18 Burst results for "Aminov"

Bye Bye Cellulite?

Art Beauty

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Bye Bye Cellulite?

"Today my fabulous co host is dr cats. He is a board certified dermatologist and director of the geneva skin and laser center. Right here in manhattan dr katz. Thank you so much for being with us today. Number with you So everybody's gonna wanna listen up because cellulite. It is a huge problem. I feel like having been in this beauty community forever. The way that i look at cellulite is that it's kind of like if your boss was to bring their bratty child to a party. It's something we all know about. It's it's a problem we all have to deal with. But there's nothing you can really do about it so nobody wants to touch it. Is that pretty accurate. That's how cellulite has been regarded. Yeah absolutely i mean we. We used to call cellulite. The holy grail he goes there have been so. Many treatments have been touted to work from lasers to Radio frequency to topical agents caffeine aminov. Flynn medication that you rub on his skin. All different types of things and you know what most of them did nothing you know. It's it's interesting too. Because i think that i want to talk a little bit about what cellulite is. What causes it. But before we get into that. I also want to specify boomer talking sometimes about you know quote unquote treating things. There's a difference between actually trading a problem and making it appear like making the appearance. Less notable and i think sometimes people confuse that they think fit like. Oh if i use this cream. This cream is actually going to treat it when really know it might help make the appearance somewhat less noticeable things like

Dr Cats Geneva Skin And Laser Center Dr Katz Manhattan Flynn
"aminov" Discussed on Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

04:48 min | 4 months ago

"aminov" Discussed on Gaming and BS RPG Podcast

"I mean i would go more gert laps or something along those lines you know. Take a generic universal role playing system fair. And say. Try to make it everything. Nothing basically you know. Look through stuff. I just if i were to run into somebody on the street esser who has that tuned into the forms. Well actually has and listen to our show. Don't know why they would be a bs at that point. Yeah but if i said hey i got this thing. Redouane hopefully loves us important. Those appraiser overdue. Yeah so i i bring up the curses. I wanna run curses stride. But i've got some players nerf down. I want to bring it down. You know only humans you know kind of mess with the rest lingering injuries. I don't want the three deaths saves. I want some. I want to crank up the leaf. Outy or the mortality. Maybe a little bit. Potentially i want it to be more thinking game and not everything is a nail and your hammer in its combat and they go great. Can i go aminov. I but i don't know it's five. They will run if ivy. Play drubbing right. That's what they're going to say. And i don't think that's an invalid response. It may work. Some people like who everybody suggested a different game and undertake and brentwood say or you could just do. Of course you can come in. Ud it's a toolbox exactly. And so i think there is no. There isn't any wrong answer. This discussion even within the any other form thread this called on a couple of times there is no saying yes or no right or wrong is probably the wrong answer. And you're right sean. admit you're right if they're jack-of-all-trades it's too strong. You're right that's destroyed. You got tired for moving so about again. I don't think it's wrong to have a very a very strong opinion. i think. Say the reasons that the beautiful part of the golden age of gaming that we live in now is at. Somebody says this that we'll be really cool. I like blades in the dark blazin dark. Make a great curses drawn system. Here's why somebody out is very passionate about some system as to why it would be really good for the senate and some of those some of the issues very setting of it. I even talked about this..

Redouane aminov esser brentwood sean senate
"aminov" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"aminov" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Or to leukemia, or even syphilis and tetracycline works primarily by binding to the ribes, oems of bacterial cells, ribes, oems or sort of the cellular factories they build proteins that are needed in order for organisms to live and grow, and by binding to the Ri- Zome, tetracycline makes it difficult for the bacterium to create new proteins. It was patented in the nineteen fifties became widely used in the second half of the Twentieth Century so what? What was it doing in the bones of Nubian people who live like seventeen hundred years ago, well Arm Lago sin colleagues followed archaeological clues to identify the source of the tetracycline was beer of course beer is another one of ultimately it falls under zagged noise domain Oh. Yeah, though this is different. Because tetracyclene is not made from a fungus, it is actually an antibacterial. That is a byproduct of some bacteria. Okay, so it's a bacterial byproduct, but essentially so technically it's duplex, okay? Point to jubilee? This is looks versus jubilee. That's going to happen with your demon. Lord introducing warfare. So beer is made from fermented grain of course and the fermented grain in this ancient Nubian beer apparently contained the bacteria streptomyces, which creates tetracycline as a byproduct, but question of course were these traces of tetracycline in Nubian mummy bones. Of like a bad batch of beer, the got contaminated by accident, or were these people deliberately culturing their beer with antibiotic, producing bacteria, and so to look at a study from the American Journal of Physical Anthropology from twenty, ten of which are was one of the authors the authors examined tetracycline in skeletal remains from throughout this period, and the evidence indicates that the ancient Nubians were consuming these antibiotics on a regular basis in the authors suggest that these ancient people were intentionally producing this medicine and this links up with some evidence from other ancient. Ancient peoples nearby such as the Egyptians that sometimes apparently used beer as a treatment for conditions like gum, disease, and other types of infections in the authors even found evidence of a four year old child, whose skull contained lots of tetracycline from this beer, suggesting that the child had been fed high doses of this like antibiotic beer, perhaps in an attempt to cure illness, maybe the illness that killed him, and so the levels of tetracycline residue found in the bones of these mummies is only explicable if they were repeatedly consuming this antibiotic in their diet. And there are actually other archaeological remains that show evidence of antibiotic use in the ancient world for example samples taken from the era of skeletons from the Dock Leo ACIS in Egypt from people who live sometime in the late Roman period, also showed evidence of the same thing of tetracycline in the Diet and this consumption of tetracyclene is consistent with other evidence, showing a relatively low rate of infectious disease in Sudanese Nubia during that time period. And a lack of bone infections apparent in these remains from the basis in Egypt so. It really does look like people in ancient Africa discovered a somewhat effective form of antibiotics centuries before the discovery of penicillin and the isolation and mass production of focused anti microbial medicines now to be clear I think like a beer that had tetracycline content from from being cultured with bacteria, like this probably would not be as potent and focused ineffective as like the isolated compounds in the drugs take orally or through injection would be today right, but it would have some effect, and it appeared that it probably was somewhat effective in fighting infectious disease right, and of course they. They wouldn't know exactly what they had here, but they knew they had some sort of beer. Beer that seemed to some sort of holy liquid that that that had some sort of curative property to it exactly I mean if a fascinating discovery from the ancient world, an interesting fact tetracycline is relatively unique in that leaves clear signatures in the bones that can be discovered long after the person has died so other antibiotics don't leave these clear markers like this that make it easy for archaeologists to detect, so you have to wonder like are. Were there other cases of ancient peoples in various places in times using some kind of antibiotics, bacterial or fungal cultures to treat diseases like these ancient Nubian. People were but that we don't have evidence of. It doesn't show up in the bones like tetracycline does. Yeah, it could've just been lost to history I was reading an interesting paper from frontiers in microbiology in two thousand and ten by Reuss Domino, called a brief history of the antibiotic Era Lessons Learned and challenges for the future and Aminov points out this unique quality of tetracycline notes. Just what I was basically just saying like how easy it would be for evidence of other uses of antibiotics in the ancient world to be lost to us, though he he also mentioned that there are other anecdotes from history about cultural traditions. Traditions that show Proto antibiotic technologies in these other examples would include red soils found in Jordan that are used for treating skin infections. It's been discovered that these soils contain some antibiotic producing organisms I'd guess there are probably also some major risks in applying soil to wounds, and then also plants used in traditional Chinese medicine that actually do have some antimicrobial properties. Yeah, because one thing we have to remember the modern antibiotic effort is ultimately based in going out into the natural world in finding these weapons that already exist, and then you re using them in adapting them. For Human Madison and you know this is essentially what is going on in traditional medicines as well, and it also means that there are weapons out there that either have not been discovered at all, especially in particularly vibrant ecosystem, some of which of course, the for are threatened all the more reason to. For us to not decimate say the rain, forest, deep ocean, right but then there are also things that may have been discovered to some degree in the past, but have been forgotten well. Yeah, that that does seem possible, because despite all all this evidence of ancient sort of Proto antibiotic technologies, the worldwide rates of death from infectious disease in the periods for which we. We have data right before the invention of modern antibiotics shows that humans generally did not have effective antimicrobials in that period, so maybe some of this knowledge was lost over time all right well on that note, we're gonNA. Take our first break, but when we come back, we're going to return to the mold research, the nineteenth.

tetracycline Egypt Arm Lago American Journal of Physical A Twentieth Century leukemia Ri- Zome tetracyclene Dock Leo ACIS Reuss Domino Sudanese Nubia Africa penicillin Aminov
"aminov" Discussed on Invention

Invention

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"aminov" Discussed on Invention

"I think like a beer that had tetracycline content from from being cultured with bacteria like this probably would not be the as potent and focused ineffective as like the isolated compounds in the drugs you take orally or through injection would be today right but it would have some effect and it appeared that it probably was somewhat effective in fighting infectious disease right and of course they they wouldn't know exactly what they had here but they knew they had some sort of beer that seemed to <hes> some sort of holy liquid that that that had some sort of curative property to it exactly I mean if fascinating discovery from the ancient world <hes> another interesting in fact tetracycline is relatively unique in that it leaves clear signatures in the bones that can be discovered long after the person has died so other antibiotics. Don't leave these clear markers like this that make it easy for archaeologists us to detect so you have to wonder like are they were there other cases of ancient peoples in various places in times using some kind of antibiotics or bacterial or fungal cultures <hes> to treat diseases like these ancient Nubian people were <hes> but that we don't have evidence of because it doesn't show up in the bones like tetracycline does yeah it could've just been lost to history. <hes> I was reading an interesting paper from frontiers in microbiology in two thousand intend by Rustam Domino called a brief history of the antibiotic Era Lessons Learned and challenges for the future and Aminov points out this unique quality of tetracycline and notes just what I was basically just saying how easy it would be for evidence in other uses of antibiotics in the ancient world to be lost to us though he he also mentioned that there are other anecdotes from history about cultural traditions that show Proto antibiotic technologies in these other examples would include red soils els found in Jordan that are used for treating skin infections. It's been discovered these soils contain some antibiotic producing organisms though I guess they're probably also some major risks.

tetracycline Aminov Rustam Domino
"aminov" Discussed on Power 106 FM

Power 106 FM

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on Power 106 FM

"Shop discharge smoke that. Good weed from the yield Long Beach, California. I'm not a doctor. I don't have no patience. Waiting calling up at polo. I gotta dropping internal posted. Been pushing week at the interstate man like Greek. Hey, greg. Oh did think David. Do. You think bro? Data rep in Long Beach. What's your name? What's your rabbinate dog? David. David. You gotta have Rodney. David. Got you. Hey, sue Nabi. Are you get away? What about home? Got you. Brothers. Yeah. You of Aminov lady out of. No like, yo. My name is Lonnie Tony. I'm proud of that water. Read some wall. Hey. I'm sitting on the ditch right now on the bench for me. I'm trying to get back in the game. Different phone carrier because you come across staticky, brother. You know, that might be. Apologize on that little. Girl. Not my phone on my hand, McFaul shattered. On the floor. Man. Maybe that might be with a crash was the vibe, though, wasn't it. All man, I had like. Double double barrel. Yeah. You straight up. Oh, man. Like city do now navy. Listen, I'm gonna tell you why car to be not happy. I'll tell you why. Coming up next on Elliott. Hip hop morning show. Power one sick. Some friends. Free. Minnesota. Breaking free..

David Lonnie Tony Long Beach sue Nabi California Rodney greg Elliott Aminov Minnesota
"aminov" Discussed on First Things First

First Things First

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on First Things First

"Do you think that the the refs caused texts tech cause them chance to win? Listen, I don't I actually don't blame the refs on this at all. I blame the awful system that is instant replay across sports. I ve only been saying this for my entire adult life except for in tennis instant replay does not make things better. It makes things worse. And the idea that that play is off Texas Tech is goes against sins Naismith invented the sport up until four years ago with four K high definition frame by frame that is off Virginia at the park. It's offer Jinya in high school that's offer Jinya in a regular college basketball game. It's off Virginia in the NBA until a few years ago. That's all Virginia. That's terrible Aminov Washington. Play though the bowl is all his fan. But then we had on me. I tell me I don't know what I'm saying. Then we have to change the way we play this. Do I not see the ball in his hand? It touches the end of his and if I were to right now, hold a basketball Antoine were to slap down on it. You know, where it would go off of last the bottom of my pinky. So we if we want to just change the way sports or played to adjust for super slow motion, high definition cameras fine. But I'm not into that. That is every everywhere you play basketball. That's tech bowl. And everyone knows that's grew to a certain degree. But I like getting the right especially the game. Like this. You want to get it. Right. And they got it. Right unfortunate for Texas Tech. But that's not what loss Texas Tech the game. You know, this was a minute fifty seconds. They had a chance to get a stop offensively. I feel like the shot at the regulation who soon agree. But why and also on the other end, why are you let them shoot at three. Why didn't you foul? Why don't you put them at the line? You could put him at the line between fifteen and ten seconds to go in the game. And why you leave your guy in the corner. Leave open your up three. So. The refs always play a part in the game. They're a part of the game. And sometimes you have to get around the refs. But for me, I'm about getting it. Right. Whatever technology we have unwilling to live with that. Because I know the ball bounces both wins. And I know there's thousands of other opportunities during the game that if you make a plight it, it wouldn't come down to get it all the way, right? When you go to replay. And you see the kid gets fouled right before the ball's knocked out of his hands retroactively, call the foul if it's about getting it right thing. Get it all the way grid everything. Okay. A lot of times in a situation like that. When the defenders coming from behind if he reaches for the ball or reaches for you. If you can continue dribbling, the ref won't call it if you lose your dribble, then they might call it because it did affect you. But in that, I could understand why he didn't call foul. Of course, meet with the contact. They were allowing in this game lead. Nothing. That I didn't expect him to call that will find either, and I totally support that. But what we see in basketball, the time is Antonio, you know, this because you played before replay was a big part of it. If you're going I shot specially late in games, and you might have gotten fouled and the ball goes out of bounds. What's the referees? Typically, call if he's not gonna call foul. We'll give you the Bob you keep the ball. Keep the ball. What do we see now with replay?.

basketball Texas Tech Virginia Jinya Antonio tennis Aminov Washington Naismith NBA Texas Antoine Bob fifty seconds ten seconds four years four K
"aminov" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on NFL: The Dave Dameshek Football Program

"But he's the best. He's number one. He's number one full of laying guest is the greatest one the will Payton man of the year. And he should he's he should win. Every I agree. But more importantly, he's funny. He's good is a good now about more. What a wonderful, man. What a just a I I was talking to his guy who was with them at all times. And I reminded him and he this guy. Agreed. He's like, yeah. That's exactly right. I said in a world of guys Chris long is a man just the chick gave away and then worry. Salary. You know, are you gonna guy are you going to climb the mountain with them? He just released list of now, you're not going to do. Big cat has promised in twenty twenty. He'll do it. Yeah. I will not be making any such climb a mountain. I would I would pay rush in In any any way. way. Then. Then it would it would be good content for Chris long in the promotion because I because it'd be like, yeah. That schmuck? The pot belly guy. He died. I Hillary they ride there. That's like that's what we're willing to do to bring attention to the need for water across the big blue marble could override your corpse back down the mountain as a sled that'd be a fun kind of arrive or like people sitting on your blow. Tissues belly just use my belly for a bouncy house for evening activity or something like that. So. Yeah. So Chris Chris long and non-football-playing guests would be Paul Rudd surprise surprisingly over John Aminov people wanna big Jon Hamm fan. But Paul rod is my absolute. Number one favorite. He's y'all. I just I just feel like Paul rod almost doesn't get his due as being like the the top like the comedy actor Jon Hamm is like everyone it just feels like everyone loves him. But Paul rod like underrated. I feel like a little bit. All right. That's your perception. I mean, they've Guoli successful. I'm sure right about on their fouled on the same plane in terms of profile, Paul Rudd. And by the way, he's considered a handsome devil himself by by the rest of the world. I think right. Maybe did you face is one more handsome than the other Jon Hamm is the most handsome guy probably ever seen in person because that true in in the history of your life. You seem more handsome, no better than Patrick claybon. Yup. Than Dan Halley just a little bit better than David car. Yep. Did you tell me feel better than handsome, Hank butterflies tank? You Brett was in Atlanta. That's outrageous. Yeah. Fiance. Brent standing nearby. She didn't even know his name. I'd like to for my FIA. Liz, I can't remember they pretty much. I like to look you in a basement. Show..

Jon Hamm Paul rod Paul Rudd Chris long Chris Chris Payton David car Brent Liz Dan Halley Patrick claybon Brett Atlanta John Aminov
"aminov" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Near the puddle avenue casino. W two seven seven WTMJ annex wealth management studio. This is News Radio. WTMJ WTMJ news time seven forty nine to walk. You please still searching for answers after a car plunges into the K K river WTMJ's. Mike Spaulding has the latest on this developing story. Yeah. Genetic crash happening late New Year's Eve nights at the end of greenfield avenue, advocate k river. According to Bill walkie police. The car was found to have a man a woman and a two year old child in it. They were evading police when the driver lost control and went into the river one of the victims identified as nineteen year old, Shannon Nima and her two year old daughter the man's identity. Not yet released by police chief Alphonse umbrellas, however saying today, the department will provide an update to the circumstances surrounding that crash later on today all that more coming up at eight o'clock WTMJ news time, seven fifty. Traffic and weather together on the tens. No snow here yet, Debbie Lazaga. Nope. No snow. However, we are seeing a little bit more building volume acting folks are starting to go back to work now on ninety four eastbound a little bit heavy eight minutes to get from the sooner downtown it's nine on the westbound side from downtown to the zoo. So we'll get a two minute delay there. Southbound forty one highway q to the zoo interchange about eighteen minutes. So it's an extra four northbound ninety four. Layton avenue to downtown is gonna take you about fourteen doubles up your normal seven minute ride, southbound forty-three Brown deer road to the Marquette about eleven minutes there Aminov found bypass between. The hail.

K K river WTMJ Mike Spaulding Shannon Nima Alphonse umbrellas Debbie Lazaga Bill Aminov two year eighteen minutes eleven minutes eight minutes nineteen year seven minute two minute
"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Our first guest this week is being Aminov global vice president of Hewlett Packard enterprise for artificial intelligence IOT blockchain and data. Analytics Beena was recently recognized as a top women indeed an analytics by UC Berkeley in this show Beena specifically talks about why she started her nonprofit humans for as a way to give back. Her nonprofit is the voted for women and minorities to be retrained to get the latest education on technology like artificial intelligence, so that they can still remain competitive. What is humans for? So humans for a is a nonprofit that I started last year, and it really began with the idea of, you know, your lard about a eliminating a lot of jobs, but I also know that is going to create Lord of new jobs, and so that was one data point. And the other data point was does continuous of Venice. And there's a lack of the men in tech. There is not enough diversity in technology, and I have seen two major technology waves the internet and mobile which had similar impact then it eliminated jobs, but it also created new jobs, and my my concern is that we are undisturbed pave now in new jobs will get created. And if we don't proactively train more women to fill these new jobs, they will never be enough women in tech. So what humans does is to be able to get more women and minorities into tech by educ? Updating them about and the way we do it is, you know, there's a number of channels. But the most important part is being able to explain in simple terms to a non computer science person Narain expect these people to become hardcore programming data, scientists data engineers, but even product managers are project managers that that also adds value. Right. And it is so important for Keith specially because you you you're aware of the kind of biases that can creep in and we need diversity in the development of here, and today doesn't exist. And it worries me a lot. And when I talk about diversity, I'm not talking just about gender diversity, but getting people from different economic backgrounds different educational backgrounds. It's so important to have diversity in the development of and humans for air is really building out content and products, which will help increase diversity. That brings up a good point about how humans free I got started. So what are some of the foundational principles in order for humans for people to engage with that? Yes. Actually, let me step back and tell you how it got started. Because I I had this idea about three four years ago now, and for me, it was just so obvious that okay, we need more women in tech and is going to create new jobs. Why don't we proactively train just seem to add up psychic googling to see is any companies any organization focused on solving the diversity problem, actually using it. And nobody was and that's how I could. Finally, I just set it up on my own last year. And my hope is that United grains enough momentum that we can get more people more people educated about. So the foundation of idea around it is to really help. The men and minorities were in other professions educated about humans for does is be go profession by profession, so far or financial professional. Be would explain all the buzzwords around by using terminology examples from their domain, meaning we would use examples for comply examples from compliance of fraud detection, how these are the steps that you would do. And this is what he does an automated. And by the way, this is what that's what is so boys learning are that tortoise unsupervised learning. So instead of starting with what is machine learning you start with this is an example of how you processing unit. Explain it in that specific domain language, and we do the same for nurses. And we do the same for marketing professionals using examples from that specific domain to explain for me this humans for is really at that point where I feel. Unites about giving back. It's about making a difference do by combining two of the things that I love the most a technology data and also being able to good, I think that's great. This year's one of our themes is technology for good. And I think it'd be interesting to go through the story behind the actual name humans for. Yeah. Yeah. It's dumb. They were brainstorming for ideas on what to name it. I knew it was about building products and getting content ready to educate non computer science, people about with the focus on women and minorities, and we were looking at for good, you know, good number of options. And I just felt we need to show a stronger connection between humans any I you hear about a lot about how is being built for humans. But we also need more humans in wall in the development of also humans for a in terms of empowering people into education of artificial intelligence, especially women minorities. Want wanna congratulate you again for being named woman of the year in business or data analytics from UC, Berkeley. Congratulations. And what better person such as yourself to actually start this concept of humans for what are some of the forecast predictions. You have in the artificial intelligence market because you definitely think beyond what the average person thinks. And you have this great optimism about you. We think is on the horizon, I am most excited about what I can do for us in healthcare and education and air is going to be prevalent in all all industries, but healthcare because just making healthcare accessible to all and same with education making education access to all. Now, you an example, Keith I believe that there is an eighty year old woman somewhere in a remote part of Africa who has the cure for cancer in head. But she has not been able to take it out to the world because she didn't have the right education and access to the right people to be able to get that cure out. And so we stop. But if. Hey, I can make education accessible to all. I think you're going to see so much more solutions in the world. If you enjoyed this partial clip of our show with Beena you can download the entire episode at I tunes on the end up is in cast box. Stay tuned Jonathan Nelson founder and managing partner of the hack fund is up next to discuss his desire to put shoes and all the kids in Latin America through technology. You have any questions or comments Email us at info SBA biz..

Beena founder and managing partner Keith Venice Hewlett Packard Aminov global vice president SBA fraud Narain Jonathan Nelson Berkeley cancer Latin America Africa three four years eighty year
"aminov" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Gary Aminov, Los Angeles commentator and host once made the statements, and rightfully so if ten thousand Swedes amassed on the southern border. I would want to know about it. And I would want to keep them out. The people who immediately go to this is about 'cause they're they're Brown people. These are pathetic people. These are people who don't believe in borders whatsoever and want to somehow shame you because you have a mind and your rational. That's what they want to do. You should somehow be ashamed of yourself for actually believing in a border. That's right, sir. I didn't mean to keep you on hold their the president tweeted about this this convoy. He said, I am watching the democrat party. Death. That's right. I'm watching the democrat party led assaults on our country by Guatemala Honduras. El Salvador, whose leaders are doing little to stop this large flow of people, including many criminals from entering Mexico to the United States. He continues in addition to stopping all payments to these countries, which seemed almost no control of their population. I must in the strongest terms ask Mexico to stop this onslaught of unable to do. So I will call up the US military and close our southern border. Exclamation. Now, a lot of people think that this is beyond. The pale is.

democrat party Mexico El Salvador United States Los Angeles Gary Aminov president Brown Honduras
"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

07:23 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"So once again, I'm joined with Beena Aminov CEO and founder of humans for. And global VP of artificial intelligence IOT big data for HP enterprise. So thanks again for being here. Vena? Thank you. So being I think it's very appropriate. Given we're talking about humans for. AI especially focused on empowering, women and minorities. What's your personal journey? How's your story? Like, and how did you get here? Yeah. It's I don't think keep that ever plan for a journey like this. So I have I have studied computer science bachelor's and master's in computer science, and then did some NBA as well. And I've always been fortunate enough to be in the data space. I have I've I've just seen this whole space of all right from the time they come down assembly language programming. And my first base it was debase and Foxborough axel. These are I don't think these databases even exist anymore, but have seen when it was very expensive to store data. It was very expensive to process did I it was nearly impossible to process the kind of data that reprocessed today. I did. So initially it was data analyst DB rose through the ranks around data team. And what I've seen is this space has evolved so much right? We started from transactional database systems and came data warehouses and business intelligence, and now then came the way of big data and data science and now it's all about AI and machine learning. But if you look back at it, a Iowa something that existed, even when I was studying, except that you couldn't try out a lot of things that you could take back in the early nineties, even personalized marketing was considered impossible to futuristic. Forget about self driving cars, even personalized marketing. I remember having those discussions was not possible. Not doable. And today, it's all real. So I think having seen how this technology has a wall actually makes me more of an optimist because having seen these technologies, I know that humans are way, moderate and. We had don't think technology can take over all of us. It's going to help us become better humans. In terms of my journey. I think having been in the technical bad growing through the leadership ranks has really helped me balance out understanding the technology as well as being a leader. And now helping helping teams reached the business goals that having that balance between computer science, and a business degree has actually I think come into play the, you know, the more I grow as a leader for me this humans for is really at that point where I feel it's about giving back. It's about making a difference do by combining two of the things that I loved the most a technology data and also being able to do good. Yeah. I think that's great. This year's one of our themes is technology for good. And I think it'd be interesting to go through the story behind the actual name humans for. Yeah. Yeah. It's dumb. Brainstorming for ideas on what to name it. I knew it was about building products and getting content ready to educate non computer science people about with the focus on women and minorities, and we were looking at AI for good good number of options. And I just felt you know, we need to show a stronger connection between humans any I you hear about a lot about how is being built for humans. But we also need more humans in wall in the development of. Yeah. Yeah. And I think just to summarize what we talked about earlier segments. We had talked about how there's always this notion of systemic bias confirmation by season humans insistence that we humans are behind the programming of these systems. And so if you are very aware that you have your own bias seizure program, those bias seasons these systems also humans for a in terms of empowering people into education of artificial intelligence, especially women minorities. I want to congratulate you again for being named woman of the year in business or data analytics from UC, Berkeley, congratulate you and what better person such as yourself to actually start this concept of humans for. So what are some of the applications that humans for areas or working on? Yeah. So there's a big focus on content, and we do it by word tickle. We've already completed some content for marketing professional marketing, professional can go in and check and read up and today, the three steps the first step is, you know, we we train you enough. So that when you read a news article about air, you understand what that means. It could be using any of the buzzwords that exists deep learning are said dependent analysis explains it in simple terms. The second segment is really around educating you about Air Products in your field. So if you're a marketing professional, you want to think about it the Gartner for marketing, so all the products at a startup that exist in your field. So if you want to continue marketing, you're still empowered because you know about. And you know about how he is used in your field. And then the third segment after you finish the first to the third step is after this. If you feel very strongly you come up with a great idea of starting your own company or a product idea for marketing product that you want to now get into the technical space. That's very partner with other entities where you can take on a product management class or project management class are an agile coach or any of these right where now you have a clear path to join a tech company. That's great. Are there any qualifications or prerequisites to get started high school? Also, partnering with. An organization called project dialects, and they have their an entrepreneur nonprofit, focus on educating high school students about becoming starting their own business, and partnering with them to be able to take a tomorrow high school students because I think, you know, our kids are studying for jobs, which doesn't exist. Most of them are even if they choose to become a doctor, it is more of you know, they'll they'll be using tools which one which aren't being taught in schools today. Right. So I think I personally believe that programming or coding as we know it today is going to change drastically in the next four to five years. I recently had a guest on Willie Takata who is the chief developer advocate IBM. And he put a a thought provoking question, which was he thinks that just like we take four languages in school. That software development language will be vital to a well rounded student.

AI Beena Aminov Vena HP VP NBA Iowa Air Products Gartner CEO analyst Willie Takata Berkeley IBM founder
"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:18 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Now back to Silicon Valley insider once again, your host Keith coup. Hey insiders. Welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with Keith Q today. I'm joined by special guests Aminov who's the global VP of artificial intelligence big data and not at HP enterprise as well as the founder and CEO of humans for a nonprofit, I'm here to empower and educate people in artificial intelligence for minorities and women once again, thanks for being here. So this week's question and no better person to answer. It is two parts. What is art official, and why do people fear it so much? I official intelligence is van V are able to use a machine our computer to be able to emulate human intelligence at this point. It is bad weekend. Actually, use it to do some of the repeatable does that humans have to do some of the boring does that we have to do. Can we have a be able to fill those tasks for us? Why is it fear? You just have to look at the media. There's also fear, but I'm an airp- dimissed. I believe that is going to make all of our lives better. But the reality is that just like any other technology can be used for good or bad. It's always depend on who's using it. So the same technology that can be used to do facial recognition to keep them all secure can be used by bad actors to target certain people. So I think it all comes down to the technology. We also hear a lot of hype around the loss of jobs and that creates. Lord of fear among people who are not associated with the technology who don't understand the technology. And when you don't understand it technology, and you're hearing that technology is going to take a job. I think the fear is natural. And part of humans is charter is to actually make the technology understandable to a common person. Thank you for the answer. And I think it's great that you mentioned the media. I I was born and raised in the United States, and we grew up during my childhood with the Terminator and. And people are definitely afraid of machines taking over I just got back from a really great economic mission trip to China. And of course, China is known as very focused artificial intelligence, and there was talk a few months ago. I talked about where Peter Thiel versus Reid Hoffman. One is a fan of a and one is not. And so are the Chinese were asking me the robots they're asking me, you know, what is the marketplace for consumer robots in the United States, and they have for pretty much everything. And I said for certain use cases people would not get trust consumer robot. Because what you just said, there's some fear. But I really like what you talked about is that technology can be used for good or bad. And we think about today a lot of where we think about autonomous vehicles drones that are being used in everyday applications being used for very good purposes. We just had a call for code event nonprofit where we were looking at software solutions for disaster relief and incident management almost everything had a component to it. So given all that. How do people get comfortable with this technology? How do they actually embrace it? What is humans for what's? How do they get people on board? Yeah. I think. One of the fundamental things is. Tends to be logged on a lot of buzzwords that doesn't make sense to compare non computer science person machine learning deep learning NLP. And in reality thing is it can be explained in simple terms, unless you are inventing the next big supercomputer. Are you're developing the next machine learning algorithm. I think it's really being able to explain how a brain processes information and act on it, obviously oversimplifying it, but if you when you read an article about a if you're able to understand the crux of the technology. I think it's more relatable. It is something then that you're aware of an actor. And the reality is that we already have a everywhere around us. I mean, you're carrying in your pocket. I mean, it's stare right? And it's being there for a few years that it's getting more and more advanced. And I hear you on you know, you hear the good and the. Head. I do think though that the the hype to a certain extent is justifiable because if e- are not aware of the bad that this technology can be programmed to do we won't take enough steps we won't put the right guardrails in place to make sure that the technology doesn't go bad actors and training, the technology like you to the example of Microsoft chat board, right? And today. It's a very elite group who understand these buzzwords humans for does is be go a profession by profession, so far or financial professional. We would explain all the buzzwords around here by using terminology examples from their domain, meaning we would use examples for comply examples from compliance of fraud detection, how what these are the steps that you would do. And this is what does an automated. And by the way, this is what that's what is so boys learning are that sort of. Unsubdued learning. So instead of starting with what is machine learning you start with this is an example of how you processing unit. Explain it in that specific domain language, and we do the same for, you know, notices, and we do the same for marketing professionals using examples from that specific domain to explain it. Yeah. Like what you said, especially in cyber security cyber risk. There's a thought provoking hypothesis that you have to have artificial intelligence in the next generation of these cyber tools because it's the only way to keep up with bad actors. And then a lot of the startups that are mentoring at these incubators, especially in what we call the concept of enterprise auto. So in a place to dot O R next generation customer relationship management, HR, applications, workforce enablement all of them will have an air component. Because that's just where we have. Yeah. And the the simplest way to think about it as anything that you do today that is repeatable and that mundane work for you that really bothers you is something that I should be doing even today. Right. And then the next step is machine learning, which is a part of which is really now ensure. Review coding it. How do you make the program? Learn on its own almost like a newborn out you train this person to learn about his or her surroundings and your training systems to learn. And I think that's such a good point. We should say it again. Artificial intelligence. Has the follow up with machine learning and without it? There's really not the ability to. Aggregated data than analyze the data. And then synthesize the data because that's how you're going to be continuously training these systems to get better. And better, and I would bring it up to I want I want to actually say which one because they leapfrog each other. But let's think about translation services. And that the two biggest players and translation service one claims leapfrog the other one, but really what it is is that in the context of being able to translate from which the other one. We're way past the point where I know one of the inventors for translation services that they had a company wide meeting in PowerPoint, and it is the translated the Texans sixty languages, but it didn't have the context. And so that's where the machine learning comes in is that people who can usually tune with these phrases are in their native language in as the machine gets smarter, quote, unquote, smarter that it will. Then know the next time. It comes across these contextual elements of what's the translation should be kiss. Exactly. And that's power of machine being able to look to massive amounts of data and drive in sight. And eventually what I see doing is becoming a tool in all of our pockets in our arsenal, which we can use to make our own lives better. So once again, I'm joined by being Aminov, Tuesday, the global VP of big data in IOT free enterprise as well as the founder and CEO of humans for a nonprofit. Purpose built to empower people especially women and minorities to grasp artificial intelligence as a tool..

founder and CEO United States VP Keith Q official China HP enterprise Peter Thiel Microsoft Terminator fraud Reid Hoffman Aminov
"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

11:06 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"With Beena Aminov CEO and founder of humans for. AI and global VP of artificial intelligence IOT and big data for HP enterprise. So thanks for being here. Beena? Thank you Sabina. I think it's very appropriate. Given we're talking about humans for AI. Especially focused on empowering, women and minorities. What's your personal journey? How's your story lake and how did you get here? Yeah. It's I don't think keep that ever plan for a journey like this. So I have I have studied computer science bachelor's and master's in computer science, and then did some MB as well. And I've always been fortunate enough to be in the data space. I have I've I've just seen this whole space of all right from the time they have done assembly language programming and my first database, it was debase and Foxborough axel. These are these databases even exist anymore, but have seen when it was very expensive to store data. It was very expensive to process did it was nearly impossible to process the kind of data that reprocessed today. I did. So initially it was data analyst DB rose through the ranks Iran and data team. And what I've seen is this space has evolved so much right? We started from transactional database systems and came data warehouses and business intelligence, and now then came the value of big data and data science. And now, it's all about AI and machine learning. But if you look back at it, a Iowa something that existed, even when I was studying, except that you couldn't try out a lot of things that you could take back in the early ninety s even personalized marketing was considered impossible to futuristic. Forget about self driving cars, even personalized marketing. I remember having those discussions was not possible. Not doable. And today, it's all real. So I think having seen how this technology has evolved actually makes me more of an optimist because having seen these technology leaves I know that humans are vase, moderate and. We don't think technology can take were all of us. It's going to help us become better humans. In terms of my journey. I think having been in the technical bat growing through the leadership ranks has really helped me balance out understanding the technology as well as being a leader. And now helping helping teams reach the business goals that having that balance between computer science, and a business degree has actually I think come into play the, you know, the more I grow as a leader for me this humans for a is really at that point where I feel about giving back. It's about making a difference to by combining two of the things that I love the most technology data and also being able to do good. And I think that's great. This year's one of our themes is technology for good. And I think it'd be interesting to go through the story behind the actual name humans for. Yeah. Yeah. Dumb brainstorming for ideas on what to name it. I knew it was about building products and getting content ready to educate non computer science people about with the focus on women and minorities, and we were looking at for good good. By the number of options. And I just felt you know, we need to show a stronger connection between humans any I you hear about a lot about how a is being built for humans, but we also need more humans in wall in the development of. Yeah. And I think just to summarize what we talked about earlier segments. We had talked about how there's always this notion of systemic bias confirmation bias in humans insistence that we humans are behind the programming of these systems. And so if you aren't very aware that you have your own bias, usual program, those bias seasons these systems also humans for a in terms of empowering people in the education of artificial told you especially women minorities want to congratulate you again for being named woman of the year in business or data analytics from UC, Berkeley congratulate and what better person such as yourself to actually start this concept of humans for. So what are some of the applications that humans for areas are working on? Yeah. So there's a big focus on content, and we do it by what we've already completed some content for marketing professional marketing, professional can go in and check and read up and today, the three steps the first step is, you know, we we train you enough. So that when you read a news article about you understand what that means. It could be using any of the buzzwords that exists deep learning ours. Mm said dependent analysis explains. It in simple terms, the second segment is really around educating you about Air Products in your field. So if you're a marketing professional y'all wanna think about it the Gartner for marketing, so all the products that startups that exists in your field. So if you want to continue marketing, you're still you're empowered because you know, about and you know about how he is used in your field. And then the third segment now after you've finished the first two the third step is after the if you feel very strongly you come up with a great idea of starting your own company or a product idea for marketing product that you want to now get into the technical space. That's very partner with other entities where you can take on a product management class. So project management class are an article or any of these right where now you have a clear path to join. The company. That's great. Are there any qualifications or prerequisites to get started high school? Also, partnering with. An organization called project Title IX, and they have their an entrepreneur nonprofit, focus on educating high school students about becoming starting their own business, and partnering with them to be able to take a more high school students because I think, you know, our kids are studying for jobs, which don't exist. Most of them are even if that using to become a doctor, it is more of you know, they'll they'll be using tools which one which are not being taught in schools today. Right. So I think I personally believe that programming or coding as we know it today is going to change drastically in the next four to five years. I recently had a guest on Willie Takata who is the chief of over advocate IBM, and he put a a thought provoking question, which was he thinks that just like we take four languages in school. That software development language will be vital to a well rounded student in that just like you take a four-lane. Where'd you take a coding language that will then help you be wired so to speak in being able to take on jobs that don't exist yet will exist tomorrow following your optimism around AI? There's this fear about how many jobs will be lost from. But there's actually another calculation that says that more jobs will be created because of because they'll still be the people that need to do the interaction. Do the interpretation actually play that still into something? Yeah. The jobs that we cannot even think about today right now all these air systems need maintenance need that feedback. Doc need performance reviews, so to speak so one job that I've been the hearing about a lot is a chief people officer chief HR officer for because just like humans they need their review they need that feedback. They need maintenance and somebody needs to look at it more on how do you nurture the? That's funny. You mentioned that. And I've done a lot of shows on blockchain. This is really an artificial intelligence show. But the timeline is that groups that I'm working with were thinking about blockchain in terms of reputation management reputation management goes to anything not just people it goes into devices. And so when you bring a chief people officer for a this concept that. A machine a system a program of virtual device can have its own reputation can have its own criteria for performance in KPI's. That's something that people never think of. Yeah. Yeah. So one of the things you talked about how to ask questions in relation to this process. Once you speak a little more about that. Yes. I think today people mostly as a wrong question is my job going to go away. What should I be learning? What she does it. It's a question coming out of a place of fear. I think the right question is how does city work or how does Alexa work, and what data is it capturing yet? You know, what can you do with that data? Now technologists like you, and me know, what can be done with that data. But there's a huge population. That doesn't understand it, and as technology becomes more. I think there's you know that awareness is a crucial part for them to ask the right questions to be able to know that when you are driving an autonomous car every data point is going to be captured, and it could be evaluated for different things. Right. And that impact of what could be done with that data. It's it's an unknown today. Right. And I think the question should be more about understanding the technology and ask. Asking those questions to prevent some of these bad bad thing happening. Yeah. No. I completely agree. I think that technology oftentimes people fear technology, but the best way to overcome that fear is you don't have to embrace technology. But you should be educated aware using the same example about autonomous vehicles or even for non autonomous vehicles. Were you still driving the car knowing that every data point can be collected? We'll be collected and that it can be used to make things safer altered behaviors changed driving patterns that whether you feared or not that can be very powerful it can help improve your driving record reduce your insurance costs. And it can be applied not just to driving but the healthcare as well. So Beena again, I thank you for being here. I don't want anyone to go away because we're going to close the show Keith Kuessel convenience solder joint with being a.

AI chief people officer Beena Aminov Sabina HP Beena Gartner Air Products global VP Iowa CEO Berkeley analyst Iran Alexa
"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Hey insiders. Welcome back to Silicon Valley insider with keep Q today. I'm joined by very special guests being I'm enough who's the global VP of artificial intelligence big data and not at HP enterprise as well as the founder and CEO of humans for a nonprofit, I'm here to empower and educate people in artificial intelligence for minorities and women once again, thanks for being here. He care. So this week's question and no better person. That'd be there to answer. It is two parts. What is artificial intelligence, and why do people fear it so much? Artificial intelligence is van V are able to use a machine our computer to be able to emulate human intelligence at this point. It is where we can actually use it to do some of the repeatable tasks that humans have to do some of the boring does that we have to do. Can we have a be able to fill those tasks for us? Why is it fear? You just have to look at the media. There's also fear, but I'm an airp- dimissed. I believe that is going to make all of our lives better. But the reality is that just like any other technology can be used for good or bad. It's always depends on who's using it. So the same technology that can be used to do facial recognition to keep them all secure can be used by bad actors to target certain people. So I think it all comes down to the technology. We also hear a lot of hype around the loss of jobs, and that creates a lot. Lot of fear among people who are not associated with technology who don't understand the technology. And when you don't understand it technology, and you hearing that technology is going to take away your job. I think the fear is natural and part of human sway is charter is to actually make the technology understandable to a common person. Thank you for the answer. And I think it's great that you mentioned the media. I I was born and raised in the United States, and we grew up during my childhood with the Terminator and. And people are definitely afraid of machines taking over I just got back from a really great economic mission trip to China. And of course, China is known as a very focused artificial intelligence, and there was a talk months ago and talked about where Peter Thiel says Reid Hoffman. One is a fan of a and one is not. And so are the Chinese were asking me the robots they're asking me, you know, what is the marketplace for consumer robots the United States, and they have one for pretty much everything. And I said for certain use cases people would not get trust a consumer robot. Because what you just said. There's some fear. But I really like what you talked about is that technology can be used for good or bad. And we think about today a lot of where we think about autonomous vehicles drones that are being used in the applications are being used for very good purposes. We just had a call for code event. A nonprofit where we were looking at software solutions for disaster relief and incident management almost everything had component to it. So given all that how do people get comfortable with this technology. How do they actually embrace it? What is humans for what's? How do they get people on board? Yeah. I think. One of the fundamental things is too intense to be logged on a lot of buzzwords that doesn't make sense to compare non computer science person machine learning deep learning NLP. And in reality thing is it can be explained in simple terms, unless you are inventing the next big supercomputer. Are you a developing the next machine learning algorithm? I think it's really being able to explain how a brain processes information and act on it, obviously oversimplifying it, but if you when you read an article about a if you're able to understand the crux of the technology. I think it's more relatable. It is something that you're aware of an act on the reality is that we already have a everywhere around us. I mean carrying in your pocket. I mean, it's their right? And it's been there for a few years. It's just that it's getting more and more advanced and. I hear you on. You know, you hear the good and the bad. I do think though that the hype to a certain extent is justifiable because if e- are not aware of the bad that this technology can be programmed to do we won't take enough steps we won't put the right guy drains plays to make sure that the technology doesn't go bad actors and not training, the technology like you to the example of Microsoft Chad board, right? And today, it's a very elite group who understand all these buzzwords. Humans for does is be go profession by profession, so far or financial professional. Be would explain all the buzzword around by using terminology examples from their two main? Meaning we would use examples for comply examples from compliance fraud detection, how you know, these are the steps that you would do and this is what does an automated, and by the way, this is what? That's what is so boys. Learning are that tortoise unsupervised learning. So in sort of starting with what is machine learning you start with this is an example of how you processing explain it in that specific domain language, and we do the same for nurses. And we do the same for marketing professionals using examples from that specific domain to explain it. Yeah. Like what you said, especially in security and cyber risk. There's a thought provoking hypothesis that you have to have artificial intelligence in the next generation of these cyber tools because it's the only way to keep up with bad actors. And then a lot of the startups that are mentoring at these incubators, especially in what we call the concept of enterprise auto auto, our next generation customer relationship management, HR, applications, workforce enablement all of them will have an air component. Because that's just where we have to. Yeah. Yeah. And the the simplest way to think about it is anything that you do today that is repeatable, and that's moon, Dane, work for you that really bores you. There's something that I should be doing even today. Right. And then the next step is machine learning, which is a part of I which is really now insurance you coding it. How do you make the program? Learn on its own almost like a newborn out you train this person to learn about his or her surroundings training systems to line. And I think that's such a good point. We should say it again. Artificial intelligence. Has the follow up with machine learning and without it? There's really not the ability to. The data than analyze the data. And then synthesize the data because that's how you're going to be continuously training these systems to get better. And better, and I would bring it up to I won't say which one because they leapfrog each other. But let's think about translation services. And that the two biggest players and translation service, one claims leapfrog the other one, but really what it is is that in the context of being able to translate from which the other one we're way past the point where I know one of the inventors for translation services, so that they had a companywide meeting in PowerPoint, and it is translated the Texan sixty languages, but it didn't have the context. So that's where the machine learning comes in is that there's people who can usually tune with these phrases are in a native language in as the machine gets smarter, quote, unquote, smarter that it will. Then know the next time. It comes across these contextual elements. What the translation should be. Yes. Exactly. And that's power of my sheet being able to look to massive amounts of data and drive in sight. And eventually what I see doing is becoming a tool in all of our pockets in our arsenal which we can use to make our own. Life's better. So once again, I'm joined by being Aminov, Tuesday, the global VP of big data and not free enterprise as well as the founder and CEO of humans for a nonprofit that purpose built to empower people, especially women and minorities to grasp artificial intelligence as a tool..

founder and CEO United States China VP HP enterprise Microsoft Terminator fraud Peter Thiel Reid Hoffman Dane Aminov
"aminov" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Including Germany and France have reached a deal to receive one hundred and forty migrants. Stranded on the boat, in the Mediterranean Bloomberg's Maria today reports the agreement will see the boat known as Aquarius dock and Malta after that Germany France Spain Portugal and Luxembourg will take care of them. The move was hailed by president Aminov. Macron as Ian cooperation at work each end the Prussian on individual nations by distributing the number of migrants Maranto Bloomberg daybreak Europe Madrid and Brazil's imprisoned former President Lula da Silva will submit his candidacy to run for the nation's top job later today Bloomberg's Brigstocke let says a. Thousands of his supporters are gathering in the capital the electoral authorities should decide on his fate within the next three weeks but. Few expect, he will be allowed to run the uncertainty over his candidacy is ever shuddering the most, unpredictable election since Brazil Return to democracy in Brasilia Bruce Douglas Bloomberg daybreak, Europe global news twenty four hours. A day on. Air take on Twitter powered by more than twenty seven hundred journalists Allan listen more than, one hundred twenty, countries I'm Leon guarantee this is Bloomberg Marcus FANG straight to sport has Colin Celtic will find out their opponents in the. Europa league playoff tomorrow night following their Champions League exit they went down two one away. To a, aka, Athens, in, the, away leg of their third qualifying round. Tie a three two aggregate defeat sells it will next face either Latvian. Side tax, your mother of Lithuania era number of upsets in the first. Round of the, League, Cup, tip Plymouth's got a one, nil victory at Bristol City another championship side which were knocked out on penalties by Exeter. Of the other ties that went to spot kicks Middlesbrough Notts County and Nottingham. Forest got past berry ten nine Andy Murray says he's still very positive. For the rest of the tennis season he failed to get past the first round of the Cincinnati masters losing the Frenchman LUKA And the Morgan still have to do to reach the quarter-finals of crickets t twenty blast the south groups, fourth-place, sites, from two nine hundred eight run defeated Sussex who now just a point behind. Them with a.

Bloomberg Bruce Douglas Bloomberg Maranto Bloomberg Bloomberg Marcus FANG Brazil Andy Murray President Lula da Silva Germany France Spain Portugal Europa league president Aminov Middlesbrough Notts County Germany Brasilia Europe Europe Madrid Luxembourg France Twitter Lithuania Athens
"aminov" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

WRFR-LP Rockland

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

"Well we were heading down under the river mother those two boys was listening special guy who turns out to be a scientist i watched the guy talking very quiet the woman with that blank look that people have in their minds it's a thousand miles away in the seat in front of them frank ward who was talking very personal stephanie from what i could get he wasn't talking about business either he was getting very chummy all of a sudden the train stops i couldn't on tuesday stephanie taking seats everybody dr something's happened were right on the river is i think we are right i snapped on the emergency lights what i saw scared me people in the aisles some of them jammed against the doors some of them standing on the seats everybody in your seats look at this thirty seconds on the dock and look at them yes you scared stephanie nominee aminov hurry to get home where we've got to get out of here look here conductor what's up well they're trying to find out now well i've got business to attend to man waiting for me out makes more right now find out what's happened we'll start i hope we won't be delayed too long to ever can tell conduct you i'm congressman joe had that way that politicians have your company operates under a frank is from the state and you have some responsibilities to the public do you realize we're right under the river found what's happening let's get out of here i went up to the head motorman was trying to find out what was wrong i stayed and helped them for about twenty minutes then i went back into the car business stephanie mann who is going to be in on the syndicates waiting for me your next more right now well what did you find out there's no power then we're then we're.

scientist frank ward congressman joe stephanie mann thirty seconds twenty minutes
"aminov" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Cornerstone community bank everything we do at cornerstone is built around you april is community banking month as a community bank we offer personal service and are an integral part of street we reinvest your deposits back in the community helping create local jobs walt disney once said whatever you do do it well as lenders cornerstone can't be everything to everyone so we focus on being the best small business and residential lender we can be we offer direct access to decision makers for a quick response when you need that new machine for a found the home of your dreams been awhile since you're big bank lender checked in on you or maybe you don't even know who your lender is you know it's time to switch to a community bank cornerstone community bank is your bank for small business and home mortgages learn more at bankwithcornerstone dot com cornerstone community bank where community is our middle name offices in grafton aminov comedy falls member fdic and equal housing lender nmls number five six five zero nine five johnny manhattan's italian steve kastenbaum berta says great every day but now fridays are freaking fabulous cousin debt wanna know why how come vinny because you when your associates did a big time upgrade on the seafood i know we now feature fresh fish selections on fridays that i'd die for sounds like you got to go to the seafood penthouse friday's a johnny manhattan's and we take reservations on fridays and every night we're open classy but casual that's johnny manhattan's two six two six to eight seventy seven hundred hey campers plan for loads of summer fun at brigham rv's big preseason sale now offering huge manufacturer incentives on models by jaco bego cherokee hartland keystone and more save on the massive selection of traveltrailers fifthwheels fold downs toy haulers and more great selection even better prices freedom rv will be any competitor's price and they offer top dollar for your trade st their full inventory at freedom are vw i dot com or stop in just north of slinger on highway fortyone freedom rv where your freedom travels you can listen to coast to coast any time with iheart radio it's just a great way for you to stay connected with this program wherever you might be the iheart radio app download it enjoy it it have some fun now conservative thought not just talk this is the dan o'donnell show.

walt disney johnny manhattan brigham rv jaco bego cherokee hartland ke grafton aminov dan o'donnell
"aminov" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"aminov" Discussed on PRI's The World

"My was my colleague reporter amaru for fauna he was speaking with david aminov the bbc's fifthfloor podcast and finally sixty years ago today an new era dawned that's the sputnik beat the radio signal sent by the first satellite ever launched sputnik of course was the soviet union's entry into the space race and that signal could be picked up across the world and we're talking a satellite about the size of a beach ball doug millard is the curators the london science museum's recent cosmonaut exhibition at what was the significance of sputnik doug it's where all of the spaceage started so people were expecting it to happen soclean america the big surprise though that it was sputnik it was the soviet union that orange first right so the us had not started its mercury missions yet or launched an any of its own satellites was it a shock to the americans that the soviets kinda got up into the skies first will on the one hand it wasn't a shock this was the the time of the eisenhower administration and he was fairly relaxed about it because apart from anything else it set a precedent for overflowing one some neighbors territories a however politically uh the fallout was immense and gradually became clear that uh you could not have the us being second and of course things start to move slowly but surely and we noted led to i mean at the time i imagine sputnik must have seemed very jules verne for a lot of people what we did it gone of capture people's imaginations.

bbc soviet union doug millard london science museum us eisenhower administration reporter david aminov jules verne sixty years one hand