seem like you're faster even though you're not skating faster, you're just reacting faster and then you're accomplishing more things. But with Michael I. Think I think he sees the game well, enough. Already I don't see there's a lot of room for improvement there. So that's that's what I see him. I think he will be around I think he. I. I would assume if he got was able to be put in a situation where he was playing with higher skilled players. Than his district distribution factor will become without more important than he'll pick up and be more productive with assists. Decent shot to you when you break it down, it's just a matter of buying time to get the time at the NHL level tax. That type of skill. I know Michael's talked about it and he's been asked to do it the physical aspect of improve first step right gotta get that first step quickness going a little bit better. unfortunately for me, this is a personal opinion that I discussed before it falls on deaf ears because I think once you're eighteen years old, you've probably already established you're skating stride. Yes, you can work and get better incrementally I know you can improve otherwise you know strength coaches and. Coaches and development coaches they've you know. There would be no reason for that because if the NHL level even incremental improvement might be the difference between staying or not being around anymore. So keep working on that. But I don't see the physical aspect becoming a factor where he all of a sudden finds Feinstein on the ice more time on the estimate place. So if you can for whatever reason. Maybe, it's back to what I was saying earlier that. You've got to exude a little bit more confidence because if you don't. No one else is gonNA pick up on. Last season a handful of players played center Andre Kobe Tar Excuse me Adrian campaign was still being tried out at the beginning of the season Jeff Carter. Michael Amodio Blake. and. Once, or twice, maybe Trevor Lewis. Now, Jeff Carter may be moved to wing Adrian Cambay apparently moved to wing, but Gabriel velocity has emerged as a you know an expected player at the center position. So is it possible for the twenty twenty, twenty, one season that Michael Amalio could shift to wing is that may be a way to extend his career with the kings of it. It's possible. I did I think we all know that the Kings are stockpiling pretty good prospect list. But, it's very difficult to bring up more than four or five. And that would be a top end for a lot of teams. At anyone time. You can rotate them during the course of a season coming out from Ontario and then to the kings and back and forth you rotate a group of four or five. So then the of the year you end up with ten or twelve guys that are you know? Playing. What ten or twelve games each So. That's where. I guess. Michael will do whatever it takes. To be there I think that it's good. It's it's always better right. It's always. It's always more. Trustworthy for a player to be able to Centerman first, and then moved to wing. to go the other way is considered much more difficult because of. overall defensive responsibilities that fall on a center position versus winger. Of course on the wing, you have to get into more boards situations with pucks coming around and. How do you get the puck out that way? That's that that could be the case but I'm just thinking again, there would probably be another. Player that's already a winger. Or maybe some of the younger prospects that are sent him and that might move to win. That might get into a logjam for Michael in that area. So. To me, I it can happen. You know I was certainly wrong. It appears I was wrong. Adrian. Tempe because I always thought I looked at his game and said Ah a settlement. And it just didn't work at center I think it looks like he's way more productive on the wings so. It can happen. I don't know if I put. Michael into that category. We are talking about Michael. Amodio to give us a look what the numbers to tell us Sean Tierney from charting hockey. Thanks for joining us again Sean. Yet thanked me back. So Michael Audio the man, the international man of mystery. The thing that leaves out to me and I'm curious how this manifests itself in analytical light is that Despite playing. Limited minutes per game. Total minutes he winds up finishing sixth overall in even strength minutes amongst the forward core behind Kotaro Follow Brown. Cambay and Carter. This is this has to be an out liar. I would think. But what are the numbers tell us about the season that Michael Lamantia ad? Rates it. It's kind of funny and we were talking off air just for a second about you know the quietest minutes a guy could play considering how much he played in. So five at five got Matt Seven, hundred, sixty, three minutes and he's the best amongst the elderly King forwards in terms of expected goal share, which is again a little bit surprising. You posted a fifty five percent X G share which puts him right up in the top right of my my charts really positive rates as good as anybody better than anybody on the Kings and really impressively. He was at about two point, one expected goals against notably below average. So some really responsible on ice impact while he was there he had one hundred, twenty, two shots all situations finished with six goals on ten expected goals in all the goals we have from. We got some tips Ra- shots slapper were are looking at completely sorta crease area, low slot area goals for him. So a guy who knows you know sorta where to get to get his goals but ultimately underperformed his expected goals a little bit probably deserved for maybe even five more goals than he had. And then just in terms of line impacts, he was kind of stapled to Clifford. It looks like you know for the time Clifford spent with the Kings this year and he wound up plodding and dull most often with the combinations he tried and when you're looking at the bottom Guy somebody who goes and doesn't kill you and kind of keeps his minutes quiet in that way is a positive. So some interesting and fairly decent underlying numbers for one of the king's death players. The the biggest. Question the needs to be answered when it comes to Michael Ammonia from my perspective is moving forward. You know you're not gonNA replace follow Kobe Tom. Brown were reasonably certain at this point, the players Cambay, the Lardy Firkh, Carter, and possibly Lozada we'll talk about him later won't be replaced. We spoke last time about Wagner and more in the role they play mean before you know you've got nine ten eleven names that aren't coming out of the lineup to make room for this, you know highly ranked prospect pool. It sounds to me like just never mind the. Broken hearts of not scoring those extra five goals in a season but it sounds to me like Michael amodio helps a team by playing in the lineup. Yen You and I over the past couple of weeks have been digging through some of these bottom six forward. Of the ones, we've discussed sort of just going back over guys like more and some of the others done through grunts drum This is a guy that I would have a head of all them in terms of playing some regular sort of bottom to line minutes it was very positive. What he's able to show. He liked that he had the expected goals there that he didn't ultimately convert on, but it looks good that he gets the right spots I'd have him as one of. Those top options one of those bottom six, four response lined up and so ultimately, maybe that blocks one of those top prospects from locking down a job next year, and ultimately you know you really want one of those guys to have to beat out a reliable NHL regular who's done it in the league. Before before you turn over the role to them and I think you know model is one of those guys that legitimately earn his spot in the bottom six and deserves that role again next year. Taking away the king's clear. It's a two on one short handed campaign with Zok campaign move sand. skoll.

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The Right Thinking Men Edition

The Promised Podcast

1:20:18 hr | 2 months ago

The Right Thinking Men Edition

"This is one. This episode may contain explicit language. Welcome to the promised. Podcast brought to you on. T. l. v. One the voice of the city where you will find amadeu modigliani street set in a neighborhood of streets named for jewish artists one for the great german jewish impressionist a lesser another for the polish italian american jewish sculptor. Enrico blitstein another name for the art academy and so on all of these near the tel aviv. Art museum it was on amodio modigliani street that the writer literary scholar and flan you're ram balabagn was strolling recently with a friend named norm. Think who grew up on mood but hadn't been back there for more than fifty years. When think said quote in the sixties designed said ud modigliani because the municipal signed department did not like the fact that the famous painter converted to christianity when he was older and quote these days though. There is no trace of your dj. Ed rather just throw modigliani. Which is so odd. And i'm not made of stone so i looked it up in nineteen eighty five book about tel-aviv by a man named eliahu alcon. There is a photograph of an old street sign and it in fact reads dj modigliani. The city archives are closed for the corona. So i couldn't look there. But i found in the may tenth nineteen fifty four edition of maariv. An article called streets in tel aviv. Oriented sorry a renowned and the founder editor of the tabloid. Ha olam has air k. Sorry wrote quote. One day i get in a cab to go to yoav street. The driver doesn't ask me where it is or how to get there. We drive in. Suddenly the driver's stops near the number house. I asked for but it's on your dj diani street and he says to me. We're here how i ask him. We were going to you up street. Why did you take to move the army. What differences make. he says. the point isn't the name it's the street. This is your street. He was categorical in declaration. So much so that. I believe them and got out and i was right to do it because he was not wrong. Inside the apartment building. I found my friend after we talked about this and that i asked him out of curiosity by the way you live on your street or madani. He smiled and explained to me. It was you street. But the city decided as i understand it to move the street named after the master of king. David's army yoav to a group of specific streets named after generals and heads of armies. And they made the place where you are now into a group of streets named for artists of the brush which is why today i live on with johnny street. When i went out. I said to myself by the way why you. Dj moved liani. I know the whole world knows it's amadeo modigliani. What happened here when i got home. I called the proper authorities that is to say the municipality of tel aviv. please. I asked south for me. The riddle of your dj modigliani and the proper authorities explained to me that it was decided in city hall to brea size the great and wayward sons of the jewish people and they didn't know in their own lives had preserve their hebrew character here at least by the grace for the city of tel aviv. They will return after their deaths to the place from which they were quarried on the little street signs in the first hebrew metropolis case. Sorry goes on and says it is a great deal. Easier to influence a dead jew living one and to turn and amadeo into a dj and to which. I'll just add to short things. A amadeo means lover of god and you deger means beloved. by god's however in the city chose modigliani's team did a pretty good job of it and two or ak sorry street. Today is for some reason in salalah the tel aviv neighborhood where they put all the streets named after the generals and arguably nothing captures the we love the world but only on our own terms spirit of the city. we love so well vivo. And the city's weird and wonderful mix of radical cosmopolitanism radical parochialism better than naming a street after one of the great painters and sculptors of modern times and then renaming the painter to remind ourselves that even though he never made a big deal of it in the end a genius like madani was totally but totally ju and not just a lover of god but beloved by god in hebrew with us in the studio is a woman who street will no doubt one day be named rocko of a hookah kaplan summer because she is loved and admired by all i refer of course to alison captain. Summer allison has written for political the new republic foreign policy the jerusalem post the jt. Many other of your very best papers magazine cheese a columnist for her are you have heard her on. Npr pri in the bbc and you have seen on. I twenty four television and al jazeera tv alison holiday neighbor world tender award for journalism recognizing. Excellence in the aspirin reportage and a simon rocked our award for excellence and covering zionism and israel. Alison how you doing. I'm good so on the subject of having to Interview all these different radio stations. I was just asked to be interviewed on his show by a guy named pat. Kenny who i had never heard of before but he turns out to be like the higham iovine a legendary anchor of ireland. Really ireland's got a good name for an irish person. And i was excited to find out. He hosted the nineteen eighty eight. Your vision awards. Danna international one. Oh my god and a controversy. So i i was excited. Yeah this eurovision guy right. But then i found out. There was controversy when he had referred to donna as he she or it really brought it up in the interview. No no i haven't done the interview adding it up and he refused to polish. While i think it's about vaccines is going to be hard to hunt So yeah so. I was like oh. Should i do it you know. He did that to done. International but on the other hand when there is a controversy in two thousand nineteen over israel hosting eurovision. He was very staunch in that. Don't boycott israel. They should be allowed to Your vision so you know very very interesting. So i'll let you know how that interview goes. Also here in the studio is a man who will one day have a street named in his honor in the neighborhood of streets named after writer critic scholar. Tour's though this will all be after. All of our consciousnesses have been uploaded into some supercomputer in the cloud so the street will only be lines of code. But i'm sure beautiful tree lined lines of code. Obviously i refer to your seltzer zita. Who in his non-road named guys also goes by the name of. Oh hod ohad delta will be is a book reviewer for our s and rates for offscreen magazine and his fiction has lately been published in granta in the past. Ohio hosted a weekly show. I'm elite. tv on arts and culture in israel. He's admired for his genius. Love for his warm human decency. Mvp for his effortless. Cool you dj. How you doing. I'm feeling loved by god. It's the best love there is as for me. My name is ron. I don't mean to boast but i learned. Recently from the info attrition chargeable that over the years since the pandemic started an average of seventeen thousand. New podcast have been started each week or eight hundred and eighty four thousand new podcast over the course of the corona which for me is a reminder of how smart choice it is for me really to give so much time to making a podcast because without this what would people have to listen to. And i don't want to brag. That's not how i raised. But i find all this a reminder to of what my mother always tells me that i am very very special this week. We have three topics of undeniable importance. But first we have this odd and unnerving and sad matter that we're following with alert interesting great concern last week. A book came out. It is a tiny book. One hundred and seven pages not even two hundred words on a page. Maybe twenty thousand words not much more than a long article. It is by does a kids book writer and documentary movie maker. Who is the middle child of almost owes. Who died two years ago now. The book is called something disguised as love and it starts quote in my childhood. My father hit me curse that and humiliated me. The violence was creative. He dragged me out of the house and toss me over the threshold. Outside called me dirt. Not a passing loss of wits and not a flick on the cheek here and there but a routine of sadistic abuse end quote further on in the book. Guy ios reprints a note from her father. She found in the archives of kibbutz hole. There where she grew up. It was written to celebrate her bat. Mitzvah every kid got a note from parent and her said quote. We won't use this opportunity to settle. Scores as you do not like emotionalism and we do not like to vilify end quote. The note also says we love you and then it goes on to thank all the people on the kibbutz who have taken care of gallia owes since he was little quote. We appreciate what they did for you. In the end we had no choice but they suffered voluntarily and quote. The book goes on like that one hundred and seven small pages twenty thousand plane on fancy words by the time the book got into stores and for days after it was all that anyone talked about all the papers were viewed it the blogs blogs about it. The tv shows chose about it on twitter. Where threads and on my facebook. There was a steady flow of posts. It was on facebook. That i i learned about the book in a post by fun. Ios sulzberger guy ios is big sister and a literature professor at haifa university. Who wrote a beautiful book with her father called using words. I've seen found ios burger public lectures and panels. And i've kind of loves her without knowing her mostly because of how much he loves her father and the pleasure that she has always taken in him. What she wrote on facebook was quote today. Gallia owes launched the new book hurling serious allegations against her father almost also against us her mother and siblings. We have known all our lives are very different. Almost a warm and affectionate man who loved his family deeply and gently he devoted heart and soul to us. The vast majority of is accusations against him squarely contradict our three lifetimes of loving memories. Seven years ago ghalia summarily cut all remaining ties with her father. End with us to his deathbed almost tried and hoped to talk with volya again to listen to understand to grasp even the claims that contradicted reality as he and we saw it values. Pain is palpable. And it's heartbreaking but we remembered differently astoundingly differently and the post assigned neely fanja and daniel does is almost widow. Daniela's is youngest child. He daniel road along posts of his own that included this. My father was not an angel. Just a man but he was the best man. I've ever known family was the most important thing in this world. Of course we were not one of those happy families that tolstoy saw that we're all alike. There were faults. There were difficulties. I have bad memories of our father but for me they were negligible. In contrast my middle sister remembers that she experienced at our fathers hand. Difficult abusive parenting. I know that there is a grain of truth in what she said. Do not erase her. But do not erase us. Either we to have a voice and our voice comes from the depths of our souls and quote after that. Dean macabees outs burger. Funniest son. Almost his grandson wrote a long post. Saying among other things quote. I am tortured and gaya's words surely reached deep into people's hearts. People expressed identification astonishment disappointments avoidance and lots of disgusting and unjustified scorn and quote. He said that his aunt has a right to say what she feels. He does not know what happened on. Cuba hold up before he was born but he did not recognize his grandfather in the pages of his book then he writes quote to close. I have just one smart thing to say if you have a break in your family. Bad stormy relations have lasted for years. For whatever reason do what you can to heal it. I do not know how you can heal only you do. Every family is different. Yes yes even the happy ones. Maybe a good rule of thumb as fixed things with gentility and with the understanding that some damage will remain and quote outside the family on facebook and twitter in the papers on tv. Lots of people at opinions along article in macquarie shown the right wing religious paper ended with this sentence quote ios bookshelf by the right and the left both as a political document that destroys the radiance of the lighthouse of the left and does so from the inside the book busts apart the moral pretensions of the man who was the mouth of a political camp and quote there were lots of schadenfreude a ish essays imposed on the right saying essentially. What are you left this. Think of your profit your ethical standard you're holier than thou mouthpiece now which of course produced anger outrage and what hurt feelings among leftists some of whom answered by putting out lists of right wing heroes. Who came with time to be known as rogues and monsters like rehvam the area a general and minister who abused and probably raped young women soldiers all of which made me worn out sad and the sadness settled than it's lingered. I feel it right now. I've told before on this podcast. How the first book. I read in hebrew after. I moved here when i was twenty. Two was a book also wrote called minihane perfect peace. They translated it with a character named his gatlin. Who moves to a kibbutz with dreams of making something meaningful of his life there and almost hoses book is. Idealism is ridiculous it's pathetic and i was living with susan and clapboard room on to rod just moved to a key boots with dreams of making something meaningful of my life there and every few pages. I tossed the book far under our salute bed just to get it away. It was so cold that it scared me. And then after a day or week i'd get on my stomach on the floor and hooked the book with the end of a squeegee and slide it back out and pick up where i left off since then. I've read more books by almost goes and i've read a few about him to a couple of days after. I read fangio's burgers post in the dumps. I went out to buy gaudio's book. I i went to to lots foreign bookworm. Adjust so and lovely bookstore cafe and robbing square. Where in normal times on any afternoon. You'll see drinking coffee and poet or writer a politician you recognize. I asked regalia book and the woman behind the counter said no. We don't have it and she turned away. Just that short sentence kurt and cold and i think what happened is she saw the key pas on my head and thought one of them. I biked over to the big brand to the chain. So much ferryman dizengoff and asked for the book and the guy said we're all sold out but we'll have more in a day or two. He smiled and said i can call you. When they're in and i saw that he had a key pas on his head and he saw that i had to cuba and i think what happened is he looked at me and thought One of us near the end of the book guy ios writes that what she has to say about her father's shocks and upsets people quote him of all people. It's like toppling a monument but adults know how to live in a complex world. Both faces of my father were authentic. He was many things to many different people end quote and he was an after this sad week. One can see how much he was and is and to how many of us. I do not cannot know what happened in that family. Thirty forty fifty years ago. I have no opinions or even thoughts about that. I just know that. I look at that family now. Finding their way through this thing with such grace really in such pain their present and their past stitch together so tight. And i think yeah one of us today. Three topics topic one right thinking men as the elections are just nineteen days away as we record and the relations between the leaders of the seven right wing parties that are sure to be elected resemble nothing so much as a middle school pool party. I'll hang with you but definitely not with you if he comes over here. Let's ignore him. He thinks he's so great. But he's not the boss of me and more like amateur claude. Strauss's we'll try to puzzle out the complicated dynamics topic to courting change as the supreme court rules on a fifteen year old case deciding that the state must recognize as jews for the purposes of the law. Return folks converted by reform and conservative rabbis in israel which ruling throws the whole country into a panic and briefly turns the rabbi politicians of the ultra-orthodox tour judaism party into baha men and topic three the people of dynamic meeting place as the chartres zone ariella central municipal library in tel aviv is rededicated. After a seventy two million check makeover aiming to change the dusty sleepy and shushi old bibliotheque into quote unquote. The city's salon will ask what a library is or ought to be in israel twenty twenty one and for our most unreasonably generous patriot supporters in our extra special special extra discussion. The linked to which you can find in the show notes on your podcast app or at patriotair dot com slash. Promise podcast on the world wide web. We will talk about our coronal situation. As the three of us i think are all official holders of green passports to weaken ohio. Two more days. He's almost and as the world around us haltingly. opening to green passport holders like us. It is as though glenda the good witch of the north is singing. Come out come out wherever you are with your passport. You'll go very far. We'll talk about what that's like before we get to any of that. Listen to this big mustache. But the deal on on her to depressed better summits at the uh alley along. Aw talk is in. That song is rapped enough. No brand new single by l. Mass will listen to her over the course of the hour. And now it's time for our first discussion until alison. did you hear. did you hear what i heard. Is that enough. Holly is totally on the outs with the year but will only hang out with the folly if he breaks it off with bb once and for all okay guys. Here's you got to know all about the israeli right two and a half weeks before the elections. Here's the scoop. Start with the fact that rei moshe and yaacov swear their best pinky swear that they will only be bff's with bb. The even wrote this down in a note and signed it. Only be we promise but get on the other hand. He says he won't have anything to do with bb because bb is a lying liar. Who lies and naphtali. Says he won't be with year. Well maybe he will. But only if you're isn't the boss because is not the boss of him but it's complicated 'cause naphtali also says he doesn't want to be with bb bb asked to sign that note saying that is his best friend. He refused but never. Tally is not going to say he will never be with bb. Because it's not right to shut someone out to boycott them unless that person is here who used to be enough tallies best buddy but lately has been saying that he's willing to hang around with. I'm in but that's only if no one else is around any really really needs to be with someone. Noth- tally also says that bed silo broke his heart and made matters worse by going steady with itomar. But but you get the feeling that enough talion bits. I'll just mike kiss and make up before the election is over and each get a good night's sleep now but sallow also wouldn't sign that note joining the i will only be club but he said that was only signing notes is just stupid. We all totally know that he's going to be with. Bbn bb says patel is the man but his itamar only okay be also says naphtali can also be sometimes kind of cool except when he's around here and then he becomes a pill that you're you're a terrible influence bb says it get on will stab you in the back and he and yeah. You're deserve each other. Bb says that the best thing about marsha and yaacov is that they hate. Yeah you're as much as he does but secretly secretly. He's wearing that. They could all become good friends with geared on if they ever have a chance to spend some time together now avic door whose friends call him. Yvette says that all bbc ever thinks about as himself. He is like so stuck up that way and he's totally unreliable as a friend. Bb only does. What's good for bb. Avic door says avic door says it gets cool. Enough tallies cool. Yeah years cool. He'll hang out with any or all of them any day. Just as long as aria. Moshe jakko bet. Sal and itamar aren dare because yo- these guys are the worst so that's all you really need to know about the israeli right two and a half weeks before the election. All the rest as they say is commentary. No what exactly is commentary. Well the commentary is that the right now is like one of those old fashioned puzzles sar can go with everyone. But netanyahu and lieberman can go with everyone. But netanyahu and the redeem and bennett can go with anyone slow twitch can with anyone but lieberman the redeem can go with anyone but lieberman netanyahu's can go with anyone but czar and lieberman. All the rest is commentary. What's the commentary. Ohad the commentary. Is that for the first time in a long time. Benjamin netanyahu or the head of the likud for that matter is not the undisputed head of the israeli right. that is the commentary. I mean this is a trend. That started with lieberman and is spreading really quickly. Like to my surprise. I never thought that lieberman lieberman would become. The stance would become so popular. But sal bennett smart. Which they're all either flat out against netanyahu or not completely nato and even though they signed those silly sleeps of meaningless paper. I think that the same goes for the name like in the end. They're the least quote unquote right wing. Ideologues of the whole bunch. I think they'll support anyone who allows them to maintain their power and monopoly. Over is jewish life in israel. And i think this is really really really interesting like besides it being beautiful gossip and i think it may be even be good and like a general body politic sense. I mean it's interesting because it shows the extent of anti bb sentiments in the right which are new and growing and are like a whole trend. which which. I don't even know how it's going to end. And because like these are the most substantial changes in the political map since we began this endless cycle of elections. It might just be the thing that breaks the gridlock and doesn't send us into another one though. Here's the question for either of you like what you're saying is right that there's a growing feeling of people who are either dead set against the or curious about what the political world will be like after nfl and willing to experiment in that but they don't fit together. There's like no way to make these things fit together because the hurry deem they might they would certainly like you said be willing to go with get on with someone who's not netanyahu but they cannot sit with. Lieberman and lieberman will not sit with them. That just ain't going to happen. And this is like a a kind of a problem in complex combinatorial. I can't see any way where the right wing to fit the right wing together into a majority that works even though the right wing is gonna get two thirds of the seats in the knesset. But i can't figure out how they get to sixty from those two thirds of the seats. Well first of all don't Underestimate the willingness of the haredim to sit with people who give them what they want. So the real question isn't including with lieberman in the with lieberman. But you know if you say okay lebron you'll never give them what they want and then that's it You know i went into journalism. Because i wasn't good at math and can't do these calculations in my head. But if somehow bennett. Sal in lupi got their act together. I don't know if that wouldn't make lieberman and unnecessary factor and If in getting the hurricane to having the redeem is also the they also don't get together in let is less outspokenly anti haraguchi anti i will never show. The rhetoric has changed just the campaign. And then there's what they're willing to do after the election and those are two different things you get. I mean and and we've seen lieberman now. You know refused like put his money where his mouth is and refused several times to go into coalition with With the higher deem even when it would very much suit him and he got offered all kinds of Nice perks in order to do so. The peed we have not seen put in that position yet. So we kinda don't know how he's gonna fall short. It is behaving him to campaign a certain way. But if you look at the pedes like large trajectory you know over the years you know he did come onto the stages father son is father was very anti d. He has done a lot to smooth that image over understanding that he could not become prime minister ever you know while maintaining a truly hostile stance towards the haredim and so therefore he's a lot softer around the edges about going into government with them then lieberman campaigns zoom with the last week and somebody asked him about the high-demand he said my philosophy right now at this moment about the hurry deem is what roosevelt said. You need to speak softly. Carry a very big stick. Which i thought was. Oh my god. I mean i. I thought this should get out to the news. Somehow that basically saying okay. i'm. I'm a kinder gentler not to the redeem in this campaign but between you and me when it comes down to it. I'm very but i. I don't see i still can't figure out push comes to shove and if we're in coalition negotiations which could make european prime minister of this country. You can't can't really Negate what he might be willing to give up her deem wise in order to get there then. If this week said he would never sit in the government where lupita is prime minister. And the reason why that's significant is because la. The lapeer has the second biggest party in the country. The rate today the likud is polling at twenty eight seats and lapierre bullying at nineteen seats. He's really really big. So having an alternative. To netanyahu that that involves a rotation that doesn't involve lapierre is also unthinkable like haitian rotate either tanya or rotation. I think i think that bennett. Or coordinating far more than its I think they that bennett is saying that. He'll never sit with a paed- because he's afraid of his many of his voters going like going right to smuggle it for example or to the likud because they say okay so i vote for benetton and then there's a like a left-wing person every single day multiple. Really do things that they're coordinating far more than than it seems i also think that they're staging like staging fights like but we amongst themselves to make it look like they're not like in the endgame probably thinking about going together but the the the second thing i wanna to say which is more to the point is that i really think that this is good because if before we had like a really a medium to small size leftist left bloc which has like. Who's the centre-left too far left blog which has gone bigger and smaller over the past few years mostly smaller mostly smaller which has always which has been really like in-fighting. And nobody's gonna sit with anybody and everybody has their own little thing and then and then we had like this big unified powerful right which went together everywhere and it was clear that they would always sit together and create governments together then now when the right of infighting like and the left is kind of less infighting as it seems that this moment like if they're they're not many seats to fight over but but still it seems like this just might like create a substantial change at least we. We don't know for sure that it's going to end exactly the same way that ended last time which is a good thing. I feel after four elections. So you hopeful. So i won't on there so like all of this discussion that we're having of he saying this but he might do that. you know. The israeli electorate after benny ganz was so vociferous about not going into government with netanyahu and then going into government with netanyahu. I think you know. The israeli voters completely cynical about believing any of these guys saying they will or won't sit with because they've seen just seen a huge betrayal of a campaign promise so everybody is doubting speaking for myself. I certainly am. But i do think that that Oh had hit the nail on the head when the big story is the beginning of the end of Of netanyahu i did some actual reporting talking to some actual human people face to face this past week which is something. I haven't done a long time. And they were all on the right and it was really a chorus of. I really appreciate bb. He's done so many amazing things blah blah blah but fifteen years. The time has come. You know it's over you know we're done. We don't think he's looking out for even the right anymore. We only think he's looking out for himself. And so that. That is something that i really felt as they say on the ground and you know not just in the Not just in the punditry. And listen to this doc. On ben dumb vizo somebody not department push dot com mentioned took a good time was abolished lush. Leon views dog. I think that is good time by illness featuring a gay boy and now it's time for our second discussion so hard you know what i miss. I miss the old days when we used to sit around and shoot the shit about the law of return but we don't talk about the law of return as much as we should these days. I'm not sure you know. I think that might just have changed this past week since the supreme court shocked a lot of us when it ruled that the state has to recognize as jews for the purposes of the law of return folks converted by reform and conservative rabbis in israel. Now you might notice. There were several clauses in that complicated sentence. I just said and they all matter. At the heart of the thing. Before i get to all the clauses is the fact that the court said that people who have undergone reform or conservative conversions are jews but that's where clauses in first of all the ruling applies only to the law of return. The law of return as you probably know is a nineteen fifty law that said quote every jew has the right to come to this country as an oleh or jewish. Emigrant and quote that simple decorative statement immediately raised. The question of who counts as jew. Only someone the rabbis consider jewish someone who considers herself jewish. Someone who has suffered as a jew. This question was especially complicated just a few years after people who were not jewish. According to the rabbis say the daughter of a christian mother and jewish father were murdered in concentration camps an amendment in nineteen seventy stipulated that as far as a return goes quote a child and a grandchild of a jew. The spouse of a jew the spouse of a child of a jew and the spouse of a grandchild of a jew are all considered jewish quote. A gap had opened between people included as the law of return and people who the rabbis would say mary in israel. This week supreme court ruling applies only. And i repeat only to the law return. It does not ensure that folks with reform or conservative conversions in israel will be able to get married or divorced or buried in a jewish cemetery when they shuffle off this wardell coil. The supreme court's ruling also only applies to conversions done in israel. now this is because reform and conservative conversions. Done abroad have been recognized for the purposes of the law of return for the past twenty five and a half years as a result of a supreme court decision from november nineteen ninety-five. What's more the ruling exudes. Reluctance and regret in the body of the opinions. Supreme court presidents emphasized that the ruling applies only to a quote civil and public matter not a religious question end quote and when she pressed the knesset to quote put more or different content into the notion of what counts as conversion for the law of return because the legislature hasn't decided on this matter for more than fifteen years. We could not escape ruling on this petition and chief. Justice was not exaggerating when she wrote fifteen years. Most of the ten petitions that were consolidated into this ruling were filed with the court in two thousand and five and the matter has been knocking around the supreme court docket ever. Since the court repeatedly asked the knesset to clarify the law of return through legislation but knesset after knesset failed to amend the law because the issue was and remained so divisive that any government that takes it on mytalk apple. This because i'll tra- orthodox parties will accept nothing short of strict orthodox conversion which will be unacceptable to most other israelis so the matter just dragged on and dragged on finally the core tired of waiting and issued its ruling maybe as a way of laying down the gauntlet to the politicians. More than anything else. Imagine this quote the way the lousy law's written now it doesn't prohibit reform conservative conversions. The judges seemed to be saying if you want a different result. You politicians amend the damn law now not surprisingly at all. The politicians responded in surprising ways. Prime minister netanyahu posted on facebook that the quote supreme court made a decision that endangers alive return. Which is a basic element of israel as a jewish and democratic state only a vote for the likud cannon sure stable right wing government that will return sovereignty to the people in the knesset. End quote blah blah blah. Nah now backup i. Ca- pokka ultra orthodox politicians announced. And what is a bit of a non sequitur that they would not join. Any government was not committed to passing a law allowing the knesset to overrule the supreme court alliott daily. The head of the ultra-orthodox shas party tweeted that he would fix a law return designers religious right also decried. The decision get on sows. New party was mostly mum about the court decision. Seeing only that showed how ineffective prime minister. Netanyahu has been getting the knesset to legislate on the right only avigdor. Lieberman enthusiastically supported the decision. Tweeting his blessing for quote the historical decision to recognize reform and conservative conversion. Which was a great though politically advantageous exageration of what. The court in fact decided on the parties of the left. there was universal. Praise for the decision. Along the same lines as lieberman needs on hall of. It's the head of minutes for instance said the ruling prove that the forces of religious coercion don't own judaism in this way for the most part. The court's decision sparked great flames of political passion. Even as it was easily absorbed into the talking points of the election on the radio there were ultra-orthodox politicians who predicted that anger over the decision would translate into two or three additional knesset seats in the elections in two weeks. In fact a lot of people wondered about the timing of the decision after fifteen years why issue and explosive ruling a couple of weeks before an embattled election. The answer is not entirely clear which is just one of my two questions for you folks the first being. What do you make of or learn from this decision and the second. What do you make of or learn from this decision coming now. Alison or would i make the decision. First of all you know. There's nothing new under the sun. Those of us who this is our beat and we cover it all the time you know. Pay tons of attention to every little development in it. And then you know when there's a big boom headline all of a sudden the The general israeli public is looking on the whole religion. state reform. conservative thing together it is You know a continuation of the inability of the government to take a stand on it because our politicians or the politicians of of of the major parties or the critical party right now likud Generally is caught between the inability to. Actually you know. Pass a law that would do at the ultra orthodox want to do because there's an overwhelming amount of public opinion against it. You know there's no way you're going to change the law return etcetera etcetera. That's not going to happen. So the vast majority of israelis. I can't quote the poll numbers. I'm sure the israeli democracy institute has them majority of israelis. Do not want to crack down. You know Narrowing the definition of who is a jew to something ultra-orthodox and their utter dependence on these ultra-orthodox parties as we discussed in the previous segment in order to form a government coalition so the government is stuck between a rock and a hard place. They do nothing the courts after fifteen years. We're forced to do something As for the timing the question is if this is the timing it was supposed to happen anyway should they not have done it because of the elections because that would have also been a political decision right so If it had been scheduled to come down and they said no no no. We're going to postpone it until after the elections and that would have been more political than just letting it sort of naturally come out now which is when it was supposed to kind of entirely understand that to me. It seems obvious that they should have waited. I by the way you know. I support this decision. I wish that it meant all the things that the people who are really happy about it think that it means the it to me to be a much smaller decision that and yet it filled the headlines for for week and i think it's a good decision and i think it's the only decision as far as i understand from what i've read that they could possibly have made and even people who who think in the long run that that conservative or reform conversion should not be recognized for the purpose of the law of return eve- even people like that said who knows something about the law said. The supreme court had no choice. It could not rule otherwise for legal reasons. That i won't go into and don't fully understand myself but i do not understand why the supreme court allowed this to become an election issue so since then we've had like our facebook pages election personally but but it's you might be glad that it's an election issue because it's an important issue that you want the politicians to to deal with and maybe you're right. I mean i know that. And and i guess you're right about that. It's bad for its bad for for my side of the political spectrum. I it's going to make it's gonna. It's gonna hurt the center and the left in the elections already. You know your your facebook feeds. Every the world is filling up with these scary posts about how the reform and conservative reform and conservative movements may choose to convert asylum seekers here in israel in the thousands and there'll be no way of keeping them from getting citizenship through this which is to say it opens up this conduit for some really smart activists among the asylum seekers to say let's all convert to judaism and if they can do that sincere if it comes to the rabbi sincerely and say we want to convert to judaism. I don't see how the rabbis can say no to them. And so anyway. All of the on. This ruling was really narrow and very specific. This ruling totally does allow what the ultra-orthodox says say about about the the asylum-seekers the what the conservative reform rabbis have said is. This is not our intent. That all and i'm sure that the right about it's not their intent at all their intent is just to convert the what they say to be twenty to thirty people a year. Who who fit this category that they have who come to them to be converted for this purpose. These people could contain asylum seekers in an asylum seeker could mary ann israeli etcetera et cetera. I guess i guess my point is that there is it now just opens the door for people to scream about the courts being the to people just to scream about About how your judaism isn't respected. And i do think that is going to be a rallying cry for the right wing. And i think that it's going to bring out a lot more right wing voters than left wing voters about something about something that has been the dockets for fifteen years so why not wait until two months after the election when there's a government and then do this and maybe the government maybe because we haven't really had a government for like two and a half years. I wait until win. Wait till there's you know not a fifth or six or seven done this. If done this three months ago would have been before the elections. If they do it three months from now it will be after the election between elections. If we're going to have a fifth election that's fine. Why do it two weeks before the election. I'm like baffled by this to the same extent that you. I really think this timing is really weird. The only way. I can wrap my head around. It is like like allison said if if because this is clearly. It was clear from the beginning that this would be fuel for for right-wing campaigns. And the only way i can understand this if it wasn't like set in stone and not able to postpone his that they said to themselves if we postpone this now or like in this is like a bit converted but if we postpone this now than the right can say. You didn't do this before the elections because you were afraid of giving us like fuel like this is a in a way saying that we don't serve the right or the left. We just do our job and put out decision. I was saying dave which is naive. Yeah which is naive. I i think. I read an interesting piece of commentary about this which i think is like it it touches such as well on the main point which i would feel like the main point here by by this really interesting guy was like google docs. And he's also like marxists leftists. He's really quiz. Name is ellie beaten and he wrote. He pointed out that as he understands it. At least there's like an inherent tension between the view of conversion and the law. Return like he wrote that while the jalandhar tries to make it as difficult as possible for people to convert like as a way of saying. We don't really need any new members in our club. thanks anyway. The law of return. Along with the difficulties of being a non jew in israel consistently make converting worthwhile for so many people like this is again like the inherent like the inherent rift between like having an ethnic democracy. Or whatever you wanna call it. And having this like this vis religion as being basis of this thing a religion that specifically does not want people from the outside to join and then and then and then what you become innocence in many ways if if you have a religion that doesn't want to join it and you have a state that is based on membership of this religion. Then you create like zena phobic scenario which is which is a problem. Make this whole thing with the asylum-seekers disgusting disgrace. this just goes to show. It just goes to show how problematic like membership of a state based on religion is like because these people are here. They live here. They go to our schools and you think you can think about like former. Fsu people from the former soviet union orleans that come here from the laboratory they came here millions and lots and lots of them are non jews and then and then what what do they do. They live here as like half members of juice like society of israeli society. They can't marry their buried. Like outside of the of the wall in cemeteries sometimes which is awful. The the partake in in certain. Like parts of civil life here but can't partake in others so so this is like a real problem. We have this tension that for years has like is broiling. Since since the state began between like the religious part of being a jew and like the ethnic part in the civil part of being a jew and every time it comes like something has to budge. Or we'll just be left sitting on this tinderbox like forever and ever just footnote. We've got a controversy with foreign workers who are fully vaccinated not being able to get a green passport to do whatever because they don't have Because they don't have an identity amara caretakers for older people and so they can't take them to the theater to the gym or wherever they want to go. So i felt odd this week. Because i could not share in the happiness that so many people felt about this and i i'm i i sort of felt as though as somebody who goes to a conservative harare. I wished like it was too little for me and that that way to it was like read when i finally read through the twenty pages of this court decision. It was like. Is that all like we. We deserve much more than this. Not less than this but But then the other people including including gillard korea who spoke about a new like posted at some length about how this was a step forward and he's much smarter about this politics than i am. So maybe this is the way changes made by like these like bullshit small things that happen and they may be minds are changed or something but fifteen years. The government had fifteen years to do something right. There's no defending the government to say this last last last last thing the government's get pissy pissy over how the courts are overturning. Their decisions in the courts are and and they just don't and they're these certain issues that the government just can't legislate on. And the knesset can't legislate on because they're so problematic. And then don't legislate and don't legislate and they themselves create a situation in which the court has to make decisions that are supposed to be made in the legislature was driving and then they have the guts to to to criticize the court and say they're taking away our power like a fucking law. Now listen to this. I don site goes muscle acoustic hassle kylie. Thank you god Ask that's his co. ltd. who chevy ally by l. mess with. Rbi low end mozelle dmz. And now it's time for third discussion which we are calling the people of the dynamic meeting space. And here's why last week was the gala for a pandemic rededication of the shard in library. Abate ariella seventy two million shekel makeover and reimagining. The shard sione library abate area is tel aviv. Central municipal library. If it was in new york it would have to lions out in front and it was also the first public library in palestine started in eighteen. Eighty five in you off. Oh by the head of the jewish community there. A man named shimon roca who later was a founder of tel aviv which didn't incorporate until nineteen o nine and he was also the father of user. Elcock who was the mayor of tel aviv from nineteen thirty nine until nineteen fifty two and now is the name of bitching urban highway. The library had its ups and downs from the start closing after two years and then reopening for years after that moving from offer to tel aviv in nineteen thirteen and then closing in one thousand nine hundred seventeen during the great expulsion from tel aviv. During which time. It lost most of its collection to turkish hooligans and then it reopened finally in nineteen twenty to the city took over the library and has run it ever since for its first decades. The library was mostly a meeting place of the literary crowd one of the first librarians. There was barra. Hose a teacher whose son dove was the founder of the haganah defense force and labor party leader and deputy mayor of tel aviv. Another librarian was bochum brenner. The writer sister of her revered writer. Brother yosef haim brenner. Another was the writer. Yoshua is instead bars. Eli the library committee. That the city setup included a hotta anaheim bialik and mayor dizengoff and other literary and political worthies whose aim was to make books available to ever wanted to read sure but more than that to create a kind of cultural center for jewish palestine a place where writers were gathered to sit and work and lecture and ponder and argue and have filings out in gossip behind each other's back in the nineteen thirties when the fifth valley bought wave after wave of kind of bourgeois immigrants from germany. The library changed it professionalized. A man named heinrich lever was hired to run the library. Fresh off a gig. As the librarian of the university of berlin he hired other professional librarians. Like kurt divide varman who studied bibliographic sciences and worked as the director of libraries and chris berg until the rise of the nazis form. Set to work cataloging the shirt sione collection and doing whatever he could to bring the tel aviv library up to high german scientific standards. The self image of the library was serious and very library. Like shh. quiet. It's highbury and it stayed that way for some time. The library moved to its present. Location a bruce building on the square outside of the art museum in nineteen seventy seven. The new makeover the library according to nama rebound who covers the architecture and urbanism beat for our it might be a step back towards the original conception of the library as more of a cultural center than as a sanctuary for quiet. Scholarship walls have been torn down and onsite sword. Space for books has been turned instead into bright open spaces. An internal courtyard was created this to make it quote a dynamic meeting space and space for activities of different sorts. The idea is to make the library and to quote unquote the cities salon or living room. The walls have been covered with hip. Art commissioned by hip artists. A space has been added for comics library including a studio for drawing comics. In graphic novels rooms have been designed that can be reserved for cultural events. The library will be open seven days a week. The wi fi will be awesome. There will be lectures and courses and storytelling and book readings and concerts in most places. No one will ever shush you all. It sounds cool. But i'd be lying if i didn't say that. It also makes me a little nostalgic for a time when the library was about the books man it used to be about the books man and it raises questions that people no doubt are asking themselves the world over what is a library in two thousand twenty one. What should it be ohad your library. Bunny what do you think. I i really love love this plan like i love this new reopening. I like i love the i you know. Bet-better has been like like a place for me until aviv for years. Like i went to school near there and when i was in the military was right across the street so i used to go a nap there in the afternoon. Sorry sorry if my Before or listening. But an and i used to go there to get pleased for when i was a theater student and i used to go and get books and nap and study for my whole mentally and just like lounge on the sofas and read the newspaper sometimes and and i think that is exactly what a library is. It is a multifunctional. Swiss army knife of a like straight out of a socialist. Utopia that. I have no idea how is still happening in like this stage of late capitalism. Like it's it's a place that is completely and fully to the service of the people who need it for free which is pretty pretty amazing like even when before bella like when even when it was still going through. This innovation used to go there in the afternoon in the middle of the week and and people sitting around were were the people who who needed a computer like to to to to read the news on or needed a place to sit on on a couch and drink water and read the newspaper when it was really hot outside or when it was raining and and i think that's really amazing and and i also think that it is still about the books like i think that all of these cultural events that that they want to to make the library hubbub. I think that that's just another way to get people around books like and get them to read like you're in the library. You're going to reading or you're going to see a dance performance or you're coming to here. Stand up comedy show and it's over and then you walk around because it's a beautiful place and people like to walk around beautiful places and you see these big shelves of books and you get drawn to them because bookshelves. The book says something that you're drawn to and then you a book home like i feel like this is this is the perfect pairing and and i do think that there still will be instill are spaces and berea. That are just about the books that are like hushing xiaoshan and you need to sit here and you can be quite in their places for studying. There are places for books. And then there's also please for drinking coffee like in a place for for for for doing readings in a place for me. Meeting people like to write together. And and i really think that that's amazing. I love these kinds of public spaces. That are available to everybody anybody Yeah and you know it said. It sounds similar to a lot of university libraries that you see in the us. It's interesting so my sixteen year. Old is an eleventh grade. Which is the intensive studying for the bug as exams period. And i said to her at one point like you know so. You're having this year like what's the difference. You'd be sitting home studying for the rude exams anyway. And she said no normally everyone who starting for the bug group they get together and they studied together in the library in the common space. So you know. They may not be studying necessarily from the books on the shelves. But it's a place for scholarships. So i think that. Making the place for scholarships place attracts younger. People is Is definitely a good thing. Can i just. I just a footnote The headline our shocked by the brutal list. Art architecture. I thought that was pejorative. Gets over so i had to look it up. Concrete brute is a is a french word. so it's it's originally It's all tel aviv. Architecture is all about yeah. I mean israel in general is all about the brutalism mcadams. Yeah so here's the thing i guess. Obviously you're right and i don't want to be scrooge ish. I also enjoy these kinds of spaces. But i'm trying to understand what it is. There's something about this. It still bothers me a little and i think that what it is is. I want libraries to be churches to books to be like warriors of books like places that have this kind of holiness and i and there's something about making them just into like cool. Entertainment centers like chucky cheese or something. That that i feel like is at odds is at tension with this like i remember i e to this day and the new york public library. You where i spent my last sabbatical. I was actually. I was at columbia. But i spent most of my days in the library almost all of my days six days a week in the new york public library with the with temperance and patients with. I think that those are the two names of the lions in front and and you walk in and there is like a book very there is a bookstore. There that sells chomsky's all sorts of things. And there's like a little teeny place where you can buy food. Get hungry in the middle of the day but basically it is all about the books and i walked in there every day and it was like this spiritual experiences unbelievable. Could you also feel that like by now. Ten generations of people of immigrants who came and found english there and found and wrote articles for communist newspapers. They're like all this unbelievable. It just has this holiness. That is really deeply about the books and you don't see many screens there. I mean everyone brings in their own screens and of course their computers to search there. But it's like it's really largely about feels like the books and this feels like it's trying to do something that's beautiful but different. And i want there to be a place for a church of books still i just i have. I feel like. I'm only a twenty three full years old but i feel like bitterly ella was never really that kind of place like it doesn't have that churches kind of vibe like you don't feel that they're you didn't feel that there before either because you walked in and it felt more like a schoolroom with these metal like benches and like before when it was shitty it was cool because it was shitty but it never felt like a church and there were always performances there. I mean. I went there most of the times that i went there. It wasn't for the library per se. It was for some sort of like a lecture performance. Or something like that. And i also think now. They've remade it. I mean that's that's the thing i agree with you and i also liked it in that sort of to. I used to go mostly for the periodical like go through. Which is you know. Unbelievable the old periodicals. And you would go and the article that you wanted you would get to the page after like looking and looking looking through through these boxes and boxes and you find that somebody cut out the article that you want but But i but now they dispense seventy two million shekels to say okay. What is the library and the answer. They came up with. Is that libraries. This is cultural center. Is this community center cultural center. And it's beautiful. And i'm not saying that that's the wrong thing but i am saying it breaks my heart because what that is not is would and they could've been. They could've made it into a a church for book. The question is who is the library for like. Do you want to make a place that is for the majority of like for people to use the. You could make a church of books like you could you could put seventy two million shekels into making a place where you walk in and feel odd. Even though it wasn't built that way wasn't designed that way. Like i think that this is true or to like to the design of the place and the feel of a place to begin with what they did. You could do that. But then how many people would display. Serve like really. How many like how many people like you and me. Are there in tel aviv. Young people who want to walk into a place and feel like a spiritual relation of being around books now. I really do still think that you can have that in a bitter era like. I'm pretty sure that they didn't touch the rare book room and the rare book room is place where he is in through this red corridor and through this music library and then there's you walk up these tiny flight of stairs and you and you stand in this place full of the books that you're not allowed to take home and it feels that way still but i do think that if your point and i think that this is what julia is trying to do. And who's the head of the culture in the in the municipality. He's trying to make this a place to bring people in late to give people a place to have like free culture. And i think that that's square between the theater and the museum which is amazing since the best museum ever and the library. I think you create exactly that kind of vibe like where were you can come in and you can have. You can take a book out of the library and you can pop into the museum and you can go see it like a matinee show and and i think it's exciting like and i. I really do think that that if better yellow was that to begin with and maybe that would be the way to go. But it wasn't like an that making it that would be moving backwards instead of moving forwards. Now listen to this young. Only own the fortieth shirley. Now she's lost. She's she's last caller beaten. Chevy nickname pig became yobo in gaza mortgage co. of louis become one-dimensional lash body four special. Jack thought the mike jackson won't be sure you'll tell me theme field of my and four elise. She's insured now she's left is let by l. mess with ortega. Avi i low yell. Mess is just starting out but you can find some of her work a little in all these you'll places soon though she'll be everywhere and now it is time for other countries segment. This is part of the show which each of us described something that might surprise amused delighted or enchanted in source. Older made even flu. This as we went our way through our world over the last awhile. Ohio what is your country. So award season is upon us which is as good a reason as any other to read some poetry specifically some poetry written by the winner of this years israel prize in literature the highest cultural honour writer can receive here know exactly. I'm under the impression that the announcement about zaki winning the prize was met with two major and quite distinct responses. those who know of and deniers. I'll probably all thought of themselves. Something along the lines of what. Hasn't she received it already and all the other people probably thought to themselves. Who because that's the kind of writer as he is and always has been exemplary who was born in jerusalem in nineteen forty. One has received pretty much every major honor an award. They give out for writing in israel and has written and published more than one hundred books which is crazy number among them. Novels short story collections poetry essays and research but she is best known for being an extremely prolific writer of children's books a fact which has consistently kept her outside of the quote unquote main lane of israeli literature. And honestly thank god. Because that's what makes her so good. She has this uber. Unique kind of magic sideways silly non important but still dead serious voice. Maybe because she's a woman who was born in the forties. Maybe because she's written mostly for kids and maybe those two things are deeply connected but in a literary atmosphere which prefers or at least preferred its authors. Serious state lakers can be zell. He reveled in the fringes doing her own thing for decades. It isn't often that. I get excited over the recipients of major prizes such as this one usually seems to me and i hope no one takes us around way that there is a list of self important old people waiting to get them and a panel of judges who spend most of their time trying to figure out which member of that list is on the is in a greater danger of dying before next year but this time he's winfield's somewhat different like a real win for literature and lovers of it and even even even even if books aren't your thing you just can't help but be happy for her like really happy for her like a friend of yours got something really nice. I mean the seventy nine year old woman who has every single reason. The world a few wronged an underrated comes off so cheery so open hearted so generous and kind that you just kinda want to give her a hug in an interview. She gave pinto of kantle boot radio her first words right after he congratulated her warmly or quote. I'm so excited. Let's see how make it through the interview and quote and then right after when he asks her. How was the call. And how does she feel. She says this quote the minister of education called and gave me the news. And and i cried and quote so neuheisel. if you're listening. Congratulations and please be my aunt. Now here are two poems by noise. translated by giving high mortgage. This one is entitled. The light fell ball after ball and for a moment needing to breathe. Didn't seem like a coincidence. A moment in which. I couldn't see the restraining gap between the table and the door. The one that cracks between being and being and that i couldn't previously pass knife through them and not to see how with the lights knife. The floor breaks into icy docs and how they are swept away from one another and the decisive smoothness of falling star. I stood on the edge of chaos with furniture. Shook like the genesis of the world and this one is fishes also translated by gilead. High mortgage living is not what you thought moving forward but rather in a circle. Where are we again where we were after journey on the journey to somewhere else if you thought that living inside a mirror and seeing you were wrong here inside the skies reflection. It's hard to tell whether their color is rosy or blue and what hides behind what think a patch upon a patch. This is the scheme we have of. Circumference are the crows on the trees or trees on the crows. You know understanding goes beyond the geometry of the plane. Perhaps the water lilies guests. We are two sided creatures translucent gloves or golden shoes but for us what is called. I stuck to itself always floating in the middle. Not hear yourself. This is what it means to be. Voiceless you we don't try either You know In this book guy owes quotes nuri darker as saying not all adults are well suited to be parents but then again not. All children are well suited to be children with very sweet alison. What is your country. So the problem. I'll talk about is probably the least of our worries and it feels illegitimate to whine or complain about it publicly There are many of these kinds of issues in the age of covert. Right the things that you just feel like a real jerk you know saying oh. I miss this. I miss that but a lot of us do it privately. Yes it's frivolous when you compare it to people getting sick losing their livelihoods and feeling isolated after a year alone at home. Anyway it's there. I've got serious tourism withdrawal Since my kids got older. I've made a point of traveling a lot and listened to the podcast. You know because they talk about my chips and that has as we know ground to a halt over the past year with the exception of my trip to the united states for the elections. I miss that feeling of landing in a new place exploring getting lost in the city wandering the streets learning its history so the other side of the coin of course is appreciating. What surround you. I've become a local tourist seeking out the unfamiliar corners. And you know what was previously familiar. Now i'm lucky in that in non cova times or post vaccination. I'm able to work it into my job. When i traveled to a new place to report. I also try to explore post vaccination. I'm now able to go to real places inside israel and talk to real actual people face to face but some of my accidental tourism over the past few weeks hasn't been work related since my father in law passed away. My mother-in-law needs companionship. And so at least once a week. I'm spending a day an evening in jerusalem and for my exercise i walk the streets of a fascinating city that i can still get charmingly lost. Plunk me anywhere in tel aviv. And i can figure it out. Jerusalem forget about it. I still don't really understand how the neighborhoods connect to each other so this week. I took my walk for exercise close to my in-laws house and gravitated not for the first time to the former train tracks of the jaffa jerusalem railway that have been turned into an amazing long winding walking path beginning at the first station the original train station of jerusalem and winding through the city all the way to teddy stadium. The railway was built in eighteen ninety two at one point. It was a major artery of life in ottoman and british ruled palestine and then in israel and it remained in at least partial use all the way to nineteen hundred ninety eight when the tracks were abandoned. The city was just gonna turn them into another road but a grassroots movement pushed for them to be a public park instead and former mayor nearby cot hopped on the bandwagon. Or i should say hopped on the train carriage and the ten million dollar park project was built between two thousand and ten in two thousand and thirteen For new yorkers. It's kind of like jerusalem's highline. But at ground level. The pedestrian path is this raised boardwalk on the original railroad tracks ties and on the side of the tracks. There's a paved bicycle path. In in the middle there's a strip of grass it winds through six neighborhoods. One of them is arab. Their acute coffee stands juice bars along the way that have popped up. There are two speaking of libraries free public reading libraries. They're old bus. Shelters that have been turned into these air bookshelves. You can donate and take books for free and hebrew. French english arabic tired of walking. Grab a book. Plunk yourself down on a bench and read. It's a people watchers paradise. You can see a cross section of jerusalemites pass by as you walk along. Jews arabs nuns monks old young religious not religious but the super cool thing about it is the way it pays tribute to its history. There's original railroad equipment. They're signal boxes communication polls all preserved in some places with explanations as to what they are. Now i'm no train nerd but i learned things. That seemed really cool. No do you know what a semaphore is. I don't know yeah. I didn't either. So it's a mechanical signalling system based on arms of various colors change positions conveying messages to train. Drivers like stop. Go go prepare to stop. So i figured it out. It's like the thing my sons thomas. The tank engine train set right with all of the different Arms so as you walk along. There are signs with old photographs. Facts about the neighborhood and the old train tracks and the relationship between the neighborhood and the tracks for instance. I learned that the neighborhood of baca was founded in the late nineteenth century. Right when the railway was built it was partially built to give the first workers on the railroad a place to live and these little modest houses were eventually not down for the fancier more impressive ottoman houses. Some of which are still there today. Where lucky people get to live Dare is at one point. A photograph of the women of jerusalem seeing off the members of the jewish battalion who fought with the british army against the ottomans to conquer palestine in nineteen eighteen. The women are waving to their men as they leave on. The train were reminded that this great railroad was once part of the hedjaz rail line that went from damascus. Twohey jaws. what's he jaws now known to saudi arabia. Yeah so who knows if things keep going the way they are in the aftermath of the abraham accords. Maybe we can dream one day of also hopping train to saudi arabia. Once more that is a nice dream so we were just done with chabad. Lunch and i was clearing the table. While the girl read the twenty questions from haaretz magazine the weekly trivia quiz. One of the questions was this quote. What did the jewish historian josephus flavius contribute to the field of combinatorial. A friend of mine sent him. Oh yes was the one where they were. Readers sent in credit excellent so the girl says anyone know. Because i do which might have been surprising. Save for the fact that she just took a course in combinatorial after having taken any number of course as an ancient jewish history so she might be person in tel aviv. Hell maybe in the world's best suited to answer the question. she says. remember the siege of yodefat. And i shake my head. And i say it must have happened before my time. And she rolls her eyes and she says you remember. Josephus was trapped by roman soldiers in a cave with forty of his own fighters. And they won't surrender but there's no way out so they decide to kill themselves because there's honor in that and they don't want to be roman slaves and then the girl goes on and tells the story that you find in the jewish wars in book three chapter eight part seven that i found when i checked after shabad was over. Goes like this with josephus referring to himself in the third person quote. Look he said we are determined to die. So let's draw lots to decide the order in which each of us is killed by another the man who draws the first lot is filled by the next in line and so on through the whole group of us as fortune runs. Its course that way no one will have to die by his own hand and the nothing unfair no one can change his mind and stay alive while the others are dead and as each man lot came up. He presented his throat unhesitatingly to the next man to cut so the girl says one way to represent what he did is to say that he arranged that forty one people the forty soldiers and himself in a circle and everyone killed the one in front of them number one killed number two and number three number four and so on number thirty nine kills number forty and then number forty one kills number one number three kills number five number seven kills number nine but we know from the book that josephus didn't wanna die so the question is where do you live right the bug. Yes so where does he need to stand in the circle to be the last one left and by now. The boy is gathered that there's more math here than there is jewish history. So he's interested he's in and he says after the first round all the numbers are dead and the girl says yeah it will always be odd because all the will always be killed in the first round and the boy moses over for minute and says yeah it always be. I'd and then the girl says so calculated out for a few simple examples if there's one soldier that's hold your lives if there's two then josephus should be i. He kills the second. If there are three josephus wants to be third because one kills two three kills one. if there's four josephus wants to be number one one kills two three kills. Four one kills three. If there's five josephus wants to be number. Three one kills two three kills. Four five kills one three kills five by now. I'm doing the dishes. So i'm only catching little bits about ascending series and and also about powers of two. By the time. I get back to the table. The problem seems to be solved. Josephus needs to be the nineteenth to survive to write the book about the jewish revolt and to tell of the siege of your fat surely. Never imagining that nine thousand nine hundred and fifty three years later one hundred and twenty kilometers to the south southwest of the cave where by virtue of combinatorial he survived but soldiers didn't his deeds and his calculations would fill a tel aviv. Chabad afternoon at least long enough so that no one needed to give a hand washing the dishes and that brings us the end of our show. Thank you meet. Ashkenazi are genius researcher. Conciliatory and scholar not residents. Thanks we tie shalimar station manager without whom we would have none of this. Thanks to our. She believed my favorite band from cuba. Together they give us the music at the start and the end of our show. Thank you alison. Thank you natalie. Thank you hod. We'd like to thank all of our patriotism borders for your generosity for your support. It keeps the show going and it keeps the station going and it keeps us move keeps us grateful and in your debt forever and we'd like to thank all of you for taking the time to listen and actually like us on facebook and drop us a line. We're gonna answer then go to apple podcasts. Gives us a five star review. Maybe one that begins with this lake. The new johnson and johnson vaccine phase. Three testing has shown the promise podcast to be almost sixty six percent effective that-that-that finished anywhere. You want before you do that. Remember that yesterday as we record on march third we celebrated international irish whiskey day so established way back in two thousand sixteen by renowned cork-born editor of the irish whisky and whiskey. Blogger sites stewart mcnamara. The date three three chosen to celebrate the significance of the number of three in ireland and for irish whiskey representing the three types of whiskey that single malt single grain and single pot. Still and the tradition of triple distillation in ireland and the fact that irish whiskey must be matured in wood for three years before it can be called irish whiskey and for the three leaf clover or shamrock the celtic tree not end the tri-color irish national flag international. Irish whiskey. day should never be confused by the way with international whiskey day. That's on march. Twenty seventh which celebrates all sorts of whiskies nor should we confused with world whisky. That's celebrate on march fifteenth and is really just a cover for the scotch who think they're so big and i gotta say irish whiskey. They was amazing. It was maybe my best irish whiskey ever. What with irish up my morning coffee and irish up my mid morning coffee and irish up my love. Lunchtime red bull and irish up my afternoon tea all before. Getting into a new bottle of jameson at the stroke of five. Because you really don't want to drink before then yeah. International whiskey was everything. I hoped that would be and then just like that. It was over not to return for another year but not so the promise podcast. We will be back next week and every week reminding you that you don't have to come from limerick to find running through your mind over and over again. Those same two syllables uttered by that man. There once was from tuck it on this the promise by fast.

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Episode Eighty-Eight

Le Batard & Friends - Mystery Crate

49:46 min | 8 months ago

Episode Eighty-Eight

"What's boys welcome in to the highly anticipated episode two of let's eat. I think everybody for listening to episode one and and really getting behind this series because really is a passion project for me to bring out the city of Miami, my hometown born and raised here to be able to share with everybody the gems in hidden places that Miami has to offer because in this episode. I'm. GonNa have to warn you I did make a pitstop place that is not known for their food. They are doing some things in the near future that will be bringing some food to their place, but today's episode is with. The team from Jay Wakefield brewery in Winwood in Miami a probably one of the most ECLECTIC breweries I've ever been to you walk into the brewery and you walk into a Star Wars Cantina. You've got a mural of the avengers on one side. You've got a bunch of Star Wars Paraphernalia everything where it's such a cool place to be, and if I told you, I've been there. I don't know thirty different times in my life. I celebrated a birthday. They're like this is a really cool place in a staple of winwood one, the first og breweries that really popped up in the area and they've been killing it since then in this episode, we're going to talk to John Wakefield Himself C. O. Onnor basically mastermind behind everything that happens at j week brewery and the first and only think head female brewer in the State of Florida her name is muddy accommodate. She's a huge superfan shot to mirror shoe super hospitable and made this whole thing happened. So we appreciate all that but we talk about. Their journey, we talk about the ups and downs of starting a brewery from scratch what it takes to reciprocate an old beer style that was thought to be gone by the wayside and put a Florida spin on it by using fresh fruits. Jay Wakefield is an incredible place and this is an incredible story featuring John Wakefield Amodio Ghabra, and on the other side of that journey brings us through to some of their best beers that they have on tap. She nerds out when it comes to the hop setter in it the way it's made where the ad junk flavors. That's all coming up next here on. Let's see. I'm really excited to be here because this is not only a place that I've been coming to. Since I was almost before I could drink I don't know if I'm allowed to say that I think the statute of limitations is over on that but I spent my twenty seven birthday here I have friends that work here I'm Jay fuel buried and it's a Miami staple. A Win would staple a Florida steeple. A real was getting to a point where we're saying a national state longhaired CEO John Wakeham here head brewery governor and guys. First of all, I want to start here. I want to reverse engineer your path, right? You got a homebrew kit for fifty dollars. You would find that a bathroom. And turn that into what we're sitting in riled as cow. Boy. Well that was a Mr Beer Kit and that was. To. Say. Fourteen years ago. And Obviously those kits were only one gallon size. So when you brute in that thing, it was never enough to share with your body's. So immediately, you know one gallon. lasted. A day. So it went to the pass that okay it's not enough beer. So the next thing was, are we need to upgrading graduate to the five gallon? Meant bigger pots vigor equipment you know and it just kinda steamroll from. That's just you know it started as a hobby at home brewing every single weekend to in multiple batches a weekend to me leaving my CPA job. Going to work at Cigar city to go to Kinda grassroots basically learn everything about the business instead of just jumping in his homebrew and having zero experience in the commercial side of things I wanted to know every single thing that I can learn about the commercial side of brewing. So I started at the bottom and worked my way into boy as Ruhr over there. So I learned everything from packaging to seller were cleaning sanitizing brewing you know and also would sit down with the CEO over there learn. About the different aspects of the business distribution marseils etcetera. So I just try to absorb and take notes in and swallow as much as I as I could and then come back and try to open this place I. also did do a small stint at Stonebridge San Diego and then came back in the process while they was being built out and then finally came back to find lies and do finish all the construction and everything else that's incredible. You working as a CPA you had nothing to do with. And you had nothing to do with. You enjoyed beer. You drank beer and you're like, you don't. This could be cool. So so you you went from a normal Tang job. A very. I didn't WANNA say. Very good paying job just saying I'm out I want to pursue my passion. I was I was making good money You know I have a graduate degree in accounting. And I basically, it was I hated sitting behind a desk crunching numbers I mean I did it for fifteen years and I was like this is killing me. This is not what I WANNA do not love doing this every single day of my life and meanwhile, I, actually enjoyed home brewing I enjoyed making beer and you know when I would take it to festivals and home brewing events and stuff it was very well received, and then you have the backing of people coming in and go nee you should do your own thing, i. mean. This was way before we're giving give me a timeframe when what is I would say two thousand. Two thousand eleven. I started getting that kind of nudge and push, and I in two thousand eleven I would take a week or two while still getting paid because I couldn't just leave my job at the time and I would go and take a week of vacation and go work at Cigar, city at work there learn some things at and I did that for about two years and then finally two, thousand, thirteen I'm just like you know what? If I'm GonNa do this I gotta quit so I quit and Ju- like I think May of two thousand thirteen? And then worked for full year basically with those gusts. That's incredible. came back in the wet directly to cal. Forty It didn't didn't just redid the whole thing like you said, grassroots going back to okay. I know how to homebrew like I've done a successful it's not it's it. Is the same, but it's not the same I mean it's such a grander scale elements like basically thinking you can cook at your. House and then go to restaurant that's not And that's that's the interesting part when people have hobbies all the time I like I like to do this I like to do that I like to homebrew doesn't mean I'm going to open up potentially where I famous right and we're kindred spirits in the same way where. The media game is very similar where you have a show you have a product whether it be a youtube channel whether it be a radio podcasts. Anything. Now, you know how it is thousand different things you can be famous on you have a product that you think okay I'm happy doing this but how do I turn this into money right? Like how is how is the first initial thing of I'm going to go to a festival I'm actually going to sell something that I made. A lot of it on your own dime in the beginning especially Broin I mean, I gave away a lot of beer and Minnesota Selena's more of a passion. Thanks. So it was really my own investment into just giving stuff away in seeing people enjoy it. I mean I would bottle stuff and give it away to friends in the net stuff with somehow end up in California got dudes in California drinking this homebrew that I made in the word kind of spread from there but it all came. Full. CIRCLE WHEN When it went to time to raise money I mean I had fun of my own My partner is my father is well. So we had a you know a good chunk of everything to do the berate, but I also wanted to get the. Community involved. So we did a wasn't a kickstarter with different site, but it was the same idea crowd in this crowd sourcing crowdfunding and I think the largest funding to date back. Then I think Arizona Wilderness had done like forty thousand dollars and then modern times, which is a massive story. Now, I think they had raised like fifty thousand dollars. Or I'm sorry sixty, five thousand raised back then and Okay, then all shoot for sixty, you know sixty, we'll call it safe because modern times had this massive plan and I was like, okay well, we will start with sixty and. We blew past sixty, thousand, the first eight hours and we went on to raise a hundred thousand dollars what Just, word of mouth like I've had a mouse hype in Oh because I was working Cigar City Brewing Beers Cigar city they allowed me to brew my own beer. Our City in those years were on it festivals such as apoe. Back in back in the day, there was fruit in the room There are other places I was I had brewed with my guys at cycle brewing and made beers there. So the word was out but. The real exposure was growing. It's Gar City and putting those beers on draft would've voted for the road and people would like bananas I. Mean We started with one beer that we still have today I think it was very first day. This was two, thousand, nine of. And It was a pink beer and no one had ever seen grow. So it tapped out I think in like four minutes what people would bananas because it was the first fruited berliner that anybody had ever done in the country. Okay. I, want to stay right there. That's what makes you guys different is that people if they've never experienced your flavoring door style of beer, can you explain for the people that only know beer as of Miller lives bud light all the same ship that everybody drinks Macaroni beer explain like what your style is in. What makes you unique were always people were cigar city stone recycle everyone was allowing you to do something that you can't just walk off the street and be like, Hey, I want to prove you're right. No, I mean I had garnered basically a following an I had a very good relationship with Joey Renner. WHO's the CEO of of? Cigar city he was at my house for the Um Fsu football game and I had two beers on tap, and that's all he drank all night and then after that is like you need to come brew this here like do its pilot batch while i. was like two, two, thousand nine. So I started like then don't like pilot batches and this and that, and that's what we did. It was basically our flavors of what were known for our fruited sours. But more classically style fruited sour is not the new wave stuff that's hitting even though we've morphed a little bit but we still stayed true style and big. Adjunct in flavored imperial stout, which more are like the desserts. So I mean we use my biggest push always was never use extracts never use fake flavoring because to me that's not really cheating the game if you can't accomplish it with real ingredients some why do it? and. We've always used real fresh fruit and remind me what's a better place to get mango guava passion. Fruit. Dragon Fruit. By I mean anything. Yeah. So we use that to our our advantage. So you guys are basically the pioneers using that fresh fruit in two years and making that distinct flavor united into salaries dubbed it the Florida Weiss, right right because of this guy. Because, because of you yes, we used to have a festival. At Tex Cantina in the incur water in it was. Florida Weiss Bash. Because that's the name that have garnered because a broiler. Weiss's basically just a classic German style Sour Ale that had no flavoring. But what they would do would be add fruit to the glass once the beers already in the glass, it would add raspberry syrup woodruff, Syrup, other kind of service that they had pre made. I took turn on his head and I'm like, why don't we just add the fruit information? While it's still going instead of waiting the added in the glass because you can just change the game. And they tried to. Change it to a recognizable style by the BJ's CPAP like the brewing panel never pass but everybody was on board that it was like Yeah Florida wise photo is four device and then that discount that's So you guys were critical intriguing basically a reinventing a style abused up because nobody's wise I don't think of that when I go to a regular far some like that. I mean it. Changed the game it was it's something I'd like to do I like to go back and look more like history but Its history of beer and I really liked to dig up old debt styles and see if we can. Reinvent them, refresh them and we've done it multiple times here that style alone with the kind of kink that we added in with a fruit. Changed. The whole game I mean, it really changed the whole game because if you really look now even though they've morphed into something else. That is still the base idea and they are one of the hottest styles of the country, and for Miami, specifically like it's such a beard half here because as we were just talking like we are communist nine hundred and fifty degrees. A nice five or six percents our beer that's light and refreshing with good fruit flavor. But isn't over edited not too sweet. You can still get you know you get a balance of the sweetness and you get a balance of the acidity. It's great for weather like this. You know it's not gonNA. You know not too much alcohol. You're die pass out you know but it's also gonna be able to relieve in, hydrate you and kind of knocked some of that heat out when you first started doing them you guys together obviously as head brewer as the brains behind the new invigorating style like how many batches did you guys have to go through like oh? This sucks we can't. We can't put the. She she came on after the fact. Okay. So she I met you two thousand fourteen. So right she was working at the fountain blue. Beer. Never, she was a pastry chef allegations or was helps a lot because they're scientists. Through. A mutual friend I met her. She came here wanted to get into beer wanted to do something again with her hands and be into A. Food slash beverage side of things again. So then I started teaching her, you know at at my house and stuff like that with other guys were coming on board. And basically kind of showing her this is what we do how do and then. That translated over here and she started running with what we had back in the day was like a five gallon treatment. You know we take single batches of our base beer at different ingredients and kind of do experiments to see if people would like it and some are. Not so good and then other ones were massive hints that we've now turned into annual releases. Like history trail so hard. As incredible by the way I, love. All. Show. But. Like diaw PF MIAMI. Madness. Those are carryovers from. From ten years ago. As those have made the jump L. Have A.. L. Halfway was before as well but offered a lot of the stuff we started from scratch here like what do what did we need? You know six years ago what would be a good fit for Miami in that's what have kinda stayed. We've obviously whittled through stuff that didn't stand the test of time not that they weren't good beers that people in Miami were looking for certain things and really it's you know it's fruit it's ours and IP s and really stoute's to I. Think anybody who wants to drill I'll stop. Anytime of year doesn't matter how. Are. All Year round here which has. Only a winter, right? It blows everybody's mind that people will come and drink. You know twelve thirteen percent off all stout when it's ninety five degrees outside. But it doesn't matter. I think that we figured out in the very beginning that people either want to sit down and enjoy three to four beers or they only want to sit down. Enjoy you. One, what's going to get you right? That's a that's Miami's style. MIAMI. Has such interesting pal too because there's a lot of restaurants as a lot of bars as a lot of breweries that have now you know blossomed of and you have to have that unique. Miami Flavor. You, guys know from Agassi years and business. There's restaurants that had a good concept that may have not been in Miami Christ and didn't work and there's breweries I'm sure you guys know of the good stuff, but it just didn't land here. Niamey like so you said fruits sours those kind of refreshing right beers is war It also has to be tied into what Miami's very tropical. Very. influenced. L. Heff as you know like L. have phase is very tropical right? My you know it's very Miami. Light beer coconut. Beach. In same thing but like with the fruit fruit appears. It's all like reliant. Fruits that everybody knows from their past and have been through Miami forever you know. So it's definitely something we've embraced I mean you know even some the you know stoute's that we do our very. Cafe, Wakefield and stuff. It's very remind me senseless and I think that's that's interesting. Thing too because when you taste something. And it ties back to nostalgia of your childhood of growing up at the willows house and all the sudden you're eating. A certain fruit May passing through guava, whatever it is, and you have that and a trigger something back or you. What you felt at the time. So we developed or in streams to call. So it's our sour base with oranges umbrella. And what you have as a kid it was an orange positive vanilla center and a lot of people it caught on really really well, because it reminded them of their childhood of the ice cream man or whatever you know. But it made them feel a certain way and that's what we try to convey in with with our beer's. Time that bag I think that's such a cool thing because there are certain aspects of our human beings smell sounds sites that true that back and all the sudden you're playing on a psychological few you're not playing Oh, I like the taste of it is oh, I liked the taste a lot but it reminds me of X Y and Z I. think that's one thing you guys have done show well is being able to adapt and Zig Zag right like that is a mainstay of what you guys do here at the art see the different styles like it feels different. Right is that where you guys are trying to commit it was I mean that's who he is the one. Who He this is Star Wars Cantina we've got the avengers. LOVES SPORTS LOW COMMENTS I. Love. Music pop culture. Pop Music but no comma, I can't. Say Call. Know right know. Britney spears. Did site. Label with other half buy-sell. No it's it's basically kind of. My childhood and my my life. I Played College Football La, basketball still play basketball. Sports very centric here, but really it's growing up in the eighties. Being wrapped into comics like late eighties nineties, and then what the movies I kinda grew up with star wars is I mean it's on my body. On the walls I mean it's it's who we are It's it shows on the labels. It's just very. Much into the culture. And in that's who we are in it's. Not I mean, we did that entanglement. One is a shot in you know. I mean it's it's constantly taking you know in in doing different things to keep updating in being. Hip. You know what I mean but it's it's what we find. Funny. It's what we find that goes with what's going on in the Times. Now you know I think if we've always had the comic book labels I mean we will continue to have those. We've kind of updated our branding and stylistic to be a little more. centric in in straightforward as far as a normal brands would go. So they hit more like a normal consumer. But you know it's we we always still have the good stuff. In it and that will never go away and I think that's one thing too is like you taste the being like, oh, this is really a beer. One Way to you look at the labels you look at the packaging, you'll get a promotion of it's different from any other grew I've ever seen like I know there's some people that do have been nobody nobody doesn't like you guys do it. No I mean a lot of people are very focused on a style like this. You know they have the style that is what they do in. It's centered around that can be very. Very artistic, but it's who they are. What we do is who we are, you know it's it's what we're about in on its in the people that work here is what they're about to you know. So it it's always good to have people on the team that are behind the movement behind the actions. And I think it shows in the quality of the beers in the flavors and everything that we're executing. That's probably the biggest thing for me is the creativity. Wasn't doing anything creative unless it was at my house numbering beer and that was my creative release. You know here it's a constant. Creation, I have constantly constantly be on top of my game. Of creating new things. Like, if you're not constantly pushing the envelope in. Do. You're you're done nine go. What's next? Everybody will find the next thing. If, you were not leading the way or on that edge. You know it's that's it for anybody. I think if you're not always constantly pushing the envelope. You'll be forgotten about Mario. One interesting thing. You're a pastry chef you're not working brewing whatsoever you drink beer. Because like it or not. Met Him and I was working as a concierge because. I lived in New York. and I was doing patient New York worked at a one star Michelin restaurant. It was awesome. The scene of food and New York is amazing. There's nothing that compares to it But when I moved back and I had my daughter, there weren't really many bakeries in Miami new. York. And I wanted to production job but I'm not gonNA work at all Vicki Bakery that's just not no no no shade on them. It's just not what I. Love for it. Right. You were a Michelin restaurant nuts into Lucchino to do. Right right. But I didn't WanNa work a restaurant either because you're the last. Desert and that people pass on you they're like, Wallet's how would teach you know so you're sitting there for no reason anyway. So when I met him, he would give me cases of beer because he would trade as well. So that's how some of his beard got around the country. He's homebrew and And he would give me cases of beer and then I would tastes. Different things in somewhere good and somewhere not so good i. You say can do this, and so his friend would always be like, Hey, you know he's GonNa open up a very these people to work there. It's going to be production. I like I'm I'm down to learn whatever it takes I will do it If it's a day job. You know it's creative. So I started looking into craft beer and. Enough twenty fourteen That's six years. And you turned into, did you take classes? Did you go somewhere and study like who did you learn to just? This guy he Knows yes yup. And your. To my knowledge, you're the only. Hedberg. WHO's feel in Florida I don't know. That's that's incredible boundaries. She was the first she still is the only one head brewer. How. Does that make you feel like mean it's cool. I just see it more as like. You know anyone who bust their ass could get to where anyone who who works hard who puts in the effort who puts an. Just, the work that it takes because it's a ton of work. You can get there. You just have to want to do it. And I wanted to do what is your favorite brew? You guys of me like your numbers right off. What's your favorite one pop okay. I always say and I've only tried it once and it John made it is a even though. Because I'd never had anything like that before and in the of anyone's ever had it like it's an ipod That was a lot of work. It was amazing but I like very sour it's our and Sweden. Let's say it was it was it was amazing and we've never done it again. And that was it was. It was just like He. Barely Bash and twenty four team. Roy. Put a lot of time into that because you start with the pods, you have to soak the the the meat inside to get the seeds out, and then you have to turn the meat into a pay news. House. Hours right it's I mean but that's i. mean that's still follows I. Mean we've gotten a little more. Streamlined in the way we handle things. In the way we're able to get fruit nowadays because in the very beginning of this whole process, a lot of these vendors and stuff weren't around that had. Pre pure as. This availability didn't happen. We used to get truckloads of fresh fruit break down house while yeah. Like thousands of pounds of fruit in. One Island I, you're talking Evanston fruit. Back. Crawl. Of It, we would deceive may skin DC and mangoes and Sides of. Course. Then Dragon Fruit. Pretty easy to do but it's We. All juice pounds of all. Kinds of pineapple look like. Three or four very large bins. Out. We had like super into watermelon. I two thousand pounds of Waterville peaches shipped in from California eight, hundred pounds of pizzas. We. Still Do. Fresh. Fruit. Fresh fruit like. The. Every. Year, we'll get like shipment of apples from the certain Valley Oregon deserve their in rose. Now. Now, they're they sound very remainder greenwood with flecks of red on the skin cut it in his pink and who take out what's and only? One, valley, in Oregon, that grows them. Sweeten Tartan crimes messed up. Like. I do a lot of homework. I do a lot of homework. I, do a lot of research. I do a lot of homework I try to find things that are different. And Out. been killing me. You guys are doing an amazing job I'm like I said I celebrate a birthday here have been drinking here since before I could even actually show a card to somebody like I. Appreciate you guys for being. Line, but this has been a staple man. I'm I'm super happy. You guys our current in continuing to. We hope to continue to be a stable for a long time for sure all. Let's get to the right. Hey guys football season is less than ten days away with reigning champs set to take the field to kick off the season there's no better place to get in on all the action than with draft kings leader in one day fantasy sports to celebrate week. One of the football season draftkings is putting you in the center of the action with not one but. Two shots at a million dollar top prize. So get in on all the action right now, making it rain with draftkings easy draft, your team standard, the salary cap and pilot points for yards touchdowns, and so much more on top of that amazing offer draft. 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We usually do let's see we eat and we try our different foods and we're GonNa do here is let's drink we got married she's the head brewer here. Jay. Wakefield she has a put together an assortment of different beers you guys grew in house. Can you walk through the different ones that we're GONNA TASTE ARENA? Let's. Just say all right. So I. When we have is our collaboration with other half's there in Brooklyn they're very good friends of ours and that's one of the things that I love about working in this industry is that we get to collaborate with our friends we go there maybe not during the times of Kobe. Kobe did. We always get to hang out so. They came here I this back in sixteen or seventeen. I can't remember if it was the end of the beginning of those years. And it's not a normally with them. We do stoute's everyone that comes here always wants to do a stout with us but we wanted to do and I ta so it's called Jujitsu. Juice. Juice. Yes. It's the label is actually an other house label that we're able to use. And it is a New England Sti- PA so it's Hazier. It's not as clear as what you would normally have your. Correct. It's also not hopped the same. So this is. Dry hopped. So during fermentation during fermentation toward the end of fermentation we start adding hops to it for. Air Matic. Purposes. So in this year in particular, we have Citra we have Morello and we have a very Mandarin Ah. So, the nose on this is going to be a lot of tropical fruits and then on your palate, it's going to be juicy. It's not going to be Palette crushing and bitter like a West Coast style would. Maybe, not, floor. More bitter forward. This is more air matic juicy. But still you get some bitterness so we will try. So. Basically. When you taste it, you get a front kind of that bitterness, but then it finish is smooth with the smell the aromatics of of that hop flat passion, fruit lots of citrus, right so this this you get that off from the hops, which is something that I find to be incredible. It's like when you're tasting wine, they tell you oh, well, you're going to get. Of Blackberry or hints of you know like Earth's arranged. So this is cool because it's the hops. If you put them in a different times, you get different results like the next one we have here, which is kind of like an orange color. Is Hatred actually. It is something that we came up with. Because as you well know online a lot of people like to spew things a correct and what do you drink when you're hating history? So it's a fruit punch inspired berliner vice. So, it's our the nose on it is. Tropical fruit. Very fruity reminiscent of like Hawaiian Punch or. Correct. But. Then it hits you with a lactobacillus which is what sours the beer. Okay, now we're now we're going to chemistry lactobacillus. Obviously, you hear the lactose in the front does that have to do with east? Bacteria lactobacillus you finding your rookie `bacterial beer they have no idea right? You Find It in Yogurt, right? So. Completely. You can digest it normally it's not a problem, but it is what's ours the beer, and then obviously the fruit comes afterward you have you know oranges, Cherries Pineapple. So the sour. Makes you want to go in for. Right. You get this the fruity you got lemonade you get citrusy. It hits you right here in the draw. And then I'll send you want to go back for more. So the Ph on this is lower right because it's our slope. Sour, candy it's It's any yogurt. That's incredible and what hops does this because obviously, it's a crew. So the US on this international bettering units is what that stands for. You don't want high. On this. So the on air. Correct. Yeah. You don't want to hop forward beer. You don't want to. It's not what it's for. Right you need a little bit of bettering just to get it and then. Let the sour, really be the. Okay. So this next one has a beautiful like Ruby, color? Fuchsia few show. This is diaw pm. This is a super. This is the beer that. Really put John on everyone's kind of like the Buzz L. where he At who knew? People. Who is like one of the biggest things in your community? So he was home brewing this and he started pouring plaster walls and. Now. We do a one year release. We sell out every single year. It's awesome. So again, same base beer as the previous one. But then we Red Dragon Fruit and passion. Fruit. The. Like. Instantly you feel like the puckering like your mouth because of the different sour. And that's a combination of the lactobacillus and the passionate passionate who when you need it it's right right right back here. So it works perfectly with this. The dragon fruit is a lot more color and I don't know if you get it but there is an earthy kind of tastes like a very cactus sea dragon fruit is from a cactus family. So that's where you're getting from. It's like the science if people knew the science behind fear, they would have a totally different respect for it and I feel like people just go to the corner store they get Mandalay. Whatever I'm going to drink to get drunk that's it. We're just using the mackerel exactly and we're not we're it's almost like you have to go out and search for stuff like this because this is not something that just run of the mill on every shelf public's right like you have to go out and. Really do your homework and invest in finding stuff like this and I think that's where we got shine as having the variety that you guys do look at the top. So you guys have five six seventy taps and obviously stuffed with rotating and like you just do it right and it's different. It's Miami and it's like I think why you guys succeed yeah. He likes to have a lot of styles on John Because he's. He wants to make sure that we're good at everything and then being good than we can be great. You know. So the styles regret I brought you so IFA. And now we're going to move onto a style, which is the other thing that we're very well known for our stoute's and are doubts. When we make Russian imperial stout it's a High V. so you're looking at twelve percent above, but it's a manageable twelve percent. You're not really tasting that alcohol. And then as he previously spoke about, we work with a lot of adjuncts. So this is kind of. Where I get to play with my background of face she. Described adjunct like what that means for people that don't still an adjunct is when you would add an ingredient. Like. Or like vanilla or a fruit to like an Oriole guys oatmeal style you guys have a bunch of different things that you play with and that's actual like ingredients. You guys crush up Oriole and put it in. June wherever it is. Yeah. We did a beer recently. And we made Coconut Candy from Guan. We hang out with. John's really good friends with this guy that owns a very in. La and they're from Guam and they kinda run like this. Crew thirty people right running together. So one of the guys taught me one year when they came down for festival, how to make this coconut candy. So we toasted coconut we make. Like if you're doing wrong. And we added into the beer and it's just it's super cool. I still get to. You still tie both worlds together. Right like when you're pastry chef and you're like, okay, this is cool and then your brewing you can reach back into that knowledge haven't be like, oh Whatever like I'm GonNa Make Oreos, we're going to do you're cooking. What anything anything you can imagine why we try to make it's so this is a list is called the hangover. We did our first hangover day for wake forest. Wake us our big festival that we do every year we invite over one hundred and twenty burris from around the world. So the coffee right off the bat, this is coffee and Cinnamon Rolls Oh. My God. And it's triple barrel blend. So it's a brainy barrel bourbon barrel and arrive air and explain what that means like if you for your beer in any of those barrels like what does that do for the flavor profile? Okay. So the beer is finished. Competing before we actually go into a spirit barrel, the beers complete A. Drink right off rip right there you could. We, put it into fifty three gallon. Bourbon Barrels, Ri- barrels whatever we can get her hands on and it'll age from anywhere about. Eight to twelve months and we have to taste it. You got to see where it's out. You got to see if the flavor that you want is there. So with this one, we had three different barrels. We pulled all those barrels out, and then we added coffee and cinnamon rolls, and this is what we got. So lots of barrel lots of coffee on the nose hint sweetness will you get that cinnamon? You get kind of like the that dough flavor. So. John is very into food. He loves cooking and that's one of the things that he always wanted his beers to be wanted his beers to be. Paired with food to be able to have a nice meal at home and you could have. All the whole gamut, these beers and It'll go perfectly. Well, it's not like. Going to a sports bar and eating chicken wings with you know. Miller later whatever you know this is something that you can have with a really nice dessert coconut. Or something that would just whatever kind of like. Very. This you can have with a raw fish Sushi Ashim. Sebha the city will cut the rate or something as fatty as like ribs or get. The sour the acidity will through that and it complements whatever you're eating. while. So the science behind is so cool because. You would think that it's just Oh, I'm going to drink in whatever it is but but there really is like a science behind what is you guys are doing here super happy to be here. Super happy to see like how it is a you guys pour your heart and soul into leftists like these are your. Children. This. From. Being ingredients on the floor like okay. I'm going to use this I mean he's got him use that and. Sudden here here it is, and it's like, Ju Jitsu. Saturday. Let's talk really quick because I know people are gonNA WANNA know. When you guys did the collaboration with the show how did that come to be? How did you guys figure out what to the ingredients to make the different beers to me like? On read it on all these different things like people will pay an obscene amount of money to get a put together a hang on series I swear to God it's not even a joke but. People will pay an obscene amount of hall and. People will pay an insane amount of money to have that not only for the packaging for obviously the can but for the taste just to be associated with that, tell me how. How you guys? Put the flavor profiles together and I see all of them have a tie to somebody on the show, right? Exactly how there's so many different things that you can use that all the sudden you turn into a year and it becomes the personification of that of that person. Yeah. So Greg, always wanted his own. But that never happened 'cause he's also very expensive. A kind of started. Because John Gives Miata Shit for missing sports radio and I'm like, but it's not really sports radio. and. I've been listening. Hochman was the producer while we're going way back. Yeah. And I always wired somehow be involved with the show and it just so happens that someone that was working at seven ninety at the time had walked in and kind of like. presented. Some sort of like a marketing thing to us. Now it's like, no dude, don't talk to me unless you bring down. I told I straight up told him that he somehow made it happen and he's like listen if you want Dan. is another thing but the shipping container and I was like. Awesome for for one. Awesome. So one day John and I went and we sat down with Mike and Chris in billion. Roy and we Kinda just hatched Roy's the craft beer drinker. He is the guy that I would see his ratings on like untapped. So I, know he's a beer. Guy? He's got the most complex bure I'd probably say four or five. Yeah. So. His votes were big with the craft beer drinkers. Because they know that were known for stoute's Great. But then you've got the other craft beer drinkers drinkers that are more about sours. So they wanted vilis and might. But first round. Obviously, billy one. But he wanted something very Miami and very like also obviously, it was guava passion fruit on put it on the poll. And Mike Kinda got jealous 'cause he was like a close second. I think it was more like a popularity vote at times. But it was just so awesome. It was awesome people come in and they get the flight because we would saw it as a flight and then they'd vote and they'd rank it however they wanted. So every week I'd get a textural Mike going you know who's in the leader who's losing? It became very competitive and they talk about it in the local hour. and. Then the following year we did it again and then Mike. And Mike Sue Cherry Line that one is to me. That's probably one of the Best Beers I've ever tasted in my entire life is that Cherry Lime may hang on? Like. I knew I loved you guys is beer but that's just from drinking teacher drinking the heavy like the regular ones you wearing. The staples, but then when I tried that I was like. Oh. My God like this next level and I don't know what it is. I. Love Cherry linemate like that. You something that I love and. A home run. Yeah. So he was really happy about that and just the guys were really involved in and they were really about like pushing it and just kind of collaborating with local. Family owned business. Now we're very big on community. We do a lot of collaborations with other restaurants making bears for them. You know different bars different bottle shops like union down here. So we're all about that. We have yet I think it was like in between the sale to entercom and stuff, and we haven't done it again. But usually you know we're gonNA have to do now right like I precious you on this before the people we're GonNa have like once they hear this, they're going to want to have won a who the hell is Tony we gotta figure out of Flavor Profile. We've got to figure something out because the people are going to be. Clamming for it. Do you want to design the labels on? Designed label. John and jobbing everybody put our heads together am very cheap. Incredibly. Okay. You don't have to worry about my wife's laughing. I'm very cheap. I'll do something for nothing but I think it needs to be the book end of the new generation of the show some very simple in that fact. We'll see and we'd have to make it happen. Now we have to sign a contract. We'll do it. Let's go. That is now on video. So now we have to have that you're gonNA talk to you. I do to talk to John, but we'll do it. Big, thanks to Maria to John to everybody that helped out getting US accommodated, and making us feel at home at J. Week fuel brewery, and again, if you want to support what they're doing at Jay Wakefield beer on instagram's where you can find them, they have a lot of great offerings there, and if you WanNa go to the store and buy your own beer one, twenty North West Twenty Fourth Street in Miami Florida in Winwood. If you're not in Miami and you'd like to get your hands on Jay Wakefield. Stuff. You can get merchant shop, Wakefield brewing dot com, or if you WANNA get actual beer. And again because of the laws in this state, and in this country, you can only get them in certain places in the mail it. But if you live in Atlanta Georgia Charlotte North Carolina Boston Massachusetts Minnesota and in southern California you can get your hands on Jay Wakefield beer by going to your local package shop or craft beer store and asking for some Jay Wakefield incredible beer brewed by. Incredible people I was so excited to finally meet an interview, some of the people that have been enjoying their the product of their hand and of their mind for a long time. So it was really cool to get with them. The next episode of let's eat will feature a very interesting and local chef in Miami I'm really excited to bring that to the forefront for those of you asking. We're trying to figure out a way to get all of the. Let's eat episodes onto twitch in a kind of directors cut live watch. I'll have more on that on my social. Media Asi, underscore, underscored through five and obviously at Lebatardshow. So before we end this I, don't know if you've heard. But. The Dan Le Batard show with Stugatz has moved from ten to twelve daily on your ESPN lineup not only that we are giving you more offerings of the show. Dan. Do the shipping container and friends on the local hour and on the big Sioux am really proud of what we're doing with the big Sui because we are giving you more show not less more show through all the offerings that we're. Giving you a digital and I have met with some of my ups and the numbers are exploding on the new change. So we thank you so much appreciate you guys following along and listening and making us the number one property at ESPN. Again, let's eat episode three coming up in a few weeks. We are nonstop recording because we know that you guys love this kind of stuff. So until next time piece. The. GEICO knows there are many reasons why you ride from the thrill of the revving engine and pure adrenaline flying down the highway to the confidence of knowing that Gyco always has your back with twenty four, seven access to claim service. But Ari Snyder has one reason in particular. I had extremely large upper arms. They won't even fit into most shirts thankfully, biking really embraced his vest culture. So I feel accepted Geigo motorcycle fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more.

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Bhante Cunda | Unconcerned With The World | The Armadale Meditation Group

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

1:05:49 hr | 5 months ago

Bhante Cunda | Unconcerned With The World | The Armadale Meditation Group

"So let's just inches myself. So my name is brenda poetry taibbi. No daynuss among four lost tracker. So i think more than modern style. Okay so we saw fifty meta sutil channel along so d- buddhist would love and kindness. This is what to be done by one who is skilled in nanas and who knows the powerful piece let him be able and upright straightforward engine to speech humble and on can t contented an easily satisfied. Not busy and not busy with duties and frugal india ways. Ps four calm and wise and skillful not pro and demanding in nature latino to the slightest thing that wise were later through wishing in gladness and in safety may mayo beings p p at ease. Whatever living being stay may be whether week all strong all meeting non the ray and all the mighty medium or small the seen and the unseen those living near and far away though spawn and to be bone mayo beings be happy lead none dc and neither or despise any being in any state. Let none fru angle. You will which has come up on. Not even at a martyr per with her life her child only chow so with a boundless heart to charities or lee being beings radiating kindness. Over in the entire. Whoa spreading was and to the skies and down with the was an unbounded Free from hatred and you will where the standing walking seating all lying down free from trout in us. One should sustain this regulation. This is to be not be supply abiding by nor holding to force us to appeal hard. One having clarity of vision fredin being free from all sense. Desire is now bone again into this world. Saw do sadhu side sadhu. Okay okay. I guess this to speak speaking into entire finisher than than ask for any question and so okay so i think we've the Before gamut shouldn't cut let me quickly introduce myself. So for anyone knew i was reading on militia and migrated from malaysia to australia when i was troll years old so i basically grew up in australia then late on saturday working up in the minds so when i was working at at the mind's i experienced of of depression loneliness and also a unwholesome meant to stay arise so i got very keen and meditation because i heard he actually helped depression anxiety. Nosso allow the mind to settle the one. I started that. Then the meditation in the minds go la benefit from my practice in the minds to the point where my head went away sleep better. I have nice streams and the side effect levels. My health improves mucha. That my hands stopped trembling and wanting on notice on that my sickness cer- become less and less to the point. Maybe i'll get maybe sick once or twice a year. So i saw that improvement and i saw the the meditation and having a boss of mine did determine how i feel within mahatma. Mine so So i got drawn into meditation quite Naturally year and i really enjoy meditation so a law firm my work call these itself they they will go after work. They'll go drinking or mesic around before being around as for myself. I started to withdraw from hanging around with my work call each and my friends and basically gave up smoking and drinking especially drinking so i sought to cut down more and more into i stop completely. Basically two on basically became a buddhist and suddenly come to body on monastery are often to learn more abundant titian this practice so it was quite interesting the so some people ask me. Why would this month now. Because i just want to deepen practice further and try to understand the deepa insider in the buddhist practice especially deep meditation and wisdom park. We still miss very important. Because it's good. To keep the precept is good to develop a tation but to increase our sealer to chris our meditation. We must develop with them. We sent me safai no part because we always we would not learn and we wanna understand because when we develop our meditation and now seila down what we allow the mind to see see things very clearly to seize the cause and effect to see what will what by action speech and minor will cause suffering to and other people so so when i was a practice. Buddhist with the mind cer- find being a buddhist. Be nice to people wasn't a weakness a strength very interesting. Because i find that perform well at work and i got promoted and also people start to trust me more because they realize i was quite genuine person. I will not tell lies. I would not make story suppler and our trip before we respect and kindness and up in in this society that means a lot of people respecting kindness. Okay so yeah so it. S a quick background on them. My early buddhist practice. And i ask my parents if i go dana. Some monastic very early. On press told me no i say when they say ten years i said okay. No raise our mma ten years. I waited for ten years and asthma kid. Embargo daynuss as buddhist puts monka presi. No he got all day. And i say another ten years and they go yes ten years. I got okay so our way for another ten years and again. My parents made a mistake. Towing the kim. Even after ten years the asked again that the answer is no. I go okay lucky. My parents told me that. So i decided okay. I'll go get my parents wishes and discard the monastery admission dana weaver. Jim brown so lucky i did. That is now buddhist. Monk and practicing embody the. I may be stewing student lifer or even so the down we're family but even i was waiting for ten years. I basically kept myself busy at work and devoted my time in meditation and put this practice. Okay you see talk about anything at topic. Ucla taba was happening. The world and how the practice can relate with the world was happening in this society society. These days so going to victoria was quite interesting. So when myself to paul lower antipodes toucher. Am i so. Went to victoria. In june when we arrived in la within a few weeks time. The second wave lockdown happening to'real so our expecting to go down did how we work and get in the ministry establishing and building community but when the lockdown kamer went we moist went on lockdown and we hardly have any guests coming into stay so basir a bubble within the ministry and there was a very good because been having a bubble within the monastery that means that it was more of a tree must rains retreat wasser so the monks and nuns and also they get sir in the monastery and devoted time into buddhist practice meditation sturdier and also do keep the work to a bare minimum because when we also the wasser like coming back to body under nowa- noticed this law is happening. We are starting to help to get things organiz butte. Kuteesa this to help out with a lot of teaching this. This is one of the online teaching. It was some available now by member during a time lockdown period. When are staying at a new rebel this ministry. We did have a love teaching twice a twice a week. One sunday morning. Talk and monday night. Guided meditation dislike dislike Amadeo classes so what the the procedure or the classes almost. Cms amodio gathered meditation. Refound it as we started giving the titian guide more people with more multiple join and the numbers increase young creasing and we went from one. Read before lockdown. Maybe the spot. Ten or twenty. Then we saw the numbers went from for up to fifty then to eighty than even up to one hundred and twenty so it was quite interesting to see the audits teaching quite important. Because when this lockdown lock to our home and do have spare time especially when Things are not doing so well and when turned the news. There's always a lot bat bat media. Bad news is happening. Or sometimes i stick fake news and it can be very confusing and the buddhism. We realized this just this away. The way of the will of the eight week wurley condition and anyone practice this or not enlightened being. They'll get for rowan. This eight willie windsor. Basically willie windsor happiness. Sadness gain loss fame. Defame and i think been important and being a nobody. This wurley windsor block. Blow someone around the place. So if someone does. Not donna any spatial practice and diana donahue meditation and don't wash their heart and mind caffey leah realize this eight wurley condition blow someone around all over the place. Despic- look at the news these states. There's so many problems and this paler so it's very important as buddhist. We have to learn to basie when this eight willie wins arise. We have to learn to be patient to watch watch. What's happening and understand for wisdom so we some part is what law overcome our mental suffering a heart and mine and we can relate to people in this very skewed where you're allowed to tell a story so one one of the story that have shown our retreat learn. We can be embodied dasha went on a coin. Retreat la entry court tin isolation. Because coming back from victoria or new people. Arriving to witness is required to go and quarantine for two weeks so for for us. There was was perfect because we come back here. We d tree must retreat wassels. It came back here and dna to two weeks retreat. At the same time we also online retreat. Support our support this in the buddhist. It of victoria so on their retreat. We show one of story. This is nice story. This story is basically gave by allen. What's he was talking about a practitioner. They send buddhist practitioner so historical speaking with saying that. There's a story of this in china. Maybe two years ago where this own chinese farmer. It was farming in the countryside. And yes his wife and his keats and one time one of his horse ran away and he ran away from his arm than his neighbors. From the this list. Really really bad that your horse ran away and farm within maybe but the next day the hawks came back. We've we've tried. the hottest. The the haas found in the countryside came back with three other horses to another farmer have for horses too small horse than the the. The village people came over and told the farmer. That's really really good this good fortune. Add that the came out the horses and the pharmacy Maybe and the next day his youngest son trying to ride one of the younger horses so we gone to the horse. John the back and trying to right around the farm but what happened was the hospitals. Basically just jump up and son fell down and broke his leg and so we have to be in culture and somebody's neighbor came oversaw. I'm really really sorry that your your son fell down. Probably slake muscle very painful and the the the all farmers of maybe so. Yeah so i mean when you have good fortune in fortune but the a few days later official army came over and there was looking for new recruits to four because there was a war starting up blah with one in the kingdom so the army fisher came into show with looking for any young able mayo led to join the army so when they went to the all farmers howser and he saw that his son mesko leg. Well that's not really good. You can't do much for your broken leg so you scott. What's the word that when you joined. The army come remembered description interception so it didn't did not enlist after that the all always came over and say some of a young able able men not went off over was recruited by the army. A lot of young people went went to join the army but his son with a broken leg the and joined the army so his friends came over. And say oh. You're very lucky ridiculed fortune. That didn't took your son away and the whole pharmacy. Maybe so it's quite funny story. That i saw we've allen. What's almost the same story of what i was about. The king with one finger that was amputated. The king the Doctor the fixed fingerless either good bad. Who knows so. Everything's in certain. So saying we've life for this time of year with the whole thing the whole grow. Blow la in some parts of glow in lockdown so in the beginning. The second waving victoria. A lot your wasn't very happy. That the lockdown happen stricter and so sometime certain what the outcome is came out. But at the moment. Victoria's doing well in the whole austrian. Very well when compete three compared to the rest of the world. We are doing very well. We even have some emails coming from adam monks from all over the world national all with the wall maybe someplace is asking if space in body on his then come and join join the monastery but we have full here and due to the lockdown restriction. We can't really do that. And we are building but those are many power teaser for any of our local people that were linked to become anti garrick and do the whole training those power. The new space many for the poverty by after restriction is all la then we can basically allow monks to come here and stay here if their space so so we we've live sometimes with theanswer with the winter. We have to be patient. Wait understand and develop wisdom so one we have developed. Storm is a pulse of mine open minor and to see allow the mind not to go all over the place to pass to future to worry too much press one. We're worried about things to marcia. It does help. How are we are like you. Because sometimes you look at after checking the news these days and i realized i love domestic violence at home with people la realize sometimes a bit too hot ler and things are really going down. People can released one so sometimes good when things go wrong. It's always just to be patient and learn to rest and learn to Be very patient and just wait and wait and wait for things to To improve besoin. I stayed in the monastery. I know When we arrived dealer almost like winterless winked starting. Yeah and a notice of the window. The storm's rains and someti- snow so much look at the poor kangaroos. The wombat and the birds and the just been doing during the cold weather and do not rioting or complaining in the monastery so when i look at the nature look at the birds kangaroos wombats and sometimes even the koala we defy okla in the monastery and i think it was probably two older and dial who asia sometimes when when it snows a lot less sometimes we will find some of the animals. Pass away in the snow so this this nature sometimes the and most tends to not make ruler. Fru food the the winter season especially when slowing a lot. Every time he snows heavy. Lia the next day time we find kangaroo and this time we found it a dead koala. And that was i think might be one of the only qua- in the monastery body heard it and i heard from the trainees. That was a koala up. The use by i never saw ty soy was was dead in the snow the who has be sadler but hopefully has a rebirth. I mean sometimes people say that is a sad in the world now with d coronavirus getting rampart and the lobby for pass away here. Is that when things happen. Sometimes nature have to dig is cost because sometimes things like that happen. We carried too much. We can be patient ner and learn like what the the more does learn to withdraw and hibernate la during the long dark winter reserve energy and wants to win often. Come up from the deep sleep meditation so when things are not doing so well we learned to withdraw back in heart and mind go into common students and peace because the outside condition has nothing we can do about it but what we can do is we can go in woods and we go in gaza. We find that in a piece in happiness. Go in inside. We can find this silent the mine when the my style is still you find in peace and happiness and freedom when you look outside all you see is confusion and despair but i was looking to the internet and they say that during the first world war and the second world war after the first and second world war defined the cases of bertha for young boys is increased long so the scientists. Don't not sure what's happening to say. You see after to measure water every major first world war second world war the sense to be a very high birth rate of young boys so the scientists recondite. maybe it's the the the bio t- of pushing the men around so it's good to have more more boy sir but to me i see in the buddhist sensor for those people who serve in the in the war and they they pass away and do the in survey that my people joined the wall about eighty percent of people. Don't want to shoot the next person. So sometimes they aim up higher. Try miss a person. So in the in the way of avoiding making back cameron by human nature human beings that we don't want to hurt the q. And other beings study we find that on the internet. Most people are eighty percent people to join the army. they're not they. Don't don't q another human beings so if those people do develop those virtual harming human being wartime then i i guess the outcome is will have a good rebirth and come back to a human so yeah so even those people have sick. Have pass away during the pen pantothenic. I would monastic. We really truly believe they will come back again. Especially when so. I pass away this with the law com moolah and attachment you see my summary reborn again usually come always come back to the same family. Yes quite interesting because my grandparents just passed away a few years ago. And we've been one year of my. My youngest sister gave birth to a young boy. Here wondering kooky my my grandfather. The okay okay. So stop babbling tamasha because really people having most boy come and join this meditation classical meditation. Okay so this console i. I'm not used to having this bright light because the press in the amodio class. Ucla were stop. Meditation asked turn off the light year but just during the live recording we can turn the light so bright light here binding my face and lot bright light here and why one ryan toddler. So it'll be unusual for me shit meditation with pry on. Try this so please. Seed kosta really okay. We can dean on. The chair can see across lake it. You can see on the on the sofa against up. Fool lotus but four to see for low teaser is never easy so if you are beginning maybe a couch might be better for both muslim than pointing with to paul showler is to learn to relax. Basie led his body. Go because we don't see through pain we we seat to alexis body as much as possible and we let it go because sometimes you see cross lake hitler and we have any sort in your backer day because seeing food pain say meditation is not to develop more pain to the body is learn to let s mass as possible. Okay so we're sitting nice and constantly so now you gently close by gently close your i take trae big breath breathing. Im brief out breathing. Brief out breathing revolt. Relax this brief naturally good to dicko couple of big breath because he that allowed to bring awareness to the front to your funnier face do breath as we are grounded within our front then bring awareness to our face. We always thought we a body sweeping some low people used to go straight into the breath but why find i should do dodd going straight at a breath by realize where i do that. Sometimes the body's not relax still tense. So if i can learn to relax the body more than i find. Sometimes she goes deep so when we can relax about the might become more. Calm more peaceful. Why the body will win. This is so important. Is the foundation of meditation. Relax we let the body go. Then the mind can be more peaceful and still so gently. Bring your witness to the top of your head. Relax hit relax your forehead then. We relax office. Relax joe then be moved down gently neck or neck. I sent straight relax neck next. We bring awareness to upper. Body makes is not to firmly up but nice and relax so we allow our upper body to relax and to rest so we'll upper body. Relax and rested re bring awareness. Arms are right in phnom right and left arms. Make sure his thyssen loose comfortable. Relax all right and left arms nine. We moved down to a hands. Make sure hands is nice constable than relax a right and left hands. relax huffing. Is you need to move around. Make sure he's as comfortable as possible. Then relax how hanson fingers now. Recently bring awareness drawback back you'll be nice street not to reach relax back relax piece back. Especially if there's any pain have stood back. Who have old back relax. It has massive possible. Relax back now. We're bringing awareness to tell me who just finished dinner of finish work nick. Show your tummy. The belt pence is thought too stiff or too tight. Make sure he's loose runaways and then relax your tummy. Now re bring awareness down down to a lower back sitting on the way on the cushion make sure is comfortably and loose and relax than relax. How back relax now. We gently bring awareness to our lake to both a right and left leg this movie around. Make it as comfortable as possible. Sometimes even move your lake right up right in st yourself too stiff across but some people who like to put the lake street. But you find you're sitting across lake. Please do that song. Steve lesson loose and relax and relax. Both our lake relax massive possible now recently bring awareness down food. I arrested and relax both food. Relax our so relaxed our toll and we need to this movie around loosen it make it loose and relaxed as possible. Relax our toll benefit of relaxing the whole body to relax any part all part of your body. You find your hand or your finger. We have this singling feeling sometime. Warm sometimes you feel like there'd be a pressure flowing that's fine when really relax than the plus soclean will flow recorded cheek or chico is flow kusak relation of the blood so in the blood is flowing around off raw body. He allows the body to heal bed and to repay any part of our body. This injured damage or tired so allow the body to heal and to regenerate despite relaxing as fast as possible and allowing the body to disappear into peace and stillness comfort. Okay now we generally bring awareness up to face faces. Relax not to tense. Maybe a body can relax face reeve nationally breath gently breathing. Peace calm proving piece letting go peace letting go breed naturally use breath to come all my body ally everything to be peaceful. Do still mine everything to settle. Set to the heart center. The mind set to the body. Why the heart is feeling part and feeling inside where we concern electric off that we come brief naturally brief gentilly alive everything to settle. Allow the mind to stay. We've been this breath. We've been the mind within the body to let go all concerned with the will the will never and the problem is endless but we can allow mine and a hot too distant that the will not our business. It's not our kitson woods where we find peace happiness and freedom relax next the body as possible brave naturally brief calmly the use of breathing to come. Come come to mind komo relaxed body find your mind you wandering off future is okay. Meditation is thought about stopping thoughts now is about letting go and allow thinking all running mine. What the monkey mind to soley said to set to become peaceful and become mindful. You find that your leaks and your body is warming up is fine. You can become relax. Relax then the ball you become more sensitive becomes more sensitive future sensation of the body as fine. The body to stuff plus is a holiday today. I'm sweating my body. Sought to warm up the esta. Chee sorta flow of my body. This is one way to regenerate and huma body sellout the chee to energy to flow offer. The body. We relax lacks louder body to flow to energy loud to peace to come this due to trinko body energy to flow all the body. Relax oh time to time your body your mind one this gently bring you in back to the breath. Be a way of breathing in breathing out. Smoothly calmly peacefully. Finish the meditation in a few minutes. So please enjoy the next few. In this joy the peace enjoy the cow. Enjoy the tranquil. Mind body okay. So we will finish the meditation now so as we finish this gently come on titian and generally open your eye but please to maintain the calm calmness from the meditation. We don't have a bill here nominal. We used to build the ring. Yeah i should ask for us bill earlier. So so we've sorry with the meditation. Uc always to body sweeping because the body sweeping and body awareness is very important in meditation because before the law buddha taught meditation breath meditation the the loss of the body. This body is a obstacle to coming the mine. So he's to taught the loss of the body a- and london drop it but when the buddha went on retreat in came out and asked him how can the sanga is gone by half to half the price and an underwood law buddha sound amongst Lifer because they go toast so disgusted on the body and the booth lobby say nano. This is not the right way to practice you. Don't destroy body year to to let it go. The body reflection is learned electrical. So after that he taught the breath meditation where you bring your awareness to the breathing and to calm the mind down so yeah. So that's why. I find that breath titians quite important but the body reflection even more important because if you can drop the body then come to minor then demilitarization will go even deeper so this body. Reflection is very very powerful. Teaching one time. I went to a place to teach or give guidance guidance to some people that actually got terminal cancer lower terminal disease. And the donnie. Have a few lever so ask going. Can you do member the body reflection. Because if i works for me so i try out on. People actually got sickness and cancer where the expense pain from the body and yeah and they don. I found that one lady got cancer twice came second time and she did the the body a- coming to mine and she got she was the only person in the in the retreat ler got. Very debilitation went so deeply. She described her body vanish. Still up and she's she saw this really bright luminous light coming out and when she went into the light you were so blissful and just so washy reported backers and i realized that she's gone so deep la where the mind is seen of mine so one normally when that happened when someone can drop the body and come to mine and what you see. Is this bright light so you look at all near death. Experience will cases where people have died in accident or in the hospital described about this vanishing the become very steeler. Where the really bright light. This came out from from the mine. So this is the my scene the mine in buddhism. This is what we call a reflection of mine. And there's quite normal quite natural so for this practitioner. We'd have to die we can. We can come our five senses in student and despite in this will rise naturally so when you come up on their brightness sir or the steel minor is realized that having just body and minor loss offering you can let it go then you feel a lot peace and happiness and you get a lot of peace a lot inside year so assigned mutations very important we are. Meditation is hard to to see that this mine is is attached to this sister and the face is attached to To do the world basically the more we attached to the world that the more we we want things when things. Don't go out where we get angry. So you tested drive drive this the sense of self signing some we have this call greed hatred and delusion because we don't do the mine going to demolition that we can never understand that we are driving are suffering through attachment likes and dislikes. Okay so that's why people ask me how come to give this body sweeping so boring around it because i find it works for some people and i find espec- myself as i get older. I just have to learn to let this body goal. I don't hang on this body and this complaint is sick this pain because i find it. I'm getting a bit older. As i get older my size doing so well and if i get sick. It has a huge quickly. So the more drop. Hitler the give a better chance for the body to hear and regenerate and recover and the next to give little happiness to say gives a law for p. tier or super a lot peace and calmness. The body to useless was to encourage people to really that call and go enjoy the calm peaceful body and the body when the body kind peaceful end in. The mind can go deeper okay. So now. I open the the floor for nick russians. This this spoke back. Thank you good to see. When you were stocking tour this have a Love zeiss checkmate us. To really i think in the monastery is. Is you see the essay out the window. You see the blue sky. The clouds the rainbow the stars the beautiful beautiful forest animals. The birds the flowers. I meet mistake. The monastery is so beautiful and so common peaceful so does five for this -mongst dancer. The ideal place to practice is always in the forest. When you we've nature your minds in tune to the common peacefulness nestle to place when you walk in the city. A- worry about other people and all you get distracted by advertising and and the conditioning of the will because all this conditioning advertising very strong outlet to we desire in in the forests or in the monastery look out the window. You go for a walk. You can smell the flower. You can smell the grass. You can smell the fresh air. You can smell the sometimes the animals if if are close by you and when you nature you mind on wonder you enjoy the beauty of nature so so. That was a blessing junior lockdown because don't have any guest coming in because also locked down if before covid reifer. We used to get fifty two hundred people coming in newburgh just monetary for for for the meal offering. So it's like a party after one o'clock then required by june lockdown. We don't have this mass group of people coming into the year so it was very peaceful monastic but the also the other problem realized this. When you don't have a lot of come in so people will come in and happy to come in to feed the monks to wash out. Listen to a talker. Aski- also give a donation that in the monastery so while they really support amongst but during lockdown it was shut off to the public. So we're going okay. Maybe very peaceful about being being very peaceful and see not enjoying the view and joined the animal soko paid abuse monastery because these days abuse to serve but anyway we to do teaching online like this car teaching and dot on sunday and gather meditation then then to our policy that we are doing teaching and stuff and all the monsters do a daily so the member to to to kill the monks and put donation online so after a while we find them. The more more initially came in here. Okay that's interesting but we mainly teach the show people out there to support the we know they're this. They're struggling suffering out there. So is day in the practice. So and a lot. You'll find law law footer on the teaching and they really want support amongst and then sued so. Yeah so even lockdown. We did get lost support. Because we have also kate catering service where someone would would drive monastry and drop off new drove off any shopping and stuff so a lot of off was coming to the monastery quite quite a lot up in newberry. So we have a mass amount coming up we go aloft career coming off doping. Suffer them for them nasty and the trainees would take care of it so it was good so it works. So if the master practicing and teaching you then softball come so we disappear and vanish then sometimes appropriate. Do anything to heating here. We like to teach because it's a service of the for our community the support for a long time and sometimes when we teach our supposed connection dealer and remember us. Oh okay thank you. And i don't know how to say. Sometimes i think for myself. I use a lot learn different tamil titian like the deciding goal being common peaceful. And just enjoying the moment. Enjoying the to debrief going in and probably stevens meditation. And if i get frustrated at la or angry at something you on my cell phone you get angry at myself quite a lot lower and practice loving kindness so for a bacteria we use. What is what will come to mind down. so loving. Kindness is one way and we find have law and gene quite restless than we do walking meditation but my favorite is used to sit down quietly and just wash debriefing the outlet to come to mind down but if if if i get complaints from people complain about everything then i do more loving kindness because the loving kindness is to stop the anger. You rising up. If i'm very restless died to walk. Imagine argumentation is to bring the awareness to defeat rising in and going. Because sometimes when i sit down if if something is making me very confused concern than i can't. I can't stop thinking islam going crazy. So the walking. Meditation is very beneficial. So even i've been among for like ten or fifteen years. Sometimes when you support a new placer or support a new monstrous starting from scratch suffering formed community suffering from the committee suffering from from complaining about things though or problem the lifer and if we all these are heart it really like drag down so so we we need to use all this method. La just stopped thinking minor. When you start to think in mind realized we don't carry stuff too long okay but my favorite washington breath then thank you. There is one question venerable from someone in the group. Yes that is i. I own parents now actively yes. They very happy because when i joined the monastery i'll be so restless ser and i'll go crazy in the monstrous accidents. They saw me become more calm more peaceful and more happy. They notice every every year combined with my family during christmas. Because my my dad will come back from the minds. My brother in law will come back from the minds. My sister or brothers will have their christmas holidays so when they come back when i come back to see i'm i'm happy. I'm more relaxed. I'm not soaked. So all the places scattered and see my face. Because if i don't have i bags. Don't look stress out when i look at my brothers and sisters. Sometimes they look quite older and quite tired tiredly so just be with dame and hopefully pick up those the energia so when they picked up the actually meeting relaxed to persuade eyewitness resume my grandfather before he passed away so it told me that when they came over in noticed hours quite quite peaceforce arena and he actually made him quite peaceful to quite piece folder into the day. Pass away so sometimes good to our show by example the so yes my parents. My parents are quite happy. Anybody else has a question for their. Oh that's good. So i told you my pleasure yes okay. It's quite warming. Perf nala picks up in body yana. Today's about maybe up to about thirty seven degrees so sometimes. When you see meditation you can feel your body warmer quite quite rapidly so anyways good is good that when the happened. Yes because when the bali warm up quite rapidly it shows that the nation is doing. Well we don't have fees stuff okay so so so being conditioning i think the onus is on but outside pretty warm out dealer yes yes quite warm. Everyone is some warmer and not to colour if where wherever they are and i mean. It's a good time to practice when when days seems to be a lot lockdown the wilder than do much about what's happening in the world but we best we can do is always light a candle or light you know hardly so when we see this law darkness allow concern law. Problem in the world is no point complaining about the world so it's always good to look inside and like light. Light light lighten heart when the war in law darkness. So this is one thing. I learned being a buddhist monk. No matter where we go we are in In victoria western australia or even militia we will always carry practice in our heart and when this law suffering and worries and probably the world. We always go inside here. And i'm always like lighten the harder. When the wars in the law doc nasa so please continue practicing and please to kill yourself. I couldn't i. I could night behalf of the group you welcome.

army willie windsor la victoria eighty percent brenda poetry taibbi depression anxiety safai monka presi dana weaver Ucla taba paul lower kamer basir Kuteesa Cms amodio diana donahue caffey leah mesko ty soy
Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast 11/5/20--Breeders' Cup Show 2

The Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast

52:42 min | 6 months ago

Jason Beem Horse Racing Podcast 11/5/20--Breeders' Cup Show 2

"Maximum security has been defeated. King for this is the jason beam horse racing. Podcast brought to you by twin. Spires your daily home for horse racing news interviews wagering discussions and more. Here's your host jason. Be route of a good thursday morning. You are welcome in the jason. Beam horse racing podcast brought to you by twin spires a happy november the fifth to you and yours which means it's a happy birthday to my lovely sister celebrating number. Let's see she was born in eighty two thirty eight years old man. Where did it go. where did it go. She was the little the little the little kid in the room next door to me for so many years and now she's like an adult woman with a business and a house and like everything going for so proud of my sister. I love my sister. She's just wonderful and Big shout outs to jackie celebrating her birthday today. November fifth i always got to think of her and also that's the day that mardi mc fly went back to nineteen fifty five to the champion under the seat and it's the day the lightning struck the clock tower. Maybe the lightning start katara. Later in the week i remember. He went back on november fifth. I always remember that date Anyways with you guys here. We had our first Kind of breeders preview show yesterday with several guests and do the same thing today. We'll talk a little bit about the friday raises. It's been a good chunk of my Wednesday looking at those. So i wanna talk a little bit about the two year old races. I always You know defacto say well you not my strength very good at them but i do have a few opinions. That are more generalized things as opposed to specific. But yet we will. We will do that. We're gonna have a. We'll continue our little variety show our here. We're going to have a trainer we're gonna have owner. We're gonna have a pony person. I for the show Trainer grant forster is gonna join me. He's a friend of mine who we had. On last november's it's been about a year we had grant on and he has pirates punch. Who has had a pretty nice little twenty twenty Since we talked to grant the source wanna brace at fairgrounds one race at oaklawn The tried steam foster didn't go all that well but he came back and won. The is lenny got hosed on the queue and then he Won the salvator mile last time so coming into this race in fine fashion we'll talk with grant about pirates punch marielle. It's to join us. Mary a pony person has benetton california and as well as kentucky and gonna talk to her just kind of about the. You know the life of a pony person during the breeders cup. I'm the question. I'm most fascinated. Ask like what are you talking about. What the jockeys like. i imagine. There's some of them that. Just don't wanna talk at all. But then there's other ones that they probably know her and you know they wanna talk about either the racer life or maybe talk about something totally different so We'll talk about About what. Mary does as far as being opponent person for the breeders cup and then c. j. johnson going to join me in a cj one of the one of the siege as in cj thoroughbreds. And they actually have a couple of different runners on Breeders cup weekend in the affiliate sprint sally's kirwin and then there's that horse that i can't pronounce the name. What is it amasi imperio. I gotta ask c. J. what the heck that means. So we'll talk with the with him coming up a little bit later on. So that's the plan for the shows. Those regress guests tomorrow. The jury will be here as well as i'll go over. My thoughts for the big saturday card will get the boys thoughts. The topic for the guys is just. I need i need. I need somebody. Who's going to win the breeders cup race and i need a favourite or you know well back towards. That's not going to run run well so we'll talk with the boys a little bit on tomorrow's show and as i said i'll go through the sunday sunday. Saturday raises for the breeders cup. Do to take a quick peek at friday's racist. Before we get to our our slate of guests the juvenile turf sprint. We started out at. And you know. I i will always admit i'm always a little bit biased towards people. We have on the show and their horses and stuff and so when i looked at bodenheimer valerie let 'em leo's horse predom- fast and that race. A keeneland was a pretty impressive effort. And you know the there's a lot of speed and here of course it's juvenile turf sprint. There's there's there should be. There's not a. I think there's an insane amount of speed. I think there's a fair bit of horses that are kind of stalker types and you know. We'll ask siege as far as amman's emp lower. Because that's a horse who's just been off the pace. But i would think more likely is going to be you know couple links off the pay or at least maybe back in third fourth fifth of. Cj maybe maybe he doesn't see it that way But i certainly was intrigued by and just from a purely speed standpoint and the fact that that last effort was so good The horse on the outside is the morning favorite golden pow. And you know just as a whole when it comes to two year olds. My approach in a lot of these races is to you know fade the favorites a little bit and for a multitude of reasons but the main reason being. I've just seen too many times where you know. These horses are growing and maturing and getting better so fast and you see a horse like golden pal who okay hasn't run since august twenty first but that's what two and a half months since since the last start for this one and to me. There's just a lot that can happen in two and a half months My general theme on wesley ward horses have been you know. The later of the season goes the less. I'm interested in them because his barn is just so for those early two year old season starts. I mean that's that's been his specialty and as he had good horses that have gone beyond late too early three. Yeah i mean he has but you know at eight to five and a fourteen horse field. It's just so tough to to not look other direction for horse. Who you know is just making the fourth were started. I mean the horses done really nothing wrong. I mean got beat At a very very short price at gulfstream on debut in one over to royal ascot and got beat a mac against obviously a very good field there and then comes back to saratoga and rhop's so while the resumes they're the resumes there for a lot of other horses to You know dirty dangle for for marquette see who goes first time for that barn. Who gave zooming gary barbara brought privately. After the last one you know one the woodbine care stakes. I really think there's a lot of horses feel gleese horse that you can make a case for it just seems so goofy to play an eight to five shot in a race that could be somewhat wide open and you know i mean could that horse golden pal. Step forward and and run. Well yes but as a whole. I think there's a lot of opportunities in two year old races to to get better prices on horses. That really aren't that far behind some of the top ones A little bit more so with racist like the juvenile fillies turf or the juvenile turf just because at least in relation to you know to golden pal. We haven't seen that one run against a lot of the competition. It's going to be facing but we have seen it in some of these other races and to me you know like the keeneland rates the bourbon stakes Which is One of the prep for the juvenile turf for the boys race Mujtaba bek who who won. That race rallied from off the pace and beat the number. The berto number that horse hours yet. Sorry sorry sorry. Come on come through here number three You know in a barda was a huge price. Last time and mujtaba was five to one in the morning line bartels twelfth one now in this particular example i do think matassa is. The is the better horse and ran the better race. There's another example a little bit later on in the juvenile fillies turf. Where at santa anita you had Tech tetra gol to travel And madan model is ten to one of the morning line to travel is is twenty two one in the morning line. Madan got the jump on Tetra again how to say the damn horse's name the seven horse. I have always wanted to do that a race. Call where if. I have a name horse. I can't figure out eventually. Get pissed off. Go find the three the three but anyways but tetra donald was sitting down along the inside. In last amodio was kind of you know in the two path in the clear in the group. Right ahead of tetra ghana and madonna got. I run opened up to and the tetra gotta almost came in and real that one in and yet you're gonna get twice the price on tetra. Gonnell i'd think there's a lot of opportunity in these two year old races to find the horses that maybe you haven't maybe that got beat last time out but you know have a legitimate chance to turn the table at a significantly higher price simply ravishing in the juvenile fillies has been awesome In in all three career starts right like a deserving favourite or or second choice depending on you know if they go to bob baffert tours etc but from a number standpoint. You know even a horse like girl daddy who's ran two very good racist so far has come from a little off the pace and bowl even crazy beautiful who was second last time and yes was beaten. Six lengths behind simply ravishing. Who is that one stablemate. But i mean you're talking about horse. Who was in contention and eventually simply ravishing. Who was on the lead just ran away from this one. You know down the stretch to win by six. Now it's not out of the question for somebody to go push simply ravishing into give that one. Some fits early on and a horse like crazy. Beautiful may be falls into a little bit of a garden trip again. It's maybe not the most likely thing to happen but you're talking about making. I mean this horse was beaten six lengths by by simply ravishing but simpler options. Kind of had everything her way way. That day it's not possible for a two year old to make up six lengths under manny very different circumstances if things do play out differently and you're talking about legitimately thirty times the price most likely i mean again with a small field that might not be that spread out. The horse might crazy beautiful. Might stay at at twenty to one or something like that but you get what i'm saying like to me. A horse like girl daddy. If girl daddy's for real and her numbers are legit she's not that far behind day. Out of the office or simply ravishing. You're talking about a couple of weeks. Vic who was beat by day at the office still ran a pretty good race and another one who is eight to one. But i mean you're talking about making up to lancs on day at the office. Who kind of had a perfectly easy trip last time. And it's just not going to be the case. I know it's a smaller field. But there's at the top end the top three or four year pretty talented and if they hook up i mean who just seems like it's a race where anything can happen if if that is the case and also by the way seems like a race that a lot of people are going to go three or four deep with those top three or four and if you can get outside of those one somehow i think you really get some separation smaller field. There's a psychology for a lot of horse players in kind of wanting to get through those smaller fields. And you know. I think people just. They're not as likely to spread sometimes in those races. There isn't there isn't i. Don't think the the super logical single in the sequence. I mean they. Certainly there's some likelier winners including the euros and some of the in the juvenile fillies The turf races but in the races especially with the shorter field. And i feel like a lot of people are going to go to the forty maybe and try to get through there as opposed to try to get a price there so something to think about. I mean we always wanna talk. you know. think about that when we get to different races. You know how we're going to how people are going to play that sequence. And where are the places where you know if we get a five to one shot. Maybe we're a little more narrow or maybe you know maybe that's that five to one shots the race where everybody spreading in the five to one shot doesn't play like a normal five to one shot. Maybe plays a little smaller. These are things you want to think about as you're looking through a sequence the fourth race on the cart fourth race. It's the ninth race carpet. Fourth of the breeders cup juvenile filly turf and i think a lot of people certainly gonna be inclined to use perl. Whose three to one morning. Line favorite trying to kind of look at optics and kinda gauge. Who's gonna go if anybody with her and campanella certainly could be forwardly placed and it's coming into this race in you know there's never been beaten The i feel like the Eleven might have a little bit. Maybe spanish love fair. But it's very possible that aunt pearl sneaks away early on and that will make her exceedingly tough. I think in this race You know it's just sometimes. These two year old races. I feel like speed is a even a little bit more of an advantage than it is for the older horses At least going long. But i guess we'll find that out but the horses question mark to me as far as the pace is to miss amulet from Over from overseas from great britain because it seems like from the comments that this one has some early speed has been going five and six furlongs primarily so is now stretching out to a to turn mile and is actually drawn inside of aunt. Pearl the other. You know maybe of likely speed types camping ill and royal approval. They're kind of drawn outside. I didn't i thought that at first. Pass that maybe. This was our best shot as far as ours. The americans. i just didn't seem like the the euros. Were all that strong in this particular juvenile fillies turf this year and i'm counting. Wesley ward Campanella as one of ours. Even though she's running europe more often. I mentioned mentioned that Tetra donald earlier. When giving the analysis between madonna and tetra gone I i do think tetra donaldson interesting. Longshot again just because you're talking about a horse that's a neck behind madan who's going to be eight nine ten to one and technical probably gonna be much much bigger than that You know the horse started over in. Europe went to del. Mar the steak and didn't run great but kind of had some trouble after a really bad start. And i mean you're talking about horses making just career start number four and career start number. Three is pretty damn good so at a big price. I think that one is extremely interesting. The juvenile is certainly interesting I think it's because of the implications of the kentucky derby the following year. It's always talked about and again. I think this is one of those races where i really want to look. Beyond essential quality and jackie's warrior and and some of those It just seems that there's so much potential for you know again. These are two year olds stretching out to this too turns and distance a lot of them for the first time I know essential quality one at this trip. I didn't think it was all that taxing an effort for that one when that day was supposed to do that. The horse that it beat. Keep me in mind is right to. It's outside in his thirty two one now. This horse in career start number three move forward and make up three and a quarter links at seven times the price. I'm inclined to find out Jose ortiz taken over for robert de niro on that one You know jackie's warriors going to have to. I think face potential pace pressure. I mean classier the baffert horse. Ready to the outside has got a ton of gas The ten has got some early speed. And that's the other diaspora so you gotta think he's you know he's trying to get that one to set up his other one. Maybe and the horse of the very outside has some speed next for wesley ward. I mean there's i just don't know how i just can't imagine the jackie's warrior just goes to the lead and gallops up upfront and never looks back and you know he's going to be such a short price that you know what i want from short prices. I say this a lot. I want horses. Who aren't trying much. Knew who are proven who you know. It's not a layoff or it's not you know this or that. She certainly proven she's passed every test thus far. But you are asking her to go to turns for the first time. You're asking her to face. A when i would say is a big field. One of the things about big fields. You know if you're if you're in front and there's nobody pressing you at all. Does it matter if there's three horses or if there's fifteen behind you like in a weird way right. I mean the horse if the horses in front i don't think that horsa writer really care that much if there's two or twenty horses in the race And you know jackie's worry really since the debut which was five furlongs hasn't been looked in the i Early on yet and been pressured. She's gone very fast. And maybe that's the reason she's not getting pressured. I just think it's a little bit of a different story. A new track and again these are just little things that you want to kind of poke holes in some of these Logical favourite types. Because you know. I mean good. Lord we're going to try to beat these kind of horses We've got three guests today. Mentioned grant forster gonna join us. Mariela and then cj. Johnson let's get to grant right now and then we'll take a break and then mary and cj will join us. It is breeders cup editions as being more raising. Podcast here is my interview with grant. Forster aren't pleased to welcome in our next guest who is Somewhere on the interstate. Sixty four i imagine heading towards louisville welcoming and grant forced to retrain pirates punch grant. How are you doing great jason. How you doing. Did i get the right freeway number. Is that what it is. Sixty four right. You are absolutely correct. Although i'm not quite on the freeway minutes ago so i'm on the just going through the The pastoral heals your the rolling hills of kentucky to get to the interstate. It's pretty awesome like the interstate doesn't really capture. I think the beauty of lexington. I kind of pulled off of it when i was driving back from colonial this year. And like there's even not even like the huge thurbers. Just some of the regular farms like they're incredibly gorgeous. Yeah and it's really I mean depending on what you like. It's a neat time year with fall with all the you know. A lot of the colors are out and The we've had some rain this fall so the the fields are are pretty lush. Still and often my left is astronaut and Strana dina springs is up here. Not too far lanes end. If you turn off just behind me is down the road. So it's it's kind of who's who around here for sure last year when it. Dan gulfstream park west. Astronomy has his own beef cattle farm thing and he makes his own hamburgers they had. They have a strong edina burger at gulfstream park west. It's a damn fine hamburger grants. Well there you go. I'm a big hamburger fan. I'll have to look into that someday. We don't have any team forster hamburgers. Yeah well speaking of team foresters pirates punch of course is slated for the breeders cup dirt. I was trying to remember. I know you had won the kentucky oaks. Have you had a breeders cup runner or is this the first one for you know first time. First time for us where Obviously tremendously excited. What the week leading up here. I mean i would assume. There's a mix of nerves in anticipation and of course you've got your regular training duties to do a. How's it been for you just on a personal level kind of handling this week. Yeah it's been fun. Today was kinda the big day we had to move over So the runners. That are the breeders cup horses that are running on friday. Had to be in by ten o'clock yesterday at keeneland and because we're running on saturday we had to be there by ten o'clock today so there was a i know some of the churchill regular said moved over earlier in the week but i know there was a lot that moved over this morning. So pirates sponge trained At his normal time first thing when the track opened at trackside at six o'clock this foreign Did our normal stuff got loaded on the van a little after eight o'clock. It's a about an hour and fifteen minute drive over here from from our track to the keeneland and So just getting settled in in the new barn and getting getting aware of our surroundings and Yeah you know. it's obviously. It's the breeders cup so you know you walk down the shadow and every horse is a horse you heard of walking by because they have all the They have placards on the stalls with the trainer's name the horse's name and So yeah it's a it's a pretty you know and it's the weather is unbelievably gorgeous. Which is pretty predictable. Just as it was for derby considering there's no no fans allowed this year so it was perfect derby weather and it's going to be absolutely gorgeous breeders cup weather so let's let's talk about the horse because we i talked to you last. It was last november and he just runs second if i remember correctly Like a week before for robbie and he's had a pretty damn good twenty twenty s had Four wins obviously. They took one away but You know he's he's kind of it a little more versatile and in his running style. It seems like there was a time. There where i kinda thought that they're going to the front was his only way. Yeah well when we first got him he he He had just broken his maiden for thirty thousand of course and they'd added blinkers and He kind of found his niche as speed horse. Sprouting and We took the blinkers off after the super derby. He's just a really really smart horse. Barry rateable But he's just very fast so there was very few racist where horses were getting in front of him It's happened a couple of times this year. And he's run actually really good races in his Allowance race where he was beaten at oaklawn. He had a really rough trip in hawaii trip. Coming from off the pace. But that kinda gave us Some some you know a good indication that he could do it. And then obviously last time they went really fast early and Our our new jockey or vargas we picked up on and Gotten together with a momma's as written a great and He sat off the pace with them. And and You know made a really eye catching move around the turn. He's always run the turns really and You know in a race like this. There's there's going be a you know it. Looks like a mad dash to the first turn and we're in a position now where we don't have to be part of that bad dash if you know if that does develop one asked about the is no. It's no fun to talk about a disqualification on the team. Thought it was a bad call. And i don't know if that was because i just think of you. So certainly was a rooting interest. But it had been really really satisfied to go back to monmouth in the salvator and kind of get that wind not validated or anything. But i just had to make think that made the the pain of a little bit less. Yeah i think for everybody. Involved i mean. I think there was some validation so to speak but you know. I think you know everybody in racing you know. Obviously there was some people that probably felt. We should have come down that day and and like ever you know there has never been one hundred percent q. And tracy probably. Somebody always thinks that he should have been left up or say now but we felt you know the the most exciting thing about the eastland was we took on a horse In warriors charge that we had a ton of respect for very very nice horse very accomplished worse and it was basically a maturation. We you know we felt like we had the better horse on the day and it looks like we had the better horse and Actually klay sanders. One of the the ten strike racing folks was the first one to call me after the race to say that we had the best source on the day and he was sorry and that they had wanted that way. you know so which was a really classy. Move on his part and so yeah we were. We were more excited with our horse ran that day and obviously you know there was You know i could have used the extra eight or nine thousand whatever. It was probably in my ten percent but Yeah no the most exciting thing was how the horse ran. And then you know we kinda thought. Initially that was such a huge race. And you know the way it was run as a match race can often be really demanding on a horse but he just bounced out of it. So well that we. We decided to go back to mama's four weeks later and you know they assembled another really good field again and and you know he didn't even more impressively aggressively and So we're we kind of had. I think we you know. We talked a lot about it at the at the time. That was our win. You're in for the breeders cup if he could come back and win that race then. He deserves for us to give them a chance at this kind of a race. And they're in our own backyard and unattractive run well over already. You mentioned the dash to the front. I mean i. I feel like the dirt mile just as a whole came up pretty pretty good this year. But it's it's. It's a pretty nice group this year. Yeah it's kind of. I think it's kind of a hit or miss thing with the dirt mile sometimes. There's a real stand. Oh the i look back. And i don't remember golden sense if he was a huge favourite. Or you know. But i'm pretty sure he was a pretty big favorite and and kind of towered over the competition to some degree. Maybe but Yeah i think this year the you know. The complexity is a lukewarm favourite. He certainly deserves to be the favorite off his last race in the kelso. But you know he's got a question mark with the two turns that's not something that he's successfully Mexico is a horse that will take a lot of money but he you know on paper. Looks like you know one of the greatest bounce candidates in the history of horse racing unreal. I mean he certainly turned around since the switch. I mean it's it's it's kind of crazy but he's also not going to just go out there and coast forty-seven i can't imagine. Yeah no. He's beat up on a couple of allowances this year and You know i'm. I'm certainly not taking away anything from him. He was a really good two year old. He had kind of a a star-crossed three year year. Not real successful showed some glimpses of his old form but never but for whatever reason is has founded this year against some software company. But he's certainly beginning to be coming in with a lot of and you know there's there's there's some neat three olds in there with art collector and rushie and You know i think it's just it's just. It's what it's what the breeders cup is. All about there's horses coming from all over the country. It's a great betting race. Whatever horse you like you're going to get a decent price and there's you know obviously we feel really confident in our horse taking on and giving his best chance and he's twenty two one morning line you know and and Or horse like mr money Who was twenty two. You know is thirty. Two one i think on the morning line maybe twenty two one. Just one the ac. Yeah just one. The ac at At churchill and was a top three zero last year and random the dirt mile and didn't handle the track san and even the last year but it looks like he's running into form so you can you know there's a. There's a lot of ways to go in the race. The the dynamics of the to turn you know short run to the first turn mile keeneland you know really play into it and you know we were. We were kinda relieved. Obviously when the post position video came out the other day and you know the first three out of the box ten eleven twelve and we weren't one of those so it was after that i was happy with whatever we got. We'll grant. I know you can win a big race it a to turn mile. I've seen to live and impressive. I wish you guys the best of luck gallagher said. I really hope the best for you. Guys come saturday. Yeah we're really excited. And i appreciate you calling and checking in on us and yeah. It looks like it's gonna be just awesome weather and hopefully it's there's some great great race in for everybody to joy. Grant forced joining us right. Thanks so much. We'll be back after a short time. Out of jason. Be more racing. Podcast brought to you by twin spires jason being worst bracing podcast brought to you by twin spires. Is your home for daily thoroughbred horse racing conversation join host jason being has he discusses racing from around the country interviews jockeys trainers media personality and horse players every monday through friday. The show can be found at twin spires dot com or on itunes stitcher or wherever you get your bug gas from the jason deem horse racing podcast brought to you by twin spires all right back here on the jason horse racing podcast brought to you by twin spires pleased walkman our next guest. Who's appointing writer will be working the breeders cup very happy to welcome marielle to the show. Mary how are you. i'm doing. Well been up since four this morning. Coney horses and so it's been a long day but it's funny. I was gonna ask what breeders cup week is like for you is. What is the morning schedule. When there's no racist going on at least a keeneland just yet stressful. This morning i got out six sources for Five well no actually six sources for six different trainers so. It's a lot of running back and forth making sure that you're on time for everyone You know trying to keep everyone happy and make sure that everyone has the time. Thought that they want which is fun when scheduling is a lot of preparation. That goes into the big day. Obviously and it's fun to be a small part of it. Yeah i i was kind of curious. I don't know how the kind of the business of it works. Are you hired by specific trainers to pony their horses in the morning and the afternoon or do you work for the track and they kind of just assign you horses to go with l. pony riders. Work freelance so We are hired by pacific trainers So and that can differ track by track it kind of You know either you. You know the trainer coming in or you can just meet them in the barn area And and so. It goes trained by trainer. How long have you been a pony rider. Hedge pay per se. Outriders are higher side. The track so that is that is different. Tony writers are also. Our job is to take care of the horse directly next to us whereas outrider manage the entire racetrack. The one thing. I didn't realize outrider. They're kind of in charge of Using getting everybody lined up to to go to the starting gate because oftentimes there's some horses who require being last horse to load or the first horse to load of. They're they're kind of the ceos of the on-track experience basically during the day right. Yeah so i like to say that especially in the morning like outriders. Lifeguards on more stock. So you know both my mom and my dad were both out right as my mom. Still an outright or now at santa anita down more so growing up outriders. Kid you kind of you know all of the workings and all the rules of the track. And they're essentially. They are the rule keepers. They are in the morning. They're the ones that You know enforce things if they see something that goes against the trump's rules such as galloping wrong way when you're only supposed to be trodden the wrong way You know they're the ones that go. Hey you slow your horse down. You not supposed to be doing that. And then yeah and the races You know hopefully there are no loose forces but they have to catch but in races obnoxious part of their job is making sure that everything runs on time so making sure that the the field of runners get to the starting gate on time. So i guess that you you got into this because of your parents involvement. When did you first start being a pony rider. I started pointing horses going into my senior year of high school so i had just turned sixteen And i really. I started pointing. Because i'm taking french classes i was going into. Ap french my senior year of high school. And my mom's like well. You can't take the off like you know you need to keep practicing french. There's the french trainer and some french writers like come out in the morning. Vite around with them. Speak french like and you know just that way. You're there and then. Once i started riding around with these french writers then from there i kind of slowly started like actually you know coning them. And then dot summer few weeks after that I started working for jerry hall norfolk and my first horse. That i really ponied. Every day was none other than blind luck. who is a hall of fame nominee. Now so i mean. She is who. I credit to me falling in love with racetrack But i mean it was sixteen. At the time i'd ridden horses all of my life. I had grown up around the race. Track with my parents and my brother as well And and then getting to actually work on the race track with horses. Coolest blind block. That's it all started back. When was what was your first breeders cup. Because i know you've pony for a few of them. This'll be my sixth breeders cup. My first one was two thousand twelve. So i started pointing ten years ago in In so in two thousand ten and my my parents gave me. You know a bit of schooling before i could start pointing the races and then by the time that breeders cup two thousand twelve came around. They deemed worthy of tony. I was gonna say is there is there added nerves. When you're when you're putting a big race. I mean every every post parade is i know it so it's so cliche to say that like every race is important but if you're is important because you know you want to win all of them and that's something that i tell all the jockeys is that it doesn't matter what our odds are. Someone has to win the race. It might as well be you so it's kind of like you know the same. There's just making sure that everything gets goes right every every rate but yeah for breeders cup when you have cameras everywhere and like you know you have to steady cam on the track walking next to you and you know that like there's millions of is on you. It is a lot more pressure to be like. You know we everything has to go smooth like you know this has to look. We are on national. Tv to go well are there. Are there some jocks that that you know like to have conversations before the race and maybe some you know that that kinda liked to stay quiet. I'm curious about that. Whether it's i'm going to talk about the race or do you. Maybe just talk about hey. The weather's nice today so growing up around santa anita in the backside of southern california. Trust like a quite a few of the jockeys. I've known meal my life like You know like can't form a group like he watched me grow up for example Gary stevens like the older jockeys like remember my parents before they started like before they got married Some of them do like david florida's so i like and also your if you're when you're pointing to the same jockey colony you get to know them so no for the most part. We would talk about their lives. And when i was in school it was how college was going. And you know when when the jockeys get married and start a family and having kids. That's how their kids are doing. And i mean. I would like to say but you know we become we become friendly like it's it's fun to have you know ten to fifteen minutes of of these conversations with with the jockeys go into the starting gate have have any of the horses. You've ponied gone onto win the breeders cup race that you pony them in the. I only had one true breeders cup winner and that was blue prize last year in the breeders cup distaff which she was trained by agnosio careers And i you know. I've lived in lexington for three and a half years now and when i was coming at keeneland every morning agnosio. His barn was right across from where my barn was so it was cool to come from rights road. Which is it's a tight knit tight knit group of people that stay at keeneland all winter long and then to go to santa anita and pony breeders cup winner form. Yeah i imagine that must be a kind of crazy and that was such a cool horse to she was Something pretty special. I'm curious about when you know that you have maybe a horse's kinda famously. A bad actor is is. Is that something you have to do. Some work with the trainer before rayson. Yeah they're like. Sometimes the trainers will let you know if the worst does something special Special with quick marts like one. That comes to mind was laker ville. Who is trained by barry. Abrams and i mean he's such a cool horse but we had to do a specific routine for every single race. Stay like to keep them calm. And i got to know him so well because i was there i tony been in like either my parents i m in every start and like i tried to be there for as many races i could because i got along really well with him and he was one that like you deviated from plan it might not go well So you're just you're trying to do everything we can to keep the horses calm and you know i mean sometimes like a little bit of information help and riding goose forces that the when the pony horses also call you know dot dot tends to instantly relaxed them and so like my family you know we we try to ride all very good minded quarter horses and just having not. Eddie coleman study influence next to the race. Horses can help. Because if you're trying to relax your race and your pony horses jumping around and it's just it's negating all of the efforts that you're doing very really appreciate taking time for us it's a it's a fascinating part of the racing world. We haven't got to talk about on the show before so i really appreciate it all right. We'll be right back after a short time out of suggests being horse racing podcast brought to you by twin spires. This is the jason beam horse racing. Podcast brought to you. Twin spires go back to the phones and very pleased to welcome into one of the c. J. c. j. thoroughbreds always good to hear from my friend. Cj johnson cj. How are you. i'm doing great. Jason how are you doing. Good your your boots on the ground in lexington. I know you're a texas guy. But you're you're back and ready for the breeders cup. Yeah yeah we were here. Pretty much all september for the sales and then i went back to texas for a little bit and then Drove back up For the payson sale and then flew home for halloween and just flew back yesterday. Actually and i will be here You know obviously friday saturday. And then sunday We are running a maiden special churchill. Gonna jet over there. And then we've got the night of the star sale phasing. And i'm gonna drive back on monday because my oldest daughter is turning eleven on tuesday. So it's been wild that's going gonna say it. Sounds like a going to your. Your halloween costume was excellent. By the way you were you were you. Were end of his jog forrest gump. Exactly and and the funny thing is. I got a good workout because we were walking around the neighborhood. You know and everyone on iran horse ryan so i just took off you know and did a couple of laps around the block. I can still do it though you know. It's funny i. I've become an avid walker. But i hadn't tried to jog in a while. i was convinced that it would. I'd run for one hundred feet. And i would have a stroke but like i went for probably like five minutes and it wasn't like it wasn't as bad as i thought it was gonna be. No and i thought i was going to die too. I didn't think i'd make it back in the family. And i did the job where you literally just pick up your feet about six inches. Yeah you know what i'm saying but it looks like jogging and yeah it wasn't too bad. My dad used to say. I had a sunday morning paper vertical. Because you could only fit a sunday paper my feet when i think about why you played baseball was an edge. I was in agile. Big man on the basketball court. But i i like to. I like to park myself in the corners and shoot threes. And i'll never forget my coach going your four inches taller than everybody else and the other team and you fifty pounds heavier than why are you. Not in the paint coach. I want to light it up from outside. I'm ricky pierce. Yeah so man. He didn't want out of it. Well you guys horses in the breeders cup. Let's start with friday's entrance and first of all you've got to tell me how to say the name because a man's emp. yeah okay and Yeah she We owned her in partnership with susan. Moulton mark the tampa. She's a cool. No nay never really You know broke her maiden first out and You know the name creditor friend. Pete ilo he kinda did his research and it Susan is very active in africa with you know charities and and good things like that so it it actually means like water is health and it's a kind of a clean water initiative over in africa and So yeah she named her that and They were broken main. I shot a gulfstream. You know we got the bolton landing And then shipped her out west Santa anita and i'll tell you it. That was a wild one because we run against the boys. I'm i was at the sale. Actually i see wesley and i'm like you know. Because they pushed opening day. Back in santa anita. Yeah smoke right. And so we shipped out in anticipation of the original opening day. And you know. I find out she worked. Well i'm sorry. She missed her work because they shut the track down so she worked next week. And wesley tells me that you know she was kind of breathing. A little heart. I'm going great. You know we're philly. We gotta be one hundred ten percent against the boys you know but she worked on a dirty. You gotta be a little different kind of fit on the dirt. And so i was a little stressed out. You know because. I didn't want to ship all the way out there to rub last And so you know she missed that workout and still didn't skip a beat and You know almost got ran down there by the The barbara horse and that are good. Friend john wong source. Who's actually running in the breeders but Yeah it was good enough to hold on and get that went in your in. it's nice to. It's nice that the breeders cup does that. you don't have to pony up. All those entry things was that the intent was when your because i was wondering if maybe you just wanted to run against the boys because it's a it's a long trek out to santa anita for you guys. Sure and wesley kinda learned when when there too you know. It's kinda like You know girls tend to mature a little quicker than boys right when they're in their early teens and all that the same thing with phillies nurses colts and so he's got no problem running at this time against the boys but yeah it was kind of the winning your thing and i think the way his other horses you know were pointed and there was one going up to woodbine you know couple more at keeneland and that was kinda spot for us It it's just always nerve wracking because you never know how they're gonna handle ship Is his body out. There blake. He did a great job saddling. Her and You know i still you know people were asking me do i better do i what do i do. And i'm like man. I told i told them just what i told you like. I don't know you know. and so. yeah we got. We got extremely lucky. Holding off the calgary charge thereby head. But she's doing great. I mean i was at a breeze Last week you know she started a little slow and then picked it up on the turf was rated good and she just you know skipped right over it. looked really good doing it and so you know from from everything on our end. It's all systems. Go with her. I know we've got a monster in the racing bill pal and it just you know he's compromised a little bit outside post but You know hopefully we'll just kind of sit a stocking trip in and be right there. Yeah i notice. Louis sayas road when you're at santa anita my initial inclination was that well that must have been maximum. Security was out there and it was but to louise going to stick around for. He's a hell of a keeneland. So far yeah and and you know what i when. I saw wesley after we won. I go wesley. You are the man. Thank you for doing that. You got us to win in your and he goes. Hey i didn't do it louis. Did it he wanted for us. So i mean and it really was a perfect ride. And i'm glad he's you know rittner before he gets there he can't i mean you can't really you know complain about that at all So i'm actually feeling good. You know. I don't know. I have no idea what to expect here As far as final go. I love to take a piece of fifteen to the other horse. Of course you guys have is in the first row of the breeders cup races race for mayor sprint. That sally's curl and i thought it really fun edition of this race. I mean you certainly can't complain about having to run into here. It looks like no no you can't i just. It's these these horses speed. Horses are so talented sharing getting interested in the derby city. Step you know to barely get by both the line. I mean i even believe. She held on that long. I was waiting for her to start backing up at the sixteen people And so if she repeats that effort she's going to be tough And obviously i mean you know we all we all know that story and you know it. Yeah there's plenty other. Speed venetian harbour. It's it's we're going to be. We're definitely gonna have some paste running to You know they gonna. Are they going to do the same thing they did. Last race will not really with give me the say in the test. I mean that was just stupid when she lived there. So they're both if they repeat those runs they're going to be really tough But i think. I'm i'm brian rotor last race. And she's kind of quirky to ride game instructions kind of said you know. Don't rusher i know you're gonna be way back but just let her feet under and and you know make that one run. Don't hit her hard in in the stretch and that kind of thing and and hey for her coming to fly home and get third. You know we really happy. So i think you know tactics might change a little bit not too much because we don't take away that lake hick but You know hopefully we're not thirteen lengths back You know we're sitting closer to build the the grade one placing. I know i i should ask you. Is this likely her last. Start with you guys. it's honestly it is totally dependent on a what kind of all the partners beside and be she runs Look if there's a business and she wins this race we'd be stupid not the seller. She's going to be entered in the night the stars except now we'll she you know well. We put a big reserve honor and keep her. 'cause 'cause here's the other thing she's so sound. Chilly ran you know three times this year so far. Which isn't you know it's because of covid. She deserved more. And we just didn't really get the shots and so if if she does well we'll probably run it through and just nc. I mean we will. She will go. You know you can go. Look at her on sunday and all that facing but and she'll go through the rain but it just kinda depends. I mean hey. The partners might saying home. We're not done you know. We really thinks he's going to be really good five year old. she just keeps getting better and better You know she's only about nine hundred and something pounds. She's not a big girl. And so i think when she gets that that mayor wait on her you know she showed she can get better So it's honestly we're we're all kinda fifty fifty right now Like i said at the business and we. We have to treat it like that. we're not billionaires. You know we we. I mean we have to but it but it's tough because you don't want to sell her and then go try and find one just like her. You know what i'm saying. You never get that again. She's such a cool. I mean really. She's she's very smart. she's a sweetheart. she knows. She loves doing her job. She loves going to the track every day. You know so. We'll see how many how many times have you watched that hurricane birdie replaced since since march I'll be dead honest with you. Probably the seventy five times. It's i mean. I people are gonna think i'm crazy if she runs out race she's going to be right there. I mean it was when she was they will do that. Race is just. It was unbelievably impressive and I know she's got it in her. That's the other thing you know. I know she can. She can run that race again. And i know that racist good enough to witness Yeah and peace call on it. It's one of the one of my favorite calls. The year i mean not good hands down one hundred percent i mean just out of the cloud. She never even mentioned once and then keys. Didn't you make that. You're on your ring or something for like when your sister. Yeah it's my phone or whatever Calls sally yeah. Yeah so Yeah it would you know if we can get her to get that race back. You know i know. We're going to be tough but again it's you've got horses that you know have way better than out sick and it just all depends on how they re. I've just as i said that. I'm pete like might have like an happy. Could do ninety nine cents hill record the voice thing for you and say herbs mardi mcgee. Gosh genius idea actually genius you can that after for celebrities to say happy birthday cameo see something like that yes. We operate race. Collar of you may have pete in the the gulfstream west trailer sitting there cut in five dollars cameos between races better. Better than the veteran jumpers at sweden or whatever he does between races now so shout out pete. We'll see jay. We let you go. Wish you the best of luck double friday and saturday and we'll talk to you soon pal. Yeah thanks for having me man anytime Glad old well Keep going at grants pass one more week. That's all we got left grants pass. We'll see big thanks to you a big thanks to you guys out there and listener land really appreciate you joining us this week for breeders cup coverage i said we're doing a little different this I think compared to everybody else and so hope you guys are enjoying it. A feedback always welcome. You can reach me jason charles. Bima mail dot com Getting lots of emails from you guys. This week did wanna give a little shout at one of our great e-mailers Professional handicapper at Sending an email him and his dad listen to the show so shanna to them and chantal. You guys who listened in email with the show really do appreciate it. We'll see you guys back tomorrow. The jury will be here all. Look ahead to the saturday breeders cup races. It'll be a lot of fun. Friday edition the program. Tomorrow have a great rest of your thursday and happy birthday jackie.

breeders cup two year jason grant forster jackie marielle santa anita eighty two thirty eight years sprint sally amasi imperio valerie let rhop gary barbara kentucky Mujtaba bek mujtaba tetra donald amodio four year Mary
Trainer Talk with Charley D'Amodio

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

58:46 min | 1 year ago

Trainer Talk with Charley D'Amodio

"Originating from Jimmy Johns of Lexington Studios this is trainer. Tom Presented by facing Tipton offers racing radio network radio work but it was oh the game Su winslet donnay assault. WE'LL GIVE trainer Steve Asmussen career win number six thousand. It was all another dugout. Nail spoiled traded away. Look six win. Canals Rosie has gotta give Trader Greater Gary Contessa his two thousand career win on dialed in to them. It was animal cane guns. Graham skied hobby career victory number one thousand blondes now. Here's Mike Pence hello again again. Everyone and welcome to the show trainers listen to this is trainer talk presented by facing Tipton here on the horse racing radio network. I'm Mike pennock coming to you once again from our Jimmy Johns of Lexington broadcast studios wishing everyone across HR nation very pleasant Wednesday afternoon so so many of you are listening live on Sirius Xm channel. Two Oh one or you're tuned in to our free live streaming or archived podcasts which are available elbow on our HR and website horse racing radio dot net really happy to have you with me for the next hour and as those of you who listen to this show weekend in week out and have done that now for nearly seven consecutive years you know that this is a show where sometimes we have the chance to visit with the more established first trainers in the business people like todd pletcher or Bob Baffert or Steve asmussen other times we have the chance to visit with an individual who is just getting started where their career and that is the case once again here this evening as I get set to welcome in the twenty nine year old native of of New Jersey who began her training career a bit earlier than she anticipated she has settled only six started to date in this extremely young career but on September second in the second race at Monmouth Park this happened there are quarter of a mile from home candy became lane still there optic way a half length back in second another three back to epic Dreamer in third on the extreme outside wild scrap blue is trying to make some late progresses. Sixteenth Pole and it is candy cane lane clinging to the lead optic way trying to grind him down Candy Cane Lane Optic Way Candy Cane Lane or optic way candy cane lane came effort on the front end optic way right there for close photo while Scott Blue Epic Dreamer well Frank Mir Ahmadi bringing them home candy cane lane seen a gutsy effort to get the victory the first career victory for our special guest here on trainer talk tonight that is trainer Charlie Doom Odio and she she is kind enough to spend a little time with us here this evening. Charlie first of all you could hear somebody screaming in the background of that call was that you that wasn't okay and so funny because a friend had commented like after watching the replays and you can hear you screaming. You know really well. You should be excited added. That was a tremendous moment for you as always is when you settle your first winter. Take take me back to that moment. Let's start there. What was that daylight for you. Oh Oh my God that's it was such a whirlwind of emotions because I knew this horse was sitting on a win and then when the skies just opened up and started recording. I was like okay we definitely go and even the guy who's running the horse through as like Oh. I should grab my reading gear like now checking the radar on the alone but it's not clear that race. Don't worry about it. I think we arrange for the warriors and then it's going to be gone for us and we'll stay dry and watching the race and him taking the lead honestly scared the hell out of. I was like what are you doing up there. You better not get tired but yeah I. I can't even personally stop watching replay. I'm so proud of the horse because so many people from old barn we're telling me how lazy he is because if you look back as other races especially when he did break his maiden win for a second time for cycle last year doc really had urge of into that went and watching the horse really win that race and even he see on the backstretch the first time I'm optically try of him. I even told your mother don't try and do anything. Let's a horse. Racing is what he's doing. Wait until the stretch before you ever have to make a move and I have nervous. I'm like Oh God. Don't get don't get worried. optically don't get worried and candy took one look at him and just like nope. You're not you're not doing this and it was so proud of the horse because he made that decision and he wanted that win. He wanted to be on the lead and just so funny because we're in the time in this country where people think we're forcing sources to do it and we're not and if you watch a race like that candy made those decisions he wanted to be up there he wanted to win that race and he went up there and he did and I'm more proud of the horse honestly then myself. I consider myself really really lucky that I have a horse like this fall into my lot. There's just like it just a given to me in my head like okay. Thank you for the nets. Horse special aren't special moment and again a gutsy effort. I Candy Cane Lane to get that victory on September Second Charlie Mojo our special guessed. That was her very first career win if you miss me saying that at the top of the show Charlie. I've always said that if you take that feeling of watching your horse crossed the finish line in front whether you're an owner whether you're a trainer whether you're a breeder whatever it might be if you could take that feeling and you could bottle it. This would be the easiest sport in the world to market and to sell so how'd you describe it. What is that feeling like. What was that feeling like when Candy Cane Lane cross the finish line it was like a combination of like pride and disbelief and just euphoria and love. It's like real love because this is my passion like I didn't grow up in this. This is just something I kind of started doing because they always loved horses and I always wanted to work with horses and this is the only part of any horses in any kind of industry show horses but like like standards whatever that I could come into and learn and make money at the same time because the bill always knocking at your door. I just love the war through. He gave me a win and I know it's just it's so hard to describe describe that feeling because I can't even just so happy for him. I was so proud of them. I isn't that he he gave that back to me as much as I gave him and Zoe's told me listen to the horse which is what I told how Lucci interview as well 'cause. They do speak their own language. They speak with each other out in the wild. They seek each other in steals. They speak to you. If you're willing to listen you know it's in their behaviors the way they carry themselves that they're fighting. You're not fighting you. If they're eating a certain way or even the way they're stall it. You can tell by horses versus behavior or if they're not feeling good just by there fall by their coops by are they running around their small too much and making a mess of it or they nicer relax Nikki. Just all nice and Clean and candy is definitely the type of course that needed to be heard I hear so much about him. I'm be more I had and how's he was such a monster and everyone was a state he would run off on writers. I remember last year enough working for Georgia Navarro which is the first barn and we're right by the three-quarter gap and where myself we're in that barnes with right by the roads and all of a sudden. I hear footprints sprints hit the road and I'm like wow that sounds like a loose worse and it wasn't going to hear the rider yelling close to the stable gate. 'CAUSE I just game why and down at this took the bit from the right it was going and I was running candy for his second start with me. It was August second. He that same writer was there and he said you know the when I got ran off with that candy cane. I was like Oh my God but he needed to be heard and not be and that's basically what I did with him. I listen to him because he used to try and kill themselves slamming the walls this and that and he's the run off with me at the farm as well and I and I'll tell you know what if you're running off you got all this energy you clearly just need to burn it by let them burn it and get hints mentality back because some of these sources you know they. They're like humans great. How Oh you little child in kindergarten. Who can't sit still and he's just burning up with energy? No you need to entertain them more. You need to let them run around a little bit more candidate. He needed to let him burn as energy so you can actually get to know with real personality definitely burned his energy. He wanted to wait a minute now. I want to go back to something. You just said. You said he needed to be heard and not be feared and then you talk about him. Slam me went to the stall walls and every. How are you not fearing that horse at that point when he's acting like that? I just have to know how to stay ahead of the horse again. You have to read the Horse he he always has tells once. I got Houston trying to slam into the wall. It's even just the sweetest twitch of muscle you learn how to jump out of the way before he keeps coming and then you learn how to stay so far ahead that you actually stop them from even doing it once they see that switch of the muscle and even like if they're gonNA strike you could see they'll toss their head a certain way and they'll bring it up at angle and toss it up and they usually talk by the pool not by like the mouth and then they'll strike so if you see the heads off you stay ahead like if you have a shake on them you get the pressure sure on the. Shank and keep them from actually throwing their leg at you and strike in it if you're willing to pay attention and understand their body language and stay ahead of the bad behaviors you can actually put an end to the bed hager's Charlie. You don't sound like somebody who didn't grow up in the sport of thoroughbred racing doing so. Let's go back to the beginning. How did this love affair with. Horses Begin for Charlie D'Amato her well actually my office hand brought me here as a child to the races my father he likes to gamble and bet and you know there's the CEO we've had family fun day so a Lotta Times. He came on Sunday so I was one of the little kid kids getting their faces painted here the balloon animals and I would pick courses based on their names so I probably would have picked candy cane lane because because I really liked him candy land of the Chinese and the kind of when I picked my pocket the two across the board and that's exactly how my father made me as a child news. We always put you across the board. Just you know appeasing and a lot of times they would come in with big money and then like stay should put more money down dad. So what about your parents did. They like your decision to get involved with thoroughbred racing like this and to become a trainer actually no no and my parents actually having spoken to me in years because I felt the relationship with my birth birth mother which made them unhappy but when I I was still talking to them when I started working on the backside Giuseppi that's how I met South 'cause my adopted father and then I used to be the trophy girl for group sales up in the winner's circle that ten years ago and in two thousand thirteen my father convinces off to take me on and apparently someone told me they remember this conversation. my father had said you know just entertainer she she she doesn't belong on the backside. She doesn't belong working with horses but she thinks she can do is he wants to do it. Just take back their show. Where a few things that make your life miserable make her hate it and obviously that didn't work out the way yeah. I've I have always loved horses. Since I was a kid. I had a few experiences I got to go to camp once per week and learn the bond my uncle had who notices so oh my parents want me to go up there when sixteen threes and I got the hang out with them and I had just all these positive experiences verses which is why when they flaming Linnea lows. I'm really not afraid of them like you're not. GonNa do anything and they can't phileas. They've really kind but I think my lack of fear is so stupid. Skip it helps me at the same time when your parents are not on board with the concept and when your father's telling Joseph that hey just maker a hate this does that make you want it even more. Yes and no I mean that was so oh many years ago when I only just found out about that like this year so if there's no point in really having that conversation if I knew the conversation back then I would have been very angry and I just would have still continued yeah doing what I want it because at the end of the day hey it's about my happiness. I love become into this world alone. We die alone so I'm gonNA please myself before I please others with what I do with my life and I'm very glad I did because like I told you I'm legit. We've never been in that. Winter Circle Candy Cane if I had listened to my parents want me to do with my life time I'm and you miserable. was there ever a time. Charlie when you thought about doing something other than being around the racetrack well in college and everything like Ah studying art history. I actually dropped out of college and start working with the horses. Just I knew I didn't WanNa live. My Life in office or library or anything like that and at school was always easy for me. I always did well always tested well even on day. They didn't feel like studying but as difficult as this job is physically it also is difficult and challenging mentally so I kinda use my education to help me out in this industry and I don't know I never ever really saw myself in this. I never saw myself in anything I kinda just went through a fog my entire life in to like started doing this and like well. I don't know what I wanted to do but I know I'm going to work. Forces concerning I started with college ASEAN Elizabeth and they didn't have an art history major so after two years. I actually transferred to mock there. Are you still interested in art. I feel good in museums. I actually took like my first day off in two years a couple of months ago and went to Guggenheim for the first time I never I love Frank Lloyd Wright because he's much like me where he just always did whatever he wanted sure so being in the Guggenheim very nice especially they could see how difficult it was full older the curator's to hang paintings on a curved law but that's one of my Frank Lloyd Wright became so famous because he had such a a beautiful mind and he utilized intimate listen anyone else told him to do. He's like no. This is how i WanNa do things how I wanNA architect and that's what I'm GonNa you do. What do you think you might be doing if you weren't training horses right now probably probably managing and McDonald's because that's what I was doing as my job I was a manager just a regular jury recall would be this so much time leader store manager by now with my benefited paint vacations a year and you know all that and easy at McDonalds was for me. I just hated it wasn't there was no love in it and I never wanted to get up and go and as tired data's. AM in the morning. I always WANNA show up for the worth it yeah. That's a great point because you know you talk about. The two paid vacations a year. You don't you don't get a vacation now Charlie. This is a twenty four seven three hundred sixty five day a week profession that you've chosen all my pay vacation pay as someone else to give me a vacation right right correct totally different ballgame now. We've had trainers. We've had trainers on the show who given up six figure jobs just walked away and said I'm going to go get up every morning at four. Am and I'm going to go train horses three hundred sixty five days this year. What is it that makes somebody want to make these moves. Everyone actually laughs at me because I roll in about like between six and seven. Oh perfect perfect. Generally what are you doing. I'm like well. I only have two horses and I have a freelance writer. That can only come late anyway. Why am I going here early. So that that is part of that being my own boss now being able to wake up late because when I was grooming and all that yeah it was before him wake up and that ruling the groom's job is most likely be hardest job on the backside yeah. How important is it to have a a good groom working with you and and good people around Your Barn. It's one of the most important things I if you don't have good help nope than you're shot because you don't only just need someone who cares about the worst. You need. Someone who knows what they're looking at can even if they don't understand what the horse is trying to communicate. They'll communicate with the trainer. Hey and seeing the horse I do this or you know they're standing like that and you need good health going to communicate. You need good health. That's GonNa have heart and and if you don't have good help because even I don't technically have hired help but I have a lot of words men that care about me so they will throw in opinions or I'm noticing that I didn't notice with my horses and we all actually wind up helping each other back here. That's that's a great point. It's IT'S A. It's a fraternity sorority. It is the camaraderie even though all trainers are competing against each other the camaraderie three and the fact that everybody is for the most part willing to help you when you're just getting started and I've heard that a lot on this program over the years. That's something that's so unique to thoroughbred racing in a lot of ways. Isn't it really is because you know when I'm in that. Paddock I'm going against people that have either worked for like I'm like beating. Georgian Navarro was a huge deal death last year. It was working for him and so part of me was really happy but part of me like felt bad like sorry sorry but at the same time he congratulated me that you know I'm proud of you and she's like an and he said he's like. I wasn't the only train race anyway. It's not like you only beat me. It's always nice with a student or the student for it. Yeah it's always nice when the student can beat the teacher though right so so I guess so yeah early that day he reminded me of a horse that Georgie has named Flower Lisa and that horse awesome above the mud and we'll go get the wiring any kind of something Yeah Nice Horse Flowers for Liza yeah very nice talking with Charlie Demo-. Do here you're on H. R. N. trainer talk presented by Phasing Tipton just getting started with her training career but as you can tell she has a passion for the sport and and Charlie it it sounds to me like you approach this and correct me if I'm wrong with a little bit of a chip on your shoulder because of some of the people that have told you you can't do this and they've doubted you along the way and now you're proving everybody wrong. I'm pretty sure was born with a chip on my shoulder. I've it's been that way in the sense I think before I even started talking like even my mother and adopted mother would tell me about when I was with. I started walking. I didn't start walking into a fourteen months old. I was full blown walking. She said Oh you just stood up one day and started walking and I think even before consciously aware of it. I refuse to let people help me and just always tried to build my strength on my own. I am glad that taught me to let people because I definitely would not have won without help from the jackknifed all right. Let's let's go back to that. You mentioned Zombie and Joseph Zafy your former boss who ended up being the reason that you got at into training full-time. Joe passed away at the age of seventy four on July second. It was less than two months. After you took over training the horses is it ran his care. Take me back through the story and how this all came about for you. the story actually starts last two years his last year. I would see him a lot and like I never stopped talking to them. After I stopped working for always remained close stop by the bone and always telling you gotta come back to me guy come back to me and I was trying to rake in Georgia's warrant like how Joe like what's going on and just like Oh blaming everything on the room and then the groom left them and I mean the common to close. I was just feeling homesick and homesick and everything he was telling me to stay in Jersey so I stayed in Jersey for Joe but it wasn't chilling anymore. It was so strange it was like every once in a while with him but then he disappeared for lyle checking up on horses that much so they really fell under my care in the wintertime and I would only hear from like every two weeks when he was show up with money and I'm like that's not like Joe. Either you always pay on time and I I would even actually picking up extra work at a former around the corner where Houston was kind enough to let a couple of days a week just so I can get some extra cash in my pocket and I told him I was like I don't know what's going Joe. They can't abandon the horses so you're still going to remain priority. He said that fine then it was in March march twenty second also Joe's calling me at least this is really weird as a police officer and he said you know Joe Oh Jovan who field and Pemberton's seeing he's not very lucid. seems like he might have dementia and I said you know what that's something. I've been suspecting lately based on his behavior and they asked me to go pick them up because they couldn't get a hold of anyone else and I didn't know any of his family joe what was referred himself as the black sheep Um so I go and I pick them up and bring them home and houses ereck like an there's no food there's rotten milk in the fridge mold moaning the saints a huge hole in the wall and he had been complaining about long over. I just didn't realize that bad that he was falling over making a few you told broken in half and I'm looking around like I can't believe this man here. There's something long and if if he's left alone here he's going to die alone here so I actually was lucky enough to get instant because he was in and out with information and in that with remembering things at I got got a hold of his primary Doctor Ilya. We went over to him right away because when I got a hold of really they said Oh he's supposed to be here five weeks ago. Never showed never heard from them so great about him. Yes please bring them in and we're sitting there in the office. Dr Yolly and really looks at me and says this isn't Joe. I said I know and we're having this conversation position on the Joe and Joe doesn't even really having conversation about him in front of him and then I spent I spent eight hours in the Er trying to convince them. I I had a man in front of me. That didn't just have dementia. There was something more wrong than that 'cause every time a new face come in he was gonNA. Lucid again sharp carrying on regular conversation remembering important information sit there like you're not gonNa make on nuts. You've expertly or something. It wasn't until around ten o'clock that night. A doctor did like a special cognitive test his hand and she was like you know what yeah yeah he needs an. MRI and once they got the staff got to see his ups and downs like a roller coaster ride 'cause he kept even trying to get up to elites and I feel where you're going going home. We're here to pick me up but there's no. I'm not just sit down and even one point where I got him back for a few minutes collided. I keep making them leaving. I don't know Joe like there's something along those lines. I know Joe. That's why we're here. We're going to figure out what's wrong and after a a couple of days of testing they did a special type of cat skin told them he had the client because he heard the crews out Jakov disease or mad cow disease however you want to call but either way once we knew we just knew he was knocking at best learn and he was placed in a nursing home that would be able to take care care of him with his deteriorating disease. I got a few more days at my visit over the course of the time. The last time I really go to Joe was like the end of April you know he didn't pass away until July and actually went all of may not visiting him because I knew it wasn't him anymore and it just killed me to go see him and him not be there and then after sure that those four weeks I just felt like I have to spend time with them and I still went once a week and his cousin even called me right before he passed. He said you know he's finally ready to say goodbye and I went and saw him the evening before he passed away and say goodbye and that was just telling Joe like your body going now now like it's just finally let go and rest and let has many passed away emotional stuff from our special special guest here on trainer talk tonight. She is trainer Charlie DM Odio and Longtime Assistant to Joseph Zombie who trained one hundred and one winners he it was very well known as being a champion of the horsemen in New Jersey longtime member of the board of Directors for the New Jersey thoroughbred Horsemen's association and for many years administered administered kind of a hands on testing for aspiring New Jersey Horsemen Joe's oppy again passed away July second of this year and we're going to continue continue this conversation with Charlie Domoto right after this short commercial break. We'll come back. We'll talk about the impact that Joe had on her career and is having now as she moves who's forward with some of the horses. There were in Joe's care before he passed away. That's all stay with me. Is Trainer talk presented by Phase Tipton on the horse racing radio network nominations nominations are now open to the basic tip in November sale. The world's premier breeding stock event sale annually produces the highest average and median any mix l. in the world and in two thousand eighteen sold twenty two horses for one million dollars or higher held the Monday after the Breeders Cup this one night sale offers leading racing broodmare prospects proven producers users and selected yearlings in the most electric atmosphere. You will find at any thoroughbred auction. Nominate your best today. The Basic Tipton November sale where stars shine find brightest bloom racing started by former jockey and thirty five year racing industry veteran Jeffrey bloom bloom racing offers racing partnerships bloodstock services pin unhooking and private race management pulling away from dancing participant the others midnight. B.'s leaves no doubt today G. Wanda Phipps it hand experienced the fun excitement in exclusive access of racehorse ownership with bloom. Rayson forming racing partnerships now get in on the action at bloom racing dot com in the recent Flood Horse Marketwatch Study of leading consigners with more than one hundred yearlings offered from two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen sixteen millward sales ranked highest among percentage of stakes horses and winners of one hundred thousand dollars or more since two thousand no rich razor sold thirty four grade one winners including eight eight Breeder's Cup winners there consignment at this year's keeneland September sale includes yearlings from deep families by leading stallions such as Candy Reid Kirwin Empire Maker go sapper more than ready quality road and Uncle Mo Mill Ridge raising and selling racehorses. I'm here with Dr Jim. Chia Peta of flare equine nasal strips Jim exactly how do the flare airstrips work might remember that horse only breathes through its nose when it's running about fifty percent of the resistance to getting the oxygen through the nose into the lungs is at the nasal passages edges that the narrowest part of the upper airway and that's where flair strips work the strips are proven to help prevent the nasal passages from collapsing so horses breathe easier and get the oxygen they need more efficiently learn more at flare strips dot. COM backslash learn. This is trainer talk presented by Facing Basic Tipton on the Horse Racing Radio Network Welcome back trainer talk presented by Basic Tipton H. R. N. Mike Pence pennant baron of the backstretch Jimmy Johns of Lexington Broadcast Studios visiting with brand new trainer Charlie Demo-. Do who is now out on her own if you miss any portion of the first half of the show and our story of her first winter which came on September second at Monmouth Park all you have to do is head head back to our website horse racing radio dot net you can check out the podcast of this show and all of our trainer talk shows the reveal before you each and every week horse. Racing Radio Co dot net horse racing radio network on itunes and of course you can follow us on social media at H. R. R. N. Twitter and Instagram and horse racing racing radio network on facebook. Well Charlie ended the first half of the program with that emotional story of her former boss trainer Rainer Joseph Zombie who has I mentioned train one hundred and one winners in a career that spanned more than a few decades and he had the reputation of being somebody okay who would help young trainers who were coming up and he did that with Charlie. Charlie spent some time talking about the impact that Joe had on your in your life personally and on your career. I will always be grateful for two jokes like I mentioned earlier. William my father asked him to make my miss my life miserable but I think Joe saw like a part of himself in me just the passion the love and he also liked that things always made sense and he'd say something like. Oh okay well that makes sense. He didn't have to explain a lot. I think that's why he I always had this internal struggle trying to be loyal to my father but then he's like. Oh wait now. There's actually a pencil here and he didn't want to stop potential and he like you said he's been that for a lot of voice men and the I guess the the biggest impact is he just showed me the sportsmanship of it the workmanship of it and I'm I'm trying to follow in his footsteps in that way. Where if someone wants to learn I will give him that shot? I'll try and teach them if they long learn if they want to move on and move on if they want to stick around and a help them stick around because like I said a lot of people told me I couldn't do this and even even. Joe told me I couldn't do it. He's like Oh. You're a woman you're not gonna be able to handle the horses. Blah Blah Blah and I just 'cause he's off also many saw so many women that were successful the also saw so many women that did get hurt and lose their heart and it was that that was a great challenge to because is that where the chip in the shoulder came in handy and I was just like now. I'M GONNA prove you wrong. Oh and one of our last conversation and together like I said I had one final good conversation with him before I never got to really speak to him again and he it was I remember is 'cause the lights are bothering them and just trying to collect the thought and he's telling me like it's not that they don't trust you. It's just that I'm scared and he was scared. The type of life that I would need in this industry because it can go downhill for so many people people were so many people can get hurt and end up crippled are dead and I think he was more scared for me. As that's why sometimes if she would tell me I couldn't do it because he just didn't want to be responsible for me being hurt in any way what Charlie what do you think Joe would have said if he was there to see you. Saddle Candy Cane Lane to that victory on September second guys can put it just shook. His head like this broad really thinks she can do it okay. Let's see if she can do it and he would have stuck with the Gar back in his mouth. I mean would have sat back and watching Bendon screaming just as much as I was and he was screaming just like Joe. I was like you turn that. You're up there I think he would have been proud. An Joe is definitely type person. Why challenged me the way he did. Where I had to proops group Sam I could do it and she would have been proud of me for approving it to him instead of just listening giving up. Will you know this is very very much. A male dominated profession professional training racehorses in there have been several female trainers that have come on this program over the years that have been ultra successful and I've always always said if you can train horses. It doesn't matter what your gender is but let me ask you this Charlie. Is it more challenging for a young lady like yourself self getting started in the business then it would be for say a young man in that same position. I guess it is because I know no one young man who he walked up to a tree and early just grandstand like I WANNA be a trainer. How do I do that and it's like out show up in the morning. We'll start teaching and the kids not training yet but he's going through it without the challenge of that trainer telling them No. You can't do this so instead instead. He's being groomed. He's being raised to chain instead of a challenge to give up on it because it's out of his leak. you know there's several female jockeys that we've interviewed over the years and they will tell me that in some ways they feel that because they're a female they have a little bit of an advantage advantage because of the way that they can get the worst to relate to them. Is there something to be said for that that is definitely said about Lada female a a lot of females have a lot more patience worth it and David rather communicate with the horse fight with the word and that's why even tell people labout candy cane and Navarre. That's getting on them. I said don't try and fight with them. You're just GonNa fix them off. They don't even bother because you're gonNA. You're GONNA have a worse time writing the source that spiting them then being relaxed Yup and a lot of females know how to relax and just communicate with the horse and they that's where they are more successful yes and they they will continue to dominate Earth. I think we will continue to dominate and increase our numbers in the racing industry because of the way we can communicate with horses that is something that has been shown onto the ages as the difference between male and female that may have a little more understanding in our hearts who are some of the other trainers that you tend to watch closely or maybe even look up to when you when you hang out around the barns at monmouth support. I try not to put anyone on a pedestal. I think every single trainer leaner I can learn what to do and what not to do from everyone has their own tricks. Everyone has their own ways of doing things I I specially like the ones that would prefer more to do different things each worse the ones that want to do the same thing with every horse every day. Hey all the ones that are on the same program. Those are the ones that Kinda nor the most because I'm like okay. You're treating them like a machine whereas each horse individual each the individual athlete who they all like to run. That's why you have your sprinters and you're just an forces at play horses your losers you know there are all all different. They all need to train differently so I try to pay attention to the ones I know are successful based on their hearts other than that. I really don't have a favorite. They're all people at the A yup talking with trainer Charlie Modiano. CEO just getting started with that training career. She's my special guest here on trainer talk presented by Phasing Tipton like all of our guests to appear on the program. We're going to send Charlie a gift courtesy courtesy of one of our sponsors flare equine nasal strips it will send those out to Charlie after this program here this afternoon Charlie after you left working. Would you went and spent some time with Skip Einhorn. You mentioned Shea Stewart and six time leading trainer or Hey Navarro. tell me about working with somebody like Jorges Navaro. How much different was that in your experience with Joe Zombie well. Obviously I see a lot more horses Georgie He. I just had different goals in Gothi so that's where you also have to look at it too exactly if he really wanted to be like Navarro he could have been but those weren't his school school. He likes the numbers. He likes even challenging himself and beating his own numbers. and I don't know it was it that was something to look up to in a way. I don't ever want to have an outfit like Georgie. There's just too much for me. I can see how it is. It's just it's too much but it was. It's good to look up to to a man like that who built himself up and actually even came from another country and originally from Panama and he's followed the the American dream and now he has his great name for himself and that is something to look forward to for myself as well like I hope one day people know my name like they know his because this is one of the less industries where you can start at the bottom being nobody and follow the American dream as we're taught children and work your self up and you have to motivate yourself you have to want it and Georgia really taught me that he taught me to want it and other than that I I loved working for the big. It was really nice because it was a family. They got me through a lot of times whereas if I was in a small outfit fit at that time like still Joe Joe help me out but Joe is just a single unit family whereas the Varos born is just nice giant family where for everyone loves each other and we still fight and grapple like family to like for each other horses. Even you know it's not just like Oh. I mean these five and that's it now. You know you see someone else help with their main. You think you you need help and that was a really nice experience being in a family. Why does everyone calls his Alpha a factory and it's just I it's not I it's just there's a lot of horses but it's a giant family family and everyone's just trying to win and they WANNA win but they're taking care of the horses so they tend with yeah and you were working with Jorge Navarro when when you got the call that Joe Zombie wasn't doing well and that they were looking for somebody to take over his horses right. That's what bothered me a little bit about that article. That's not quite how it happened. There was real hall yeah it was just me figuring out on my own and after knowing Zombie for so many years there was something wrong yea but it was it was joe who had asked me to stay for him and I was just like you. You know what I will like. I could feel and hear the desperation I just. I knew I had to stay in New Jersey for them. I didn't know why but I knew I had to say and I I yeah I walked away. Well at the time. I thought it was walking away. Some big opportunities and I didn't realize I was actually walking forward into an opportunity and it just turned out that way. We'll take me back to the day that you settled your very first starter. I think it was what may eighteenth that Monmouth with a horse named cotton time. Is that right cutting time. Yes fickle little will now. Mary we still call the daily because she was tiny she was funny and so much potential and so much talent and definitely have the speed but No desire to actually compete and she actually she's officially retired now I found fighting for her and a young girl named really who had her and she's going to be starting hopefully find her lane to show ring which I think she will do very well so pretty and very very willing to jump she just yes. She had no real heart in running like she likes to exercise. Hugh liked to go Gallup. She'd like especially like the take a hold of the bidding go but in a race. She was just like whatever she didn't care. She didn't care about the other horses. Mrs and that something big I think some people need to recognize to in this industry when it give up on a horse and that's why I gave up on her because otherwise you risk ruining them and for what I could've maybe maybe started or twenty more times and finally broker made it and say the guy finally broker meeting but for what it was really for nothing and it certainly wouldn't have been for the Horse. It would've been for myself and I just don't do that to her because she's a real heart yeah well. It was like walking into the paddock that day with your. You're the first starter that you're gonNA saddle in your own name. What was that like. I actually didn't settle Jim Popovich fouls that day he he was helping me and teaching me and I I was still schooling and learning and just wasn't very comfortable and ready yet and was total nervous Anneli and he actually Sadler for me and then after that I started satellite all right so what was the first horse that you actually saddled it was it was actually caught in time with her second start with me and she was so good in the paddock and I was so nervous and everyone would like this is a family here and I've been here over ten years now so area knew me so they were like we were watching. You know my good good friend grew MC pitman. I've known him for so many years. It used to be a valid and he told me afterwards he said don't worry. We were all watching paying attention. If you needed help you were there. We are ready to help you and so far. Everything's been smooth. Her and eating candy canes thing good in the Paddock as well and I didn't have to really worry about anything anything you can see how dangerous saddling in the Patrick Kane get that that was a nice relief knowing that I was amongst family well the best birth. The MONMOUTH Paddock Charlie is that if you get really nervous they had the bar just steps away so you can just hit the bar right in the paddock birth Do they still have the bar. The regular right for once alcohol is not not on my mind. That's a good sign. That's a good yeah right. You're moving in the right direction Charlie. Yes yes at bars right there. I actually the bartenders very well. They're good girls and they actually I know I like to drink gun crime and vodka and so anytime I come up through like you WanNa Charlie today and like yesterday it can. I have a charlie perfect for no fortunately. I haven't really needed that if usually when I'm watching the races when I want my drink because I'm just like shaking the whole time because no matter knowing that I'm sending out a sound hoarse. I'm always so worried about a breakdown and like that's always the scariest thing on my mind like what if something happened. Actually my first start with candy became he's faded in the stretch not the stretch sorry he faded in the backstretch and I'm like why fading what happened and like you said enough and then he comes back and he's actually sliced up on the hind tendon and the ankle and luckily it was all superficial but it was enough to make them say no. I'm not running at this race anymore. It was like ouch that hurts and every wha wait and watch the replay and I saw horse you know rushed up on them and and it wasn't even the jockeys fault because the jockey did his best to collect the Horse and off of Candy Canes Heels which thank God the Jockey did taking hold of a horse because it could've turned into an accident and that that is always my biggest fear is like if something happens all it takes even just a fad and and the horse can go down every time I send one out on just like we come back. Stay you can come back dead less but come backseat and that's what I was so happy with candy cane that they like okay you know he came back. These gotta cut but he protected himself. You know I can't run out the race but this and took care of it it wasn't much take care of thank goodness and he came back and around that second and I was. I was very proud of him. Without even that's day felt like a victory because that was my first second and after him fading with my first start with him and then coming back and running a second. I just so happy and I was really happy that no one place them up that day. Yeah that's always a plus talking. We'd trainer Charlie Devoto here on trainer. Talk presented by Phasing Tipton Charlie earlier when you talked about being around Georgie Navarro's operation. You said that you know that big monopolization really wasn't for you. You don't want to go that direction so what's you said. You have two horses in training now. What's the optimal number that you would like to have her now. especially it keeps things small 'cause we discussed earlier. it's hard to find good help so until. I am confident that that I have the help I can count on to gloom the way I like. The groom and even have is the way I like to have is on the horses is I don't want big numbers because I can't do it on my own right. Now I n doing on my own with some help here and there the good friend Lance seasons old horsemen Hayes chain before the Laura as well need to delay for him. He didn't care but he's excellent parchment and he's one of the second pairs of is that I have here that I wouldn't be successful without He's just he doesn't feel like grooming so I'm not going to is it it optimal next ten but if I just keep doing it on my own between three and five just hopefully over time improved the stock basically like right now Candy Kansas Very Nice whereas my other horse has potential being a nice course. We'll see hey how he goes. He he reads it very well. The day I was happy with his Grease Grease half moon fifty and cow outbreak. Sorry sorry what's his name. That's victory tour yeah. He is he ran a second for Joe but at four in the second for Joe last last year and then when he came to the farm his behavior he was like a nutcase like what is wrong. I just think even time off. There's there's something wrong with you so you're getting time off so I only started him. Back in the spring went to training so he has I. I haven't had to get in and it's it'll be like candy when he's reading. He says he's ready is when he'll start other than that. I'm not gonNA push him because so there's something Joe at said about him because when I was trying to get in so out of Joe's ailing minds he just he started talking about Sammy's trip. That was another coincidently chestnut. He's the have and he said I pushed fanny either. GonNa shoot pushed him. He's like I don't WanNa push victory very and that's why I'm not pushing towards one of the lessons. Joe Total listed. Don't push him. I said okay when the horses ready is one horse betty you know there's two things. Charlie listening to talk throughout much of this program that kind of stick out to me and and correct me if I'm wrong but it sounds like if I were to describe your approach to training horses. The one word that comes to mind is patients and the other one. The only thing that comes to mind is put the Horse I is that yeah yeah definitely I it's an argument. I've had fellow grooms in hot workers over the years here's because even if they want to only walk a short amount of time rather than a long amount of time or they. WanNa do this instead of that because it makes it easier on their your life even though they should be doing it for the horse. It's always like they're the reason why we're here there. The reason why there's a roof over my head or the reason why the food in my belly they're the they're the reason why every single one of us has a job so if you don't put them. I don't took take care of them. How are you going to even make money off of them. Are you GonNa get that food in your belly and that's yeah they. They have to come. I if I'm GONNA Andy Susceptible has to be about the horses not about me because if I don't make it about then what do they care about me. Yeah you take care of them. They'll take care of you charlie only about Let's see less than five minutes left before we have to wrap things up here. It's been a an hour that has has just flown by been an enjoyable visit. I'll ask you this question. we talked earlier about your love of art and I often like to end the show by asking trainers. Here's what else they enjoy outside of horseracing. That's certainly one thing if you do get a chance to follow it something else or to do something else outside of racing what's Charlie early DEMONIAC GONNA do well. I always joke that one day. I'm GONNA charge really rich people to fix. They're badly behaved. Horses there you go. I say I'm going to be a horse therapist one day and yeah just or or maybe even write books or something like that. Go Back to school and for you know behavioral psychology for they call here with the quality of non human animals as needs to actual physical way of saying it but I always is. It's not training. It's always gonna be something to do with horses or animals. In general I four I foster dogs before me and my exit fourteen dogs together be fostered over the course of a couple of years and I yeah yeah. I think that's going to be my go-to especially. If one of these horses ever does finally cripple male just have to settle with talking about their behaviors and how how you can fix their behaviors and especially if proven people how thoroughbreds really aren't as crazy. Everyone thinks they are yeah well. You touched senator earlier. If you're willing to listen to them and you pick up on some of the tells before they start becoming a really bad actor it can save you a lot of trouble up the road yeah and sometimes you have to tell when they're faking it. That's my though go lame on. You and there's nothing wrong with them. Do do you spend that much time involving social media in your operation or you on twitter and instagram and things like that does that tie into what you're doing is a horse trainer. a couple years ago. I started falling. Ott De Connect on facebook and follow the other couple of course horse pages and actually a lot of hits and a lot of insight has come through other people's experiences that they in our expressing through the Internet and you know a lot of the industry is about networking and talking 'cause anything and everything can happen would've horse and there then I forget what it was. I can't remember exactly what it was. I remember Joe Making a comment like in my third in thirty years. They never seen anything like this but he you know you talk around. You've eventually we'll find someone who's seen something like that. You're dealing with and they figured out how to take care of it and then they share that information with you hopefully and then you pass the buck because you should do someone ask someone else after help. You got helpful. You should help that personnel from as well and that's also comes down to the worth to if it's not about Oh. I'm not going to help you because I don't like. You know help that person. You're actually helping the horse sharing that information and a lot of a lot of my eight has come through other people's experiences that they've expressed online and I'm grateful to the Internet for that as well no she is trainer Charlie Emoto and as you heard here tonight just getting started with that training career. She is as passionate about the sport is any trainer that we've had on the program and Charlie can't thank you enough for the visit here tonight. Unfortunately rod a time. We could spend another hour but we'll have to do part two. Maybe after you win the Kentucky Derby up the road that would be fantastic. It's we'll see if that never goal right. Now is just handling these to see what we can do. Appreciate the visit here tonight and all the best moving forward and thank you so much. I appreciate you coming because they actually want one victory to learn so you're saving me a few bucks l. We'll get out to you. Charlie demotivate ladies and gentlemen our Special Guest here on trainer talk tonight. Don't forget if you missed any portion of the show head over to our website horse racing radio dot net and check out the podcast you can listen at your leisure horse racing radio dot net well from my producer. Lee Dela Pena in our Jimmy Johns of Lexington Lexington Studios for our Special Guest Charlie Mojo on Mike Pence. Thanks for listening to trainer talk presented by Phase Tipton.

Joe Joe Charlie New Jersey Charlie Doom Odio Georgian Navarro Monmouth Park Phase Tipton Charlie Mojo Joe Zombie Jimmy Johns Mike Pence Charlie Demo Gary Contessa writer Phasing Tipton Houston Your Barn Rainer Joseph Zombie Lexington Broadcast Studios Steve Asmussen
#019- a Veut Dire Quoi Communiquer ?

Le Quart d'Heure d'Inspir'Action

16:19 min | 9 months ago

#019- a Veut Dire Quoi Communiquer ?

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Willie O'Ree, Penguins Big Move

ESPN On Ice with Wyshynski and Kaplan Show

1:01:27 hr | 1 year ago

Willie O'Ree, Penguins Big Move

"Hey Emily Greg. So the Lacrosse goal the Michigan the specialty coffee the Forsberg. Whatever you WANNA call it? It is poisoned in the minds of the ESPN editorial staff. And I'll tell you why we put together a top ten coolest goals scored in the NHL list that ran this week on ESPN DOT com. And let me tell you. There's someone here that I love. The Peter Forsberg the Pavel Datsyuk flip during the shootout yager slicing through the defense savard slicing through the Defense Mareo decoding sliding slice defense number. One without question Ovechkin. The goal scores it on his back. Awesome stuff against the coyotes. Everybody remembers the two thousand six but number two on the list. Is the Lacrosse goal. What do you consider the Lacrosse goal to be the second greatest version of a cool ogle and NHL history? Honestly I think it's been diluted lately because not only did I just do it in a game but we've now seen it in the. Oh L. we've seen it in Sweden. We've seen other guys do it. And like maybe because Austin Matthews tried it a few times and couldn't executed and everyone in Toronto went crazy and said this must be the hardest thing in the entire world But Yeah I think it's been diluted dude I mean the only thing you can really pull off as a moustache from what I've seen but I think the thing for me is depends on how how much amodio has done to be quite honest share. Yes then it's at least if he can get four buttons undone and with the Mustache then he pulls up mustache. No He's Lacrosse goals. Incredible first of all whenever we talk about anything in hockey. We are talking about things that I can't accomplish given ten ten years of training. Let's just be honest but the Lacrosse goal. When I look at the other goals in this list and I see these incredible feats of athleticism and slicing through defenses and decoding and shooting and doing things lightning fast speed? That just defy logic and gravity. The lacrosse goal is basically just like surprise. It's just basically like the goaltender has back to you. And you put the goal the puck on in your blade and you sneak it past him. And that's that's fine. It's a cool goal but essentially what it is. Somebody always has to have their back to view based on the position that they play. And you're taking advantage of this by sneaking the puck like over his shoulder. It's fun it's a super surprise reminds ends me of people out from behind the couch for your thirtieth birthday or whatever but as a goal as pure athleticism get. Give me the deacon through five to get in making a backhand shot and just do the whole thing. That's what I want you I want. I see all these names on this list. And we've got the the younger of the World Crosby we've got Pavel Beret Denis Savard Merrick maleek big homing Merrick Leak and his shootout goal through the leg that is surprising athleticism. That's surprising and remains the old. The American League goal to shoot apologised is like the Roswell crash to you like this thing happened once and that's why we should believe aliens like this thing happened once and that's why we should have the shootout doubt go sixteen rounds with different people because a random third pairing defenceman might score an amazing goal. Like it's now Gospel to these freaks leaks that like the shootout. The one thing I'll say about this list is devils Fan Jack. Well a true three on three aficionado. Surprise me at this list is that economist. David didn't make it and I've had some people point out to me after this list drop wears mcdavid and the only thing I can think that maybe he scored so many great goals that it's just commonplace and like none of them really are that exceptional because they're all exceptional. Maybe it's some sort of random thing where you know if we're all super none of super I don't know but why did you like was mcdavid. Even a choice. We did this voting. I I WANNA say yes but probably know and and you're right like I can think of a half dozen of goals off the top of my head and all them are amazing but then we just call it Wednesday for him right exactly. He's God level so we don't we don't even have to laud any of his goals on top ten list because he's he's on his own list he's on the puck end his mouth and spews it out to the unexpecting goalie. He will remain off this list. That was my favorite part of this list. By the way is the what comes next portion at the end on what could possibly be coming coming next insofar as the future of goalscoring. That's good. Yeah my favorite was doing the Lacrosse spin by Nikita Gustav literally occurred in the All Star game where anything can happen and there's no possible way that could game. Yeah every shot and hard shot is like five hundred miles an hour. Okay all right coming up on the show really good show actually will ris got an actual legend. Grace's this podcast with his presence. We talked really about a great many things including his awesome. A new documentary that you can catch on. ESPN plus And also you know issues with race and hockey which Willie is eloquent. An awesome on plus the penguins make trade. We might be going back to the Olympics. Maybe filibuster loves hotdogs PUCK HEADLINES AND ALL that more on this edition of ESPN and ice. Let's start start. The show proper shelley to your ear buds a podcast about hockey featuring things to do with hockey from your friends at ESPN beyond it's espn on ice with Shitski and Catholic everybody it's ESPN and ice. It's the podcast. ESPN talks about hockey. I'm Greg wishes in your NHL writer and then like Kaplan National Nhl reporter. Greg we have a trade and it was not one for one which one for one at all yeah trade to announce it was fun. It dropped when I was walking a dog. So that's always exciting. It was the Pittsburgh Penguins making the big old deal with the Minnesota wild. Finally Jim Rutherford gets his white whale. I I'm Captain Ahab and get's Jason's hooker finally from the Minnesota Wild The wild deal him for Alex Skull Chenya Expiring Contract Act. Defenseman Kaelin Addison which is an extraordinarily young Defenseman in two thousand twenty name and a conditional first round pick that will not the wilds if the penguins are in the lottery but since the penguins are have the fourth best record in the NHL Right now probably a twenty twenty first round. Pick going to the wild for Jason Sucker now. Zucker has he's in the second year of a five-year twenty seven point five million dollar contract of course emily. We remember that he almost became a member over the Pittsburgh Penguins last year in deal it would have sent him. And Victor Rask to Pittsburgh in exchange for a lovely and talented Phil Kessel and a lovely Johnson Jack Johnson and that fell through when Phil said Nah. Couldn't Minnesota so Jason Sucker now a member of the penguins couple thoughts on the steel one. I think that this is technically a cost-saving deal for the penguins. And I'll explain why I won. They rid themselves of Alex. Chen Yuck for the rest of the year so they didn't have to do any other finagling there too. They can fire their entire amateur scouting department because they don't have any first round picks six and there's no purpose of having one so look they save a ton of money. They're all jokes aside. I think that You Know Bill Garin wasn't going to get fleeced on this deal. Nobody knows the penguins prospect system better than Bill Garin who literally ran it for the last couple of years as the assistant. GM in Pittsburgh This is a really great first statement trade for him as the GM decker is a guy who you know. It's a luxury like they didn't need to get rid of him. They have under contract. He loves being there. He's a great player but if teams kept calling on them and they did They got a really good return getting a first round peg. Get Him at defensive prospect eating Abdel Shenyang Salary for the end of law season. Like that's a great hall for many as Garin starts to cement his legacy and start to put a stamp on this roster. I'm from Pittsburgh perspective. This is awesome. This is the guy as you mentioned that they've long coveted this guy that's under term for the next couple of years which is important for them because they're always going up against the cap and this is the guy that can play on Sydney's wing. He plays a really good brand of hockey that meshes well with their style. They've been looking for scoring winger. Probably before but especially Lee since Jake and so was out for the year and this just cements them as you know I think probably well as probably maybe this cements them as a contender in the east. I'll say it right there. Yeah and it's already been announced that he's going to play on the wing. You wonder how life changes Sir when Jake gets healthy but for now it's the Zuckerman crosby show and like you said from a financial perspective. I mean his cap hit and it seemed a little high when he wasn't necessarily scoring at the same level he was in his contract. You're funny how that always seems to happen in the National Hockey League when you guys have incredible careers at the moment the signed big contracts but at at five point five million if he's going to be thirty goal scorer like that's great and he's twenty eight. He's he's writing prime. They have cost certainty on the contract through two thousand twenty three and also like dude. Who by all accounts is a real solid citizen in the room? A real solid citizen in the community Good good good move by the penguins and and again like Compare What The Wild oiled could've ended up with a year ago in this deal a thirty two year old who has cratered in Arizona. Maybe he's thirty three and John's thirty two. I forget which one's which but like both of them. Are you know past their prime and not exactly what a a rebuilding team needs. So you know. Thank you Paul. Fenton for having a trade xed out by Phil Kessel and thank you Bill Garin for actually making a deal that addresses the future a little bit for the Minnesota Wild but so this is like a little bit earlier than the trade deadline. Maybe we thought this could be a move. That is happening a little. You know a couple of weeks from now we actually have to sit in a room and report on all of this stuff. What's your vibe right now on the trade deadline as we are less in two weeks away from the February twenty four three PM deadline the NHL you know initial fears that this was going to be another really slow year air? GM's you talk to say that everyone's looking for someone with term and that's obviously much harder to trade but you know this year I get the sense ends with so many teams. On the cusp. There could be movement of people trying to separate from the pack and like a perfect example is the Colorado Avalanche. You are super talented wanted team. Everyone's lauding them as a contender already. they were already thinking of adding luxury items. Like you know the sniffed around Taylor Hall and that was going down and now that they're out Nazem Kadri for a little bit of time. I wouldn't be shocked if they go out and get a big name and and get a score that can help Nathan Mackinnon relieve some pressure from him. Will they were always sniffing around Chris Kreider so we'll see if maybe that comes to fruition at some point bliss everyone's sniffing around Chris Kreider. He's great he's great in any line. Lineup I pry. I'm guessing what do you think X.. Body spray or like Jakhar would think he smells like I think he's smells like smelly equipment. which is like like dogs smelling each other's but that's just love to smell very very descriptive? Producer Ryan says that Chris Kreider riders posed like Sex Panther. Well that's interesting possible. Every you know works every time I think the interesting thing about the trade deadline right now is that we are less than two weeks away but in in in two weeks a lot can change and you know and and putting together our trade deadline preview stuff in the last few weeks. The usual suspects were there. I I mean you know the devils the senators the sabers wings the kings the sharks. You know duckie's but now that we're getting closer to it and you start to see like Montreal had horrible loss last night as we do this podcast there now. Seven or eight points out of last wildcard spot. That's a team second. Now maybe flip the switch and become a seller the rangers. We knew we were going to be shared Weber's out but the panthers probably not a seller. They're kind time still in the thick of things but you go to the western conference. I mean what's the think of the Nashville predators They're right in the thick of things but are they going to be that team like the blues. Were a few years ago where David just decides to break glass and say you know what we need to kind of change the configuration of this team. Because I don't know that we can win right now with this with this roster. You're what are the wild. Do the Blackhawks for a hot minute work contender now. They've moved back a little bit. They have a couple of games in hand. What happens with the goaltending? That's the weed their their playoff chances in the last month or so so. There's a lot of sort of flux right now with some teams at Montreal very much particular that could easily flip from being teams is that were like. I don't know maybe we should just hang on guys we can get in the playoffs. Teams are like sell sell sell. I think it's going to be interesting. Two weeks to see where these teams end up. The only not that I'm confident is going to unload. Players is the king's like when there's enough smoke and it's like really really cloudy over there in l. a. these days like there's going to be fire in Tyler. Toffoli is not going to be on this team. mid-month from now there's other Alec Martinez I think teams will probably try to make a big trade for him. mm so that's the one team but like if you want to make sure bed of WHO's going to make a move I'd say it's the kings other than that like the other bottom. feeders don't have obvious. Candidates is to trade like the wings you could probably say anyone is on the table outside of dill marketed. Anthony Mantha but does anyone want anyone on that roster like anyone want Andre is on pursue my green. Yeah exactly You know the senators. There's not many obvious candidates. They're like John. Gabriel go oh patio patio because you should make more French if you know. They don't figure out an extension. He goes in the devils it. We still haven't quite figured out what's going on with the Sami Boston in an Andy. Greens or both impending. Ufa's yeah and then the real interesting one there for all the talk about Tomas Truecar. You're potentially being available for the Canadians. Man Gimme cow. Paul Mary any day of the week if he's available but again the thing about the devils right now is that we understand stand their lot in life we understand. It's GonNa get another sort of form of a rebuild we understand there's an interim gm from ownership like Paul. Mary could bring bring bring them back a lot of value but like he sure. And you've got to have somebody to pass to get started. Go in the tank completely for the next six years or something here. It's kind of a bummer. To think that you and I have covered deadlines in recent memory that involved will John. TAVERAS be traded. Will Eric Carlson. And be traded. Will Matt Duchenne and Mark Stone be traded. And now we're all kind of lighting candles to see if you know Jogos or were Kreider is going to go where the the Alec Martinez Derby. It's kind of a step down from the big blockbuster. Earth theories and hopes and dreams of previous deadlines that said there are a few wildcards at play here that if they if they become available or if they their teams decided to go in a different direction could change the complexion of the trade deadline Max domes one of them are earthy this summer. I think a guy that they wanNA bring back in theory but he's got no trade protection if they get blown away by something. Montreal Mike Go Someplace there. The Minute Ryan gets laugh or Joe Thornton says you know what I think. I'd like to move on and do something else they're going to be traded. I don't know if either of them we'll say within the next two weeks probably not but who knows PK Sue van. If the devils gobble up half that contract you wonder whether or not the lease might be in the. PK Suba Business. There's sort of speculation coming from Toronto that that might be the case. And you know the thing that we both want to see happen but probably won't have because there's ONA's way too close to the playoffs. The recycling of Taylor Hall now only three million dollars hours against the cap because of of the the salary the devils up and John Jacob all accounts thinks that. He's got a chance to resign Taylor Hall. I don't think that has a chance to resign. Taylor tell her halls gonNA play in a different kind of market than than Arizona disrespect to Glendale. But but I mean you don't you don't trade for Taylor Hall to flip them if you have a realistic shot the playoffs as much fun as that would be right especially the but so much premium making the playoffs this year. Like they have to do it if you if you were the Bruins. Okay and you were like dabbling in the dark arts of Chris Chris Kreider or Tyler Toffoli. And you had this package and you're like I'm GONNA spend this package on a on a rental like don't you go to Arizona. I and say look we know we know you have Taylor Hall and you WanNa win things. But what if we gave you this and you give us Taylor Hall in his three million dollar cap it for the rest of the season like don't yeah at least make that phone call. If you're don sweeney you make the call. I have to say John. Jake has a pretty good record with trades like you rarely gets least. That's true I mean. Say what you will about the coyotes. But he's he's been pretty good on the street from all right. I make one one prediction of something think's GonNa Happen. Okay go ahead. Good Chris Kreider is going to be blue. Wow Saint Louis Blues. I think they're going to pull the Patrick Kane with bloody terracing goes capit- Pitt kind of maybe they look. He's got a couple of weeks he's going to debut in the playoffs. Use that cap space. Get Chris. Kreider go all in on defending the Cup one prediction for the trade deadline. All right. I'll go here Sami Vatanen to the to the capital's ooh I like that. Yeah I think I think. They're going to bolster their Blue Line. Before before the postseason of course it would help. Maybe they they should trade for a mechanic to put the wheels back on because they've certainly fall off in the last week or so the capital's Mike All Right. Let's talk to an absolute legend. We're going to class up the joint for a few minutes. Here with William Murray and now joining us on the line is a very special guest hockey hall. Famer Willie Willie thank you so much for joining us. Well it's a pleasure. Emily so I have to ask about this documentary which is streaming on. ESPN PIN plus How long has been in the works and tell me a little bit about the pitch? They made you that they want to make a documentary about you. Well it It all started though with Brian. McBride who was the producer and he got together with me. Oh this is back probably I probably say about two years ago. And he says well he because I think we should do a documentary on your life and I said Oh my goodness That would be nice and It would take some travelling you know We would be contacting a lot of your your friends in your hometown A lot of places that you Played and so it all started and then Brian came to me and said yes. He says. It's In the final makes and he said we'd like you to take a look at it to to See what you think so. At first it didn't jump out at me. You know it But I I was excited to see A lot of my friends places where I had I played Friends that I had known for years and then I thought two or three times and I Then just started to sink in with me and I said Gosh I said this is certainly did a fantastic job of filming and traveling around and Talking to some of my old friends that I've known for over seventy years so I I'm I'm thrilled and I I'm just overwhelmed. that it's going GonNa be shown on On ESPN when people watch it. What do you hope they get out of it? Well I hope to get out of it. Not only The the hockey interest that I that I played you know I I only played with the Boston. Bruins for for forty five games. spending Three years but but The work that I started doing When Commissioner Bettman appointed media director of the NHL diversity program About Traveling around and I just wanted to give back to hockey and give back to the sport hockey given me and I felt that I I had something inside of me that I could share with boys and girls and helping them choose another sport that they play and traveling around north. America with the The cities that I've gone to I I hope that they they They get out of Shane the work that I've done and The lives that I've touched over. The years is quote that you said that really stuck out to us to me. I didn't know I was breaking the color barrier until the next morning when I heard it in the paper. Is there any part of you that maybe that could have made that experience easier for you. Well I don't I don't think so. You know I had gone to the bruins training camps on two occasions in nineteen fifty seven and fifty eight and and You know I was keeping my fingers crossed that The hopefully I'd get the opportunity to to be called up with it ruins But when they contacted the Quebec Aces the team that is playing for in in Quebec Canada And said we wanna read them. Eat The bruins in Montreal to play two games against the Montreal Canadians so when I arrived in around in Montreal I met Milk Schmidt the coach and Lynch Patrick the general manager and they They sat me down and said we've we've brought you up because we think you could add a little something Do our club and all of us thinking then is just trying to When I get on the ice is to play a good game in representing you know the cup to the best of my ability? But it didn't go through my mind about that. I was breaking breaking the color barrier or opening doors for other players of color and black players but honestly when I The next the next day and then I read it in the paper. 'cause I my parents come up in some good friends. Come up to watch the game and I just throw thrilled about you. Know beating the Canadians at night. We shut the three nothing and That's all I can think of is You know winning winning Against the Montreal Canadians I didn't get any goals or no assist but Just to be beat the Montreal team name With just a feat in itself. Hey Willy it's Greg Gerski thanks for doing this. You recently addressed the Chemo lose situation obviously stepping forward and making accusations against bill. Peters and Peter's residing shame because of it and I think anyone listening to this podcast podcast knows that we applaud Akeem for having done what he did. You did the same thing. What were your thoughts on on that situation and what a team was able to do to affect change age well? I'm I'm very pleased that that he he took the opportunity to step up and And you know tell tell what happened I had Racial remarks and racial slurs directed towards me when I when I played but You know thanks to my older brother brother who was not only my brother and my friend but he was my mentor and he taught me a lot of things that I would need to know if I was gonNA choose hockey as a career and he said I really says names will never hurt you unless she let them in. I I I went out. I knew I was a black man. I didn't have to be told that I just went out and concentrated on playing hockey and done. I let all the racial remarks and slurs win one ear. Note the other I I F- I fought a lot when I first when I first started. I thought because I had not because I wanted to but players just wanted to see When I was made of and You know I always tried to protect myself because back then. We didn't wear any helmets to goldies. Didn't wear mass or your face was exposed to exit sticks and everything else but I I just I wanNA give credit to these These players that are playing saying now that setup and just telling them you know we just can't. We just can't stand having racial remarks and rations racial slurs directed towards these players that said you also said recently that when it comes to the NHL and Racer Sport in general race that we've taken one step forward and two back. Would you mean by that. Well I meant you know When I broke and I was I was the first black player Fourteen years later Mike Marson broken with the Washington capitals and then later on with the Los Angeles The Los Angeles kings but I in the statement I made. I'm thinking we're heading. We're heading in the right direction. Then all of a sudden You hear these racial remarks and racial slurs from from these fans fans in the stand so it. It doesn't seem that we're going that going that far and the thing is that This is a this is the twentieth going the twenty first century and I. I'm just shocked that these things that are still happening. These racial remarks and racial slurs are still happening In the League and these these players of color and black players. They're there because they have the skills and the talent to be there. They're not they're just because they're black. They have skills and talent and Basically I just think that It's GonNa get we're working in the right direction but Some days. I think that we've already taken a step back. And then so now we've gotta take another another step forward to to keep going and and and recognizing What not What the potential goal is will? You've been so involved in hockey is for everyone and making the sport more inclusive especially at a grassroots level and we are seeing a a lot of progress in that but if you look at. Nhl Front Offices and their coaching staffs there's very little diversity and we often see the same guys getting hired again and again the same aimed guys who had opportunities before. I'm curious you know I know the. NFL has a rooney rural and demographics and the NFL are different. But is there any version of that rule that could make sense in the NHL. Well and what would that look like. Well you know the opportunities are there for anybody that wants to be a a a referee or linesman or general manager. Her or or or going going going into coaching The opportunities are there. You just have to you. Just have to You know set goals for yourself and work towards your goals I I use myself an example when I when I was seventeen years of age fourteen years of age. I told my my brother that I wanted to become a professional hockey player. And what do I need to do. Well being the youngest of thirteen children. I I had to stay in school Get an education I played a number sports growing up but I accept my goal to play professional hockey and hopefully one day get into the National Hockey League and I think that this is what a lot of A lot of people Have to do if they WANNA IF THEY WANNA get into a career you you need to set goals for yourself often. You need to stay focused on what you wanted to do. And don't tell anybody that don't let anybody tell you you can attain your goal and my message is if you think you can you can if you think your rate and there's a lot of truth to them. I totally agree with you. That said is there anything the NHL can do to help facilitate a make sure that these opportunities are being given people are given fair. Looks for these jobs well. They adore doors are open. You know and I think the NHL Cello doing everything they can. You know to to make it possible for for these people to get these positions You know you have to You have to feel within your heart within your mind that you WanNa make something happen and you if if you think you can in and work for you and you can make a difference. Willie Emily and I go to a lot of different events. All Star Games all sorts of stuff. We've seen you so many times at at these events meet-and-greet and people taking pictures of the kids. That sort of thing. What is that experience media? We're talking two thousand twenty now longtime since you're you playing days and yet people are coming up all the time to get pictures William Henry. I know it's a it's a nice feeling really You you know since since since I came aboard the NHL and You know I just wanted to give back. Give back to the sport what the what the sport had given me and I'm I'm so I'm so happy that you know commissioner bathroom and gave me the opportunity to get back into hockey after I had retired from nineteen eighty and then getting I'm back into hockey in nineteen ninety ninety six I just have a great time. I know that people are GonNa come up to me and ask me for an autograph re picture and you know I can't I can't even you know go into arena and get the my you know. Walk towards my seat before you know people come up and recognize me and I can see them pointing in in my direction and you know I'm coming over and saying Mr read. Do you mind if I get a picture with my son or daughter. So but It's Nice it's it's part part of what I do and I I'm so thrilled that I'm still able to Work at my age and be it'd be a part of the NHL family. What's your relationship to the current? NHL Right now do you watch it. Do you have any favorite players. You like Enjoy a lot of favorite place but I just watching. I just love watching the game. You know You know when I played Six teams or what's called the original six and then in nineteen sixty seven it it expanded six more teams and now we have thirty one and then Seattle will be coming in next year and For thirty two and it's The League it just keeps it's growing and growing the I love the The two referees the two linesmen all those still they miss a few things but The game is faster The players are bigger stronger. Better condition than than I was because they have the facilities rate in the arenas to tape themselves in the top. Physical Condition I I think the fans are enjoying the You know the three on three and And the shoot out a Lotta love the shootout so they're doing things to make To make the game more exciting for the fans and I have the the NHL package. And I watch in my home. When I'm home I watch you know four or five games A night and It's Ah the game was the game is just a great game. I think it's the greatest a sporting game on earth. My Hope Gary gave you the the Free Discount Code Food for the mistakes do Gary Gary takes good care of me. I guess I'm very pleased and very happy curious. You know sorry. I was a little focus on the coaches and GM's thing but are there any rising stars right now in the coaching ranks. GM ranks that so you think that fans should pay attention to and could be the first black coach in the NHL or first black GM. Oh not great off not right off hand there's I imagine there are some Individuals out there that you know that WanNa get into coaching and some of them that are probably coaching junior college. College teams names We possibly consider you know getting into the into the NHL S- All Right Willie last one because this is the question. Everybody's been asking around hockey for the last two weeks. But they're ready. I am Sir is a veteran. GonNa break rescues record or what I believe. So yes the ways going. If he doesn't get hurt I say yes. Yes Oh man what do you think about like did you. Did you think that goals record for grants was like unbreakable or did I mean. Did you think it was at one day. Oh I I knew that I knew somebody would get one day. You know you know you know back then in the NHL You know when you scored thirty goals thirty goals it's a big a year You know and then all of a sudden. There's there's a forty goal score and then you know Players Gordie Howe and and bobby hauling those were getting getting you know forty and fifty goals but you know the the equipment now is much better the Everything is much better now. The sticks are are so much better than then the wooden sticks us Back then and I just I just think that these players these players that have that have the skills and the the talent They'll they'll they'll work towards breaking breaking that That that goals yeah. Well Willie we so appreciate your time especially because you're calling in California and you can be enjoying the sunshine right now so thank you cannot wait to watch your documentary and ESPN plus on encourage all of our listeners. To do that as well. Yes I when I'm excited about about seeing it You know I'm here with my wife and and We'll definitely be watching it and I'll be telling my My friends that are here that I know here in the San Diego Mesa area and I'm sure that they'll it'll be tuned in to watching. Thank you so much really. You're welcome Sir. Emily thank you our thanks to me hall of Famer absolute icon Willie. The documentary critically acclaimed will be available throughout the February on. ESPN DOT COM. which you can of course get on your desktop or on the ESPN APP and we'll have four airings on ESPN? Two the Seventeenth Eighteenth Twentieth. And the twenty four th check your local listings but you can check that awesome documentary out on the deuce also awesome stuff emily the has come crawling back to the NHL saying nobody gave a crap about our hockey tournament. Last time and young Chang we would likely back in the NHL Business for Beijing the big news this week a meeting between the the NHL NHL Jeff there as well will the IOC willing to go back to original levels of funding for things like travel insurance housing. All the things at the US to pay for then decided not to any more on top of that loosening the restrictions on marketing rights whether it's the use of still images or video Olympic markings the ability to maybe promote and make some dough off of Olympic. Branding all of of this stuff now on the table the NHL optimistic saying hey this is what you've been asking for the NHL being like. Oh who might not still WANNA go and it's an interesting time isn't it for the Olympic. I feel if the NFL's really on the clock right now because this is everybody else calling their bluff. They've used it as a convenient. Excuse that hey. We're not getting any marketing out of it. They're not making it easy for travel insurance like all of these things. Just don't make sense for us to go and now with as you said the IOC taking all those things off the table able to like okay. Well what's holding you back. Why don't you want to go like if you WANNA show that Sidney Crosby Canada goal on NHL Dot Com do it? We're not stopping you about your big hold up and now the NHL really has to admit that this was the convening excuse. They just didn't want to go because it doesn't make data think it makes money for them which as we all I think you and I agree and I think a lot of players agree and I think a lot of fans degrees is a little shortsighted That's only looking at the direct immediate impact of the Olympics. Not The bigger girl larger picture of global outreach and appealing to more casual fans began the this is super interesting to me You see right after this happened. They'll daily the Elliot's still reiterating their point. We're not close to being there. We continue to believe the negatives outweighed the positives But the pressures on them right now. It is have a column on this on on Thursday but I find it to be a real kind of head on desk. I think for a lot of us. When it comes to the Olympics you explain I stand with the NHL in their fight against the the single most corrupt organization outside fever? And I think that they played their hand really well because the NHL said look. We don't think we get anything going to Chiang. Also the is is skimping on the money they used to give us. We're not GONNA go so a bunch of replacement players went nobody cared and the said you know what maybe we should. Just go back to the way things were so Kudos Gary Bettman and Bill Daley and everybody else for taking a stand in calling their bluff seven and now the IFC comes crawling back. That was smart and I stand with them until it comes to the point when you realize that may may be none of this is actually about the Olympics. Maybe all of this is simply them finding a pressure point to try to get the CB extension. They want they're using it as a thing where they're like well. I don't know if we should go unless we get A. CPA in place even though the CBA deadline comes after the Olympics the players are more than willing to figure out an international calendar going forward for Olympics and World Cups and Ryder Cups and all that stuff. They're less willing to tie an event that again happens before the CBA expires expires to the extension of the current CBA. And where I really really really really really get fresh with the. NHL Is that they're on the side of good and light for most of the stuff because they really should get more out of the experience than they have and then they turn around and I and they start getting it and then it's still like you know for lack of a better term playing grab ass and saying well I don't know if the owners want to go even other getting everything that they kind kinda wanted in theory so it's a real it's frustrating for someone who who has supported the NHL throughout this fight. Against the I two now realize that. Maybe it's not about Siasi. I don't think it has to be quite frank. I still think that they're using all of these things as excuses. Like I think once they turned in two thousand the eighteen and didn't go and then Kinda start selling those themselves and the owners on this idea like why were we even going in the first place. We're not getting anything out of it. You know the risk of injuries too big the you know the subject of the season too disruptive they really started believing it and that's my personal belief is now they're going to be need to be talked off the ship because they really don't. I don't WanNa go yeah. I don't believe they. They really don't WanNa go by the way I mean I just don't I cannot process the the amount of investment that they've made in the Chinese market going over there taking their product they're bringing the games they're working with the Chinese government government who has given the NHL substantial money through different corporations to bring games. They're like all of this stuff leads to a dream. Cream of Bill Daley's which is the tap the Chinese Asian markets better than the. NHL has their way behind the other sports. Insofar as figuring out a way to monetize those markets and I just don't think it would seem so counterintuitive to me to spend as much time laying the groundwork as they have their to then not bring in their product to the centerpiece of vent in Chinese sports for the next decade. Like it doesn't make any sense to me but listen it's the NHL wouldn't be the first title. Things didn't really make sense to me. Decision wise I understand what they want to shut down their season. If they do shut down their season they wanNA keep all all the prophets. I completely understand that but from a league perspective and from like you said a big picture perspective. It just seems like a no brainer to bring your product to China if if you've been trying to bring your product China and you have your product to China. Okay here's something I want to throw out there though we know that Gary Bettman and came from the NBA and is often influenced by decisions that they made including wanting to establish a presence in China. What happened with the NBA and China? The last couple months Daryl Amaury happened and that became a huge eyesore for the league and really hampered their goals there and and in many ways set back and became a huge distraction and maybe cost the league maybe millions of dollars are they risk averse in that sense. That are scared that there could be a daryl. Morey that Kinda screws it all out for them. They're like what we're playing with fire here. Maybe China's it's not as important as we thought it's entirely possible. I mean I'm not not ruling that out but at the same time it's like they're still. I mean they've still been uh digging for oil. There haven't been looking. I mean it's it's not as if they don't know the political realities of of the Chinese government and and they're still bringing games they're bringing players there and having you know guys glad glad hand fans and things like that so but I don't. I don't dispute the fact that there there are certainly some considerations of that nature when it comes to being business with the Chinese but we'll we'll say I I I tend to believe this is going to work out. I've always been optimistic that it's going to work out and never really bought the idea that we weren't going to Beijing. We'll see you. You see more pessimistic than I do. I am and mostly just because I've listened to Bill Deli and Gary Bettman for the last more than eighteen months. It's feels feels like two years now. Isn't that in posturing it's just the same things over and over again where there's drilling out. They don't WanNa go. They don't WanNa go. They called out on all their bluffs with all these deadlines boroughs IHF with Vassal saying like. Oh you've got to get us to this deadline. They call them out. They call the ballot and I just feel like they have such a stronghold on this idea that they don't like go they kind of hold all the leverage right. Now Yeah we shall see all right now. It's time for a favorite segment of the week. Phil Kessel so now. Tot Dogs now. He does not love to eat hotdogs. Weekly looking sad and straighten Edward. It's Phil Kessel hotdogs. It's the moment where each week we take a look at the hockey media and the things that are said that are dumb and the reactions actions that are made that are dumber Damien Cox has appeared in this segment many times in the appears again this week talking about the Toronto Maple leafs goaltending on February fifth after Michael Hutchinson was torched by the Rangers. This is on kyle dubious. He designed this all skill. Not We know grit team. He said two years to get back up goalie. He believes in hockey theories few others do. That's fine but if this team can't make the playoffs that's on him. I am twenty minutes later. After the leaves trade for Jack Campbell Damien Cox Davis obviously realized. You couldn't wait any longer. Campbell should be an upgrading reading goal. The Data Damien Cox. Today's later on February seventh leaf. Goalie problem not solved apparently Damien Cox the two days later on February ninth not sure about the tying goal but otherwise. I can't believe night represented a promising step forward for the leaves in dealing with their goalie changes. They looked in charge. I don't know about you but I got whiplash. I've actually wearing a neck. Brace right now I got so much flesh. So where did we land here is is answer. I think prompt promising promising step forward is where we are four days after in two years to get it back up goalie. So there you go all right now we're PUCK HEADLINES DATELINE ALBERTA BAD news for both the flames and the oilers obviously marked your Dano a week to week with a hamstring ring injury. That happened since last. PODCAST announced today as you the podcast convert gave it two to three weeks with a quad injury. He's gone back to Toronto to Rehab with his people. Not Good News at all horrible news in fact for those of us who are dying to see Convic- David in the playoffs. Can the oilers survive without. Jesus three weeks no but they can maintain status. That is quote. which is maybe you know? Split the next few games their next six games are actually in eastern division opponents after they play the blackhawks tonight on Tuesday and then when mcdavid should be back at the end of the buff is when they go against the Pacific Division again with such tight race in anyone's game. So maybe they can in starve off Total single until then But I wouldn't expect anything out of the team for the next two to three weeks or however long with David ends up being out the the oil as we do this. podcast have sixty four points tied for second in the Pacific with Vegas. Keep in mind that the Arizona coyotes are currently the team on the outside looking again and they have sixty three points to remind you how close and tight and how three bad weeks away someone could be from being on the outside looking at the Pacific Division Dateline Alex Ovechkin so he's at six hundred ninety eight goals as Tuesday two games in a row without got a goal with the world watching clearly. Emily cracking under pressure. How much money did bury trots put on the board yesterday to tell us? Alex Ovechkin is not breaking the record against us because islanders played better than I've seen them play in many many moons. Yeah one of the funniest things in that game two was just maybe one of the longest waits for confirmation on a goal that lovie potentially tipped in front of the net. They ended up giving it to John Carlson but like they can't get that that wrong right and it's it's good that they got it right as I think why no pointed out ovechkin hit seven hundred and then gets one of taken away after the game would pick. NHL So glad that happened. I WILL BE IN DENVER FOR THE CAPS next game on Thursday against the avalanche. Hopefully there to witness history but we shall see he's GonNa obviously hit seven hundred soon and I hope he does it sooner than later we could say on that sixty goal pace and they can do it when one of those games are on. ESPN plus your one of those games on ESPN plus but also could keep slicing and dicing his way into that Gretzky ski record. Oh man it's going to happen. Dateline calder trophy. All right we've been talking Kale versus Quinn all season. As of right now it. It's the status quo Queen Hughes your rookie leader in points as a defenseman. I mean mean rookie leader overall. But he's also a defendant. Calma car has the better points per game. Average by a pretty wide margin over over Quinn but are we missing the big picture here. Are we arguing about two elite young defensive. We should be talking about a certain hip swiveling goaltender in Columbus who might run through and win. The calder Elvis. Moore's Lincoln's and I don't know why no one's asked. This is question sooner. It's genius. Yeah we should be talking about him. He's probably the best story in hockey right now. And I look at the last goals won the calder for ironically or maybe on ironically Steve Mason with the blue jackets. He played a pretty much a full season. But then you've got Andrew Ray craft with the Bruins. He went twenty nine eighteen. Okay that's the full season most of these guys have full seasons but I'm trying to say But if Ovitz's as impactful as he's been I would give my vote to him As of right now he has a nine thirty evens. Rates Save percentage or a nine hundred overall save percentage rather with a two nineteen goals against average twelve five overall twenty four starts. I mean we'll see long season. Obviously I think he's kind of exerted his will into that race a little bit dateline been caught stealing. Oh look at Major League baseball with its Fancy Nancy you maybe we let the WELKER teams pick their opponents idea that they totally stole from the Southern Professional Hockey League two years ago come on you tell them yeah everything. That's great came from hockey. We know that except for the stuff we steal from the NBA. We've talked about this format before four. I think on this podcast I still I think. There's two ways look at it. One is that teams are cowards. They will just pick the team. There's a post play out of fear of making the wrong decision and God forbid you like are supposed to play the eight seed and you pick the seven seed because you think that they're going to be an easier matchup and then the seventies like what we are now really angry and then you know. Sweep you blue jacket style but where I think. This format is interesting. Thing for Major League Baseball or any sport is the idea that if there is a catastrophic injury I if if you are in the Pacific Division drivers seat and you have your choice between Arizona and Vegas and Vegas just lost flurry to injury and you have the ability to Pick Doc Vegas as your first round opponent because of that. Well I mean that. That's that's an interesting wrinkle. If you're going to have this format that I suppose picking your opponents thing I do. If they're wrinkle also includes a big prime time TV special where you can make it entertainment. I think baseball has learned in the path. That struggling for relevancy is not easy and look. They've been in the news lately for not great things but at least the relevant right. It's like a big big scandal. Were grown men are standing in hallways banging trash cans and a big trade that nobody understands. Why happened between two marquee franchises like those things are good and they keep people talking about it and if you can get a big event on Fox Primetime where you've got you know mookie Betts with the dodgers going up saying we choose to play the lowly Chicago cubs in the first round? Like that's awesome. Yeah that would be awesome. I'm actually with you even beyond that. There should be more special event type things that happened in sports. Like like one of my favorite things. Low Key in in all sports is the FETA World Cup group draw like like. That's a fun event. And I wish there was more stuff like that for like the playoffs on an annual basis to more dateline Anaheim a record crowd for the US National Women's team on home soil. Thirteen thousand thousand three hundred twenty packed the Anaheim's arena to watch our our heroes defeat Canada for three on Bacon. Bo's ex power play goal. Roll forty two seconds into overtime awesome event. Lots of people digging it and a big old crowd again for this barnstorming tour between the Americans and Canadians. I have to give credit here to the Anaheim ducks who did a heck of job promoting this event and when it comes to women's in sports promotion matters and they took this extremely seriously. They tried to get new fans into their arena. They tried to get existing fans into their arena. And I know that the ladies appreciated it and I think that should be the standard And you know I compare this to when they played in Hartford Connecticut at the Excel Centre a few months ago and like there were editors unders at ESPN ESPN. W didn't even know that event was going on which is just a shame really so I've got to give credit to the docks and this seemed like a great rivalry series. It seems like the mental going forward and They want so who who's not cinema cinema happy as they say dateline finally dateline. The Oscars Sir had literal tears in my eyes parasite one. I was so happy a love that movie. It's a perfect movie and I love that. Who made it and I love how it got made and I love that? It's somehow somehow a foreign language film with actual subtitles overcame a war movie with the British Thespians. To Win Best Picture. I could could not be happier at the results of the Oscars. What was your takeaway from these Academy Awards? Emily and I need to see parasite the uncultured idiot. Who hasn't seen it? I think a lot of people haven't seen it to be honest with you. I think subtitles scare people. There was a thread that our good friend. Katie bakes from the ringer hit me too about like should be dubbing movies versus subtitles. I think there's a large contingent the people that would rather watch a movie than have to read subtitles with the cooling up a parasite. I'm trying to tell people. Is that like. Yeah there's stuff you gotta read to keep up with the plot but it's not as if it is a constant stream of subtitles like there's a lot in the movie. That just tells the story through visuals. which is you know? Filmmaking how exciting what did you think of the Eminem drop drop in twenty years after eight mile the confused. There aren't very confused. Can you explain to me I. He didn't perform perform. When when yourself one so I guess this correct the record? I don't know it's it was a very random thing it got their start. Relevancy woke up. Some people So it's the Oscars were the Oscars. And and congratulations to all the winners congratulations to walking Phoenix for an Alzheimer Acceptance Speech. That if you had a cow insemination on your Oscar Bingo Card well boy howdy. Did you make out okay after that speech now. It's time for the rent line. Thank Greg and Emily Something tracking the holiest kind of pitches being all about the hockey world. In general is seen goal border. Every single one admits the east coast. Does this thing get nobody. Nobody does a single thing to try to correct doc. Those issues. I mean kid team start you know earlier on the East Coast to coast and later as is a rather take pat a team in the central can sail to watch the games that late people who can pay to literally watch carefully watched them the next morning. Thanks for everything first of all. Good Sir how do you know that. Emily covers the western conference has always covered the western conference. I'll have you know that I relocated to California last year so I don't know who this every hockey reporter thing is but emily and I are fighting the good fight against East Coast bias while working for a company based in Bristol Connecticut. I truly believe that I have a central time bias. I believe that central time is the best time zone. All teams that play in the central time zone have an inherent advantage so I will vote for all of them for awards. I would never vote for any west conference people for awards. I mean. There's an east coast bias not bias for all the Eastern Conference and it can in for heart Jordan Benton can get the shore. Pasture Dot Clark's Carlson. Norris to calder vitral of San based on sample size. So that's a good pick. Yes L. Key obviously Patrice Bergeron shot up to the God awed being awesome out US obviously. Yeah is there any other Toronto. Maybe you should get the soup man as the you know. He hasn't played like fifty games. But you can get him in the calder. Jackie you've both Jack. Adams is a three way tie between Mike Sullivan Sheldon. Keefe and Bruce Cassidy. Ready to get buried trots the nomination for real though I I try not to be as cynical as I used to be about the voting at a good conversation Frank Survey about cynicism the other day and vote and the voters voters I think I think people have gotten better. I think people are no longer simply just paying attention to the teams they watch paying paying attention to the Games they watch. I think that East Coast bias has eased up a little bit when it comes to the awards I think there is AH also the. Pow Way does a good job of diversifying. Its voter base to try to get as many people from different geographic areas as they can involve not just make the Boston Toronto awards awards so like I think it's gotten better is what I'm trying to say. I don't think it has to get better because like if you if your job is to cover hockey and you're never watching Connor mcdavid allies pederson like on a daily basis. What are you doing? You're not covering forty percent of the best players league so all right well I I. I don't disagree. It's a problem but I think it's gotten better as the point. Thank the rent line to the Great Williams for joining us. I'm great wishing ski. You can buy stuff in. ESPN DOT COM. I my call him. The wishlist comes out on Thursdays will be about the Olympics Issue this week also. Oh my podcast puck soup with me. Ron Ryan Lambert where we say. Naughty words is also found weekly tunes and do check that out as well and you were awesome on the daily this week I was talking talking lovie. That's a a real fun podcast to be a part of an and and As I said to me I was honored to be on because I was under the impression that it was going to be an XFL. Only podcast going forward based on her tweets responded to you. I believe we're next this whole network going forward so just an honor to be able to get some hockey in their exactly exactly the XFL. I am I'm Emily Kathleen Emily. M Kaplan follow Miss Stuff online and all I have to say his bye bye.

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