36 Burst results for "Amnesty International"

'Many hundreds' killed by Eritrean soldiers in Ethiopian massacre, Amnesty International says

Marketplace

00:53 sec | 3 d ago

'Many hundreds' killed by Eritrean soldiers in Ethiopian massacre, Amnesty International says

"Of civilians were killed in the massacre last November in northern Ethiopia. As NPR's it a Peralta tells us the human rights group is calling it of war crime. Amnesty International says that the massacre happened just after the government launched a military offensive against what it considered a rogue regional government. According to dozens of witnesses. Ethiopian and Eritrean troops exacted revenge on civilians after some of them attacked with sticks and stones. Amnesty International says civilians were shot as they fled, and when others tried to collect the bodies. They were also shot. Report says hundreds were killed in bodies lay strewn for days along the cobblestone streets of Axum, which is home to one of the holiest churches in Ethiopia. The troops committed war crimes at honesty says that may amount to crimes against humanity it a product. NPR news, Johannesburg One of the nation's

Peralta Ethiopia NPR Amnesty International Axum Government Npr News Johannesburg
Fresh update on "amnesty international" discussed on BBC Newshour

BBC Newshour

00:36 min | 32 min ago

Fresh update on "amnesty international" discussed on BBC Newshour

"You're from the vigilante group whose toe kill them, so they have taking arms so that this reported them tells, but yet from refused to accept the dialogue with those who refuse to accept the Daleks are being this activities now. Governor of Sam Farha State, Bello matter. Wylie, speaking to the BBC's Claire MacDonald. Governor said that dialogue had taken place with the bandits as he called them, but that no ransom was paid. I've been speaking to us I orgy, co director of Amnesty International in Nigeria. What does she make of that? The authorities of the quite elusive when questions are asked whether ransom or some sort off agreement on the position has been made with the bandits, or in this case, they are doctors. It's worrying that the state Governor, rather than addressing the root courses seems to appear to take a soft landing for the abductors rather than Warm that would stand on justice and accountability for crimes committed is that you give the guarantee Is it your view that the ransoms Have been paid and perhaps may well have been paid. In this instance. We're not able to confirm that. But the fact that this attacks keep happening on we hear that they were negotiations. Worries us. I don't know where we can fully know What has gone down is if government is open and completely transparent. What is your anxiety about? This is because there clearly is a suggestion amongst those who watch what has been happening in Nigeria in with these abductions that The government likes to capitalize on the fact that a release has happened and that the anxiety of parents has been alleviated on. But there is also suggestions that there is corruption at the heart of these negotiations that government officials are somehow benefiting. Are your concerns around those sorts of areas when you talk about transparency? It's a lot off things for us. The first thing is, how is government prioritizing human life? We feel the secrecy around any negotiations actually puts people in bigger risks in those communities. The reason why the attacks have continued, is because of impunity. Corruption is a root cause off some of the human rights violations We see in our country today on if at all resume is paid. Why is it so difficult for the authorities to come out fully to say so, the president Muhammadu Buhari said. Just on Friday, he urged state governments and I'm quoting him now to review their policy of rewarding bandits with money and vehicles. Warning that the policy might boomerang disastrously. Do you think that that shows that the president of Nigeria is acknowledging that state governments are actually paying ransoms? I think some state governments off actually said that they have no choice because they want to save the Children on. So it's it's good that the president has commode clearly to state this, But the question is, will it really follow through? With action. The issue is about addressing impunity on punishing wrong to us rather than compensating them. It's been suggested that kidnapping has become a growth industry in Nigeria. Why, in your view, do you think the government is unable to keep school Children in particular safe? Um, it's yes and years of neglect off the education sector in Nigeria, 10/10 years off fight with polka Rama's meant that a lot off I'm forces are focused on one fight. And that has led to a lack of interest in order areas. Do you regard this as a Abductions of Children from schools as a Czwartacki rhymes, and you've continuously referred to this as a violation of human rights. Does this feel like a moment of reckoning for Nigeria? I think means you're a said the crossroads where it needs to choose between the life of his people Onboard. Decision to always try to cover up when mistakes have happened. So when President Buhari says we're working hard to bring an end to these grim and heartbreaking incidents of kidnapping First of all, Do you believe that And does he need to be doing Maura than just saying we're working hard? We believe he needs to be doing more than saying we're working hard. He's coming quite late to the scene. At this point in time. We really need him to just step up. It's quite dramatic and out off the Children. Who especially another night in jail, who have been taken I exposed to violence. They've probably seen their fellow classmates killed either shot at or injured as a result of the long journey. They've hatin on the take when they're doctors took them on the desk potential for life long term. Trauma. It was a psychology co director of Amnesty International in Nigeria. We have repeatedly today tried to speak to President Buhari spokesman but without any luck. Let's turn to Myanmar now where people are continuing with their protests against the military coup on February the first later in today's program we'll hear from a journalist who took part in the 1988 protests. Which ended in many thousands of people being killed by the army about how journalists are now being targeted by the army in these protests, meanwhile, is foreign ministers from the 10. ASEAN countries. The Association of Southeast Asian Nations meet virtually to discuss the crisis in Myanmar. Prime Minister of Singapore. Lee CNN Long has been speaking to the BBC Karishma vous Wani asked him first for his reaction to the coup. It's an enormous, tragic step back for them because there's no future that we He knew that that's why they move forward. Into Elections and the civilian government. And You used lethal force against civilians, Unarmed demonstrators, I think Is just not acceptable. It's disastrous not just internationally, but it Disastrous domestically because it means that there's civilians. Everybody in Myanmar knows You mean try and squeeze down the Internet, But it's what news gets around and then me and my population knows who's on their side. And if they decide that the government is not on their side, I think the government has a very big problem. So you really have to get back released on some Suki. Negotiate with her and work out a peaceful way forward for me and Mama. Outsiders have very little influence on this. You can ostracized them. You can condemn them. You can pass resolutions or not. But it really has very little influence on what the man must will do. So I think that we have to be realistic about this. You have to express disapproval for what is done. Which is against the values of many other countries, in fact, a large part of humanity But You say that I will take action against them. Well, where does this lead now? The demonstrators saying military intervention in Myanmar. Is 82nd airborne going to arrive? So what you've outlined is more engagement. No sanctions to economic considerations come before these humanitarian concerns. I don't think it's a matter of economic considerations for benefit from trade with me and by the volume of trade is very small for us, and I think for many other countries Question is what can make a difference to them. And if you do impose sanctions, who will sort And it will not be the military. Or the generals who will hurt It will be the mama population who will hurt you deprive them of foods of medicines off essentials off opportunities for education. How does that make things better? What is the endgame? Then? How do you see this playing out? I hope that Wisdom will prevail as it did the last time and my door will conclude that to go. The military route does not lead anywhere and they have to work out an arrangement with the civilian government, which has bean Democratically elected. How realistic is that? Given that we have seen live rounds fired at instant protesting in the riots and 88 89. Many thousands killed. And then there were further violent demonstrations and I think 2000 and seven So these things have happened before his bad things. What That things haven't happened. I think sense can still eventually prevail. It may take some quite a long time. It can happen. It has happened before. Prime minister off Singapore Leafs and Leung speaking to the BBC's Karishma for Swan e. We will be returning to Myanmar later in the program. And if you'd like to tell us what you think about what you hear On this program or any edition of news hour at BBC World Service. Is the networks Twitter handle. If you'd like to speak to me directly at wrestling Bar, you're listening to the BBC World Service. This is news hour. Your list and listening to the BBC news hour here on W N. Y.

Claire Macdonald Friday Amnesty International February BBC Twitter Muhammadu Buhari Wylie Nigeria Karishma Vous Wani Bbc World Service President Trump LEE Today Karishma Myanmar Maura 10 Governor Prime Minister
Massacre by Eritrean troops in Ethiopia's Tigray region may constitute crime against humanity, Amnesty says

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 4 d ago

Massacre by Eritrean troops in Ethiopia's Tigray region may constitute crime against humanity, Amnesty says

"Amnesty International has called on the United Nations to conduct an urgent investigation into reports of possible war crimes by Eritrean forces in Ethiopia. Thea Organization says hundreds of civilians were massacred last November. During a battle for control of the city of Aksum in the region of Tigre. The Eritrean soldiers were supporting an offensive by Ethiopian federal troops. John Baptiste Scallop is the report's author. We've also documented, indiscriminate chilling and extrajudicial executions, especially in the context of the initial offensive on exhumed by joint between and its European force in the 19th of November, and we've also documented very large scale and widespread lutein by Eritrean forces of civilian goods in the city of excellent further period.

Thea Organization Aksum John Baptiste Scallop United Nations Tigre Ethiopia European Force
Amnesty strips Alexei Navalny of 'prisoner of conscience' status

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:55 min | 5 d ago

Amnesty strips Alexei Navalny of 'prisoner of conscience' status

"There was a time when a figure like alexei navalny might have been able to count on if little else the full-throated support of amnesty international. The russian opposition figurehead would appear to meet. Every definition of a prisoner of conscience imprisoned on exceedingly dubious pretext spy unpleasant authoritarians and slash. With no record of ever having furthered he's caused through perpetrating inciting or suggesting violence however amnesty appear to differ on the basis of remarks made by navalny about immigrants a few years back. Amnesty has announced that whatever they will classify navalny as prisoner of conscience is not one. Join with more on this by mark kelly. Russia analyst and author of several books most recently a short history of russia. Mark festival to this maneuver by amnesty. Aren't they missing the point of prisoner of conscience a little bit that it's not necessary that you actually agree with them. Yeah absolutely and this is definitely something of an own-goal for amnesty. And especially so because it seems to bury much be have been triggered by a campaign or if not orchestrated by the kremlin but certainly sort of very much augmented by kremlin friendly. Voices in on social media does hurt navarre only at all it. Does i mean we go. To realize that the kremlin the moment is trying to portray him as anything but a immoral icon. I mean this wine set of charging him with treason or anything like that. They've gone for embezzlement. And basically he's dismissing a great patriotic war veteran and this is going to be an ready. It is being magnified by the russian state media as if it somehow amnesty deciding that novell abadan of course amnesty saying they still think that he should not be imprisoned so forth but that kind of nuance doesn't matter. So the kremlin is definitely gonna use this for it's worth which part of the russian electorate public does this stuff play with though i mean the charges against navalny especially that one. You alluded to of having insulted a veteran of the great patriotic. I mean that's absurd even if true that you would put somebody in the dark for that. The point is this is a long game. Let's be honest. Nevada is going to be in prison for at least two and a years. and what. the substandard kremlin tactic. They basically throw so much mud that even if each individual charge is when you look at it pretty ridiculous at some point just begins to sift into the subconscious of of many of the potential electric. Who aren't really people following the news in detail. They not committed inobound nights. They just went on the they. Just get unsensitive. Oh yeah you know what there will lose court. Cases wasn't their rulers allegations. The hope is that it'll stick again. It's not a sophisticated tactic but they hope is that skin. They have so much control over the media and probably a couple of years to do it. They can black and his reputation before he ever sees the light of day. We have talked before about the strategic sense of this from your vladimir putin on the russian regimes point of view as like why you would turn valley into the center of a circus rather than just ignore him. They hoping though that if he is sent to the salt pile fluently for at least two and a half years that he will just be forgotten about. Definitely the idea. I mean again. They hope is that this way he just simply becomes someone who again used to be someone now. Of course. The difficulty is the moment they have him in a top security prison within a prison. In due course he's going to have to go out and presumed me to just an ordinary prison or in this case a penal colony which is how the russians classify that their prisons and at that point. You know there is the chance that he will have access to whether it's sort of illegal cell phones that he can send out the message and so forth so the there is going to be this constant narrative struggle navanly's people want to keep his memory alive. They want to make into a current thing. The kremlin indu course will want to make him into just some past figure who gets forgotten the you. You have responded to the persecution of nevada by imposing some sanctions which do more symbolic than anything else navalny's supporters unsurprisingly asking the eu to expand those sanctions but is there anything the eu can realistically do in the sanctions department which is going to Compel russia to adjust their behavior. Navales concern because russia can't back down now right valley's going to the penal colony for at least two and a half years yes. There's no real question about that but look sanctions are more than anything else about political symbolism and when you just assigned to go for four fairly obvious candidates who basically have no property in the eu. And unlike we're unlikely to becoming to holiday in the south of france the symbolism the message you're giving is basically we have done the least possible we really don't want to get involved in this if the e you had come up with with a much more robust package of measures. Of course it wouldn't have meant. The putin would suddenly have quake in his boots. Before ios it burrell and reversed his policy but it would have said look. We do take this seriously. We will consist on adding costs to your actions. The trouble is at the moment that actually what they basically said is quite the opposite. The russia obviously does hope that we've out navan the as its figurehead than the protest movement that he leads will just sort of dwindle. Evaporate and disappear. Is that light clear. The discussions about how the rage could be maintained. I mean i'm thinking back to those color revolutions in eastern europe in the early part of this century in one of the reasons or one of the ways they succeeded as that they were substantially lead a loose so the authorities seeking to suppress the movements. Didn't really know who they should cart off. Yeah absolutely and this is one of the problems. I mean they pass. The opposition has had the great virtue of his finger navalny as figurehead because he's very charismatic and effective but now they novelli shaped hole and really echo three ways. They could indeed dwindle all it could. Well be that we will find new leaders. Arising i mean it might be as in belarus that actually you'll find for example navales wife emerging as a new figure all others who can basically fill that role. The third possibility is though if this movement which is essentially very much it's nonviolent. It's political if this fails then there is also the risk that actually people become more radicalized. They feel that we. We tried everything we could within the system. We're going to have to try and go without the system. And i think this is the moment we actually have. No idea. notice the kremlin which way it'll go

Navalny Alexei Navalny Russia Mark Kelly Putin EU Novell Nevada Burrell Navan France Novelli Europe Belarus
Navalny No Longer Designated 'Prisoner Of Conscience' By Amnesty International

BBC World Service

00:49 sec | 5 d ago

Navalny No Longer Designated 'Prisoner Of Conscience' By Amnesty International

"International has revoked a prisoner of conscience status of imprisoned opposition leader Alexei Navalny. Here's Charles Maynes reporting from Moscow. Amnesty is still calling for Navalny to be released from prison where he's currently serving out a 2.5 year term for parole violations. Both he and amnesty argue were politically motivated. The human rights watchdog will no longer call Navalny a prisoner of conscience, citing past views that Amnesty says violated it's hate speech. Rules of only has long been a controversial figure among Russian liberals in particular over what some argue were overtly nationalist statements early in his career targeting migrants and ethnic groups in Russia's southern caucuses region. On. The allies insist his positions have evolved over time and suggest amnesty may have fallen for a coordinated online campaign by pro Kremlin bloggers to discredit the opposition figure.

Navalny Alexei Navalny Charles Maynes Human Rights Watchdog Moscow Amnesty Russia
Gunmen in Nigeria Attack School, Abducting Dozens and Killing a Student

NPR News Now

00:54 sec | Last week

Gunmen in Nigeria Attack School, Abducting Dozens and Killing a Student

"Nigerian troops are searching for forty two people kidnapped during an attack on a boarding school in the northwestern part of the country. Npr's ada peralta has details. Witnesses told local tv. That gunmen stormed a boarding school. Inisia- states on wednesday. The government says the attackers killed one student and abducted more than two dozen others. The identity of the gunman was not immediately clear but the islamist group okla haram has often carried out these kinds of kidnappings in northern nigeria. Two months ago gunmen kidnapped. Three hundred and fifty schoolboys in about one hundred schoolgirls of nearly three hundred kidnapped by boko haram in two thousand. Fourteen are still missing in a statement. The human rights group. Amnesty international says education is under attack in nigeria. It said quote. No child should have to choose between their education and their life. Npr news nairobi.

Ada Peralta Okla Haram NPR Nigeria Boko Haram Government Human Rights Group Nairobi
More than 300 Nigerian schoolboys kidnapped by gunmen Were Rescued.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

02:22 min | 2 months ago

More than 300 Nigerian schoolboys kidnapped by gunmen Were Rescued.

"Of cat scene state said bringing relief to many families. I think we have recovered. Most of the boys governor me bella. Massari said in a televised interview with state channel and ta abduction grip the country already incensed by widespread insecurity and evoked memories of boko harms. Twenty fourteen kidnapping of more than two hundred seventy schoolgirls in the northeastern town of chiba took last friday nights gunmen raided the government science secondary school in sina on motorbikes and marched the boys into ru forest in the biggest such incident in the lawless region in recent years massari said a total of three hundred and forty four boys held in the forest had been freed in neighbouring zamfara state. The boys were on their way back to cat zena and would be medically examined and united with their families today. Massari said a retired health worker whose thirteen year old son was. Among the kidnapped boys could not contain his joy at their release. He's only concern now. Was reuniting with his son. He said boko haram has claimed responsibility for the kidnapping in an unverified recording the video which features boko haram emblem shows a group of boys in a would pleading help us help us the father of one of the missing boys who gave only his first name. Emma said his son was one of the boys who is heard. speaking in the video. Boko haram has a history of turning captives into jihadist fighters if it's claims a true its involvement in northwestern nigeria marks geographical expansion in its activities. But it could have purchased the boys from local criminal gangs with which it's been building ties armed gangs that robin kidnap-for-ransom widely referred to as bandits carry out attacks on communities across the northwest making it hard for locals to farm travel on tap rich mineral assets in some states such as gold. Such gangs killed more than eleven hundred people in the first half of twenty twenty alone according to the rights group. Amnesty international a former acting chief the us department of homeland security's intelligence office has told congress. The dhs

Massari Government Science Secondary S Ru Forest Zamfara Boko Haram Chiba Sina Zena Emma Nigeria Robin Amnesty International Us Department Of Homeland Secu Congress DHS
They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

They Call Us Bruce

03:51 min | 3 months ago

They Call Us Asian in New Zealand

"A low unwelcome. Today calls bruce unfiltered conversation about what's going on in asia america and other parts of the world bank less affected by covid. I feel you have yang. And as phil has served telegraphed we are connecting with another part of the asian diaspora in the form of very special guests old friend. Who is actually a dialing us in from new zealand from the code. Free paradise of the medicaid seeming mark. And thank you so much for joining us. I killed a koto carta. Yeah all the way from my little island safe-haven aspirational destination of all of us. Who are currently huddled. Sorry we both a wall. You don't want people from shithole countries like america company. How does it feel well. I mean okay. So let's begin where we begin and obviously you are there You actually have been in your from new zealand out born in new zealand. Yeah there are chinese new zealanders again part of the espera that we don't really kind of talk about enough here in in our american centric place now of america and one of the things which has actually been a delight Over the years we've known each other has actually been hearing from a different perspective. What if what. Asian america looks like from people who are asian but not american and i. I am kind of curious what america especially looks like from the perspective of somebody in new zealand at this point. What looks like. Oh you want me to say i don't wanna like i'm you walked. It looks like i. I honestly i wanted to press you. We just sitting here going. Holy shit you know holy shit. We knew it was gonna be bad with the guy you know for four years. It's basically as bad as if anyone could have imagined that could get so we. We have elected him out. The only person who can not really acknowledge that is donald trump out Hopefully means things will get better but he really did kind of dig a fricken marianas trench for us and through us in there and he still to acknowledge again that the rule of democracy is is is operated. And it's like guys yeah you know. He lost the election but he won. really damaging the democratic process. And a still doing so as a as a kind of like a political scientist you guys are in like a bad situation with regards to keeping democracy functioning and not becoming like a regime that really recon uphold its democratic institutions. And something that you know compared with new zealand I just like you sit around on my god. I'm so lucky that i have a functioning government that has a loyal opposition by the concept of an opposition that supports the democratic process that supports like peaceful transition of power. A wicked human rights longtime right. So using tim's that we use you know amnesty international About how this is not a peaceful transition of power. Will people really excited. Because maybe you're going to have a peaceful transfer of power. It's like you shouldn't be getting excited about a peaceful transfer of power. You develop develop democracy

New Zealand America Yang Bruce Phil Asia Donald Trump TIM
Reported Ethiopia massacre: UN rights chief warns of spiralling situation

UN News

00:49 sec | 3 months ago

Reported Ethiopia massacre: UN rights chief warns of spiralling situation

"Amid reports of mass killings in the european town of mike adra u. n. high commissioner for human rights. Michelle bachelet has expressed increasing alarm the rapidly deteriorating situation in the tigray region. She won't that if the tigray regional forces and ethiopian government forces continued fighting. There is a risk that this situation will spiral totally out of control. This could lead to heavy casualties and destruction as well. As mass displacement within ethiopia itself and across borders ms bachelet said while the details of the alleged mass killings reported by amnesty international in my cadre in southwest. Tigray have not yet been fully verified the high commissioner cool for a full inquiry. Here spokesperson rupert. Colville if confirmed as having being deliberately carried out by a party to the current fighting these killings of civilians would of course amount to war crimes

Mike Adra Michelle Bachelet Tigray Ms Bachelet U Ethiopia Amnesty International Southwest Colville
Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

Morning Edition

01:47 min | 4 months ago

Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

"That please. Peace. A chance. But the governor also said protesters had not been killed. Even as he spoke, his city burned. Angry mobs set the port Authority building on fire. They broke into police stations, grabbing furniture cabinets setting those on Amnesty International says it has documented 56 deaths since protests against police brutality began about two weeks ago. Demonstrators. Complaints have broadened to include corruption and the lack of jobs. The protests are the biggest in Nigeria in decades, the rights group says. On Tuesday. The military systematically targeted protesters turning off streetlights and security cameras before they opened fire on a gathering on Lagos is Leckie Bridge. But on Wednesday, demonstrators returned to the bridge and protests erupted nationwide in the number up up in in south south eastern eastern Nigeria. Nigeria. A A small small group group gathered gathered for for a a candlelight candlelight memorial. memorial. You You mourned and read the names of young Nigerians killed by police.

Nigeria Leckie Bridge Amnesty International Port Authority Lagos
Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

Morning Edition

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Nigeria's Lagos shut down after at least 12 protesters killed

"Marched in New York yesterday to demonstrate against police violence in Nigeria. Officers in that country all opened fire on protesters early this week in Los Lagos, Thie The country's largest city, killing at least 12 people. Amnesty International says at least 56 people have died during two weeks of demonstrations in Nigeria. Protesters there are calling for the disbandment of a police unit that's been accused of corruption and human rights abuses. Nigeria's president promised to break up a specialized anti robbery squad or SARS

Nigeria Los Lagos Amnesty International New York Robbery President Trump
Nigeria protesters break curfew amid gunfire, chaos in Lagos

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 4 months ago

Nigeria protesters break curfew amid gunfire, chaos in Lagos

"Nigeria's anti police protests as have stayed on the streets in Laos breaking the government curfew following a night of Celtic violence in which demonstrators were fired upon please open file descriptors has continued to demonstrate against police brutality in Nigeria Amnesty International said late Tuesday that was credible but disturbing evidence that security forces had fatally shot protesters who were demonstrating against police despite a new curfew being imposed one protester has told the Associated Press that his brother was shot and killed in the previous day's demonstrations and that he himself had taken a bullet in the leg I'm Charles the live as much

Nigeria Laos Amnesty International Associated Press Charles
A Conversation on Nigeria's uprising

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:46 min | 4 months ago

A Conversation on Nigeria's uprising

"A video of a man apparently being killed by police goes viral. Protests breakout grow, and spread even internationally. Calls for police reform get better and louder. The police react violently protesters are killed. Off It's too familiar story and this time it's happening across. Nigeria. The focus of the protesters fury, it's a group called the specialist Anti Robbery, squad, or SARS secretive outfit with a long-running reputation for brutality. Stop Stop. Stop killing. It seems clear that Nigeria's people have had enough. President Muhammadu Buhari has already made concessions, but the protest mood hints discontent that stretches far beyond police reform. These have been completely widespread protests taking place in most of the major cities, not least in Lagos, which is the main commercial hub Buju, which is the capital. Jonathan. Rosenthal. Is The economists Africa editor. It is the biggest rising in. Nigeria in a in a very long time. So it seems there was a lot of pent up frustration before this about the police the really has been an and frankly this goes back a very long way that the protests of Tatton's really deep well of anger against the police and in particular against the special entry robbery squad, which was set up in the one thousand, nine, hundred, ninety s many's tackle violent crime in logos. And this has been a particular target because of its brutality people have seen as sort of absolutely faceless and an accountable. Amnesty International looked into it and they found that just in the period between January two, thousand, seventeen may two, thousand and twenty. They found more than eighty cases of abuse torture extra-judicial killings and found that they've been absolutely no accountability no attempts by the Nigerian police force to police itself, and so how has the government responded to all these protests? What you've seen as really two faces of response on the one hand you've had. Quite a violent response by the police of police have fired into protests. We believe the two people have been killed by the police that there will serve reports of police using water cannon, tear gas being protesters, and the like, and the very same time this has been happening. You've had the government's trying to come down almost the side of protest saying that they would dismantle police unit that they would redeploy the offices elsewhere and prison Bahari has has spoken to. This is just one step in our immune. To excessive. Loser. In order not sure that the parameter duty of the police and I look for some agencies. remains. The section of lives and loudly hoods up people. Let's there will be investigations civil society and Human Rights will be involved in this to cry up to bring accountability bring greater oversized to policing in Nigeria, and that seems to be giving the protesters what it is we're looking for. It is a first step of what the protesters want. The they've been I is quite skeptical of the school. There is a very, very long history of. Police violence and police abuse many years people in Nigeria would call special police, units, kill and. Previous protests have been match with with previous promises to reform units and to bring in more accountability. So I think there's a lot of skepticism by protesters about whether the government will follow through. That south has. Has. been dissolved different words to need disbanded and dissolved this year we're not funding for the same lies. Okay. The second issue is that they are are concerned about. The much broader issue of pleasing injustice and rule of law than just this special anti-robbery squad. There are calls for Vesa Training for police officers, much better judicial oversight, and frankly also just better pay better training and more effective policing. In that regard, it seems to be a real echo of what we've seen in America and elsewhere in the world this year. It really has. So when process brockhouse initially in the United States on black lives massive movement, there was a lot of empathy and sympathy within Africa broadly, and one saw both ordinary people and leaders of States speaking out on this issue, the year twenty twenty remembered for the massive groundswell to push back. The frontiers of racism. Under the umbrella. Hashtag black lives matter movement. As a country that has known to well the and wish of institutionalized racism. So Africa supports the demands. Quickly in Africa in the sense that. A lot of civil society groups and just ordinary folk in Africa would see their leaders condemning what is happening in the US and yet. Overseeing police, sources that we're frankly as as violence and dangerous at her across many parts of Africa. There's really been this upwards of support Nachos for black lives matter but turning into into anger at their locally sing. Of course, the SMI- Jaren issues has also taken off. Nigeria has a very large, very, very active, very vocal diasporas. We've seen protests taking place else when that's been brought in some international stars cut each on up a John Vega have been speaking on this issue.

Nigeria Africa Robbery President Muhammadu Buhari United States Amnesty International Lagos Smi- Jaren Rosenthal Bahari Jonathan John Vega Editor Buju America
Thousands of Nigerians demand police overhaul for sixth day

Hugh Hewitt

00:34 sec | 5 months ago

Thousands of Nigerians demand police overhaul for sixth day

"Reports of deadly unrest in Nigeria and apparently it's not over yet. Police allegedly used life bullet on the protesters, mostly young people, who are demanding an end to police brutality. The authorities have yet to comment on the claims by Amnesty International. But earlier, the police said two officers have been killed and three others critically injured during the week long protests, which are likely to continue on Tuesday. Instead, mint. The police and Legos says some off the protesters were armed and that they attacked a police station where they're free. Two suspected kidnappers on Monday at the BBC's haha lead

Amnesty International Nigeria BBC
Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

TIME's Top Stories

07:28 min | 5 months ago

Dogs Can Be Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19, Studies Suggest

"Are now emerging in refugee camps. Why did it take so long for the virus to reach them By Melissa Godin. For a number of months, the world's largest refugee camps appear to have been spared the worst of the coronavirus pandemic but human rights groups now say cove nineteen infection rates are on the rise in the temporary. That house millions of the world's most vulnerable people with alarming consequences both for those vulnerable groups, as well as the world more broadly the United Nations high. Commissioner for Refugees reports that globally twenty one, thousand of the world's thirty million refugees have tested positive for the virus across ninety seven countries at the end of September. Thirty two new cases were reported in the refugee camps. In Cox's Bazar. Bangladesh home. To seven hundred, forty, five, thousand Rohingya an ethnic minority fleeing violence and discrimination in. Myanmar. In Greece, more than two hundred, forty refugees have tested positive for the virus on the island of Lesbos, and in Lebanon, Syria and Palestine. Cova nineteen outbreaks have occurred at several camps over the past month though UNHCR reports the numbers rose sharply in September. The true number of cases remains unknown because of limited testing. Aid agencies had long expressed fears about the potentially devastating impacts of the virus for those living in crowded camps where medical services are sparse yet for the first six months of the pandemic case rates remained far lower than expected while low testing rates in refugee camps could explain why so few cases have been reported experts say camps isolation from host communities, as well as the imposition of strict laws down measures curb the spread of the virus even if refugees have so far been spared the worst of the pandemics immediate health impact, the outbreak has taken a huge toll on refugees lives. The global economic recession has led to major cuts to humanitarian funding for refugee camps, causing food shortages, and. Employment Opportunities for displaced people with the Norwegian Refugee Council estimating three quarters of displaced people have lost income since the pandemic began lockdowns have also further restricted refugees mobility with countries like Greece placing tighter restrictions on refugees than the rest of the population. Moreover, many experts say governments are using the pandemic as an excuse to violate refugees rights. Governments are using covid nineteen as a pretext to block people from the right to seek asylum says bill freely the director of human rights watches. Refugee. And Migrant Rights Division. It runs roughshod over the basic principles of refugee protection. He says now, as the virus begins circulating in camps around the world experts worry that refugees who have already suffered so much from the pandemic may not get the medical support they need. If the disease gets introduced into more refugee camps, it would be a tinderbox says freekick noting that the virus would spread rapidly the low case rates we have seen so far free lick says are just a lucky break. Why have cove nineteen rates been lower than expected in refugee camps? covid nineteen rates in refugee camps or unexpectedly low in part because the camps tend to be isolated from surrounding communities limiting the odds of the virus spreading into the camps camps are situated often in the most desolate unwanted land that a country can find free like says, no one casually goes in and out national lockdowns also help protect refugees from the virus in Jordan, for instance, which hosts seven hundred. Forty seven thousand refugees mostly from Syria the government implemented. One of the world's strictest lockdowns, shutting down airports for several months and jailing people who broke quarantine. There was tight lockdown that was put in place towards the Third Week of March including the shutting down of all the borders and airspace says, Juliet Toomas. UNICEF's Chief of communications for the middle, east, and North Africa, about Jordan this help she says. Additional restrictions placed specifically on refugee camps also helped limit viral spread. Many camps have reduced the number of people entering and exiting. For instance, in Bangladesh's Cox's Bazar only twenty percent of the usual number of humanitarian workers were allowed to enter during the first few months of lockdown and deliveries were made less frequently in order to reduce potential transmission according to Saad Hamady a south. Asia campaigner for Amnesty International many of the operations except the essential ones were carried out remotely Hamadi says, these are the measures that might have reduced or delayed the spread of the virus. There are other factors however, that could explain low case numbers. Half of refugees worldwide are under the age of eighteen according to the UNHCR and their relative young age may make them less susceptible. To having a severe infection with the virus if young people are ACM dramatic or have mild symptoms, they may also be less likely to get tested. It's also possible that there have been cases of course at nineteen that have gone undetected and camps. While some testing is available, it's hindered by shortage of testing supplies and medical personnel to carry out the tests. Some refugees also don't. WanNa get tested for fear that they may have to self isolate and therefore be unable to carry out any income generating activities they rely on for survival in Cox's Bazar the world's largest refugee settlement in Bangladesh less than one percent of the population has been tested. The lower case numbers could therefore be a result of low testing rates. The actual number of cases could be higher. But experts say that despite low testing rates cove in nineteen infection rates in camps still have not been as bad as expected. Even if you carried out a large number of tests, it still likely to be a low number of infections says somebody if Cova Nineteen was spreading through camps undetected camps would witness rising numbers of people requesting medical attention or rising numbers of deaths neither of which have been the case in several camps according to UNHCR data I do think there's a hidden outbreak to an extent, but we're not seeing other indicators showing a massive outbreak says to Jacobson cares country director in Syria were not seeing a host of people falling ill or dying.

Unhcr Bangladesh COX Norwegian Refugee Council Syria Government Cova Greece Jordan Director United Nations Melissa Godin Commissioner Myanmar Migrant Rights Division Juliet Toomas Asia Unicef
"amnesty international" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

05:51 min | 5 months ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on Worldly

"Jammu-kashmir had now has shut down the Internet gone a complete crackdown on the region and seems like a lot of problems there. An amnesty has minutes of those using again, the money that comes on the UK and elsewhere goes to trips to their and dribble to interview people, and and I should also say, let's not forget that this money also goes to pretty vulnerable people and is a poor country just as and and. The money that. Like. Amnesty get. Go to programs to help alleviate, poverty and get people back on their feet and and you know do what they can and make a better life for themselves, and if they can't use that money then what India is basically doing the union government is basically doing is making it harder for NGOs to you know be good to anti-poverty programs and I find that just so incredibly cruel. And heartless but let's be clear about why this is happening or at least what seems like, why is this happening? So in two thousand, sixteen mody as prime minister said that he was the victim of a conspiracy by NGOs and that they wanted to quote unquote finish him and remove his government and Zach alluded to earlier. Moody is very sensitive about perceptions that you know he's anti-moslem and that he's against everyone, it's very clear that he is But like this is what he's sort of railing against, he believes that there's this Local NGO. Cabal, in fact, like consortium working against his government and that he needs to push back against I. Think it's important to note that between twenty eleven twenty nineteen. What we saw was about twenty one, thousand NGOs had their certificate registration certificates canceled because of this are a law twenty, one, thousand that's a wild number. Yes. Then we one, thousand. Wow. And then in that time about seventeen thousand or roughly eighty percent they were canceled by Modi's regime and it should be noted and it is implied in that stat that the previous government before mody was also canceling NGOs and like using this law and so let's it's not like a mody only thing but it looks like it is being weaponized by this government on purpose to shut down the operations of groups like Amnesty Yeah one thing to add there when that happened one of the organization so like Twenty one thousand is a lot but think nearly nine thousand of them were Indian organizations like. That operate. Now the way that they essentially got around that was by saying, they received money from outside groups from foreign contributions again, the Foreign Contribution Regulation Act of CRA one for example, was this group called Sebarang trust it had received money from the Ford Foundation, which is another NGO that does. Human Rights and development things around the world. This organization was using that money in part to hold meetings and workshops on religious violence. including the sectarian riots that shook, Jurat. So again, these are the kind of organizations that are that are directly doing this kind of work that directly targets. Activities at the Modi Government is involved in right malign activities, right? Sectarian violence. So it's not hard to understand why they're doing this right if you want to continue doing things that are extreme violations of blatant violations of human rights will yeah. You don't want people they're taking photos and interviewing witnesses right? You want to be able to get away with it. So a very blatant kind of you know. At move that they're making here but but they're not even like they're they're using this kind of you know we'll talk about this more later they're using this bureaucratic kind of rule. But it's very clear. It's very evident exactly who they're targeting exactly why it's not exactly subtle. So don't take our word for it. I actually interviewed a top level person at an NGO, a prominent, Ngo, India who not want to be named for fear of being persecuted by the government and and and who can blame this person and I wanna read what they told me because I think it sort of encapsulates everything that we've talked about so far overall. The new S CRA is an instrument of course into stop international NGOs from operating and choke any advocacy policy recommendation or work that identifies creates opportunity to tell the government or communities that something is weaken its governance. and. So yeah, I mean, what else can you say if you if it's seen as an instrument of coercion and it is you know basically making this person's lifetime imagine was doing to the all the other thousands of NGOs that are trying to make life in India better, and this is sort of the underlying tension is. Paints himself as populist, WHO's trying to improve economic well. Being of his people and and just the overall status of India and what you're seeing or at least the broader implication of all of this is that he is. A much more prioritizing his own like feelings and viewpoint and and standing than those of his people who get helped by these thousands of NGOs who do really important work every day. So we're GONNA a quick break and when we come back, we're going to talk about the nature of the Indian NGOs crackdown in context of a of a much broader international trend of right wing populace doing this kind of thing and to to talk about how this network of right wing populace governments is actually changing the foreign policies of their countries in some interesting ways. Right now the United States is deciding who it wants to be.

India Indian NGOs Modi Government union government UK Modi prime minister CRA United States Moody Jurat Ford Foundation religious violence. Zach Sebarang
Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 5 months ago

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. unpacking Pailin, tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. Well, how can you have the Super Valuable Company? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. Yeah. But one, hundred, twenty, five most. Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, very closely aligned with the trump administration. There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. But in seventeen year history, it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. So surveillance predictive policing, possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, notable backers of talent tear include investor, and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen campaign. Evening. I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. A, huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, Alex Carp investor roadshow, which true to carbs personality, and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. Welcome to Powell, tears investor day. We're very proud to have you here. Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. He has amazing curly hair. He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. Patrol. Tracking immigrants at the border. But Carp in the company not backed off in. That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, values and commitments. Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. If you think, we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. that. That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. Andrew. Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock Exchange. We've had lots of conversations over the years. This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated offerings or listings in a very long time. Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. So let's start with why now? Well, first of all, thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, we really needed to build our products. With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. Deserved a access to liquidity. So we we decided this would be great time for us and so far. It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, very grateful. Outlets. The single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, the company unto itself is still not profitable. So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. Well, you know we build these products years before people build them, and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, nine, percent, forty, nine percent off of a seven, forty, three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our software offering. But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, two, proposition twenty, twenty, three proposition can I put you on that? Well, you you can push me but of course, my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, supplying it and I think that are year I. First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, and we'll see how we do. Confident confident we'll do well. Alex, one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? Can you speak to that? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? Of course we always sold this as a license. Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. So I think the real debate now is. Move significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. The question then is, how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. It could be like that. We are going to deliver the best software. With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. Palette. Here is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. Alex has everybody knows You have contracts with various government agencies, obviously and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, four months, how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? And grow that business. Well, we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, how can you have the super? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. These aren't just any institutions. The literally, I would ask people who are watching this to make. A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, we don't go out and advertise our product, but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. So we want to keep these clients. Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. Year came from our existing clients. What does that mean our existing clients? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. So of course, we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, and we can do it without raising our headcount, and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. We are going to expand our client base. Why? Because now with Apollo, we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, updating and providing them with new products we built. So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, get new customers and continue our march. Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. Well, as I mentioned, ninety, five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. So customers, obviously if a customer wants to leave they, can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. Fees. You can't get out of or building something over years, and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, and it's not because of my charming personality. Alex well, let me ask you a different question. We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, criticized, the company recently for its role of working with ice. How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? Especially, the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. To Your Business Well, look the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. US clients. But it also gets us. Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. Alex. One of the other questions now you all republic company. But as you know, you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. Valley. Defending the. warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, well, why should talent you're having F. structure? What is my? What is my what? What can I do if? I don't agree with them. The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, we will not just blow with the wind. And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, both commercial and government, and that's why I believe they're super important, and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. We don't have to buy challenge your shares. You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, a splinter net if you will. How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. Decision five years from now today. How would you measure success? Here, what would be the metrics which measure it? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. Wow, that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. In favor of things that are good and noble. And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. Carpool. You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But hopefully sooner than that. Thanks so much Alex.

Alex United States Silicon Valley Davos Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Carp New York Cnbc Powell Joanne Lipman Peter Thiel Gotham Us Army Navy Department Of Hom
Amnesty International India halts its work on upholding human rights in India due to reprisal from Government of India

Monocle 24: The Globalist

00:16 sec | 5 months ago

Amnesty International India halts its work on upholding human rights in India due to reprisal from Government of India

"Human Rights Charity. Amnesty International says it has had to close all its operations and let go of it stuff in India after the Indian government froze its bank accounts amnesty hat published two reports in which it was highly critical of the human rights record of the administration of prime. minister. Narendra,

Human Rights Charity Amnesty International Narendra Indian Government India
"amnesty international" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:08 min | 5 months ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on KCRW

"Blocking the right lane. I love you. Traffic is brought to you. By Goetzman Group Times 5 50 Case your W It's all things considered from NPR news. I'm Sasha Pfeiffer and I'm Elsa Chang Coded. 19 has taken a heavy toll on health care workers around the world. Amnesty International reports that Mexico has recorded the highest number of health care worker deaths from the Corona virus. 1400. NPR's carry con reports on how that country came to lead the world in this grim statistic. It's a regular scene in the courtyard of the sea Glowing, you know, medical complex in Mexico City. Dozens of the public hospital staff break into applause to encourage patients struggling with covert and honor. Those who died and there are many. Mexico now ranks fourth in the world and deaths from the virus and of the nearly 700,000 infected. One in seven has worked at a hospital or clinic. I can feel Gutierrez, a pediatric nurse, the signal being you know hospital. He first felt covert symptoms back in July. I felt really bad. My whole body heard I had a terrible headache. And then I infected my wife and two girls, he says. As his two weeks of paid sick leave was running out. He was tested a second time again Positive, but five days later, he was ordered back on the job. I guess we can still infect others at that point, says Gutierrez. But he says by then his symptoms weren't that bad. Two months later, though, he still have a cough. There are many reasons why so many health professionals in Mexico are getting sick and dying. Lack of quality protective equipment long work weeks that expend exposure to high viral loads, and Mexico quickly hired tens of thousands of professionals to boost staffing. Critics say they haven't gotten proper training. Sofia Ramirez of the nonprofit Mexicans against Corruption says in the early days of the pandemic, healthcare workers were dying at rates.

Mexico Gutierrez Mexico City NPR Sasha Pfeiffer Sofia Ramirez Amnesty International Goetzman Group Times Elsa Chang cough
Mexico Records The Highest Number Of Health Care Worker Deaths From COVID-19

Marketplace

03:45 min | 5 months ago

Mexico Records The Highest Number Of Health Care Worker Deaths From COVID-19

"Taken a heavy toll on health care workers around the world. Amnesty International reports that Mexico has recorded the highest number of health care worker deaths from the Corona virus. 1400. NPR's carry con reports on how that country came to lead the world in this grim statistic. It's a regular scene in the courtyard of the sea Glowing, you know, medical complex in Mexico City. Dozens of the public hospital staff break into applause to encourage patients struggling with covert and honor. Those who died and there are many. Mexico now ranks fourth in the world and deaths from the virus and of the nearly 700,000 infected. One in seven has worked at a hospital or clinic. Like an angel Gutierrez, a pediatric nurse, the sick element, you know, hospital. He first felt covert symptoms back in July, I I felt really bad. My whole body heard I had a terrible headache. And then I infected my wife and two girls, he says. As his two weeks of paid sick leave was running out. He was tested a second time again Positive, but five days later, he was ordered back on the job. I guess we can still infect others at that point, says Gutierrez. But he says by then his symptoms weren't that bad. Two months later, though, he still have a cough. There are many reasons why so many health professionals in Mexico are getting sick and dying. Lack of quality protective equipment long work weeks that extend exposure to high viral loads, and Mexico quickly hired tens of thousands of professionals to boost staffing. Critics say they haven't gotten proper training. Sofia Ramirez of the nonprofit Mexicans against Corruption says in the early days of the pandemic, healthcare workers were dying at rates five times higher than in the US If we don't take care of her health personnel, I'm not sure how they're going to take care of Oliver. The numbers have improved somewhat in recent weeks. But health care workers still account for nearly 16% of all infections in the country. This month, Dr Theresa at the end, head of the Pan American Health organization made an urgent plea. Countries must ensure that have workers can do their job safely. Carlos Eduardo Perez Palma, a radiologist couldn't agree more He says he spends at least $1500 on protection equipment for himself. Goggles, masks face shield every three months. He works at two of the biggest public hospitals in Mexico City. Paris also leads a group of health care workers fighting for workplace protections. Thor, it is like to call us heroes. But in practice, they sure don't eat of the heroes. Mexican authorities insist their covert protocols are up to international standards, and they dispute that the country ranks first in the world for covert deaths among health care workers. In a briefing, the government's lead epidemiologist Jose Luis Alla, Mia, said it's unfair to make this claim because, he asserted Not all countries report deaths among medical staff and fed among men whose government eat five years. Salome is a data show healthcare workers actually don't get a sick or dyas frequently from Cove. It has the general population. But his data may be misleading because of Mexico's low rate of testing. Mexicans are generally tested on Lee after their hospitalized with serious symptoms, but healthcare workers are supposed to get tested as soon as they feel sick. Mexico's Health Ministry declined to respond to NPR's questions and interview requests. Doctor

Mexico Mexico City Angel Gutierrez NPR Amnesty International Pan American Health Cough Health Ministry Carlos Eduardo Perez Palma Jose Luis Alla Paris Sofia Ramirez Dr Theresa Thor United States LEE Salome Oliver MIA
Amnesty accuses Malta of using illegal tactics when dealing with migrants at sea

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

00:53 sec | 6 months ago

Amnesty accuses Malta of using illegal tactics when dealing with migrants at sea

"Rights watchdog. Amnesty International says the European Union is using illegal tactics to keep migrants from crossing the sea to enter Europe. Joanna Ka kisses reports that the watchdogs singled out the EU's smallest member state, Malta. As a destination for migrants crossing from North Africa. Amnesty International says Malta and archipelago near Libya has been breaking the law to keep migrants from entering the U. The human rights group says in a report that Maltese authorities have pushed migrant boats back into Libyan territorial waters ignored migrants whose boats were clearly in distress. And refused port entry. Two vessels with rescued migrants aboard one of those vessels. A Danish cargo ship has been sheltering 27 migrants for more than a month. Malta says ports are close to migrants because of the pandemic for

Amnesty International Malta European Union Joanna Ka North Africa Europe Libya
"amnesty international" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Courthouses dating was sentenced to three years jail later reduced to six months on a peel Amnesty International publicly recognized him as a prisoner of conscience over the next few years days wife, anesthesia would lose track of her husband's whereabouts as he disappeared into Russia's sprawling brutal penitentiary system, then early November of two thousand sixteen nearly two months after dating transferred to penal colony number seven and a stage received a letter from her husband's smuggled out of the prison camp by his lawyer Dana had been thrown into solitary confinement upon arrival they said he'd been hiding too razor blades amongst his possessions. He would. Claim that they were planning on by prison guards. He went on a hunger strike and protests and his defiance was met with violence the day after his arrival he said he was beaten a total of four times by ten to twelve people at once after the third beating they stuck his head into a toilet bowl in a punishment cell. He says he also alleges the beatings were overseen. By the penal colony administrators or ministers, then things got worse. He says I'm so temper twelfth staff cuff, my hands behind my back and hung me up from the ceiling being suspended in that way caused a terrible pain in the wrist twisted out my elbows and brought savage back pain. I was hung up like that for half an hour. At least then they pulled off my underwear and said, they would bring another prisoner into raped me. If I didn't call a hunger strike after that torture session. One of the administrators were warned him that if he didn't accept food. He would be killed and his body would be buried under the fence. Russia says he's lying, but I doubt it state media says he's making it all up in order to draw attention to himself. Call me cry. Easy, but I don't control don't trust state controlled media. His even though Russia's not technically communist anymore. It has so many communists elements to it very detailed -tarian still the investigative committee in FBI style organization answers only to Putin yet. Another secret police type organization also said it has no evidence of wrongdoing into camp. Of course, they're going to say that slight conflict of interest. Dayton's accusations been backed up by fellow inmates. And also by Pablo chick off a leading Russian human rights lawyer who visited the prison camp in early November. According to chick off prisoners who were kept in cells in different parts of the penal colony and had never met each other told almost identical stories of torture..

Dana Russia Amnesty International FBI Dayton Pablo Putin three years six months two months
"amnesty international" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Globalist

"And we keep banging on about being a rules based international society that that's a our futures and rules based order, I say, yes, that's absolutely true. So let's start observing it a bit more. Clearly, I'm very critical about the way a number of governments reacted not least our own over recent years. And it is the case course that we live in a world in which a lot of non-state groups now behave like states and states behave like non-state groups. So this whole. Distinction between states, which are as respectable and sovereign entities. And non-state groups which are in a sense an archaic distinction, which is held for two or three hundred years is seriously road it now, and it's time that if we want to live in a more ordered. Well, we've got to restore that distinction at a period where non-state groups are becoming ever more powerful. So it's even more important that governments play by rules that they all agree and understand and those of us who set up the rules in Britain and America where the two countries that had probably more than anyone else to do with setting up the rules of the twentieth century that were carrying into the twenty first that we are seen to as enforce those rules within ourselves really important point and pull Haley is going to take the lead on this on the on the bringing everybody together. Well, it's it it's up to our governments. But I think that civil society also has a great role to play and in this respect, the sort of technologies that we're talking about now also aid civil society. So the civil society groups. You know, the Amnesty International's, and the international crisis groups, and so on all these groups who have great influence around the world, and whose whose will and view is very much respected. I think these sorts of groups are also odor in a sense. I knew they do implicitly, but I think they should sign up more explicitly to establishing and thinking through the international rules of the global order, and I think our future governments have really got to take that on if they want to serve their own interests. So it can be done. It's just that. We've let our distractions of the last twenty years and the the effects of the international economic crisis since two thousand eight let we've allowed it to lettuce drift away from all of these rows important points at a time when we need the most clock and Paul Rogers. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four year with the globalist and a little later this ad China wades into the argument about the delay Llamas successor and cases, the latest business news and the newspaper headlines to but I with the time seven twelve. Here in London. That's a summary of some of the other world news headlines. Protesters in the Sudanese capital Khartoum have ignored a nighttime curfew and stayed out on the streets. Today's long-term President Omar al-bashir was overthrown by the military on Thursday the demonstrators claim he's been replaced by members of the same regime. The Indiana line Jet Airways suspended all its international flights. The carrier is one billion dollars in debt and to seeking a financial lifeline. And the man with close ties to the WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange has been arrested while trying to leave Ecuador the man hasn't been named..

Omar al-bashir Amnesty International Jet Airways Indiana Khartoum Julian Assange Ecuador China Britain Haley President America WikiLeaks Paul Rogers London Llamas founder one billion dollars three hundred years
"amnesty international" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on KCRW

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin since President Trump took office, the US military has quietly increased the number of air strikes. It carries out in Somalia. That's according to a new report from Amnesty International. The Pentagon insists that anyone killed in these attacks has direct links to Islam militants in al-shabaab. The human rights group says that is not true NPR's. Ada Peralta joins us on the line from Nairobi ater. Can you explain more about what amnesty is alleging here? Yes. So they used satellite images to pinpoint where these airstrikes took place. They sent researchers into what we're really remote parts of Somalia, and then the talk to families to witnesses to doctors near the strikes, and they say they are confident that at least in five of those strikes. They looked at at least fourteen civilians were killed. I spoke to one of the researchers. Abdulahi hassan. Here's a bit of what he told me. The government have indiscriminately killed some of the civilians when the attack civilians who had been there funding or windy hit a vehicle carrying fighters in the middle of a village full of children and women than that is also unprofessional in Hudson says that they have killed women and children, and he says one of the big problems is that the US is acting with impunity. They admit that these strikes take place, but they're not taking responsibility for any of this that may have been killed. In fact, Hudson says the US is not even conducting on the ground investigations to find out who these airstrikes are killing an amnesty says that some of these strikes violate human human rights law, and that they may amount to war crimes, but doesn't the Pentagon argue otherwise that they actually do do reporting to find out exactly who who. Who who were the fatalities in individual attacks? They do they don't give us much information about what that investigation entails, and that's part of the problem here. Rachel that that that this is happening in very rural Somalia, and they happen in areas controlled by al-shabaab. So it's it's hard and really dangerous for independent researchers or even us journalists to to get out there and talk to people after a strike has happened. And I guess some of it depends on how you define who has a direct link to Shabaab and who does not. And that's another thing we don't know from the from the Pentagon US Africa. Command did send a written statement reacting to this report, and they say that from June twenty seventeen they have conducted one hundred ten air strikes killed more than eight hundred militants. But they say that no civilians have been killed and not even one injury. It's worth noting that we have been asking for interviews with. Africom to get more details on how this works. We've done it for more than the year. And they've only responded with limited written statements on the US treats much of what happens in Somalia with a ton of secrecy. I'll leave you with one example, we tend to call these bombings drone strikes. But amnesty says that in at least one attack the US may have used a gun ship Amand gunship. The problem is the United States won't even publicly released the kinds of aircrafts. They are using in Somalia. NPR's eater Peralta sharing reporting with us about a new report from Amnesty International about US strikes in Somalia eight or thanks. We appreciate it. You rachel..

Somalia United States Amnesty International al-shabaab Pentagon Ada Peralta NPR Rachel Martin Steve Inskeep amnesty Hudson Abdulahi hassan Nairobi President Trump Africom Amand gunship Shabaab
"amnesty international" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin. Since President Trump took office, the US military as quietly increased the number of air strikes. It carries out in Somalia. That's according to a new report from Amnesty International. The Pentagon insists that anyone killed in these attacks has direct links to Islam militants and al-shabaab. The human rights group says that is not true NPR's. Ada Peralta joins us on the line from Nairobi ater. Can you explain more about what amnesty is alleging here? Yes. So they used satellite images to pinpoint where these airstrikes took place. They sent researchers into what we're really remote parts of Somalia, and then he talked to families to witnesses to doctors near the strikes, and they say the are confident that at least five of those strikes. They looked at at least fourteen civilians were killed. I spoke to one of the researchers the Hasaan, and here's a bit of what he told me. The government have indiscriminately killed some of the civilians when the attack civilians who had me they're coming off when they hit a vehicle carrying about failures in the middle of a village full of children and women than that is also unprofessional in Hudson says that they have killed women and children, and he says one of the big problems is that the US is acting with impunity. They admit that these strikes take place, but they're not taking responsibility for any of those feelings that may have been killed. In fact, Hudson says the US is not even conducting on the ground investigations to find out who these airstrikes are killing an amnesty says that some of these strikes violate human human rights law, and that they may amount to war crimes, but doesn't the Pentagon argue otherwise that they actually do reporting to find out exactly who who who were the fatalities in individual. Tax. They do they don't give us much information about what that investigation entails, and that's part of the problem here. Rachel that that that this is happening in very rural Somalia, and they happen in areas controlled by al-shabaab. So it's it's hard and really dangerous for independent researchers or even us journalists to to get out there and talk to people after a strike has happened. And I guess some of it depends on how you define who has a direct link to Al Shabaab, and who does not the trick. And that's another thing we don't know from the from the Pentagon US Africa. Command did send a written statement reacting to this report, and they say that from June twenty seventeen they have conducted one hundred ten airstrikes and killed more than eight hundred militants. But they say that no civilians have been killed and not even one injury. It's worth noting that we have been asking for interviews with African to get more details on how this works. We've done it for more than a year. And they've only responded with limited written statements. The US treats much of what happens in Somalia with a ton of secrecy. I'll leave you with one example, we tend to call these bombings drone strikes. But amnesty says that in at least one attack the US may have used a gun ship manned gunship, the problem is that the United States won't even publicly release the kinds of aircrafts. They are using in Somalia NPR's eyder Peralta, sharing reporting with us about a new report from Amnesty International about US strikes in Somalia eight.

Somalia Amnesty International United States Pentagon President Trump Rachel Martin NPR eyder Peralta amnesty Steve Inskeep al-shabaab Hudson Nairobi Al Shabaab Africa
"amnesty international" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

08:27 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"And now they're most recent commercial has kids wrestling in the grass and the chubby dad comes over and says, hey, hey, boys, cut it out cut it out with your rough housing. Remember, if if something if a group is not explicitly right wing. Then it will eventually become left-wing. And that's true for some companies now as well. Here's a tweet from Amnesty International. They tweeted people are upset with the Gillette ad repeat after me, and then they put the Bullhorn emoji. And in other words, a Bullhorn emoji. Repeat? After me. We want a world without toxic masculinity. We want a world without toxic masculinity. And they did it like five dollars. That's right. Amnesty International Amnesty, International started to free political prisoners from authoritarian dictatorship jails. It was actually founded by some Quakers. So if you wanted to put that on the political spectrum it probably pretty far right wing. And now they're sending out tweets because they're a bunch of social Justice warriors fighting against mean men. So if a group is not explicitly right wing than it eventually shall become left-wing quick follow up to last story. We shared about the high potential student program at UCLA, do you? Remember what they they don't. They don't they don't call kids at risk anymore. Do you? Remember this like low income kids they used to call them at risk students, and they don't call them anymore. Remember what they changed it to? I think it's at its they're called like potential. That's ads. Yeah. We like. Because that's me. At. Achievement. And if it's not attitude it's ads. Remember this? Remember even talking about it. There's a new PC term for at risk students. Abbas okay at? I don't know. Potential near dwellers. No, no, no. But I kinda wanna Friday night fight you in the nose right now for that. Bring it on my. And I'm gonna put up my Duke slagging this. I laughed. All right. Right. Eric. Needs to be like years ago. Go alive. Yeah. The fifties boys. Yeah, you're like a lot of people are ahead of their time. Yeah. Oh, no. Now, the low blow. It's getting really nasty, and when did boxers start this posture when they fight. Fists like backwards right in front of your face. I got traditional like, I don't know something that protects your face think. One turned his fist round. It was like. Better. This bizarre position for so long. It's like they were watching Saturday morning cartoons. It went. Oh. That's funny. Stand up routine. I laughed. All right. Bye. Good physical humor. There you go workshop something, so Thomas soul and his great book. Vision of the anointed told the story of San Jose State, and they had a program called the alternatives to incarceration program, and they took selected prisoners. And instead of putting them in prison put them in college. So you got a bunch of prisoners enrolled in San Jose State. Couple of decades back. So the San Jose police chief notice that there a spike in the number of rapes reported on campus. So he did a little research into the program. And this is what he wrote. He said what I complained the project director said that the clients criminals were screened and that California had declared it an exemplary program. Actually, we think about this is such an interesting story. So remember exemplary program, what's an exemplary broken California's deemed it an exemplary program. So when I think seminary program, what do you think that means we're gonna possibly an exemplary program they say exemplary? Based off what you've got to ask ourselves. Whenever you hear like a conclusive statement that it's exemplary based on what no one ever questions at. He says actually we found out later that the program screened applicants only on the basis of academic scores federal rules prevented consideration on their criminal records. Does couldn't be like, oh, this guy's a rapist. He should not be in college or whatever. But here's the key California had declared the program exemplary only because it's submitted quarterly reports on time. That's that's how they were deemed exemplary now anything to do with the program itself. But because they had to they gave their quarterly reports on time therefore exemplary. When my complaint. This is the police chief complaints about the program became public was censured by the students and faculty and advised by my superiors and city hall to go easy after all this was an exemplary federally funded program to reduce recidivism. So the point here is that this program was entirely about the intentions, and that's how progressives think that's how the anointed that's the vision of the anointed that souls talking about, but progressives Democrats think about intentions. Intentions are all that matter results me nothing. Until in this case, it became too obvious to ignore. When a couple months later an honor student in the program, one of the students, one of the criminals who was lifted up as an example of how the program is so successful. He was arrested for torturing raping and murdering two women on campus. In ten years of this program. None of the students graduate and many of them were arrested for committing crimes against women on campus. Oh, but the intention was so noble. Blinded. People can be by them does engines. We just a lot of things everyone does this. What we see it today with the border. We're supposed to believe the left wants to believe that all immigrants all coming in our future Rhodes scholars. Does look for a better life and education for their children. And yes that exists obviously. But that's not everybody. And not all immigrants murderers either. But it's sensible to know who wants to come across our border, and who you are no. But the left just wants to close your eyes and hope for the best. One hundred seven sixty K FM be don't judge programs by their intentions judge them by their results. And then even when you get the state coming back and saying, oh, it's exemplary question everything. One eight hundred seven sixty K FM one hundred seven sixty five three six two. Hey, we got some good news gentleman. We have a new tax in California. Yes. We've got a great. Yes. Great new tax new year. New tax is the first of many, we'll tell you what is going to be taxed now in California. Because it's not enough yet taxed already apparently. But don't worry. It's going to a good cause. So. Oh. Again, the intentions are good one hundred seven sixty cafe will tell you that next. If you have a single family home, a two unit three hundred four plex, and you have significant equity, but you're tired of managing it. Right. So you want to get rid of it? You know, how to deal with it anymore? Got a couple of options, you can just sell it and the fine. But then you gotta pay a bunch of taxes. And I think the government's got enough taxes you can do a ten thirty one. But then you gotta take the money you get and put it into a bigger property, and the point is you don't want it. Why are you probably don't want to start managing the when he got bigger one. So the only other option to avoid paying all these taxes is what's called a deferred sales trust. So how does this work? There is a free deferred sales truck seminar, Wednesday, February sixth at seasons, fifty two and UT and a deferred sales. Trust seminars. Gonna explain exactly how this all works. So the complicated just an option that you may not know about so getting the benefits. Are you not to pay taxes? You got pass it income for many years afterwards, and you don't have to manage the proper. Pretty anymore,.

California Amnesty International San Jose San Jose State Gillette UCLA Abbas Eric director UT Thomas One eight hundred seven sixty One hundred seven sixty K five dollars ten years
"amnesty international" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"What a beautiful day. Isn't it? Isn't it? A remarkable thing you wake up every day. And that's another bucket full of nuts. And and here we are once more the the government is still closed down. Perhaps. It's a partial shutdown by twenty five percent of the government news media's very upset about this. And the news media tells you the American people really don't care about this government shutdown thing that excuse me don't care about the border security thing care, very deeply about the government shutdown because that's the democrat party's position the democrat party's position as you should care very deeply about the government shutdown, but you should not care at all about the non crisis, not a crisis at the border and the news media CNN MSNBC Washington Post, their SIM, politico, they'll all tell you that the American people aren't concerned about the border. There's no crisis at the border. We have a perfectly acceptable level of child sexual abuse. And and women being raped. Aleph line, of course. But the the last line is CBS news. We talked about it yesterday. Our our friend listener Rafael called in. And and pointed us to the CBS news fact check which was pretty funny yesterday. In fact, checking the president from night before last has as address to the nation from the Oval Office and the president said thirty percent or one third of women making their way north are subjected to sexual assault and CBS in their effect. Check, of course, declared him to be wrong. Well, that's false. That's wrong. Because Amnesty International says it's not one third at sixty percent to seventy per sixty to seventy percent now seventy two percent. Eighty percent sixty to eighty percents. I'll get this straight sixty to eighty percent of women, according to Amnesty International actually subjected to sexual assault during the journey. And that's of course, Trump's fault because he lives in central Mexico late at night ninety flies down there and lurks in the bushes. And it's all his fault. Everything says, full and and CBS news like that's wrong. It's actually two to three times that level go. That's not the way they put it. And then and then yesterday, I cited this poll as well. But it's it's worth repeating because it's so absurd. The people at politico and morning consult, and and across the media spectrum all over the place. They reported this poll, they asked Americans morning consultant politic. Is there a crisis at the border? They asked people how they describe it. And they say, well, Amir plurality only forty two percent of Americans say there is an illegal alien illegal immigration crisis. The US Mexico only forty two percent. So the president is clearly in the minority. And if you look further into the Paul and in some stories, it's going to be hard to find another thirty seven percent of voters said there is a problem, but not a crisis. So that means. That seventy nine percent. That is seventy nine percent of us. That has the headline should be four and five Americans. See crisis are a problem at the border. That's that's nearly eighty percent that seventy nine percent for those who are math challenge seventy nine percents. Nearly eighty percent. Eighty percent is four out of five so four out of five Americans agree that there's a problem or a crisis the US border, and a majority of those believe it's a crisis sats another way of phrasing. The same numbers. This is how the media Krupp's things because I just took it and rephrase the same digits just off the top of my head that come out with a completely different headline a completely different news story. But then then they they say that twelve percent say there is neither a problem nor a crisis. Now, if this were Brock Obama and the media's on the side of the twelve percent the media's firmly in the twelve percent can't because that's where the Democrats are the Democrats are in the twelve percent camp. The president is in the seventy nine percent camp. I am in the seventy nine percent cap. That's because seventy nine percent of us nearly four five, oh, I'm in the vast majority of Americans who see either a problem or a crisis at our border. Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer and CNN there with the twelve percent say there is neither a problem, nor there is there a crisis because the right amount of heroin is flowing into the country. The right amount of crystal meth the right amount of sexual assaults the right amount of child sex trafficking, just the right amount for Hollywood Hollywood needs a fresh supply for their weekend parties, and so on and the Democrats they like lots of fresh kids, and if they're from foreign countries, they're they're good with that. They think this is the acceptable level, Natalie's, etc. Kind of optimal, and I say, well, the drugs CNN, they've got people that come out and say, well, the drug dealers the cartels will find a way to get the drugs in any way. So horrible. We you do anything because we already did something and it didn't work. So they're they're done there when it comes to fighting drugs coming in through the southern they want to dispute the mechanics of it, then because they litigated everything into the ground. Well, you know, the ideas that we fight it. We remember Winston Churchill I think he was a member of the white patriarch. I think and and has been dismissed as such no doubt. We will fight them on the beaches on the rooftops. Will we'll fight them. We'll fight them in the streets. Now, we've got Tim Kaine saying the same thing the democrat Senator from from Virginia, and he was Hillary Clinton's running mate to he lost along with her. It was a great day for western civilization wasn't and Tim Kaine. We'll fight them in the streets. We'll find you know, he's talking about. He's talking about his next door neighbor and his fellow Americans not MS thirteen drug cartels and human sex traffickers and all that. I don't wanna fight them anywhere. They just going to capitulate to them relent to them. Because that's what they do. What we've gotta do.

president CBS assault politico US CNN government Tim Kaine Mexico Amnesty International democrat party Brock Obama Winston Churchill Rafael Hillary Clinton Nancy Pelosi Chuck Schumer Trump
"amnesty international" Discussed on World News Analysis

World News Analysis

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on World News Analysis

"Join me in the studio was my colleague, we thank you. So a first nation an Indian politician this J O two for life in the latest conviction for crimes related to nineteen Eighty-four MTC griots stay in the country. A three year old girl is in critical condition after being raped, a New Delhi Shania Austrailia and police have offer a one million dollar reward for information leading to a conviction in murder of student. Scott Johnson thirty years ago, a woman Australia says she missed her Paris golden wedding anniversary because the out of the home office lost her family's passports movie onto Africa. Nigeria's army is calling for the closure of Amnesty International's operation in the country reports say to Scandinavian female tourists have. Been found the dead in Morocco with their throats cut to the Middle East. A ceasefire in Yemen and minutes after going into effect, a son of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu says Facebook lock him a made a spat over his posts regarding the Sienese and Muslims continue. Our Hungarian public broadcaster. MTA is delayed as target for demonstrators angry over the government's new labor law. Homeland government has reinstated. A number of superimpose judges whom it had forced into early retirement looking to Latin America women jail for attempted murder under Salvador's antiabortion law as being freed Latin American banks af says approve a five hundred million dollar credit line for Venezuela's central Bank. Finally, North America. Fomer CBS network had less moma's will not receive a one hundred and twenty million dollars severance package..

Austrailia Benjamin Netanyahu MTC Latin America New Delhi Amnesty International murder Scott Johnson CBS network Morocco North America Yemen Middle East MTA Prime Minister Nigeria Facebook moma
"amnesty international" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"It's brought to you by Spurs sports and entertainment Spurs one last night over the jazz. It's back to back wins for the first time since November third and long time. We had won four in a row from October twenty seventh to November third and then couldn't win two in a row since then, but we have now in Phoenix ought to be three tomorrow night back in the day on the day this day tenth day of December. It's all about the Nobel peace prize one hundred twelve years ago. Teddy Roosevelt picked up that honor for negotiating peace between Russia and Japan. Fifty four years ago, Martin Luther King award of the Nobel peace prize for his civil rights leadership forty-one years ago, nineteen seventy seven the human rights organization. Amnesty International picked up the prize founded in nineteen sixty one in twenty five years ago today. Nineteen Ninety-three Nelson Mandela awarded the Nobel peace prize for his work to end apartheid in South Africa. He shared the prize with a guy who released him from prison, South African president Frederik Willem de Klerk fifty one years ago, nineteen sixty seven Otis Redding died in Wisconsin plane crash. You had just recorded sitting on the doctor the bay a few days. Earlier Wayne's world Wayne's world two released in nineteen ninety three twenty five years ago and thirteen years ago on this day two thousand five Richard Pryor died of a heart attack at the age of sixty five. Birthdays today include Eckerd director producer Kenneth Branagh. He's fifty eight everybody remain remember blog? Oh, yeah. Rod Blagojevich, sixty two in prison. The former Illinois Governor doing hard time for trying to sell Barack Obama's vacated Senate seat. He was sentenced to fourteen years in prison. Still a lot of rumors going around that the president is considering commuting his sentence and happy birthday, Susan Dey. Laurie Partridge on the Partridge family later grasp grace van Owen on LA law mispronounced her now, I've never seen a single episode of L A.

Spurs Nelson Mandela Kenneth Branagh president Barack Obama Frederik Willem de Klerk Susan Dey Laurie Partridge Teddy Roosevelt Martin Luther King Amnesty International Otis Redding Wayne Rod Blagojevich Richard Pryor South Africa Phoenix Eckerd
"amnesty international" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on Ideas

"Sometimes we we look at the particular of a single event of a single incident, and we try to unpack how the the wider. Let's say set of political forces is crystallized within this one incident. So we would analyze the details of either video from TV footage or of recordings of police inter communication systems. And we would try to understand how this kinds of media relate to one another and how they describe the event a few years ago, forensic architecture work together with Amnesty International to pick apart the events that occurred on a single day in Rafa during the two thousand fourteen Israel Gaza conflict during an agreed upon seventy two hour ceasefire there was a firefight between Israeli soldiers and Hammas in Isreaeli soldier was taken prisoner. What followed where three days of intense fire. Getting during an official ceasefire. Forensic architecture. Amnesty International sorted through all the chaos to find out what really happened and why they began by analyzing hundreds of photographs so figuring out exactly the angle of the photographer. What's what what were they looking towards? We would recognize identifiable buildings like a world ser- tower football stadium, and then try to figure out exactly the the precise angle. That's the photograph was taken what this allowed us to do later on was to build a model of the whole city to the sun. How those relate to one another we've van were able to look at this strange structures that are the bunk clouds, which registered the event because the shape of such cloud never repeats itself. It is something like like, a fingerprint writes, it becomes an identifier. And so by looking at the shapes of. Of the clouds within the images where we were able to connect one image to another and to create a chain of relations. So exactly because we had the precise location of the photographs. We were able to see that from the north, and we were able to figure out the of the shadow lines that we noticed on on the photograph. And we're revealing what time them they vent was taking place. So we develop the connects like that in order to to mop to locates and time each and every one of those strikes, and so by placing the witness testimony in the same kind of model in the same three D space as the images in the videos. We were able to see how this moves through the city how these gaps form one bonding to another where they tried to take refuge. What's happens in strike by strike, and we were able to kind of fund the stand the whole logic of the war? When it's soldier was captured the Israeli military invoke the Hannibal directive a code name for an order that allows troops to take any action in order to stop the abductors. Even if it means injuring or killing their own captured soldier whoever died from the villains who almost two hundred people who died during those days after cease-fire, those were just collateral damage. Right. But but we could see was that. There was a very high number of civilians who were going back to their homes and were attacks and then bombings. Okay. So the number of civilian claims unnecessarily high. So what's we're trying to show through the report is how systematic wide spreads the those days of bombings word. They were excessive power for trying to retrieve once older, it is a really kind of controversial directive and following our investigation and the work that was done by other human rights groups Israeli later revoked the Hannibal directive, it is definitely a move towards taking one command of the playbook. Let's say..

Amnesty International Hannibal tower football stadium official Isreaeli seventy two hour three days
"amnesty international" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Next, we have two very special guests. They run the say it now club which helps refugees who come to this country because the LGBTQ from the countries where from that is criminalized sometimes ends up in the death penalty that doing an incredible job here in the UK. So please put your hands together and give it big guilty feminist Amnesty International, UK, welcome to wishes. Tell us about now. You started it doors, you'll from Cameroon from you. Got, yes. That's a big shift. Cameron. MS Nelson, shape, accounting. We have one you've done. From uganda. Used to live that really took the ball. You were both from countries where being criminalised and your your both gay. And I wish you to Uganda for being guy went yes where disallowed cap, of course, the ditch from Uganda. I witnessed one of the worst for the equal every experience. So it was because of that. I started the campaign to raise our in the country in accord. Yes, universities and stuff about my struggle is. Ended up being mentally into this country in the internet UK. And when I came in here, of course, I had to go through their side on process because to go back to my time for because my life for the danger and was simply because of my sexual orientation being gay in Uganda. Sad, DVD the way people treat you. So when I came here, of course it was very difficult for me. I said, I playing site. I mean, Nate contrary is really gift card, but when it comes to style on yours because you are because of your sexual orientation is one of the worst forms over precautions you ever seek in to any country because I asked her questions, if you say, how do we know your game? And Dr Steve said that sometimes I say, let's be looked aid and have short hair. Yeah, I know it's kind of hard, especially when you from Africa. We have from different coaches, those who are different because they have the opportunity to. I know your case, some eligible eligible septum compared to African countries. They spare illegal. Like if she would come shop hair just met suspicion Yuping unless they just suspect you less than if you got tattoos on your body, suspect you less than for men because like my country, there was a dose of infants, white guy. Got arrested because we Trink bellies. So they arrested because they thought they were gay drink drinking daily? Yeah, bellies berries, Bailey. Ready for. Absolutely. My yes, so the king is arrested. So those are the kind of. Yeah. Yeah. Imports that drinking by must be absolutely thought they just suspected like those guys. So you have to be very, how that to show up. Those are restrictions that we have like I like to my, not like something always liked to have very of that. I just had the fear to set things from back home because the fed has been there since I was spun. So I just had even want to come to the United Kingdom. I knew, yeah, I could tell him. But you know, since I had already still difficult, I have come living in the United Kingdom. Deep inside is inside. So big now. You could get wake getting. She could free. By here. There's still that fear. Club helps LGBTQ refugees and asylum seekers to assimilate to speak English to find pride in their sexuality and find.

uganda United Kingdom Bailey Nate MS Nelson Amnesty International Cameroon UK Africa Cameron fed Dr Steve Yuping
"amnesty international" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"That gives the location, a single middle-aged. I read in your area scored over. Listening to Joe imposed. Now, many of you will know the history of the secret policeman's ball. Just give us the chief. You remember the secrets. Just just to cheer fuel too young to know that. The secret placements was in the nineteen seventies with Monty python during an awareness raise of Amnesty International, and it's it's, it's been something that's happened about twice a decade every decade since then you have there are some very memorable performances and tonight the guilty feminist has come together with nationals through the secret policeman's podcasts live because I'm nationalist about human rights. The human experience is diverse now because of the power structures. Most of the very very famous people in the world are white straight, my SIS, but that doesn't mean we are limited to that because the talent pool is so much wider. And so tonight we come together to celebrate the diversity of the human experience. The human condition is often white straight male. To be honest straight SIS. Men are in the minority in this country. Think about it. There's more women than men are the men, some of them out some of the mount straight, some about some of them are disciples. So it's lovely that white straight non-disabled SIS. Men get so much air time because they are minority. Remember that every time you see them represented on your television on a panel show with six of them and one quivering woman on the end looking like, she's all job into the. They look like they're best to the park because. How power structures were. And the guilty we are shifting one day at the time it ready is working. It's a micro climate where women succeed, and it's hard sometimes if you're what straight mound in twenty eight because things are shifting. It's getting that you don't know if you can grow woman in a public place or not. And. Confused confusing. You confused with a little bit confused said he'll say yes, but I don't know if it's just a Robert headlight to disagree with all your very confused. Yes. No, obviously in, here's in confused for ten thousand us about our places society. It's your turn. Welcome to our lovely club. Identity identity is confusing. So now all of, you know, the secret placements bowls. They often recreate classic sketches. So famous sketches from Monty python also on a recreated live on stage. Now here because this is an Amnesty International guilty feminist event we who's we wished to do this. But tonight we bring you a slight spin on a sketch about people have had hard life. People have had a very hard live. We present you with people who've had an even slightly heart alive, put your hands together and make extraordinary welcoming noises for the fall. You share..

Amnesty International mount straight Joe one day
"amnesty international" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on KGO 810

"And on top of it all in the case of judge cavenaugh. This just happened in the last couple of hours Amnesty, International USA. I was actually shocked to see this go across may feed. Amnesty International USA today called on a halt to a vote on President Trump's nomination breath Cavanaugh the supreme court of the United States unless and until I'm reading from them any information, relevant Kavanagh's possible involvement in human rights violations, including in relation to the US government's use of torture and other forms of ill-treatment such as during the CIA detention program is declassified and made public. Remember? This was actually the start of the whole controversy around. Cavanaugh was the fact that he served in the Bush administration had written all these papers Bush, actually, said go ahead, and publish some of this stuff. And yet somehow the Senate Republicans were holding it back Senator Booker got caught up in all of this doing some things I agree with and because Cavanaugh was part of writing these mellows. It's just weird to me that no it's all political game. No, it's not a real. This is a supreme court Justice. Who becomes a swing vote? These are real issues for the American people for one five eighty eight ten what do you think? By the way, here's read a little Amnesty International USA's statement for their actual press. Release. Amnesty International takes no position on the appointment of particular individuals government positions unless they are reasonably suspected of crimes under international law and could use their appointment to the position in question to either prevent accountability for these crimes or continue perpetration. In addition to concerns about Kavanagh's involvement in torture and other ill treatment by the US government. Amnesty International's deeply concerned about Brett Kavanagh's record on a range of other human rights issues, including sexual and reproductive rights. That's Amnesty International today. My friends today. So the national sexual assault hotline has fifty seven percent uptick in calls. Amnesty International has now come out. We have a second accuser on the record in the New Yorker and Michael avenue ATI has said there's a third that he has who will be giving public interview shortly. And according to Ross story there is a fourth alleged accuser in Montgomery County, Maryland that they're ever looked invest area. Now, that's according to Ross story. So I don't have an ATI as a very good track record on these issues. You can dislike them all you want. You can even say he's a media. Game stir like a President Trump. He is he's a master at getting the media to cover him. He's a master at it like President Trump. Mike Levin ATI is whether you love them or hate them. That's that's objective. He's masterful playing the media game master. And he claims he has somebody who's going to be giving an interview here shortly. That's unbelievable. But Mitch McConnell goes on the attack and says, it's all the Democrats, and I don't need to listen to this crap. Because how dare a rape victim or attempted rape victim of sexual assault victim or an attempted sexual assault victim. How dare we listen to their story in relation to my supreme court pick. 'cause the federalist society said, yeah, we love this guy. Wow. That's where we stand in America today. No, I disagree. And we're going to fight this thing to nail Mitch McConnell, man. You're going to be in trouble for this. We don't have to listen to them just telling you the other word is good rape away. Why not we'll defend.

Amnesty International President Trump Amnesty International USA Brett Kavanagh Cavanaugh Mitch McConnell ATI President assault United States US government CIA rape USA. Senate Ross Senator Booker America
"amnesty international" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"You the the kit organizing people to to like do teams and the playground? Did you run for any official office where you kinda quiet one who watch everything. Did anyone see in you like some potential. I was the noisy note just one. I certainly enlight to gays in school and on university. I was very active in organizations so we have in UK we have six full, which is the senior years in high school. I guess the the the is before university there. I was open ising debating society at university. I was in the device in society. I stood for president. I was a vote with Amnesty International, so I was out regional of Representative. I set up the football Supporters Association for our region of physicians, and that's football rail guide the one bite? Yes, yes. On. The anti-apartheid movement. I think I said multi-mm` being involved in things and actually guy Gillette choosing causes you and I share that. I was. I was very involved. Probably from quite a young age job you, what was the? What was the impetus for that kind of level. Note to the onus because I have been therapy interesting things to find now I was I was badly, but it go, you know, you said seeing by Twin Otters lethal on still little, but I was very differently. So when I was, I think it was probably a way of proving myself. I don't that unity say to have some input which I couldn't have in the playground sports focused, physically, I wasn't. I wasn't competitive, was wounded semi if by some, why? So maybe there's something in that, but actually I enjoyed it in even before I heard that so networking we should come across until my very late twenties. I was always doing. I was always connecting Jason people making things happen on that sort of followed. May you know into what I did freshly now, I am what I do outside. You know, I very active outside my day job in a committee. His trusted for say, I organized separately to that. I open is a charity event in local area on vote with Special Olympics arranging presentation skills, special Olympic athletes of bats caverns who launched degree you make me wonder actually, when I first learned that we're networking because like you, I was very involved in active, not in the formal leadership roles. I actually remember running for some sort of student body office not winning because it was a popularity contest and I wasn't that student, but then I actually had all the students who won buildings signs for a campaign that I was running. From student government. I basically like put them to work. I was doing idea of when did that. When did that recognition that this is actually a saying? Comments really interesting because you know, it's it's a little amorphous. What you and I teach in a lot of people think you just sort of learned along the way, but most people aren't learning these skills. When did you realize that what you had to offer? The things you had learned in life was a marketable skill that people would actually pay for is an interesting question. I think much Joni was slightly different in the my fault, co-founded a business network when I was twenty nine and I joined that off the six months of, that's what I hope to. I joined Paul time because I wanted to come in freight on strike on quit my job, and I was going to, he said, come and help us while you get some commissions. But that ended up being the thing and I went onto the Gallup, try. Raining and so forth. So it was an all. It wasn't. A natural journey was almost a full journey, but I think that they're all people to whom it comes naturally and there are people who have to work at it a learned how to do it. And I think both the valid today, it always interests me when I read just finished reading a biography hills recommend. Michael Wolff..

guy Gillette Amnesty International Michael Wolff football Supporters Associatio official UK president Jason Representative Joni Paul six months
"amnesty international" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"For road residents living in part of, the city's largest area Kibera were given just two weeks notice to leave boarders moved in at dawn as people watched helplessly. From the. Sidelines Amnesty International has condemned the evictions but Kenyan. Officials, say, the people living in the area there are they will live in there illegally Residents fought the road in court Filing to legal challenges, but lost when a judge ruled the dual carriageway which authorities say will ease the traffic in the west, of the city that in fact. It was in the public. Interest they ruled last last year sounds like something? We'll we'll familiar with isn't it The human rights group executive director for Kenya Iran goo Hooton added that the. Demolitions betray a deal may to agree a resettlement plan before evacuating the residents the Kenyan, urban roads authority a, governmental agency refused to comment on Mr. Hudson's criticisms directly referring Thompson, Reuters to, an earlier statement saying it was working with an outside group to resettle the residents let me give you some of. This look closer to home here a. Little closer home federal, federal federal prosecutors have a dozen recordings that were seized from President Trump's former lawyer Michael Cohen a court appointed officials. Ruled, that the recordings can be reviewed by investigators because, they are not protected by anti, client privilege is one of those tastes reported features Trump in coin take talking about a payment to a, former playboy model who claimed she. Had an affair with with. With with Trump now there are some, other things I just Oh that's just that's just just. Just horrible but I definitely want to make sure you heard something. About this stabbing Eddie Edie Bart station lease one black. Woman dead another injured and the. Police identified the suspect police are searching for a suspect in the brutal slaying of a black. Teen Sunday at the MacArthur Bart station, in Oakland, California, authorities say eighteen, year old Neil Wilson died. After her a throat will slip by the man who was a dentist guide this afternoon as twenty. Year old John. Koh whale her sister who was also, stay up survived the. Attack Cole well is not yet. In custody Bart released an image of him on Monday afternoon via their. Twitter account calling for the public to help find, him police, say, co well approached the two sisters on the train platform at, nine forty five pm signed tonight shortly after they had, disembarked authorities say the attack appears to, be random a man or dinovite himself as the father of the victims and Sar Mohammed till KTV you he wants Justice for his daughters man There was a black man far from Home Depot for standing up to racists customer, offer to a racist customer offered his. Job back but is no longer interested by now. We should all know the story of Mars Rucker the sixty year old Home Depot employee who was fired from his job at an Albany New York, store after he responded to the racist. Verbal abuse a customer lobe, door threw at him if if. Trump wasn't president you wouldn't even. Have a job the. Customer allegedly yielded at? Him? You're from the ghetto. What do you know all because it is rocker asked him to put his dog on a leash and Rockaway had recently been named cashier of the month and had been working for ten years was unceremoniously. Dumped because he didn't follow proper, protocol To Dafydd to. Defuse the situation and because he snapped back you're. Lucky I'm at work because if I wasn't this wouldn't be happening or you would be talking to me like light like this wow that's that's something, but you know what I think the. Brothers right I think the, brothers right there's a whole climate. That has created that situation we. Got a lot talk. About it we're going? To? Get back to this. Kind of thing on the other side of the break stay right there get yourself together southbound got a lot talk about all right news and get ready for our our word of.

President Trump Bart Amnesty International Eddie Edie Bart MacArthur Bart station Kibera Kenya Thompson Home Depot Mr. Hudson Reuters Twitter Koh group executive director California Cole Oakland
"amnesty international" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"amnesty international" Discussed on WGTK

"Award from amnesty international that's mindblowing amnesty international i do you know what it first started they said we're against torture we're gonna fight torture in the world i said that's great i sent them money misses the very beginning when they started i was my twenties i actually i wish i had my you know in those days all money was done by check i wish i had my canceled check not cancelled my endorsed check my check my cash check deposited check by amnesty international i'd put it up on my website it would have been from the nineteen seventies because i thought let's beautiful thing and then the left took over amnesty international maybe it was left from the beginning i remember i interviewed an amnesty international official who condemned the united states as a major human rights violator because it had capital punishment for murder and then i gave up on him that's when i realized so now colin kaepernick you have we're going to hear colin kaepernick he got a he was presented with the ambassador of conscience award from amnesty international here's what he said how can you not be in a rage when you know that you're always at risk of death in the streets or enslavement in the prison how can you willingly be blind to the truth of systemic racial injustice not being a rage when you know that you're always at risk of death in the streets or enslavement in the prison system in the prisons how for doing nothing wine to the truth of systemic racialism injustice and that's the that's amnesty international the ambassador of conscience award everything in the morals fears perverted by the left everything like everything and every other era arena i still reeling from the tax on that the girl wearing to the high school prom an asian dress for cultural appropriation they make up non issues and then they attack you for violating the nonissue we'll be back you're listening to the dennis prager show.

official united states murder colin kaepernick dennis prager