17 Burst results for "Amitav Ghosh"

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on Future Based Podcast

Future Based Podcast

04:34 min | 6 months ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on Future Based Podcast

"And of course there's a balance you can't have spare bedrooms ready all the time for a hundred thousand people because and that's that's relatively costly but you could think of okay. What what is the reasonable number of spare beds that we should have available for reception centres in case of emergency. So I would say the crisis was not so much migration, but the crisis was reception again, who is responsible. It's not a migration crisis. It's a bureaucracy Christ as a management crisis of not wanting to see and manage to obvious developments in dead. Migration into the EU or into the Netherlands. So we have the capacity if we would prepare to forsake migrants in but we we do not prepare. Yeah, we're a very well organized country. We have a very large population who is very welcoming to migrants. And I mean, once the the Syrian refugees arrived, I think the reception centers were equally flooded by volunteers and toys presented by kids who wanted to share their our life are with the newly received refugees. And you also often see that people, you know, first protest. We don't want to Reception Center for refugees, but once they're they're home a couple of years later if the center is closed people are actually sad that they're leaving. We're good ABS organizing things. We're good at welcoming. Before we go to for the recommendations. I have some statements which I think at least it seems like a lot of people believe in them and maybe you could debunk them because I think they are false. So one of them is most migrants enter by the Mediterranean Sea on the rubber boats. Yeah. Most migrants come. Well one. What is a migrant? Yeah. Okay. Yeah, too. I think most people fly in with a Visa or because their visa free travel like labor migrants family migrants and when I talk about family migrants, most of them are the family members of Dutch people if we look at the Netherlands and I could go on false. Yeah dying down that maybe most migrants come to the Netherlands or Europe because of poverty probably too superficial at least. Yeah. Definitely I mean cause for nuance but for instance the People who live in true poverty across the globe don't have money to migrate. It is a very costly trip across Iran or Iraq turkey Afghanistan wherever people come from. Maybe maybe I wanted to make a recommendation for for further reading in this respect. It might be very good to get a read gun Island from amitav Ghosh and Indian Arthur and to answer the question on who and what does it cost to sit in one of these rubber boats took the Mediterranean. It's definitely not the most poor. Well, maybe the last statement I have here is migration is a threat and that may did we did we didn't talk about culture that we talked about who is Dutch so dead ties into it and that might complicate things but it's migration as threats. I think that's a very personal experience. I don't experience it as a threat. But like I said, I have a migration background myself. I enjoy the cultural experience of exchange with people with different cultures. I think a lot of people other ones like to eat Chinese food pasta is definitely on the table in most houses once a week and we we we can thank our Italian guest-worker for bringing us pasta. So I see migration as a fact and as a richness of culture, I think I learned a lot about migration and I hope the listener also no matter back migration, but what if they want to learn more about migration, do you have three things you would recommend to them to maybe read or watch to learn more about migration or other topic we discussed..

Reception Center Netherlands Mediterranean Sea Arthur EU Europe gun Island Iran amitav Ghosh Afghanistan Iraq
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:52 min | 1 year ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Was so free of blonde man gesture I will send from Providence Rhode Island singing their rendition of Tenney by running our bow and daisy may hand which they dedicated to their nephew and grand children who they haven't seen because of self isolation in the midst of this pandemic this is democracy now democracy now dot org I'm Amy Goodman in the studio with nermeen Shaikh and self isolation in New York City we're turning to India now where prime minister Narendra Modi's ordered the largest lockdown in human history starting Wednesday telling the country's one point three billion people to shelter in place with six hundred ninety three confirm coronavirus cases and thirteen dead India's three week lockdown is an attempt to stave off the skyrocketing death tolls and overwhelmed health systems already seen in China Italy Spain now the United States but as the country's economy and daily life comes to an abrupt halt hundreds of millions of Indians who live hand to mouth have been left without the means to support their families more than eighty percent of India's work forces informal with most living off daily wages often less than two or three dollars a day wages they cannot earn under the pressing curfew some states including Uttar Pradesh and Caroline have announced economic relief packages for workers and the poor in Modi's government is expected to do the same in the coming days but critics say Modi's response to the corona virus crisis has left India's poor to fend for themselves with migrant workers left stranded at now close train and bus stations with no way to get home and millions wondering how they're surviving weeks and potentially months without work meanwhile India's testing lags far behind other nations leading to fears the actual number of cove in nineteen infections is far far higher than reported as of Tuesday India had conducted only fifteen thousand tasks fifteen thousand in the nation of one point three billion well for more we're joined by the award winning Indian writer Amitav Ghosh joining us from his home in Brooklyn New York where he is shell during in place his books include gun island in the great derangement climate change and the unthinkable thanks so much for being with us let's start with what's happening in India let's talk about this largest lockdown in human history what do you understand is going on I'm a tough well it seems to be a very chaotic situation how do you know what let me say first of all there are one of the terrible things about this lockdown is that it should have happened a lot earlier I mean I've been certified saluting here in Brooklyn for almost three weeks now and I talked to my friends and my family every day are back in India really for three weeks then we'll just start prognosticating this seriously at all and those signals have to come from the government for example short cartoons on to you know he was a friend of mine on the really devastated to hear about sponsoring but I'm told he had a huge party in Bombay's our you know our our earlier this month and you know if they had shut down these sort of big gatherings and so on two three weeks ago it would have served it in almost purpose but they didn't and soon this lockdown has come as a huge surprise my family back in Calcutta they're completely up I need to because our B. didn't have time to go out and you know buy food or anything so and you know that's I'm just talking about how my family as for you know that eighty percent of windows are about our employment is so are in the informal sector and those people are just completely devastated you saw the picture of what our people being beaten by the police a lot of informal workers are now out in the streets they lived on the streets anyway they have no way to get back to their homes which are maybe you know hundreds of miles away they're just stuck on the street yesterday I saw horrifying video of a young boy being beaten by the police and he was just out on the street for our you know because there was no but he had nowhere to go you see these pictures of starving or workers carrying their children on their heads are trying to walk back hundreds of miles or given to their to their families it's so it's just on a shocking situation gross what do you expect will happen now what are you learning from your family because at the moment this lockdown is supposed to last for three weeks what are you hearing though about how long it's likely to continue beyond that and also what provisions the more the government has put in place if any of four people under a curfew to get access to even basic goods of food and drinking water at centra well the government has announced some sort of relief measures and it varies from state to state in India so Kayla has actually been very proactive and the you know acted very early amongst our Indian states how effective these measures will be I just don't know you don't even delivery workers are being beaten by the police it just makes absolutely no sense the judge journalists trying to get to work and being beaten by the police healthcare workers have been peeking so you know as far as I can see it's kind of a strange situation of chaos and panic of beating up on each other so the general are middle class families are like running or evil tool you know a storm a certain amount of food at home but if you think of the little people who are stuck in tiny shanties.

Providence Rhode Island Tenney
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KCRW

"New play with the John Leguizamo on a one man show with a bit of a personal story from him yeah it's Latin history for more on and it's a one man show in part about representation and another part about father failing it's really funny it's really inappropriate and right now it's absolutely essential all right we'll hear more about that coming up in the program and the birds thank you thank you all right look forward to it yeah coming up on All Things Considered a Saudi Arabia has been planning to sell off a slice of its state owned oil company Saudi Aramco in a massive IPO but this weekend's aerial attacks on Saudi oil facilities that sent oil prices soaring may scare off investors will talk more about that later you're gonna hear from author Amitav Ghosh about his new book is called done island and state and local news at four thirty two of the show Seinfeld can even be more viewable than ever before after this. live from NPR news in Washington I mean he held in the wake of this weekend's attack on Saudi Arabia's oil facilities and here's Greg my reports the US and its allies have not officially blamed Iran so far the US and Saudi governments are both strongly suggesting that Iran was involved in the weekend attack this disrupted the flow of oil along Saudi Arabia's eastern coast the Saudis say Iranian weapons were used in the strike on the oil production facility but it isn't saying who fired the weapons are where they were launched US defense secretary mark esper says on Twitter that the US military is working with its partners to quote address this unprecedented attack and defend the international rules based order that is being undermined by Iran the US and the Saudis are still investigating and have not indicated how they might respond Iran denies it was behind the attack Greg my re NPR news Washington the US green beret was killed in action today in Afghanistan Jennifer glass in Kabul reports this comes about a week after the death of another American service member there prompted president trump to shut down peace talks with the Taliban aimed at ending the eighteen year old war the Taliban have lunch numerous offenses in the north east and central Afghanistan and continue to hold ground in the south traditionally their stronghold the US has also stepped up air strikes and is evidence that US forces are fighting on the ground alongside their Afghan counterparts another American combat deaths in Afghanistan the seventeenth so far this year British prime minister Boris Johnson was greeted by anti brexit protesters booing him today on a visit to Luxembourg Johnson wound up pulling out of a scheduled press conference leaving Luxembourg's prime minister standing next to an empty lectern Johnson was meeting with EU officials to.

Taliban EU president Kabul Greg my NPR prime minister Luxembourg Luxembourg Johnson Afghanistan John Leguizamo trump Jennifer glass Twitter mark esper Iran
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

When We Talk About Animals

13:30 min | 2 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

"It's interesting 'cause tom. Sebok who you discuss in the book who was one of the one of the linguist recruited help design those signs. I learned recently only that he was one of the figures who was very against a movement in the seventies and eighties to try to study anim- on non human animal's capacity to speak something like human language through keyboards such an but it's so it's just fascinating and i think it speaks to what you were saying before about. The the kind of ambivalence is that that kind of project can capture a what was i if if i may ask what was bucs wchs if you know what what what was the basis of his objection to this sort of version of language measurement one of the many jewels of the bookers you you speak about language at some indigenous languages one of which has i think seventy percent verbs to english has thirty percent verbs and in this particular language as you write the words for the object sort of make a claim about whether the object is animate the mountains are animate but also songs and stories are her animal. We were curious about how you think about the animal as a category like we we think so much about humans versus other beings and what the anthrax vaccine might mean for ourselves as species are we you know perpetrating basically a version of manifest destiny species level but i think your book also troubles that easy distinction between where do animals end and an nature begin your and you can feel and the pros that you just animate meet the landscape for us through the music of the sentences thank you that's when i was saying yes. There wasn't agreeing. I should say with your evaluation of of my i ah i was following your thoughts in enriching it as such and the this idea of what i call after ruben wolf camera a grammar of intimacy that that that may be ways in many people discuss this in which i language grammar grammar languages underlined it's where it's where it's habits sediment dining and inform straughter and fossilising sat <hes> and and therefore it's an ideological space base because that that that that is where the decisions that are made over many many things but among them who to attribute sentient so person hood subject to to <hes> find find that that that forms is grammar and once they've sediment they go on scene. I think to a degree we will we all know that the kind of unfiled habits of an presumptions of language we've see those in the the very active conflicts of produce now within within human human groups groups and and an identity groups <hes> so so yes i am very interested in in how <hes> units language in and and grandma's might recognize that that that that ultimately but there's a there's a second conversation here which has to do with what jack ron cycles the partition of the sensible which is a phrase identify. You come across. This is iran. Sierra says we have lived for too long with a <hes> a boundary between <hes> what we consider to be life and not life. That's the partition of the sensible <hes> see blaner sense of rather than the kind of wise wise <hes> the two conjoined and the partition of the sensible he says has it's sort of it drops <hes> around animals so <hes> humans and animals. Yes we recognize these as life. <hes> we have slightly more problems admitting the kind of pont kingdom to to to nations of of of life and we have even more problems admitting the fungal kingdom two nations of life as as we sort of move away <hes> keep a distance and then and he says that we what we don't admit is is what we think of as inert matter rock and ice and air whether and all these other forms of <hes> of entity and galaxies for an enlargement of the petition of the destruction of the partition of the sensible threat i- panetta's dangers with that which is the famous amos dangerous that it it calls out to flat on thirty and the fat until she says oh well you know everything in the world is is lively. Everything is vibrant. Everything is alive. Everything everything has subject hood and therefore you end up with this problem of how you assign relative levels of value or importance to those forms of subject but i am still drawn to the thought experiments at least deep time helps us with that thought experiment because as soon as we see ice and rock moving within the context of deep time my goodness it's lively lively and it is powerfully gentle as well and i know that there's not necessarily constitutive of what we might call life even might cool rightful subject hood good but i i am i. I'm fascinated by what happens. When looking through the deep time uptick we see these things move and and become lively in those ways. There's a very long answer to your very good question. Identify got anywhere near answering it and in addition to that point that rock isn't just rock but as we see in the a book like literally life accumulated ancient skeletons condemn since you likewise right that our bodies aren't just life but rock and there's a very beautiful phrase is that you come up with called the geology of the body which i thought was fascinating if you'll let me over at one sentence here from the book which is we are part mineral beings to our our teeth are reefs are bones or stones and there's a geology of the body as well as the land it has mineralisation the ability to convert calcium into bone that allows us to walk upright to vertebrae to fashion the skulls shield our brains that flip of the idea of with both both where rocks and rocks are life was very moving. You you can feel the intimacy that you speak of thank you. I i think the the insight is of rather than mine but it it it like as <unk> as with you when you met it when i met it it struck me so strongly in this idea that yes of course we've we became bony beings we learned to be to metabolize is almost geologically and that has given us posture and all that is followed from from from that and so so many things so yeah it is a kidney stone is is is is a geological presence and unwanted one but an r._t. A yeah so these are these to me if fascinating they can leave us innovate space ace which doesn't get very but <hes> but i think that they they belong to that order of idea that when i met and i think the anthropoid scene if we if we can call it that another of these ideas that when i met roxy back and and delivers what kristof benign caused the shock of hanthropy <hes> yeah the shock that this michael gio untie g._t._o. And a sort of being of of landed -ness of of <hes> this is <hes> is one of those entities easy to forget. I read that you keep a notebook that contains fragments of land mud and some and i was curious <hes> reading whether i mean 'cause you're someone you're conducting these explorations within language and unearthing these terms that open up these new dimensions of the mind that had been getting dusty potential and then but then you're the rare writer who on land is sort of as intrepid as you are in the mind and so i couldn't help but wonder just from a process perspective are these chapters and these questions forming for you as you're physically in these landscapes or is it more that you go absorb them and then they percolate and then you they end up on the page or does it vary. What is it like for you to explore in the world versus exploring in well. That's a that's a wonderful question. Russian coming as it does off to the idea of mineralisation because you suddenly put into my mind that this is a the notebooks are in some way where where mineralisation has in yeah. Thanks to you eight nine. See that i mean that's literally some of them. Do have bits of mica flakes of mica from greenland or i like to pick up dust stamm dust <hes> just to remember kind of particulate level sedimentary level what that place was like. I mean these these in a way trivial. We'll <hes> souvenirs <hes> when might pick up in the landscape equivalent of a gift geophysics but but they're important they're important to me. I'm into the into the notebook goes so goes this this kind of role matter of fragments and shards of image and and bits of data but mostly image <hes> and then when i come back from a place i i i spend a day or two days. It is just pouring everything i can remember and i will sit at a computer and just poor and poor image sentence memory everything haptic him <hes> verbal pull ups informational down and that i always think of is the like the potter getting the big lump of wet clay instead of grabbing it tired of the grind the and then from dining goes on the wheel and it's an ugly process. There's no craft and no pride pride in it but it is that is the that's the matter and then comes the treadle and you stop pressing your insperity the wheel tens and tens and tens and tens and then turning trailing processes what takes those years still might lead to muck definitely did not lead lead to mcdonagh space you write in the book at one point that thirty years ago you focus on these questions no way even as a little kid and you tell in addition into telling the stories of the remarkable people you meet with great affection along the way you also tell a very brief during the book about how you and your father made it time capsule slow when you were young child and placed into various objects and messages and put it beneath the floorboards new including a jar with a notebook page where he wrote in pencil quite tall for my age very blonde blonde hair biggest fear nuclear war you're still quite tall and he's still flying here by wondering if you were to make a time capsule that now what would you write. Is your biggest fear today. The question is this book that time capsule well that is that's another brilliant question and it doubled down on its excellence with that last phrase i i do. I do think of this book. As time cuts it is it is <hes> full of messages that are made in one time period being red or are interpreted in another and if there is a as it were a new ticket the at the heart of it is it is the difficulties of making sense across expenses of deep time all the ways in which we long to recover and read signal <hes> not just across time but across species spaces and across other forms of divergence allegience and discrepancy and distance and <hes> so yes in some sense. I guess if i had to put any of my books under a floorboard. If i were arrogant enough to think that the future would need anything from me which it doesn't <hes> it would probably be this one because i think they will. Alert is the oldest book i've ever written. It is the most of the now as well <hes> but i probably wouldn't put a book of mine in in in in a in an uncomfortable because how arrogant twit that be <hes> wh what would i put that is that is such a good question. <hes> i think what i would put is is a piece of ice and of course what that would leave behind his is nothing at all <hes> i it would melt <hes> but i think we we we we are living through what michael mccarthy calls the great thinning and <hes> and that sense both of of of of rising up and falling away of of a thickening of the trash of the toxic there and a thinning of the the the value airs and <hes> isis is the substance that manifests that that thinning most mice drastically is consequentially and so if i might be allowed to put in that in that jim jar piece of vice that would leave nitrates of itself you i know you've quoted before <hes> the book the great derangement by amitav ghosh russian in which he writes about why there are so ineffective stories about climate change today and he identifies remained challenges is posed by the anthropic into literature and culture <hes> what you've written about before which are how to represent action in consequence within deep time how to recognize the the life of the more than you men how to come to terms with the fact that humans are not the center of the universe and i'm curious in telling stories about climate climate change it are there particular roles to bring it back to animals that you animals can play in trying to overcome these challenges and make.

anthrax tom iran Sierra ruben wolf jack ron amitav ghosh panetta writer michael mccarthy roxy michael gio kristof mcdonagh seventy percent thirty percent thirty years two days
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:46 min | 2 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"So heavens tapestries our way of saying, I was there but she didn't put herself into them. That's quite a complicated concert. Yes. Yes. But she probably a file tapestry with her on the arm of male Lewis restored to her rightful husband unto being Queen Vogels, and the thing that you've been criticized for although I have to say it's a very mild. It was very mild criticism. It's a sort of criticism that people have to do into show that they've actually read the book, isn't it really? And it was to say, say she's in that, that's an acronym stick for Helen to have such subjectivity in, in terms of telling a story. I'm afraid Helen's tapestries are in Homer, the person in the early ARD, who is doing what Homer did is Helen, she told the story of the war in third wall, he told it in words. There are your could argue. Some of some of what things Helen says about the Trojan women the way they copied her eye makeup on that kind of thing, it probably is an acronym stick, but I mean there are lots of deliberate anachronisms in this book, because I am not writing history. I'm retelling myth history is then myth is now myth is about what we do now and one way to remind the reader of that is to include a knock Renault soms. But also when people say, well, a woman of Helen's time and social class with say something like that. A Helen never existed. Be she hatched from swans egg. If you're saying women who had from swollen eggs, don't say things like that, you've got to say, well, what's the size of your sample? The great Pat Barker who incidentally, we wish all the best for the women's prize, which is happening on Wednesday. The day after this podcast goes out. Well, one of the things that is a merge for me this year. It's the question of how fiction response to our increasingly catastrophic times. Here's the Indian novelist Amitav Ghosh in a session about his new novel, gun island now as well as writing novels that you're a polemicist essay writer and you put before this was the great derangement, climate change in the unthinkable in which I don't know, whether anybody read it fantastic provocation, which is about this sort of central thesis, why has the novel not doubt with yet caught up with what's happening in climate change so writers like, Arundhati, ROY, for example, who writes, nonfiction, about the effects of environmental degradation? It hasn't yet gone into fiction, will you talk a little bit about that about your thesis there. Well, you know, because of a writing books, like one hundred and so on, I became very interested in what's happening in the in the world around in the so follow that more and more loosely, you know, these developments, and in twenty fourteen hundred fifteen it became kind of an obsession with me. And I began to wonder. These terrible things are happening in the world, and anyone who is following. It knows that it's only going to get worse. So why is literature, not dealing with the subject head on and here? I must say that, you know, my argument in the book, is that it's not just that writers who need to deal with this. And in fact, it's the case that many writers have tried to confront these issues and very inventive ways. It's the broader ecosystem of, of the literary world that has marginalized, this kind of writing because even when very well known writers, like say, Barbara king Saul someone writes, a book about these issues like she did in flight behavior. The most important literary journals don't take those books. Seriously? They treat them as they treat them as genre fiction fantasy whatever. All they don't review them the big. Literary journals review many nonfiction, books about these issues but very rarely fiction, so I started asking myself the question I mean, what is it about climate change that confounds the techniques of the modern novel, if you like? And that led me back to this very audit experience. I had the student when I was twenty one in Delhi university. One day I was sitting in the library in. It was a it was in March. I think I was sitting in April. Yes, I was sitting in a in a library in Delhi university working away. And the weather became very argh. There were huge club, strange clouds in the sky hail, etc. So I decided to stop working, and I went outside, and I decided to go, and visit a friend. So this took me on a road which I never went onto the rule. It was completely out of my way. So I went onto this road and I was walking down this road. I saw my friend, and then I was walking back and the weather turned order in order. So I decided to go back to my room. I came out. And when I was walking on this road, I heard a sound and I saw people looking up. So I looked over my shoulder and I saw this immense, grace loud, you know, in the sky, and as I was looking at it sort of strange spinning thing came out of it, you know, like a spinning finger and it was coming directly down towards where I was standing. So I had the presence of mind now as I suppose, I would have stopped to take a selfie, but. And would not now the here to tell the tale. I had the commonsense to take shelters Iran to adore those, this huge glass door. But there were many people there, so I ran around and the night through myself into a small balcony. And then I looked up, and there was this sort of this completely surreal thing of seeing, you know, like scooters and bicycles and lamposts an entire stalls just hurtling through the sky in front of my eyes, and it lasted for about fifteen seconds, and then it was gone, and then it stopped, and I went back to the place where I thought of taking shelter, and I looked and all those people were dreadfully injured because the glass doors broken, you You know, know. I can't even explain to you, this utter devastation all around. I mean, entire walls have been taken out of buildings in India. We have fans on top the fans had been twisted into these shapes buses had been carried over walls, something thirty or forty people died. And so there, I was completely randomly walking down a road that I never take for exactly the five seconds that the only known tornado in the history of this area struck down in this place. So it was a complete black swan event utterly improbable. But as a writer we all mine our own experiences. And for me, this was an incredibly powerful experience and then book after book every, I tried to write about this, you know, I tried to introduce a scene, where some characters walking down the road and suddenly Trump tornado comes down and strikes the character. And I could never do it. Why? Because it just seemed so improbable. You know, the reader won't believe it. So you know what happens in real life is actually much more improbable than what is allowed to happen in a book. That's a strange sort of that's the strange sort of paradox of the modern novel. Do you think matab is right? Yeah. Well, it sent me a theme that's been knocking around a lot in the sessions. I've chedda John Lanchester for example, whose latest novel. The wall is distorted very grim dystopia set after a great climatic disaster, talks about the importance of imagination in forming an optimistic vision of the future, and the, the moral obligation to have such a thing. So the big question that comes out of it is absolutely incurably, pessimistic. Or is there a little bit of optimism in, you know, Mr. on, I think my main ambition to the book is to be ro. I take any form of wrongness. I'll tell you in just wrong about the signs. Wrong about it not happening. And I'd really like if it's far as I can do anything possible to prevent that world from coming about I would. Really love that 'cause we can't bequeathed that world. It would be shameful thing to do to has not acted until left that world to the future. And that's why I think that there's actually a moral obligation to be optimistic because if we're pessimistic will despair, and if we despair, this will happen if we despair, we weren't act and this will happen, and we morally can't happen. I think it'd be one thing. That's what the science if the was saying tuned, it's finished. It's all over that would be a hard thing to hear, but that would be what the science, but it's not what the scientists saying the IPC conference caddy and last year says it's still possible to the world to one point five degrees of warming since the end of the industrial revolution. We've had about one degree already another point five, and that's no paradise leaves. The oceans, still getting warmer for centuries to come because of residual hit fares. But it's incomparably better than. The world. Even two degrees will is the Paris target. The talk in the Paris accords which was the previous one, and as the UN says that's tens of millions of lives prevented from catastrophic negative impacts just that difference, one point five degree to degrees tens of millions of every tenth of a degree is hugely consequential for millions, and millions and millions of people. And the fact that the science says we can do that is incredibly powerful and the real source of hope, as I say, again, we actually immorally obliged to be hopeful, because that's the basis on which we will act. James Lovelock, one of the things he said, was sooner or later guy will cough and it'll cough humanity of the surface, the and then it will carry on and have that in what way have that reflects in the project of novel is incident and in way your novel coughs in the middle doesn't it has a cough. There is an attack I was wondering, just before we open it out into into public questions. Whether you just read the bit about the attack, which is when everything changes we're trying to give away various plot things, but there is a shift in the middle of the book and it happens after this. In the course of their night shift on the web road snacks. And this is the point where the cook. Mary is derived on her by a subject. She said when she arrived. Hello, darling. I swear, I'm getting more unfair the long graduates that doesn't make sense, does it should be the other way round coffee and a biscuit, not in that order, hold this. She reached into her shoulder bag and was holding pack biscuits. I remember thinking chocolate and orange Jan my favorite, I took them and put down my rifle on the bench still within arm's reach as per the rules and unhooked metal Cup from the outside of my rucksack. While she fiddled with thermos. I was glad it was coffee, rather than tea, because the t-, tasted better coffee was more effective, keeping me away as I reached for to pour it. So she'd spilt it over herself. Spilt it strange place along her throat in the front, top of waterproof. And I thought that's where I know she can't be clumsy that how did marry manage to pull the coffee, upwards somehow to throw it upwards over self? She made a small noise. Nhs, a bit lightly of when she stopped her bike, but quieter more involuntary she sounded surprised she dropped the thermos and look down at herself..

Helen writer Delhi university Renault Homer Pat Barker Lewis Queen Vogels Amitav Ghosh Paris Nhs Barbara king Saul gun island cough John Lanchester India IPC James Lovelock Mary
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Two my name's dean maccammon and in a straight line environmental humanist all historian my dangerous ideas not one i thought of it's the idea of the anthrocene the term was coined by paul crutzen who is a physicist and he said that we have become a force of nature that's the simple idea that once we were tossed around by forces of nature now humans have become a force of nature weaken overwhelm that you we can change it this is one of the most extraordinary an awesome and fear full ideas that you can possibly imagine but it has some good implications for me as a historian and a humanist because what is this done really is it is so large an idea and trying to solve it is so difficult that there is no single deci the plan that can do it we really need to put the whole lot together from art from history to science to engineering to architecture you name it those disciplines have to be welded together work together in order to solve the problem some of us as a force of nature those a coming together with study for the first time in my lifetime and in many other people's lifetimes to work together in a crossdisciplinary way to solve what i believe is the most terrifying problem the earth now faces when we have become forces of nature we can create new climates that we can no longer control we can create new changes in the sea level that we can't control we can melt the ice floes that we can't control we generate these problems but we don't have the capacity to solve them and that's what i'm talking about the anthrocene means we've got to get together to solve them in my calman is historian and explorer he's the author of darwin's armata and the relief so this hour we're talking about climate change and the imagination and one of the biggest challenges in talking about climate change is how to convey the scale on it mean weather happens on.

dean maccammon paul crutzen physicist darwin climate change force of nature
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A human scale weektoweek month to month but climate climate since centuries and millennia it's a whole different time scale charles monroe cain recently walk through a new exhibition of word by convoy lng me he's a new yorkbased artist his work is all about getting us to think differently at that time if we're going to talk about time deep tom is an hone of a piece of we think of geologic time thus a whole nother bees you know when you have your first cares tom doesn't move at the time niche o'clock tells you should move when you are in solitary time is not move at the same time lech o'clock till you should time is not actually something that is innate in our existence what is something that is fluid is created is malleable is interrupting oh so i'm i'm looking at a wall moslem feet tall as a bunch of different digital clocks of photos of from your family your past just found photos behind it a stars in small blinking different times it almost made me it relaxes me like lalas they get the the stomach oh yeah doesn't matter like you know.

tom charles monroe cain
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Really believe you know that ally of people of my generation restore oscar parents what did you do in the war you're right in the second world war oh children in them are going to cedras are how do you respond to this and really i think the world of the arts and culture was not have very convincing response and he said that you're a goal is not to point fingers but but you do point a finger at least one person john updike who in a book review years ago once defined the purpose of the novel as an individual moral adventure which is a fascinating idea i mean there's a whole philosophy there of what he thinks a novelist supposed to be you take issue with with idea right yes but over what is so interesting to me is that updike statement of this really comes about out of exactly the same time that we have this sort of invention of of a neoliberal economics where everything is really about individual choices this has had a profound effect on all know thinking in so many anyways and it certainly has has profoundly affected the ways that artists and novelists think about their work also well you look at earlier kinds of novels i mean i think an iconic of a really great american novel led groups of raf how could you possibly called out an individual modern adventure you know and this novel grips of up his perhaps the single most influential novel written by an american in the 20th century it's an every way a novel about a collective predicament if we take a novel aghribs the fraud or you take another great iconic novel american over moby dick which to me is perhaps the greatest novel of the 19th century if not a foregone in what way would you describe this deserve individual model adventure it's no it's something else it's about a collective predicament okay so if the novel if we're living in a different age now and we need a new mindset had to a different sort of imaginative space what would it mean to write about a universe that is animated by nonhuman voices and that's really the problem isn't it i mean because them the nonhuman has no grace are within novo the search or you know because nervosa.

world war fraud john updike
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Future climate change is now it's happening it's all around us the when we project these things so much into the future of we actually give people a wave not dealing with these issues fear saying that at it i guess what we've called serious fiction literary fiction that's pretty much stayed away from climate change i mean it's sort of it's been left to fantasy it's been left to science fiction of these catastrophes that might happen in the future but those people who were writing novels about our lives today they pretty much stay away from that issue yes sir and it's not entirely the case i mean john mcewan has written about climate change in his book solar above wrecking solvers written a wonderful novelber enrich climate change plays apart it's called flight behavior but it is largely absent i mean if you look at the mainstream of literary fiction today it's carrying on much as it was twenty or thirty years ago and this seems to be absolutely no recognition of the profound rupture the divides our of the world of today from the world of of you know ninety i have to ask but you has climate change figured in your own fiction it has been in the bleak ways and i let me to see here that you know this book at harvard and the great derangement do in a way it's an introspection it's really me trying to cope with my own inability to grapple with climate change and so i'm not pointing the finger at anyone nor does it in any way my intention to approve of writers four now what they choose to write about arming that's one of my business really so i'm frank rost blow my own limitations if your leg i mean i.

climate change john mcewan harvard frank rost thirty years
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:36 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Probability its own conventions of believability do you put it into a novel immigrants among his well king on a road and i've just that moment this completely unprecedented thing happens i that is so fast i mean you you really are saying the truth is strangerthanfiction here have hat is exactly the case the truth is much much strangerthanfiction in fact friction is a very watereddown version of the world's most of the time k n you say in your book that it's not just novelists who don't really want to deal with these kinds of extreme events it's our our larger intellectual culture i mean sure there's the occasional major stormer earthquake but those are usually sort of written off his oneoff events and for the most part we assume that what happens in nature is gradual but it's not sudden end and huge it's something even stranger than that i thank you see any number of books and films which visualize as it were the project cleared the drowning of new york city at some point in the future of ray who i mean there says that there were flooded with apocalyptic stories we are and he yet if you us even your friends has anyone responded to the actual drowning of new york city imprinted drove with the novel a story of doom or or a painting there's nothing absolutely zero so how do you explain that you know i i struggled to explain it i mean it's just not what the modern creative imagination is about if you ask any any artist to right or what their work is about or what the sphere of auto literature views the first thing they're phase that it's this fear of absolute freedom and what this freedom meaning in the rest him tradition freedom as the idea of freedom as it's developed using from very important respect freedom from nature you know only people who were free of nature with thought to be capable of creating their own history creating their own off of people who had to leave as it were responding to nature constantly were people who were thought to be without our consciousness without history without ach and and that sort of the traditional definition of culture culture is what is not nature the traditional since the late eighteenth century i mean that's when these the divisions who quicken please before that really these distinction never never of lied to talking about the enlightenment here i mean thethese are enlightenment values that put human beings at the center of.

ray new york
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And i was walking back to my room and the university when i look for martial older and suddenly i saw this sort of strange sort of finger extracting from a cloud it was coming within down directly at me you know other people was sort of huddling against our door under mourning the loss dora remember there wouldn't be much shelter for me that so i hung around the corner managed to find the little balcony to shelter under it was a tornado people have been thought through the door many had been therapy her i think dozens were killed and it was a disaster seemed like i've never oversee thorough lead who is strong the only tornado in the recorded history of daily and i happen to be there on that road day just the butler and that is a true story about the storm that nearly killed amitav ghosh think of all the great novels the world would have messed see of poppies glass palace the goche has been thinking about that storm lightly and about all the other weird freakish whenever seeing because he's trying to figure out how to write about climate change as a novelist he makes the case for climate as a crisis of imagination in his new book the great derangement climate change and the unthinkable steve paulsen talked with him so when you look back at that experience all those years ago what do you make of it well it's a very strange thing after that for many years i did try to right about that experience and are you know i'm a novelist are novelists liked to put stuff like this than their books and i've often tried but threat yet i was never able to do it as simply because the very on in light came as the bizarreness of the experience the very improbability of it was such that it was a really impossible to put from abukar mmhmm snow are how'd you write the novel which has its own conventions of.

climate change steve paulsen abukar mmhmm snow amitav ghosh
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"But the syrian refugee crisis really changed my thinking about all that when i saw you know just a couple of million refugees as you say totally scrambling are geopolitics and then you think about what could happen in bangladesh where there may be you know conceivably as my hit one hundred times as many climate refugees coming out of a drown bangladesh that's really really terrifying eu said that on that you did want to scare people and his scare people awake you to get some blow back from environmentalists sin and climate scientists you know i don't wanna go through out a lot of different points but one of them the point than it's it's possibly counterproductive to terrify people and also possibly dangerous when people with no hope don't have much motivation to change you know that there have been a few psychology studies that suggest that fear especially on climate is not the best motivator but i have to say that personally i think it's it's clear to me i don't i don't even understand the perspective from the other side frankly that it's very clear to me that place in see about climate change is a bigger issue then fatalism i just think they're many many more people on the planet in the us in the white house with her not scared enough about climate change than are people who are too scared thank you thank you david wallace wells his article which came at in new york magazine is called the uninhabitable there now you can debate the likelihood of any of those projected scenarios but the point is and how or when or hiv will reach five degrees celsius warming the point is that climate change is really hard to imagine the scale is literally beyond as and so we're going to need more than science to come to terms with that we're going to need imagination has in the hearts one of this literally took a martyr minute though in my memory loss would forever novelist on attack so i was i think twenty one and i decided to visit a friend and run i was visiting the friend the weather suddenly got worth the sky was full of clouds the strange little rain everywhere.

bangladesh eu us climate change david wallace wells new york five degrees celsius
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's um it's less than a year so um were probably going to be seeing many more health crises like that across the world as warming um gets worse wow there's another section you write about the air becoming unbreathable i think you call it a rolling death smog which is what well there are a lot of different factors in how reliable the air is one of the things that i found most interesting was that had just simply having more carbon in the air that we breathe has really damaging effects on human cognition i think the stats that i site in the story is that if we get to about a thousand parts permit carbon parts per million in the air which were on track for by about twenty one hundred that um human cognitive ability declines by about twenty one percent so we have a choice of being cooked to death or becoming stupid are not sure which i prefer yachts it's not a it's a sophie's choice um you know there are again there's there's the possibility that there will be technological solutions for a lot of these effects but it's also the case that they they really add up many of the scientists i spoke to said to me explicitly it's not the heat stress it's not the food shortages it's not it we haven't talked about the effects on conflict or economic growth which i find super interesting it's not even those taken individually it's the fact that when you see civilization stressed on all of these points at once it's just going to be very very hard for governments and public org the.

food shortages twenty one percent
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To understand that something much more like our worst fears is actually possible because that is where we're headed if we do not too action so you began that article no matter how wellinformed you are you are surely not alarmed enough said okay go ahead alarm us what what can i um what what should i started with an talk about heat death well this is probably the scariest part of the article most of the readers responded to most viscerally and this has to do with what he levels the human body can tolerate if we get to about ten or eleven degrees of warming which basically nobody thinks as possible by the end of the century but if we do absolutely nothing we will certainly got to within two hundred or two hundred fifty years then huge parts of the globe the entire equatorial band and the tropics in even part of the sub tropics will become literally uninhabitable by that i mean that any time spent outside at all will result in death wow and then there are a lot of other um a lot of our other factors that we don't really know about yet i wrote in the article about this kind of epidemic of kidney disease in the sugarcane region an of else el salvador where something like half of all the men working in the region have chronic kidney disease because they are dealing with very regular dehydration and that is because the region has been um warmed by climate and it's you know it's not even necessarily a warming that these people would notice themselves of it's just a one or two degree um higher temperature across the board you know maybe you might think hot summers are a little hotter than they used to be but it's not so dramatic that they can perceive it but their bodies perceive it and the effects are really devastating kidney diseases hardly expensive to treat all salvador is not a wealthy country and even if you are able to get your way to a dialysis machine and the life expectancy for chronic kidney disease on dialysis is only five to ten years and then if you if you can't afford dialysis.

el salvador kidney disease salvador two hundred fifty years eleven degrees two degree ten years
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:47 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's to the best of our knowledge from p r axe i man's chain champs how do you imagine climate change hey if you had to guess how bad defense it'll cat there was a devastating heat wave in europe in two thousand three that killed forty thousand people by the end of the century that will become an average summer huge parts of the globe the entire equatorial band and the tropics and even part of the subtropics will become literally uninhabitable by that i mean that any time spent outside at all will result in death a lot of south florida including miami beach will be entirely wiped off the map and basically devastated by regular flooding i think the estimates are that the flooding there will increase hundredfold and much of bangladesh which it is much scarier scenario because they're hundreds of millions of people who live there fifty percent more more global gdp growth in half huge families across the world there's really no place on the planet and when we say own no he bong will be entirely protected attack this is not make believe it's not a trailer for an apocalyptic thriller it's a fat base projection of our future from a widelyshared article by david wallace wells and possibly the most terrifying thing i've ever rat it's also been pretty controversial david did you set out to scare people i think the short answer is yes every day we walk out into the world and we're familiar with the world as it is but in our minds we experience it as a kind of bestcase scenario and were relatively familiar with this sort of median outcome scenario but we almost never contemplate the scarier half of the spectrum of possibile ladies and that means that we tend to sort of think of the median outcome as a worst case outcome you know the sort of base project that i was engaged in the basic endeavour was i took the un's basically unimpeachable projections for how much warming would happen if we take no action and i took their sort of highend estimate and when tuna member of scientists who specialized in subfields and said what would it mean for your work on food what would it mean for your work on conflict wrote immune for your work on economic growth it's yeah it's it's really scary i mean i think it's important for people.

climate change south florida miami beach bangladesh david wallace wells un europe fifty percent
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The nuclear threat from north korea on monday the president will write his trade representative to consider opening an investigation into whether china unfairly presses us companies to surrender innovative technologies and other proprietary information american companies have long complained that china forces them to share their intellectual property as a condition of doing business in that country aides say if an investigation is lost any remedies could be at least a year away administration officials downplayed any link between the trade action and us efforts to enlist china's help in putting the brakes on north korea's nuclear and missile programmes but trump himself has said china's cooperation with north korea could lead to more favorable trading terms scott horsely npr news washington joint chiefs of staff chairman general josep dunford is travelling in asia he is due to meet tomorrow was south korea's president and prommoting ten this is npr news los angeles has taken a key step towards landing the twenty twenty eight olympics with the city council signing off on hosting the games even before having a budget in place daniel carson reports of the city was rushing to meet the international olympic committee's august 18th deadline to sign the agreement the core contract requires the host cities to pay up if spending goes over budget the way it did in athens and rio de janeiro but la officials say the city already has stadiums and arenas ninetime goldmedal winner carl lewis sees the games intrinsic benefits the olympic games in just about a community in just about an event it's about a whole city that gives conspire to do things more than themselves corporate sponsorships ticket sales and other revenue sources are expected to pay for a big chunk of the costs that critics still say signing off in a multi billiondollar undertaking so far in advance his reckless the city doesn't know what it's economic circumstances will be eleven years from now for np pr news i'm daniel carson in pasadena california those years men's four by one hundred meter relay at the world athletics championships in london will likely be remembered for the way jamaican star you seen bolt was forced to end his career bold crumpled to the track with an injury to his left leg as he was chasing a final gold medal at metal ended up going to britain the us won silver at the pga championship the last major golf tournament of the.

carl lewis pga britain pasadena npr south korea chairman gold medal london california olympic games north korea athens olympic committee daniel carson los angeles asia josep dunford us china representative president one hundred meter billiondollar eleven years
"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:28 min | 4 years ago

"amitav ghosh" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The come up to your knees at your door on manhattan island we need as many stories this possible to try and teach people how to here scientists telling their story novelists artists activist regular people am answering chaps this hour can stories an art help save the planet is live from npr news in washington on giles snyder president trump is urging americans to come together following the violence this weekend in charlottesville virginia were closely following the terrible events unfolding in charlottesville virginia we condemn in the strongest possible terms this agree juice display of hatred bigotry and violence on many shots president is facing criticism for his response to the charlottesville chaos sparked by what's being described as the largest gathering of white nationalist some years democrats and republicans are saying he should be denouncing hate groups by name instead of condemning the violence on many sides three desert linked to the rally including two members of the virginia state police who died in a helicopter crash one woman was killed at more than two dozen others were injured when the driver of a car steered into a crowd the justice department has opened a federal civil rights investigation into her death as in pierce carrie johnson reports james alex fields at 20yearold ohio man already faces local charges for driving into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally now the us attorney for the western district of virginia is launching his own probe into the circumstances behind the deadly car incident civil rights investigators want to know if fields across state lines with intent to commit violence fell ask whether he was motivated by racial bias and whether he had any help attorney general jeff session says when such actions arise from racial bigotry and hatred they betray our core values carrie johnson npr news washington sides the driver of the vehicle three other men have been arrested in connection with the charlottesville clashes the trump administration wearing possible action against china over suspected unfair trading practices and pierre scott horsely reports move com says president trump is seeking china's cooperation too addressed.

charlottesville pierre scott horsely attorney ohio james alex carrie johnson giles snyder npr china manhattan island jeff session civil rights us attorney justice department president virginia trump washington