17 Burst results for "Amiri Baraka"

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:46 min | 5 months ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I had to go back to my my my my relationship with my father had to go back. To the fact that at the heart of who I am, is a vulnerable young black boy who's scared. Who was so profoundly fearful. Um and what? And what happened in writing Begin again is that I had to tap that. That that well, you know what I mean? I had to. I had to reach to that. To that source in order to allow my pin to stand next to Jimmy's to to try to translate and what I was thinking in my spirit. And and to see how it matched how it worked with him. And you know, I I was I wrote a piece not not too long ago just for myself. On. I began by saying every time I sat down to write, I would look up and there would be a glass of whiskey right next to my right hand. Cause he was just taking me through the ringers, man, But I survived. Well, you know, I survived which you produce some very good work on DH prompts me to also ask you about The reception at Baldwin got particularly doing the would be referred to as the black arts movement was very militant period. Andi was looked upon with some scorn. And this Ah, well discuss might be too strong word. But maybe not. You know, he was too soft. He was a ce faras. The revolutionaries were concerned. He and Ellison both were Often irrigated for not being part of the revolution and not preaching a revolution, I suppose, didactic Lee enough. That seems an unfortunate blip at this point, but it's one that has to be remedied. Maybe because he was filled with anger and filled with the desire for Major transformation. Yeah, I mean, oftentimes we read black power as just simply this. This explosion of rage when it was much more complicated As a political moment, we wouldn't have asking American studies or black studies if it wasn't for the black power era. We wouldn't have this expansion of black elected officials that happened to you. We could see it bump after the Gary Indiana Convention with the Modern Convention Movement, Black Convention Movement, and Baldwin understood Jimmy understood. The reason the rationale for the turn to black power he understood disagreed with the kind of miss what he called that mystical those those students who were so central to sneak And he said to them if you promise me that you don't but you will never believe or concede to what the world say about says about you. I promise you I will never betray you. And these are kids who were putting young teenagers putting their lives on the line in the bowels of the south, who would then turn out to be proponents of black power. And Baldwin never said a word. Even those you know Eldridge Cleaver in the light question to sexuality, made horrible claims about his his dying love for white men, or Leroy Jones Amiri Baraka, initially criticizing him relentlessly, along with Ishmael Reed. But both Ishmael Reed and Mary Baraka would later in life. Come to see how prescient Baldwin, Wass and some wasted it was caught between those white liberals he rejected. Right, and those black power proponents who didn't quite see what he was calling us to be and what he was calling us to do. The Baraka, for example, said he was writing for white people who wrote that famous essay where he said that Jean Toomer and change Baldwin Ralph Ellison, well writing for a white audience. There was hegemony of white people in publishing, but Also there was a really kind of almost condemnation of his homosexuality, particularly Giovanni's room came out Of course, I mean, he he was out there by himself. I interviewed Angela Davis for the book. And and he she was psychic. And as she talked about it, and she, you know, her eyes just danced and She was like in so many ways. He was just out there by himself. Right is he said that he had to come out. Right. So he said, You can't hold that against me. I told you Right. And so Giovanni rule, Giovanni's room is brimming. This is the book that follows. Go telling the notes of a native son and it has it has it makes this abrupt turn, you know and introduces. A different kind of way of being in the world, not as queer or homosexual. He really resisted these categories not because he aspired to some liberal notion or sentimental notion of human being. But because he wanted people to see each other in the fullness of who they were, without these categories that settled questions beforehand, but black power with his hyper masculinity. With his with his revolutionary drama Melo drama. Let's put it that way. It's romance Baldwin couldn't fit in that is too complex to nuance to fit in such simple story. My guess is that he glad. And he's professor and chair of the Department of African American Studies at Princeton. His new book is Begin again, James Baldwin's America and It's urgent lessons for our own. And if you have questions, Freddie glad, or if you'd like to join us conversation. Let me invite you to do that now. Our tollfree number is available and you could be part of the program. The number to call is 86673367868667336786 You can also get in touch with us on Twitter and Facebook. We're at 84 amore. Email Any questions or comments you might have to form at dot org's and any glad I'd like to ask you Also, before we come upon a break here about how you see Change Baldwin's vision and Jake Bolin's sensibility tying in with not only the moment but in terms of policy and with policies really stem from his thinking as you see it. Well, you know, I think he clearly saw where the country was going. You know, people ask me. What would Jimmy say about today and well, we just need to read what he said about then it would be pretty accurate about now, right? I think if we return Tio no name in the street and evidence of things not seen well see Baldwin grappling with a country that has become obsessed with greed. Of extraction of resource is of really doubling down on white supremacy of turning its back on working people on Imperial Project. But at the heart of it all, is this moral claim. About character..

James Baldwin Jimmy Leroy Jones Amiri Baraka professor and chair Giovanni Ralph Ellison Black Convention Movement Ishmael Reed Eldridge Cleaver Angela Davis Andi Gary Indiana Convention Imperial Project Jean Toomer Mary Baraka Melo Department of African American Twitter Lee Freddie
"amiri baraka" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:20 min | 9 months ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KCRW

"All one stroll what so bang bang I would usually four months home home home home home home grown it's called strange stories with music by appeal Saunders Dooney tune called twice one by the one and only John Coltrane into one eight triples is owning the sound and train stories deal Sunday she heard it all right here on K. C. R. W. the loneliness a month before that along with Amiri Baraka he pleaded Mary's these are tune key players bang bang out actually last from the album called our souls question have grown with the bed of mysterious so from the album foreign one by the one and only needs she time magazine vulture has in answered you are questions the only indication cardboard of you podcast piano some of the best of the singing year as if with he shows on was music at the planetary politics food health storytelling and so much more you're sure to find something to love KCRW bull dot com slash podcast we see say nope so she shined boxes sideways dudes with big musical thing goes the apple quiet time holy roller Barnes preacher space rocket to the west church know your logic should instead is as the and my music is the spiritual expression of what I am my face my marriage might be when you began to see the possibility of using your desire to do something really good to help humanity to help you manage it for himself from a tango I want to speak to their souls soul this it is he's so the album is called folk Casey jazz cats service and and through and then mmhm from from from from more the war on terror if the firm I've been told the truth sure.

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The mayor of Newark, New Jersey, Cory Booker through asp, nor cours what they think of their former mayor not so simple. I think it was a good meal, but he didn't do too much. He was okay. The crime went down a little always. So Newark was just a stepping stone. One Booker has a complicated relationship with the city where his political career began current mayor RAs Baraka says it starts with the fact that Booker wasn't from Newark Newark has a deep history of, you know, politics, activism families that's been involved in what's going on book. It was not a part of that Baraka is a part of that legacy. He's the son of poet and civil rights activist Amiri Baraka and made his name in the city. Is a community. Organizer Booker on the other hand grew up thirty miles and a world away in the Bergen county suburbs. He graduated from Yale Law School and moved to Newark in nineteen Ninety-seven and won a seat on the city council. One year later people were suspicious. Many still are like Patricia Samson a retired teachers aide. She wonders did he actually live in one of Newark's most notorious public housing developments until two thousand six you may have had a residence in breakdown. I don't think he actually lived in booked out knowing but not everyone wrote Booker off he formed early alliances with leaders of Newark's growing Latino population and wasn't braced by the local business community who saw the former Rhode scholar as much needed change. After decades of corruption Booker also begin cultivating relationships with some of the city's political elders like council president Mildred Crump who sympathized with the newly arrived. Outsider. Does it matter that he wasn't born in geared is here. Now. And something to off Booker lost his first run for mayor in two thousand to two longtime incumbent Sharpe James for years after that James dropped out of the race at the last minute clearing the way for booker's victory. He quickly became an effective spokesman for Newark outside of the city and was able to lure new businesses to Newark like Panasonic audible and manage Schevitz lifelong resident and activist Richard cameraderie says those early investments continue to pay off for the city is the current mayor raucous says Corey got a number of things onto the football field and roses moving them across the goal line. But some of booker's choices were deeply unpopular. He laid off hundreds of city workers and raise taxes to plug a budget hole. He was a big proponent of charter schools causing friction with the teachers union and turning some of his political allies against him. And then there was the one hundred million dollar grant. He got from Facebook's, Mark Zuckerberg for new. York schools one hundred million dollars. Many local educators and school parents complained. They said they were never consulted as to how the Facebook money should be spent when Booker appeared at a twenty thirteen town hall hosted by WNYC students and activists briefly hijacked it. We're going to wrap. We're going to wrap this up. Finally, there was Booker stewardship of Newark's police force. He appointed Garry McCarthy, a white former NYPD Commissioner to lead the department McCarthy's outsider status and heavy handed policing methods worsened already tense relations with the community. All these things were fuel for booker's growing. Storm of critics Roz Baraka who was a school principal at the time. Led the chart and run them the hell out of here. Political divisions and strained relations boiled over sometimes violently like at this twenty twelve city council hearing that ended in a near riot and police lockdown..

Cory Booker Newark RAs Baraka Amiri Baraka Roz Baraka Facebook New Jersey Yale Law School Patricia Samson Bergen county Sharpe James NYPD Mark Zuckerberg Mildred Crump Garry McCarthy Rhode principal York Commissioner
"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A level of consciousness where we care more about really a radically changing the way the world is because if the world remains as it is right now for people of color, and this is not just in America would at around the world is terrible. We are under oppression. The actual term woke the first time. I heard it was on Erica by do's new America album. A song called master teacher, drummer music, producer quest. Love. In which the synopsis of the song was basically. What if we were master teachers what if we're is truly opens? And we fell from our slumber. Stay. Music was an important weapon during the civil rights black power movement of the sixties and seventies. Just as crucial as it was for their reconstruction. Jim crow period of slavery. Which it was literally a means of communication. Title black fire is taken from the collection of writings and poetry published in nineteen sixty eight by the music critic, and Mary Baraka, LeRoy Jones is he was then known. Larry Neal who founded the Blackhawks movement. Which conveyed the musical and poetic expression of black cow in the late nineteen sixties. It's a radical anthology of essays art manifestos poetry and plays by black writers musicians. From around the world a moment in time for of revolutionary thought about music and the owners. Asking a buffalo. What is the political truth at black music? The Baraka finding the essential blackness in black music whitening. Combining the African heritage of its sentence of slaves in America with the freedom opened up by modern Johns. Players like one at Coleman Archie Shepp and above all, their great spiritual leader, John Coltrane. Was like we were trying to show that there was a movement. The late poet and critic Amiri Baraka. We were saying, you know, we want an art that was identifiable black that.

America Mary Baraka Amiri Baraka Coleman Archie Shepp LeRoy Jones Larry Neal John Coltrane Blackhawks Jim crow Erica producer
"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:49 min | 1 year ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We come into a level of consciousness where we care more about really a radically changing the way the world is because if the world remains as it is right now for people of color, and this is not just an American would at around the world is terrible. We are under oppression. The actual term woke the first time. I heard it was on Erica by do's new America album. A song called master teacher, drummer music, producer quest. Love. In which the synopsis of the song was basically. What if we were master teachers, we're is truly open. And we fell from our slumber. Stay. Music was an important weapon during the civil rights black power movement of the sixties and seventies. Just as crucial as was for their reconstruction. Jim crow period of slavery. Which it was literally a means of communication. Title black fire is taken from the collection of writings and poetry published in nineteen sixty eight by the music critic, Mary Baraka, LeRoy Jones is he was then known. Larry nail founded the Blackhawks movement. Which conveyed the musical and poetic expression of black cow in the late nineteen sixty s. It's a radical anthology of essays art manifestos poetry and plays by black writers and musicians from around the world a moment in time full of revolutionary thought about music and the arts. Asking a all what is the political truth at black music? Baraka finding the essential blackness in black music was whitening. Combining the African heritage of its sentence of slaves in America with the freedom opened up by modern Johns. Players like Ornette Coleman Archie Shepp and above all, their great spiritual leader, John Coltrane. Was like we were trying to show that there was a movement. The late poet and critic Amiri Baraka. We were saying, you know, we want an art that was identifiable black.

Mary Baraka Amiri Baraka America LeRoy Jones Ornette Coleman Archie Shepp John Coltrane Jim crow Blackhawks Larry nail Erica producer
"amiri baraka" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

11:47 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I'm happy to have with me today. Rabbi Bradhurst field. So you know, there's a story about a priest and a rabbi who go at now. No, no, no, no bad joke. But it could show so. Today. We're going to have we have a packed show. A lot of different interesting guests, but I want wanna thank you for being with us bread. Let's turn on if you turn on the news or go online, there's constantly continually bashing of both political and media and janey joining us is James Kirk James is a widely published. Journalists and Brookings fellow who like many people wants us to return to a season greater civility. And he's written about it in the LA times. Most recently James also wants to elevate the debate over the changing role of free speech on college campuses. And he's running for election. Two years board of trustees for just that reason. Thanks very much James for being with us. Thank you for having me, James. A you recently wrote an op Ed in the LA times, basically saying that the Republican party shouldn't be afraid of standing up. The Donald Trump nor to be criticizing his policies in order to redefine the Republican party in the way. The message is being the livered. How do you see that happening currently today? Oh, what I propose was having a Republican officials elected officials doing a weekly radio and TV address the president does and basically explaining traditional conservative policies. Particularly on on issues in which I don't think Donald Trump really seeks for conservative principles and also remind people of civil tone that we could have maybe it's an alternate universe. But to have Mitt Romney one week or Charlie Baker. Governor of Massachusetts is very popular Radio Free GOP. That's what I recommended. Yeah. It's kinda keep the banner flying to remind people that you know. There is an alternative out. There doesn't have to be what Donald Trump is presenting. And the way that he's presenting it really was being who saw the press conference yesterday. I mean, it was you know, typical Trump performance meandering insults, really not becoming the office of the of the president's. So James, I hear two different challenges. I think they're both important. I tend to agree with you about both of them. But I wonder if we don't need to separate them. One is a president who in many ways for many self-declared conservatives has abandoned classically conservative positions. The other is a degradation of public discourse every political line. I wonder if we're not going to have to separate those two because the more we talk about policy difference the harder it is to drill into saying. There is a larger question we face wherever we locate ourselves, politically, and that is that we have substituted bashing for conversation. And whether you. Happen to get a policy right at any given moment may actually not matter. If we so totally degrade discourse. Yeah. I agree. And I think this is a problem on both sides. Scientists the president clearly I mean, we saw the way just ask couple days. Soul is this. Brad Kavanagh in the way in which, you know, unsubstantiated allegations, which may be true, but they're unsubstantiated had been basically accepted as fats by many people in the media and the Democratic Party. I mean, really serious someone I'm gonna get I'm not saying that these aren't shrew right true. But we have a legal process in this country. We don't have mob Justice. So made look like then to actually focus and concrete ways on raising the bar on the way, we engage one another. Have humility and empathy for other people and non automatically assuming that, you know, people disagree with you that they're necessarily evil or racist or homophobic. I think that's really where a lot of this comes from. I see this on the college campus where I'm running to Yale. Where you know, all too often. Incidents might happen on campus and people rushed to judge that incident as being sending from a racist loader or homophobic, when you know oftentimes, that's not means Tennessee behind a lot of these campus. Why don't you speak to us a little bit about your own personal experiences? A student fifteen years ago at at Yale and kind of is motivating you a little bit to run as a trustee of Yale University today. I graduated in the class doesn't six. So I was there two thousand to two thousand six and it very contentious time politically Iraq where we're selling on. You'll have a lot of labor union strikes strikes every year. So there really serious contentious issues being debated shouted down or totally conceive. Or prevented from seeking? I've witnessed a kind of change in tone, and it's a Yale. And it's and other certainly and other universities where that's beginning to change where people are being shutdown just for seeking what about Amiri Baraka. So when I was a freshman e African American cultural center invited in early it probably familiar with a lot of your listeners use a former poet laureate of New Jersey and wrote the emphasis on about how Israel knew about the nine eleven attacks. In advance told all the Israelis not to go to work at. And he was invited CEO, and he actually read this home in front of a room full of students. I'm sitting there in the back as a as a columnist for the daily news, and it was really a horrific experience as a freshman. See, you know, a bunch of my peers, basically giving a standing ovation to an emphasis medic conspiracy theory. But you know, I didn't I didn't shout him down. I didn't organize a protests drive them off campus or to get the academic dean live invited. And fires. I wrote about it for the elderly news, and we had some really difficult conversations on campus was a real learning experience. You know, while it might have been better in the grand scheme of things that he had never been invited to be honest. I actually learned a lot from medicine. And so I learned how to deal with difficult situation. How to how to argue how to make the case? That's a really important step and really becoming an adults and that you have to constantly confronts issues. Like, this I fear that this drive to just sort of, you know, make students feel comfortable all the time. And to not be exposed to anything that might. Be somewhat painful or disagreeable to their worldview, we're not really preparing young people to be citizens in a democracy that way, so you're describing a situation with Barack and others in which you've chosen repeatedly to light a candle rather than curse the darkness. We have a culture that is obsessed with cursing, the darkness, and whatever it disagrees with politically. Religiously it doesn't make a difference. What sustains the ability to hang in as you have done in. I think a profoundly important yet, sadly counterculture away to keep committed to lighting those candles as opposed to cursing, the darkness, probably masochism. Well, let's go with something non pathological talking to a prisoner. Rabbi, we want to believe it's better than you do face a lot of these questions. I mean, you're Jewish fellow. You're a gay man, you've countered bigotry or homophobia, or whatever you want to. So I mean, how do you still stay committed to these principles without just as I said just be coming down on the whole world. You know, I just really deeply believe in this. I mean, I've always been a real deep believer in freedom of speech. I have I have the cover of the Charlie Hebdo issue that led to those people being murdered years ago. That framed on my wall. I've worked as a journalist in traveled to countries where people are, you know, filling in prison for especially near points of view of interviewed many political dissidents around the world, and I just said the most important freedom that we have in the United States is he to speak our minds, and that's how that's how we make progress is by talking and no move no movement for for progress. Whether it was from abolishing slavery to the gay rights today. None none of those loopholes gotten anywhere if they didn't have unfettered right to free speech. And oftentimes you're going to have to put up with south. You don't like, but that's that's the cost of doing business. So how upsetting to you? What's happening across American, universities and campuses all across America. It's very upsetting. And I think it's a real serious trend. And I see it infecting the culture at large. I mean, this look what happened in the past couple of weeks. You had the New Yorker magazine, we're going to invite Steve Bannon, who I I really don't like, by the way, we're going to invite him to be interviewed by the editor at their festival next month and within hours, you know, a bunch of people on the left started screaming, it's going be legitimising white nationalism. And you can't do this. He cancelled the invitation, so no we've all been deprived. What would have been? I think very fascinating discussion between David remnant, the editor of the New Yorker and Steve Bannon just last week, the New York review books of Asian I contributed to basically fired the editor simply because he published an essay by one of the men who was accused in the in the meat. Fascinating essay. What is it like to be a die? Because of the way he treated women your life is basically been ruined. You can't get a job. You can't leave your house knowing lights off to you is a Canadian radio host. She wrote an essay about it. You know, some people might have thought it was self pitying, and it wasn't fair perhaps to his alleged victims. I don't see why we should be deprived. And having the ability to read that essay so chance quick question because we're don't have a lot of time left in the segment. So real quickly many of your opponents in this conversation will quickly say well are there. No limits. And so I think it's important for you to be able to say 'cause I know you do have a sense of that. When you talk about championing, free speech. Are there? Limits are there places in which you're willing to say, yes, I will fight for the right of those. I don't like to be heard. But I also know there are times I will stand on the side of saying actually that we don't need to listen to well, I'll say one to two days we already have very limited number of of legally defined areas. Where you can't, you know, we're we're is not protected say iron crowded theatre is there's libel and slander. And then there's you know, there's. Defamation. These are very circumscribe legal categories. They already exists. If you're referring to like hate speech, which is not a legal term. It's a nebulous category. The no, I don't think we should be banning hate speech. By which you might say, you know, very empathetic seats are racist, homophobic speech. I don't think you know, if I were a fat. Adviser to student group. I would encourage the Knoxville invites certain people like Milo Yiannopoulos for an older, I don't think that they add anything to the conversation. But those people have a legal rights to see. It's just a question of should we be using our precious resources to beginning platform, that's the central question. Greg James, Kirk Schick is a widely published. Journalists journalist and Brookings fellow. We're very grateful for you to be with us here on in the arena this week. Thanks, james. We'll be right back..

James Kirk James president Donald Trump LA times Republican party trustee Yale University Rabbi Bradhurst Yale editor Brad Kavanagh Mitt Romney Massachusetts janey Barack Steve Bannon New Yorker magazine Amiri Baraka United States
"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Think, free. Speech prevents the government from preventing speech you the. Right to, stand on the sidewalk and rant and rave. Yeah absolutely nobody can. Put you in jail already can arrest you know that's probably. The greatest thing about this country. This is James Kirk he's a visiting fellow at Brookings and about. Fifteen years ago James was a student at. Yale I was a freshman Yale in the spring of two thousand. Three and that semester James was cut off guard when someone he strongly disagreed with, was invited to speak on campus The African. American cultural center on campus had. Invited a poet by the name of Amiri Baraka who passed away. Several years ago and he was notorious at. The time for having published a poem called somebody blew up America And in this poem that he had written he alleged that the government of Israel, had warned all Israelis in Manhattan not to go to work at the twin towers that day And he was invited, to basically read this poem at Yale to read that yes Somebody blew up America they say as some terrorism Barak Arab in Afghanistan. And It was a fairly traumatic experience, for me and I grew up in a fairly well to do Boston suburb but never experienced real anti-semitism in my life before and then to come to Gale's freshman and see something like. This happen was disturbing and my instinct was, not to shout. Mr. Baraka down I was a columnist for the elderly news the school newspaper so.

Amiri Baraka Yale James visiting fellow Barak Arab America Boston Gale Israel Afghanistan Manhattan Fifteen years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And karen you're out reporting in newark every day just by way of political analysis is tom moran right in his column is this election more like a carnation of baraka than it actual contest we'll baraka has the endorsement of all the political bosses in new jersey you know when he announces reelection governor murphy was there he was a candidate he has the support of the county executive sort of everyone's aligned in his favor you know even his one time rival senator booker rush back from from dc to announce his reelection campaign so he has everyone's support and everyone's money with that and and he is an incumbent and so it's difficult to win against an incumbent in newark gail cheney field jenkins however she's been around for a while she's she was a longtime a city council member for about ten or eleven years and she ran with roz bracha in two thousand fourteen they were once allies but she's expressed disappointment with his administration and and chose goes to to challenge him but it sort of came a little bit late in the game you know there were rumors of whether she was or wasn't going to run and she announced earlier this year so i don't know if she's had enough time to really put her name out there to the greater city so we're buckling was baraka was first running for mayor for years ago he was seen as the radical outsider candidate his father father's many of listeners knows the late activist and poet amiri baraka roz was seen as sort of the grassroots antidote to cory booker but you have an article that says well radical mayor turned out to be good for business yes i mean when i was talking to people about the last four years of ras baraka the word i kept hearing was he's turned out to be a pragmatist in a very practical mayor and people were really scared that he would you know alienate the business community but he's actually really worked with what booker laid the grounds force.

newark governor murphy dc jenkins roz bracha amiri baraka roz booker karen tom moran executive senator booker gail cheney cory booker eleven years four years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That were retreads of newark two minutes and twenty five seconds of unscripted but practiced praise for the city and its promise baraka was born in newark the year the city elected its first black mayor he comes from activists royalty his father was amiri baraka a poet and civil rights leader he's been a council member public school principal and an artist company either that voice in the interludes of this education of lauryn hill that's it so when baraka got elected for years ago he made a promise to be a certain type of mayor never forgets how he got here yeah we need a mayor that's radical he's had a certain type of vision for the city and i think that there were many people who were frankly scared of that morale teaches political science at rutgers university he says in twenty fourteen baraka one with the support of unions and grassroots organizations while the business community and essex county leaders supported his opponent so he came in with already at statistical outlook from many forces and the state and in the county but cut to four years later and barack is part of the establishment he's running with a slate of longtime city council members he has the support of the county executive and the governor and even senator cory booker who he used to mock and villain is just the politics of it but then when you also take into account the the business with the development side of it also seems to be a type of partnership relationship building there that has surprised many people morales says it was expected for baraka to have hostile relationship with the business community but you only need to visit the rooftop of one rector street to see that didn't turn out to be the case it's a twenty two story building new works first brand new luxury residential high rise since the sixties it's still under construction on a recent tour real estate development consultant anthony marquette points at the clear views of the manhattan skyline low cut and then he points at the old heynen company building a swanky department store.

newark amiri baraka principal lauryn hill rutgers university barack executive senator cory booker morales consultant anthony marquette manhattan twenty five seconds two minutes four years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In downtown newark has sat abandoned for over a decade but on a cold wet morning artists and community advocates crowd into the leaky dustfilled ground floor of the building welcome thank you so much for coming rats brock is second ceremonial groundbreaking in three days and he's got it down a little joke guess she's talking about me knowledge means to everyone involved we thank you for being a part of newark's forward motion so congratulations to you look for and a reminder that every other week he's been cutting ribbons at residential buildings restaurants retailers supermarkets spaces spaces of the pass twenty thirty forty years and even spaces that were retreads of newark two minutes and twenty five seconds of unscripted but practiced praise for the city and its promise baraka was born in newark the year the city elected its first black mayor he comes from activists royalty his father was amiri baraka poet and civil rights leader he's been a council member public school principal and an artist that voice in the interludes of the miseducation of lauryn hill that's it love is so when baraka got elected for years ago he made a promise to be a certain type of mayor never forgets how he got here yeah yeah we need a mayor that's radical a certain type of vision for the city and i think that there were many people who were frankly scared of that to mingo morale teaches political science at rutgers university he says in two thousand fourteen baraka one with the support of unions and grassroots organizations while the business community and essex county leaders supported his opponent so he came in with already at statistical outlook from many forces and the state and in the county fuck four years later and barack is part of the establishment he's running with a slate of longtime city council members he has the support of the county executive and the governor and even senator cory booker who he used to mock and vilnai's this is just the politics of it but then when you also take into account the the business with the development side of it also seems to be a type of partnership relationship building there that has surprised many people morales says it was expected for baraka to have a hostile relationship with the business community but you only need to visit the.

newark brock baraka principal rutgers university barack executive senator cory booker morales mingo vilnai twenty thirty forty years twenty five seconds two minutes four years three days
"amiri baraka" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Way back to the gulf of tonkin and remember the main this is the way u s fights wars they make an outrageous unsubstantiated claim demand that the being immediate answer the really demanding total comfort chelation and then they use it as an excuse to stage a war it's very dangerous every time it's used today and we can see that from what's happened in the past and it means knowing of live la last there and here because the wars do come home every bomb that falls there falls too and for these was sara flounders of the united national and t war coalition on new jersey state supreme court joe jr don't blow to lure mayor rospa rocco's effort to establish the civilian complaint review board with the power to investigate and subpoena the police the judge sided with the paternal order of police union in ruling that the board constitutes a violation of police officers right to do process we spoke with larry ham chairman of pup the people's organisation for progress which has been fighting police brutality in northern new jersey for almost forty years hamm says the judge's ruling is a serious setback our low bring we've been fighting new jersey for over half a century trying to get a police review board established here nor in two thousand fourteen we had both the election of the son of activists poach play right now deceased amiri baraka is son rosca rocket is now the mayor of newark that was a victory for the people here north and mayor baraka was elected and almost simultaneously the us justice department announced that it was calling for the implementation of a consent decree in newark new jersey to reform the police department in response to the outcry of the people in newark about the issue of police brutality police killings violation of people's constitutional rights wrongful the rest of cetera and one of the stipulations of this consecutive.

sara flounders rocco chairman amiri baraka newark gulf of tonkin joe jr larry ham hamm us justice department forty years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on Pure Nonfiction: Inside Documentary Film

"Who died in two thousand seven born was a trailblazer of black documentary starting in the 1970s he directed several films on historical figures including paul robeson amiri baraka and langston hughes this month new york's metric graft cinema is holding a retrospective of bornes films most of which are hard to find i ask pollard what st clair borne meant to him of saint was a a towering figure for blatently as it were but also time figure in the black documentary world and we all really looked up to him and when i was a young assistant editor icm in different you know production postproduction centers that was always in all of them always in on little frightened level and i used to ask people whose that guy attack sinclair boeing and he's the way these in the winter tony with his long weather coat and you have this big leather bag on his shoulder and he had this big huge bracelet are things i remember about him but about four or five years after i had so the been introduced and seen in another colleague of mine the gentleman named george bowers who had been a editor and had become a director recommended meet to sing in 1980 tell you the film call chicago blues and i spent six to eight months would saint in the room as we're editing playing the film together and he was like a big brother to me i look and what he did for.

paul robeson amiri baraka new york pollard saint george bowers editor director langston hughes boeing chicago eight months five years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"In real food you're listening to all things considered on wnyc i'm jimmy floyd we've been spending the week looking back at the newark riots which happened fifty years ago the riots which are cold the rebellion in parts of newark ushered in new political leadership for the first time a black mayor was elected in nineteen seventy and all the mayors have been african american ever since wnyc's karen rows reports on fifty years of black leadership in newark ronald race was born a year after the riots and has spent his whole life in politics he fats from inside the city many thought of riots as a watershed moment of black ascendancy spoken to thing of legend for my generation and a to action action a call to arms but from the outside the nineteenth sixty seven riots marked the city as a place of violence i call it the original sin of newark because after that we never saw the issue that created the rebellion in the first place and that was police brutality that was racism the police department and it wasn't just policing poor schools poverty and a lack of jobs were also a problem at the same time newark was part of a political and cultural black our math movement let in part by poet amiri baraka got rife says black residents still have no power the backdrop is why talion an irish control city hall irish nukaya controls school board irish entire control of the democratic party are good time console the republican party but none of them having any power that would change change after the riots in nineteen seventy a young civil engineer named can gibson was elected newark's first black mayor the rise in late live two people were ready well i'm good if some is now 85 and retired i visited him at his home untucked feeder road he shares with his wife camille and they're doc lucy it's the same day jeff sessions who had for us justice department under trump is testifying before congress fashions wants to eliminate the justice department's monitoring of local police departments including newark federal monitoring of civil rights violations has its roots in that july night fifty years ago that sparked the riots the irony is not lost on gibson but as much as he agrees that the riots were about more than thing he disagrees that they represent a singular events that turned the.

real food jimmy floyd newark wnyc ronald race democratic party republican party engineer camille trump civil rights gibson amiri baraka jeff congress fifty years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Help with money and knowhow so businesses can say yes to their best ideas and get business done wnyc has been spending the week looking back at the newark riots which occurred fifty years ago this week the riots ushered in an era of new political leadership 1971 black mayor was elected for the first time in every mayor since has been black as well wnyc's karen rows reports on fifty years of lack leadership in newark ronald reagan was born a year after the riots and has spent his whole life in politics he fence from inside the city many thought of riots as a watershed moment of black ascendancy book on the thing of legend for my generation in a call to action on a called the arm but from the outside the 1950s seven riots marked the city as a place of violence i call it the original fan of newark because after that we never solve the issue that created the rebellion in the first place and that was police brutality that was racism the police department and it wasn't just policing poor schools poverty and a lack of jobs were also a problem at the theme time newark was part of a political and cultural black empowerment movement let in part by poet amiri baraka but says black residents still had no power the backdrop is why talion an irish control city hall irish nukaya control school board irish anti control of the democratic party arrogant you control the republican party but none of them having any power that with chain after the riots in nineteen seventy a young civil engineer named ken gibbs thin was elected newark's first black mayor the rise in libya may the people will ready well lou williams gary if is now 85 and retired i visited him at his home untucked feeder road he shares with his wife camille and their doc lucy it's the same day jeff sessions who had the us justice department under trump is testifying before congress are you will get fashions wants to eliminate the justice department's monitoring of local police departments including newark federal monitoring of civil rights violations has its roots in that july night fifty years ago that sparked the riots the irony is not lost on gibson but as much as he agrees that the riots were about more than police thing he disagrees that hey represent a singular events that turned the political tide.

ronald reagan newark republican party engineer ken gibbs libya camille us trump civil rights gibson amiri baraka democratic party lou williams jeff fifty years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of the deaths that occurred during newark summer of sixty seven these kids were using m1 rifles a menu will never give someone that without a lot of training people worry responsible for that and yet we never held them responsible for that we never held them responsible for what we sure that after the rebellion residents demanded change newark elected its first african american mayor in nineteen seventy kenneth gibson gibson says the images of the rebellion still haunt the city to this day hundreds of villages of stools berlin into holes revelealed with the the burn the third there was no miserable the city little did the those villages the deal for the city of newark the continues to the son of late poet amiri baraka is now the leader of the city mayor ras baraka was sworn into office in july of 2014 vowing to take the city into the future amanda puts city i a never forgets he got we need a that's radical but poverty and unemployment levels are higher than the national average late last year the police department was put under federal consent decree after the justice department found widespread civil rights violations at the hands of the newark police for npr news i'm alexandra hill in newark through cancer patients are step closer to an entirely new way to.

newark kenneth gibson gibson the deal ras baraka amanda berlin amiri baraka civil rights npr
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Governor called in the national guard things got even worse surprising as it sounds today no charges were ever filed in relation to any of the deaths that occurred during newark summer of sixty seven these kids were using m one rifles i mean you would never give someone that without a lot of training people were responsible for that and yet we never held them responsible for that we never held him responsible for what we should have after the rebellion residents demanded change newark elected its first african american mayor in nineteen seventy kenneth gibson gibson says the images of the rebellion and still haunt the city to this day hundreds of images of stores broken into homes for lived to see did not burn a third there was no move the city looted burn with those alleges created the wood for the city of newark the continues to dave the son of late poet amiri baraka is now the leader of the city mayor ratsiraka was sworn into office in july of 2014 vowing to take the city into the future america puts his city i never forgets how he got here we need a barrier that's radical but poverty and unemployment levels are higher than the national average late last year the police department was put under federal consent decree after the justice department found widespread civil rights violations at the hands of the newark police for npr news i'm alexandra hill in newark six years after reporters uncovered a widespread muslim surveillance programme in the nypd the city.

newark kenneth gibson gibson ratsiraka america dave amiri baraka civil rights npr six years
"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"amiri baraka" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The national guard things got even worse surprising as it sounds today no charges were ever filed in relation to any of the deaths that occurred during newark summer of sixty seven these kids were using m1 rifles a menu will never give some on that without a lot of training people were responsible for that and yet we never held them responsible for that we never held them responsible for what we should have after the rebellion residents demanded change newark elected its first african american mayor in nineteen seventy kenneth gibbs said gives since says the images of the rebellion still haunt the city to this day hundreds of images of store broke in to halt truthful lived to see did not burn effort there was no move the city the burn but those villages the deal for the city of newark the continues today the son of late poet amiri baraka is now the leader of the city mayor ras baraka was sworn into office in july of 2014 vowing to take the city into the future a mayo that puts city i obey i've never forgets how we got here we need a thus radical but poverty and unemployment levels are higher than the national average late last year the police department was put under federal consent decree after the justice department found widespread civil rights violations at the hands of the newark police for npr news i'm alexandra hill in newark cancer patients are a step closer to an entirely new.

newark kenneth gibbs the deal ras baraka amiri baraka civil rights npr