36 Burst results for "Amherst"

Fresh "Amherst" from Fresh Air

Fresh Air

00:35 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh "Amherst" from Fresh Air

"Us. Didn't have to do it. There's no reason why people who are alive in the 19 tens and twenties had to set aside land for the national parks right. They could have just develop that land as remarkable. It's is a professor at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. He studies big environmental problems. One of the things that's interesting about these issues is that they are long term, so we're making decisions today that are gonna have their biggest influence on people far in the future. There's a body of research that shows things like reciprocity, fairness and grab. Attitude motivate us to do nice things for people who've done nice things for us. But Markowitz wanted to find out something different. Can those same feelings help us make better decisions to benefit future generations? People will never meet. What we find is that the people who feel the most grateful Towards past generations for their environment. Elections are the same people who are most willing to put their own money on the table in order to protect these these environmental wonders for future generations. Which I think is really powerful, Marco, it says. In order for this kind of pay it forward psychology to motivate us. We need to hear the stories see the park's understand what there is to be grateful for, which is where someone like Chris Collier comes in. He runs the youth program at Yellowstone called Ground Works, Ah partnership between the National Park Service in the Environmental Protection Agency. That lets urban kids know the national parks are for them, too. Because in the old days if you're a person of color on you went into the woods. It didn't go so well. People would arrest you for vagrancy. You know, there was you could travel across the south to great smoky mountains and enjoy the park. But along the way, you couldn't find a hotel. You couldn't get your car fixed. It couldn't eat in a restaurant. So it's our job now is with the new generation is to reach out out of the parks and build those connections, the bridges and it starts by not just bringing the kids in the parks. It starts by building the parks in the cities. The kids in Collier's program first work in local city parks, doing trash picked up some trail work, and then he brings them out here to Yellowstone s. So they see that the work they're doing is Is part of one conservation movement. The United States 80% of America's population lives in urban areas and kids.

Chris Collier Yellowstone National Park Service Amherst Markowitz US. Professor University Of Massachusetts Environmental Protection Agenc United States Marco America
Springfield, SW of Boston, reports 115 new COVID-19 cases in one day, highest since April

WBZ Morning News

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Springfield, SW of Boston, reports 115 new COVID-19 cases in one day, highest since April

"Battle with coronavirus plays out in the daily numbers, with a caseload level not seen since April. Many communities air setting new records by the day. Springfield, for example, now on high alert, the Springfield Mayor Tom Sarno, reporting 115 new cases of the coronavirus in the last 24 hour reporting period, the highest ever. Mayor asking residents to it here to masking and social distancing protocols in a statement, he says it's not going to kill you to wear a mask, but God forbid it could. If you don't wear one at the Taconic Regional School System and Pittsfield High School, they go to remote learning for the rest of the week because of more than 200 cases in the last three weeks in that area. At U Mass. Amherst. They announced that for the men's and women's basketball season, no fans for home games at the moment center In the

Mayor Tom Sarno Springfield Taconic Regional School System U Mass Amherst Basketball
Bridging HUGE Gaps between Consumers, Providers, and Payors with Evan Osborne

Outcomes Rocket

06:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Bridging HUGE Gaps between Consumers, Providers, and Payors with Evan Osborne

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here and today. I have the privilege of hosting evan osborne. Evan osborne is the founder and managing partner of diabetics united and also president and ceo of ride salem and healthcare management consultant with a focus and quality initiatives and change management. Evan has over ten years of professional experience in direct patient. care as well as he's he's held leadership roles and both the payer and provider rounds of the industry. Evan has a diverse background and continuous improvement systems building and program management and has earned a bachelor's degree in biology at western oregon. University and in therapeutic radiation oncology from the oregon health and science university. He later earned his master's degree in public health at the university massachusetts amherst and is currently completing a doctor of business administration at california southern university. I'm excited a chat about the work. That evan is doing with diabetics united and really his his contributions to healthcare overall. So evan. such a pleasure to have you here with us. Thanks for joining honor to be on. Your program saw a mouthful that you just read off from my for working through year busy man. You're a busy man. I liked the busy thinks you know so. One of my favorite quotes is an idle. Mind is a workshop of the devil. The right yup. Yup you've done a lot of really great stuff in in healthcare avenue. I definitely want to share with everybody. Listening the work that you guys are up to bat diabetics united but also unite salem. Which is really cool. Cool stuff but before we dive into that just park for second and under better understand. What inspires your work in healthcare. Certainly will it's comes back at the turn of the century when i was pursuing a career opportunities aligned with my education being biology and computer science unique blend of potentially stepping into the healthcare realm and then during that time on a personal level. I had a one of my favorite uncle Called me up. And tell me about their their brain tumor that they just developed and They were working with some health. Professionals called radiation therapists us. I really enjoy His time with them. They're really good at what they do. Such an i never heard of such a field before around the same time. I university Counselor recommended a program oregon. Health and science university radiation oncology. And so having not so close together being told about the program and i looked into it and before i knew it was gonna program wonderful program there in portland oregon And then ten years later after working bedside in oncology taking on leadership roles progressive leadership. I was exposed to bigger picture. Realms healthcare And then on a personal note. I later developed Type one diabetes late in life. So i went from a very rarely going to healthcare. Not really seeing it on the customer's level. More just out of the health. Professional became a frequent flyer. Customer i seen it from end to end. And then my career took me into both sides of the industry and the health insurance industry hostile side and then consulting as well So with my diverse background there and my personal connection with it I continue to strive to to contributes improving yourself to the healthcare system that that's unfortunately a little bit more messed up. And we'd like to net but with all the numbers out there. It's it's easy to see that it needs improvements. And that's what motivates me to continue getting up every day to kalki poker evan That's that's great man. I mean how those two road scott converge to get you in new on the young college field and then you you stayed in and then type one diabetes happens to you and you just like you said this. This is it for a year it contributing in a big way. I appreciate you sharing your story very down and you know what i you know. We don't truly fully understand until you live it and You know having the the steps that that you have to take to manage diabetes. You live it firsthand and inspired you to create diabetics united. So tell us a little bit about diabetics united and what you guys are doing to help the healthcare ecosystem and in particular Think consumers right. Yeah her so. When i first was diagnosed stylish trying to teach myself a green all the information that i could help management as even and what i noticed. Was you know. There's pockets of information throughout the internet to go pretty deep to get what useful and practical you the season diabetics. So you have an enormous amount of information for diabetes one basically so someone that's in the process of developing diabetes or just recently got diagnosed. You're just basically learning alphabet diabetes. That's what's out there But there is no actual central location where it takes it to the next level. More of a practical approach bringing everyone together in the industry so Like a hub. And google is the hub in in essence. There's so many layers to get to where you need to go. It's not filtered out. And it takes a lot of time to get what is pertinent that you're looking for from someone such as myself. A background and diabetes kinda still through a narrow it down to what's practical to diabetics But also the ability to interact with it so diabetes united completely interactive platform on a web based solution. We can say so. Members can get on the website and an add content to sites. It's kind of a fusion of facebook. Amazon and wing thin And we've got some other Services that were hoping to roll out here in august. That'll be practical to this day and age being remotely accessible and coach

Evan Osborne Ride Salem Evan Oregon Health And Science Univ University Massachusetts Amher California Southern University Oregon Diabetes Health And Science University Marquez Brain Tumor Salem Portland Scott Google Amazon Facebook
UMass Amherst, West Of Boston, To Bring More Students Back For Spring Semester

WBZ Morning News

00:34 sec | Last month

UMass Amherst, West Of Boston, To Bring More Students Back For Spring Semester

"Plans to bring Mohr students back to campus for the spring semester in conjunction with a Morven Hristo Corona virus testing program. School officials say first year and transfer students will be given the option to live on campus. The option will also be offered to students who depend on the University for housing and dining. Including international students, those taking mandatory in person courses and varsity athletes. School officials say those groups represent about 60% of the typical on campus population.

Morven Hristo Corona Mohr
Some students to return to UMass Amherst, west of Boston

WBZ Programming

00:31 sec | Last month

Some students to return to UMass Amherst, west of Boston

"U mass Hammers plans to bring more students back to campus for the spring semester in conjunction with the more robust Corona virus testing program, school officials say First year and transfer students will be given the option to live on campus as well. Students who depend on the University for housing and dining, including international students. Those taking mandatory in person courses and varsity athletes. Schools chancellor says they represent about 60% of the typical on campus population.

Chancellor
Choosing A College When You Don't Know Your Major

The Scholarship Shark Podcast

06:07 min | Last month

Choosing A College When You Don't Know Your Major

"It might surprise you to know that fifty percent of students enter College as Undeclared Majors undecided or Undead. Layered refers to an admitted or an enrolled student who has not yet selected a major now while there's nothing wrong with being Undeclared. It does mean that you have to ask yourself different questions about your building your college list. For example, you would need to think about which schools are best for undecided students. What makes a good college for undecided majors and should I go to a college with a lot of Majors or apply to specific schools many different types of schools. So what does it mean to be undecided again off when you apply and you haven't selected a major and a major is an area of study that you pursue through your course work. For instance. If you're a history major, you're going to take a majority took courses in history. And if you're an engineering major, you're going to spend a lot of time taking engineering classes and upper level math classes. So one thing I want you to know that job Being an undecided major is temporary. You don't graduate from college undecided the purpose of coming in as an undecided or Undeclared major is to get the student time to decide on what they truly want to major in before they have to declare it now different schools have different times when a student needs to declare their major and maybe at the end of their first year or the beginning of their second year and there are some schools that allow you up to your junior year to declare your major. Now, I do want you to know that being undecided wage doesn't mean that you can't build your list. It just means that you have a different checklist and a different criteria for picking your universities. So let's talk about things that you need to consider as an Undeclared major. So number one decide on the location. Do you want to stay close to home or are you willing to travel a distance to get your education wage? This could open up possibilities as you're thinking through your college list. So decide on the limits of how far you're willing to travel is a necessary First Step number to think about your in-game. So what is your ultimate career goal? And even if you're not very clear on exactly what it is you want to do think about a general area or some common themes about what it is that you want to do and then begin to write down a list of all of the majors that will help you get to that career goal. So, you know, if you want to start college Undeclared and you're thinking about, you know, various Majors many different majors and you can't just pick one then you might benefit from options provided by larger University so that you have more Majors from which to choose so try to find a school that offers a great number of authors. Ends that you're potentially interested in and then that way as you're taking some of your first year courses your core courses it gives you time to think through exactly what it is that you want to change number three consider an open curriculum college. Now, there are some colleges with what's called an open curriculum program is designed to enable students to develop their own program of study with the help of Faculty advisors. So schools like Amherst Brown Wake Forest vs are offer Open golf program. So you go in and you really go in Undeclared and you're allowed to build your course of study with the help of your advisor off. So, you know think again about those types of colleges on your list number four, and I think this one's really important but make sure you have support Wrap-around support services. So there are some colleges that have advising for Undeclared undecided majors and it's really important to make sure that you know the schools on your list do Provide support for students who check that box on their application as undistracted or Undeclared schools such as University of Maine and also USC University of Southern California. They have very strong Undeclared advising for students to help them begin to think about what it is that they want to do number five think about extracurricular activities, you know, you you're thinking of, you know, don't just focus on the program of study. But if you're as you're looking at schools, you want to take a look at the types of wage Opportunities and experiences experiences that you can have through society's through professional organizations. For example, let's say you'll enjoy writing but you're not exactly sure what you want to do with that. Well, maybe there's a campus magazine or journalism club or a college paper. Those are all great ways for them to explore writing a little bit more to see the type of writing a major you may be interested in pursuing. So it's important to get some of that real life experience and you can use the extra curricular activities as ways to do some Discovery as well as Co-op experiences research opportunities and jobs internships any kind of hands-on experience and positions that will allow you to discover a little bit more what it is that you may want to do Thursday.

Amherst Brown Wake Forest Advisor University Of Maine Usc University Of Southern Cal
What If Trump Refuses to Concede?

Today in Focus

05:41 min | Last month

What If Trump Refuses to Concede?

"Lawrence Douglas era professor of law at Amherst. College Massachusetts you write for The Guardian and you've published a book called Donald Trump will he go about whether the president would actually step down if he loses. Interestingly. The rhetoric we're hearing now is an knew he was working from the same script in two, thousand and sixty, I can promise and pledge. To all of my voters and supporters. And to all of the people of the United States. Then I will totally accept. The results of this, great and historic. Presidential election. If I win. The remaining. When you started worrying about what you're hearing? will extinct many Americans pretty gobsmacked by the last presidential debate that he conducted with Hillary Clinton. Chris Wallace said, will you accept the results? No matter. What do you make the same until you will absolutely sir that you will. Accept the result of this election and I think trump just kinda refused to admit I will look at it at the I'm not looking at anything now I look at it at the time, and then for swallowed pushed him a little harder in that and trump threatened the tourist the answer I will tell you at the time I'll keep you in suspense. I remember watching that in gang Wow that's an astonishing thing to hear the candidate of a major party say and I have to say at the time I also thought, wow, he's finished. You cannot. You cannot refuse to accept electoral results match just kind of attacking norms of constitutional democracy. So I kind of thought at the time that he was. His own coffin shot. A so much for my prognostications, but even when he won they theme continued from him didn't it guess it did in fact, right after his election I actually started writing as a contributing opinion writer to the garden in the very first piece I wrote was about his claim that he had in fact won the popular vote as well except for the fact that there were these three to five million phantom illegal voters he stated that before I think he stated his concerns of voter fraud and and People voting illegally during the campaign, and he continues to maintain that belief based on studies and evidence that people have to him. Press Secretary Sean Spicer doubling down on the president's claim, but repeatedly unable to point to evidence that backs up the charge that has been debunked by Republicans and Democrats alike, and in this piece that route from the garden I really tried to ask what are the politics behind it claim like that I mean not only did he threaten dispute the outcome of the election if? He lost his disputing the outcome of an election that he want. But if in four years time, he trotted out a similar type of argument not to for the purposes of challenging his loss in the popular vote. But challenging his lost the Electoral College vote The damage this system should be hard to exaggerate. Okay. Say Things feel quite different this time because in the run up to this election, he basically got asked that same question again didn't he and he responded similarly you commit to making. Sure. That there's a peaceful transfer of power after the election going to have to see what happens. You know that I've been complaining very strongly about the ballots and the ballots are a disaster. We WanNa make sure the election is honest and I'm not sure that it can be i. don't I. Don't know that it can be on top of that. He's a lot to say about the workings of the election itself what is his argument and how much does it change now that he's the incumbent president Well. For one thing, he has spent the last three and a half years telling the American people that our electoral system is unreliable, which again is kind of unprecedented act in American history and what trump has done is he's kind of created this heads I win tails you lose situation in which the only way that the system can demonstrate its legitimacy is if he wins and if he loses well, that's simply becomes proof of what he's been saying all along. We having in yesterday's episode that Donald Trump is really hitting out at the postal system. And in particular state Sir automatically send out mail-in ballots voters. Why politically focusing on this issue There's a particular demographic that we need to pay attention to. These mail in ballots a recent poll indicated I. think that around twenty to twenty, five percent of. Trump's supporters intend to vote by mail in pallets that compares to about fifty five to sixty percent of Biden voters who are going to vote Mallon ballot. So we can see that trump is kinda tactically trying to discredit votes that are gonNA, break against him and very, very unfair to our country. If, they do this, our country will be a laughing stock all over the world because everyone knows it doesn't work how many ballots is sending in California's exit twenty, eight million or some massive number. Other states are sending out millions and millions of ballots I don't WanNa. See a crooked election. This election will be the most rigged election and history

Donald Trump President Trump Sean Spicer Lawrence Douglas Amherst United States Massachusetts Chris Wallace Wanna Professor Of Law California Hillary Clinton Mallon Biden Press Secretary Writer
Boston - 19 Communities Added To List Of  High Risk For Coronavirus In Massachusetts

WBZ Afternoon News

00:50 sec | Last month

Boston - 19 Communities Added To List Of High Risk For Coronavirus In Massachusetts

"DPH says they're confirming 509 new cases and 19 more fatalities. They also put out their weekly report tonight. Every Wednesday night. We get this, saying 19 cities and towns have now been added to the list of high risk communities the red zone areas. Only two towns on last week's list were taken off that list. So Holliston and Lynnfield no longer deemed to be high risk. The new communities going on to the Red Zone list include Woburn, Webster, Waltham, Sunderland, Southbridge. Cushion It. Amherst, Brockton, Chelmsford, Dartmouth, Dudley, Holyoke, Southborough, Randolph Hudson, Kingston, Lester. Maldon and Plymouth. So yeah, again about 20 of those communities going on to the States. High risk community list for covert 19 7 48

Holliston DPH Randolph Hudson Southborough Maldon Woburn Southbridge Lynnfield Amherst Holyoke Lester Dudley Brockton Dartmouth Plymouth Kingston Chelmsford Sunderland Waltham Webster
Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:24 min | Last month

Civil Rights Champion, Unita Blackwell

"Hello for Wonder Media Network, I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Today. We're talking about a key figure in the civil rights movement who risked her life to lift her voice and the voices of other black. Americans. Through violence and abuse she campaigned for equality and became the first black woman to serve as mayor and Mississippi. This is the story of UNITA. UNITA Zelma Blackwell was born he uses brown on March Eighteenth Nineteen thirty three in Lula Mississippi. Her father was a sharecropper and you need a picked cotton in the field alongside her mother until her mother sent her to live with relatives in Arkansas to receive a better education. At that time in Mississippi, black children could only attend school for two years before they were forced to return to the fields. Though you need us mother couldn't read or write. She was determined to give her daughter a better life. You need a chose her own full name after her teacher told her. She couldn't just go by the initials UC. She decided to go with UNITA Zelma. At the age of twelve, you need a left school she returned to picking cotton until she was thirty one years old she married three times but kept the last name of her first husband Jeremiah Blackwell. It was with him. She had her only child Jeremiah Junior. The turning point of UNITA's life came in nineteen, sixty four during the freedom summer. The student nonviolent. Coordinating Committee or Snick was campaigning to raise awareness about registering black citizens to vote you need a signed up to help right away during her attempts to help register black voters across our community. She was arrested more than seventy times. She was also targeted by the K. K. K. members burned crosses in her yard. You need was one of only eight black people in her county who tried to register to vote armed white men threatened you need other brave people trying to vote outside the courthouse and nearly prevented them from entering when they were finally allowed to enter the building they were forced to undergo an unfair literacy tests which all of them failed. You need to realize that despite the fact voting was illegal right society still stacked all the odds against the black community. She was more determined than ever to make her voice heard. So she began to participate in one movement after another to fight the unjust system. In nineteen sixty five UNITA sued her county's board of Education for suspending three hundred students including her own son for wearing freedom pens. She also suit to desegregate the school district. These cases traveled all the way up to federal courts though the pins remained banned, the district was ordered to desegregate. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six UNITA was elected mayor of mayors spell. which reportedly made her the first black woman to serve as a mayor in Mississippi. When she took office, the five hundred person town had unpaved streets and no sewer system many residents lived in small tin roof shacks with no running water. UNITA immediately set to work on improving conditions serving the town for two decades from a one room. City Hall. She led the way for the town to pave a name. It's roads, install streetlights, built sewers, improve its housing, and even get its first fire truck. In nineteen eighty three UNITA earned a master's degree in regional planning from New Mass Amherst having never previously attended college in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two, she brought national attention to mayors, Ville, and all rural communities when she won three, hundred, fifty, thousand dollar Macarthur Genius Grant. Throughout her career you traveled internationally she gave speeches advised presidents like Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton a never stopped fighting for civil rights. She was defeated for re election to her position in two thousand one by then she'd long made positive mark on the rural communities of Mississippi and beyond. You need. Blackwell passed away on May, Thirteenth Twenty nineteen she made an enormous difference in Marysville Mississippi enter influence extends far beyond her hometown. She fought for the rights of all Americans and brought attention too often forgotten areas of the country.

Unita Unita Zelma Blackwell Mississippi Unita Zelma Ville Jeremiah Blackwell School District Lula Mississippi Black Community Wonder Media Network Jenny Kaplan Jeremiah Junior Arkansas Thirteenth Twenty K. K. K. Bill Clinton City Hall Marysville Jimmy Carter
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:37 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"This is but why a podcast for curious kids from Vermont public radio I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Vermont Margot Jane Lindholm Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:32 min | 2 months ago

Why Do Dogs Have Tails?

"I'm Jane Lindholm On this podcast, you ask the questions and it's our job to find interesting people to answer them. In this episode, we're talking all about dogs. Now, if you WANNA learn about cats check out our companion episode that episode includes some amazing facts about how cats communicate with humans in a special language they make up with their own individual human family. But in this episode, we're going to stick to barks instead of meows. Lots of your dog questions had a common theme you to know about some of the ways that dogs are different from humans. Jessica Heckman is a veterinarian and a dog researcher and she has a blog called the dog Zombie because she's obsessed with dog brains studying them not eating them anyway I. Guess You could say she's a dog scientists and she's here to answer your questions. Our first one comes from Margot who is five and lives in Amherst Massachusetts. Why did Adopt Tales That's a great question Margot whenever someone asked a question about why does one type of animal look one way and is set up one way and why is another type of animal built a different way the way I like to think about it is talking about that difference why? Why what we use it for? So dogs ancestors, wolves, ancient wolves had to run to catch their dinner and tales helps them balanced when they ran so that was they had them back. Then and dogs some dogs still do have to run as part of their job, right? Like she herding dogs have to do a fair amount of running but dogs also use their tails to communicate. So that's another good reason they have tails. They don't use noises quite as much to communicate as humans do but they use body language a lot more than humans do. So with dogs a tale, it's really high means I'm confident a tale that's held low means I'm. Nervous a tale that's really clamped rate underneath there but means please don't smell my but right now and also I'm really scared and then a wagging tail something all really familiar with because it can mean that the dog is happy but also you can see it in angry dogs I would just caution you to be really careful when you see a wagging tail overall, we try to look at the whole dog, not just the tail to interpret body language but the tail. Is definitely a very important part of the dogs tools for speaking why might dog wag its tail when it's happy or when it's mad? Why would drag tail for both possibilities I think from the dogs perception that they might be seeing something different from a wagging tail than we do. They have this very complex set of tools that they use in body language and we as humans because we're not dogs. We just have trouble fully interpreting that and so I think that. A. Wagging. Tail. It might look a little bit different to them with the dog is happy than if the dog is angry and we as humans might just not be able to perceive those differences. And sometimes, I think a dog who is angry or alarmed or considering that they might possibly by you will wag its tail almost as an appeasement gesture to say like Hey I'm not a threat I'm not don't hurt me but they might still be thinking I'm kind of scared of you and I'm prepared to bite if you come any closer. So it's just It's just always important to look at the whole dog to look at his face and his eyes, and you know how he's holding the rest of his body and not just the tail hello money aller five, six years old I live in Falls Church Virginia and my question is why thumbs up partner Paul. Hi Alex well I think dogs have their thumbs up on their paws to keep them out of their way because they are basically walking on their hands rates they're using their four limbs for something differently than what we use them for horses by the way have taken this to extreme they walk just on the tips of their middle three fingers. Into hooves. So I almost feel like it might be a better question to say why are human thumbs so far forward rather than why our dog thumb so far back we're actually the ones that are unusual. Because humans and other primates like monkeys and apes we have this unusual hand that we use to hold things because we evolved to climb rate, and so we would use our hands to climb up a tree and then humans are thumbs are are even more different than in other primates because we have these very complex hands that are good for really delicate work like holding pencil and things like that. So we're actually the unusual one but yeah, they they walk around their paws obviously and they don't want their thumbs to get in the way.

Researcher Jane Lindholm Margot Jessica Heckman Amherst Massachusetts Falls Church Virginia Alex Partner Paul
"amherst" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:09 min | 4 months ago

"amherst" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"You recommended placing mult around the trees over the emitters and That area. We have been reluctant to do this because we fertilize with an organic granular fertilizer, which needs to be worked into the soil. How do you recommend feeding the trees without having to remove the mulch and the drip lines? If you are using drip lines that have built in inline emitters, there was no exposed emitter. It's built into the half inch tubing. It makes this task much easier. Basically rake aside the mulch. And with half inch lines, you can easily avoid the lines. Get around the lines. No big deal. And then fertilize, work it into the soil, water it in and then raped the mulch back in place. That's the easy answer to that. And remember, too, as we discussed last week with that live Oh, That mulch if you're using an organic mulch like arborist tree trimmings. Or bark, small barque, especially Various sizes of Barker best. Basically, the thing to do is let that mulch help you out in the feeding process because, as it breaks down, it's also feeding the soil so you will be using less fertilizer as time goes on. And also it's always good idea at the end of the growing season to do a soil test to see what your soil needs. It may need nitrogen. It may need ah, phosphorus potassium, but probably they're big made will be nitrogen. So don't add any fertilizer to your soil unless it absolutely needs it on the way to do that is with a soil test. And the last time I checked There were two universities that do very reasonably priced soil tests, and they are back in business after taking a covert 19 break, the University of Massachusetts Amherst And Colorado State University. If you Google either Colorado State University or U Mass Amherst soil testing, those pages will pop up very reasonably priced around $20 or so. You might want to check it out. All right. We will take a break for news. When we come back. We'll be talking with Don shore from Redwood Bar Nursery and Davis and will be answering your garden.

Colorado State University University of Massachusetts Am Redwood Bar Nursery U Mass Amherst Don shore Google Barker Davis
Cuomo: Buffalo police video "disturbs your basic sense of decency and humanity"

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 6 months ago

Cuomo: Buffalo police video "disturbs your basic sense of decency and humanity"

"In buffalo two police officers have been suspended for an incident caught on video cops job does seventy five year old man to the ground he hit his head and he started bleeding officers didn't stop on a Cuomo couldn't believe you see that video and it disturbs your basic sense of decency and humanity of what why why was that necessary where was the threat older gentleman where was the threat and then you just walk behind the person why you see blood coming from his head the man is in serious but stable condition the governor spoke to him by phone Martin Gugino is a long time peace activist from Amherst the governor says they shouldn't end with suspension I think the city should pursue firing and I think the district attorney should look at the situation for possible criminal

Cuomo Martin Gugino
Guest Teacher Oli Bridge: How to Build Video Funnels for Your Business

The $100 MBA Show

05:52 min | 6 months ago

Guest Teacher Oli Bridge: How to Build Video Funnels for Your Business

"Dive into the first part of your video. Funnel engine conversion funnels how about using a personalized video respond to a new inquiry on your website rousing just foreign back a regular email. While as we researching the white paper. Last year I found that customers a seventy percent more likely to respond to emails. If the email has a visual of you in it think about it. You'll video that you'll Sunday is proof that you've taken the time for that. Customer and human psychology means a much more likely to reciprocate the effort amherst spongy. How about using videos to get more leads to show for sales demos but dropped personal video in the days of the hours before the meeting will the Denner. They'll see as a real person behind that calendar appointment until much more invested in the process. Meaning they'll be less likely to cancel all how about using video to get leads to attend your weapons just like with sales calls reach out to them personally insisting that impo beforehand means we prime feel comforted eager to show up and support. I'll do this myself. Every weapon run the attendance rates engagement on my weapon is just night and day. Compared to when I was leading ultimate emails you can even use video to follow up maybe off to a trade show meeting or to rekindle a stagnant sales proposal. The crucial fan is by doing things just a little bit differently. I'm putting in just a little bit of extra effort on humanity. You will stand out against the tide of regular emails. That person gets every day and you'll be more likely to come through and get a response. Okay just a little brief signs include here want to explain to you very quickly while this stuff works why. This video worked so well. It's all about this in cool the Activating system. What is this? Sounds WAY IT Personalization in any walk of life is effective largely because of warn shed human physiological mechanism insisting on talking about the retaking activating system. Let's maybe call it the rest for sure. Save a little time. The brass is a network of neurons. Located in your brain stem are good to the bottle. You too much hip in everyday language. Your acts as a gateway deal conscious brain. It filters foundation that you should pay attention to it helps you control the constant flow signals reaching your senses in any given moment. Let's break this down a bit simpler. So when people talk about selective hearing will then really referencing is effect of the rest that is causing you to ignore some of the information being shared with a pad to the other bits. You care about an easy way to understand. This effect is by thinking about what's called the cocktail party effect. It goes something a little bit like this. Imagine you're at a party with dozens of people jumping there by. You'll easily tune out those compensations buzz as soon as someone say something that is of particular interest youth may be name or film you. Just watch your magically tune into that conversation. That's you'll russ were particularly activating system. Activating you'll conscious brain. This is why puzzle is Magden is so much more effective than mass moncton as humans. We all hardwired to respond to it. And you can think of pus nights video as a sort of standard in personalization sation. It taps into customers conscious. Brian and it gets their attention. Okay let's move onto the next pulse. Fuel fifty funnel engine activation funnels his some simple ways. You can use videos to build deep relationships with your existing customers can help out sending a simple thank you video when they buy new product for me. Heroin joy seen countless examples of this bumpy repeat purchase rates by huge margins. Or how about Husni Ni asking for review for your happiest and most engaged customers? Someone's having a great experience if you'll product or you need to do is ask and they'll happily give you that reveal. What about customer said made it to number one on trust pilot in the men's fussing custody by simply asking for reviews Video rather than picking out one of those ultimated post purchase emails Familiar with what about personal requesting a case study from a happy customer Rothen Out Fifty emails a bunch of your customers and crossing fingers and hoping a good case that he can be the law blood if you'll sales process surely worth taking thirty or sixty seconds to record a video the might land really great case study from a customer remember when recording these videos. This is your opportunity to take your customers experience to the next level. I just shown to let them know that they're not just another number in your business so make sure you count him out by name. You've got to do that. Used that name. We just talked about the rough riddick lights rating system. I'm worried about seven potent. Let them know why they support Full business I may be at a puzzle. Touch whether that Spring Newcastle. You'll total into the video showing them something goofy going on in the background. As you're walking the coating your video this has a humanness an openness that deepens the impact of your message using that name and doing cookie things or just being a bit more real and human. That's all about activating doubt raw system and getting access to the brain so just being human with your messages

Denner Husni Ni Heroin Brian
Boston - Virtual Ceremony Is Bittersweet For University of Mass Amherst Graduates

WBZ Afternoon News

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Boston - Virtual Ceremony Is Bittersweet For University of Mass Amherst Graduates

"Yesterday was graduation day for the UMass Amherst class of twenty twenty here's WBZ TV sterling Donald a bit of pomp and circumstance and a whole lot of social distance of all let me say what I antibodies this is weird similarly here the UMass Amherst class of twenty twenty attended a virtual graduation celebration Friday the twenty minute video featured messages of encouragement from Hollywood stars hello right you're wrong call the giants for yourself still

Donald Trump Giants Hollywood
Prince Albert of Monaco tests positive for coronavirus

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:23 sec | 9 months ago

Prince Albert of Monaco tests positive for coronavirus

"Prince Albert of Monaco has tested positive for the novel coronavirus the palace says his health is good he is being monitored by doctors prince Albert continues to work from his home and is asking the people of Monaco to limit contact with others to help stop the spread of the virus prince Albert by the way is a nineteen eighty one graduate of Amherst College here in

Prince Albert Monaco Amherst College
"amherst" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:16 min | 9 months ago

"amherst" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Students have said they plan to stick around still most likely Amherst are leaving on their way out they expressed frustration about the cost of last minute travel lost work and be a Levin hundred dollars a month they pay for dorms they're leaving empty it's something else that bothers remembers most though I've worked very very hard in Fresno to overcome people's expectations and actually get to this college and I'm really happy to be at but it's back home for him at least through April fifth SF state leaders say they'll be monitoring the situation and will update students before then I'm gonna set I'm going you know KQED news now it's time for bay curious this week the highest point of curiosity have been about the corona virus and what we should be doing or not doing to keep ourselves families and community safe the big curious team's been working hard on this and Michelle Wiley's been fielding a lot of questions that have come in from listeners so Michelle this question list just keeps growing but can we grab a few and try to get some answers yeah let's do it first from Amy she says I'm a wedding photographer and I go to a couple of weddings all over the bay area every month to work should I cancel my work or what kind of precautions should I take yeah so there's a few things to think about here so this week governor Gavin Newsom announced then updated policy which recommends the gatherings of more than two hundred fifty people be rescheduled or cancelled through the end of March now for Amy it's possible her work doesn't fall into that category unless it's a fairly large wedding so in that case it really depends on what she's comfortable with and what her health status is you know if she decides to go to work you need to make sure she washes her hands frequently tries to carry hand sanitizer with her and maintain some distance at least six feet per CDC guidelines between herself and others just to ensure that she's being as careful as possible going to work also includes potentially riding on a bus with other people so listener Alan Kay wants to know what the recommendations are for transport ation getting from one place to another in general so for public transportation again the general rules apply make sure washing your hands some folks will be happy to know that many public transit agencies in the bay area including muny and bart have upped their cleaning schedules I spoke to bart spokesperson Alicia Trost who said that after each train completes the loop workers are now disinfecting any area of writer might touch so that means you know handle loops any bar you might hold on to the seats really anything you put your hands or body on and she said also because there's been a drop in ridership because so many people are telecommuting you can maintain a lot more distance from others on the train then you could before and then officials of many also say their equipment's being cleaned daily but I should caution people you know it's only as clean as the last person whose hand was on it so again making sure your hands are washed and if you're touching public spaces trying to touch your face.

Amherst
New green technology generates electricity 'out of thin air'

The Naked Scientists

05:34 min | 9 months ago

New green technology generates electricity 'out of thin air'

"Engineers and microbiologists have collaborated to invent a device that generates electricity out of literally thin air. They call this incredible bit of Tech. The Air Jen relies on tiny strands of protein. Farmed from bacteria these so-called Protein Nana wires absorb trace amounts of humidity in the air. I'm produced Electricity of the moment. The Air Jen compiler only small electronic devices. But it's inventors from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have big plans to scale it up Phil. Sansom spoke to one of them. Dirt lovely to find out how it works. We've developed a new type of sustainable. Electricity Production. Don't require sunlight. We don't require wind. We can make power twenty four seven from the humidity in air. I gotta be honest. It sounds like science fiction. I know and that's was our initial two. We spent many months trying to discredit the idea. But it all checks out an remarkably. We can make electricity literally from thin air. So how does it work? It's very simple device with two electrodes and in a new type of electric material called Protein Anna wires and those wires absorb moisture from the air and generate a voltage and current. What am I picturing here? Are there to bits of metal and then something in between them. That's correct basically a sandwich with the protein and wires in between two electrodes. What is a protein nano? Wire it is a filament. Three nanometers diameter ten to twenty microns. Long comprised of protein that we produce with a microorganism called Gio b-actor Ju- backers a common constituent of soils and sediments. It produces those wires to make electrical connections with its environment. So it's little molecules that are around the edge of this bacteria little molecules produced inside the bacteria. It assembles them into the wireless. The wire is produced. It pushes it out of the cell so the cell looks hairy. Basically there has hairs extending all from it. Those are the protein in wires are you. Are you farming these bacteria and then shaving them like sheep absolutely? That's exactly what we're doing. How physically do you deal with them? Because they must be too small to tweezers off right absolutely. But it's quite a simple process. We throw them into a blender which will share the wires off of the cell and then we collect the wires. Ana filter and so. How many do you get at once? Billions and billions. Of course they're so small it's only micrograms from a relatively large number of microbes. Wow and then you attach them to the metal actually We just suspend them in water. Put trump that water on the electrode and let the water trail once you've done that. What's the point of all this? What are they doing once? They're actually on the electrode they start making electrcity ity. I mean this was very surprising result to us. We were actually working with the protein and wires to make wearable electric sensors and then even without applying any electricity to this system generating electricity itself. This was almost an accidental discovery. Absolutely serendipitous so do. Do you know how it works. Then we think we know which is long as it works okay. Of course we certainly are trying to uncover more of the basic mechanisms and what we do know so far. Is that film of the protein? Wires absorbs moisture from the atmosphere in creates a gradient of water because only the top is exposed to the atmosphere. And then how does that water then translate into electric charge? The protean wires have charges associated with them and are exchanging protons. So it's basically setting up a gradient of protons within that film. So is the cool part. How tiny these wires are or is it the way that the charges work on the wires themselves. I think it's both you need to have tiny wires with tiny pores in between the wires but they also have to have this charge in order to get the voltage gradient. And how much electricity can you actually get out right now? We're making small amounts of power and the reason for that is the initial devices. Were quite small. This was because we could not produce a large quantity of wires with Chey b-actor. We've now constructed a new microbe. A strain of e-coli which is very easy to grow can be grown in large quantities so we can mass produce the wires and once. They're mass produce. What's the potential? How power can you get out of this? Everything did I'm going to say next is theoretical because we've only made the small devices but with continued scaling that device say the size of a refrigerator could in theory generate enough electrical power to power say small home and doesn't matter if you're in a really really humid. Do you have to be in the rainforest for example? No that is another fantastic part of this process. It can work over wide range of humidity say even as low as you would find in the Sahara desert energy from thin air. Just sounds touchdown. Believable doesn't it. That was lovely from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. And you can read about their Jen. If you're so inclined it's published this week in the journal Nature

University Of Massachusetts Am Gio B-Actor Ju Sansom JEN Phil Chey
"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

Hot Take

05:53 min | 10 months ago

"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

"I teach a course on a writing a climate themed writing course at Umass on the road And not all of my students know when they register that this is going to be themed until I tell them and I think a lot about sort of this moment that both of you talked about of climate despair. Yeah and how do I bring them? This news and some information that they often don't have before and also give them the tools to manage that anxiety And I just wondered if you could talk a little more about that experience and I know it was interesting to hear you talk about community because it sounded like even twitter became a place of community for Bogere More for me than win so much. Yeah are there. Are there other particular resources or texts or communities? That you've built that have helped you. Yeah I think that's part of what we're trying to do with. The podcast is like to have those sorts of conversations and invite people in There are other great climate podcasts No place like home is really good one And so is our warm regards where you can. Kinda of get that sense of community I I do climate twitter to be a community. It can get on your last nerve best-looking your siblings. So there's that too but the best thing you can do. I think is for real life communities and so my my biggest solace has come from that But I also think that we're kind of rushed too much to try to make things not feel bad. I never want to be able to look at the loss of the whole entire natural world. I don't WANNA see a billion animals burn up. I don't WanNa see. I don't know how many people died in the typhoon season this year in the Philippines. Or how many people drowned in Indonesia or any name disaster? I don't want to be able to see that and not feel sadness and feel heartache So understand that like that's part of being alive right now and I want to be alive I there's ways to manage those feelings in the best way to manage those feelings. It's not do them in isolation so yes this book did help me get out of my grief but it helped me by saying like I'm not crazy. I should go talk to somebody and when I finished it I did. I went in and talk to other people. They were like. Yeah I feel the same way and that sort of broke the isolation because I think activism and action dies in isolation totally alien actually Community is a big theme in this book Title Building. I just want to say that I Yeah I mean especially especially as a writer I mean they're really any any any occupation or endeavor that involves a lot of just individual work. You know When you feel isolated you know. Then you're then you're really. You're really a sitting duck for the stuff you know social and yeah and getting back involved in in the activism again like the organizing actually being part of a campaign again with folks just reminded me how much I need. Community and How much I had been lacking it although lacking a certain kind of community you know. I'd been lacking that community of resistance but there's another kind of community that personally really helps me. I'm I'm active in a couple of different Faith communities actually I'm I'm a Buddhist and a Christian and I've been active in a Buddhist Zen Buddhist Songa for a long time now and a member of an Episcopal church in Right near where I live. And it's a pretty a pretty progressive activists D. kind of place to so That you know that helps helps keep me going so I think people will find find your find your community you know if you build it. They will come if you build the community. Greta Thunberg I think is at this lot of people have said that the best cure for climate grievous climate action But you also have to let yourself feel your feelings some days. You'RE NOT GONNA be able to go to whatever rally. You're not going to be able to invest okay. You get to be human. You get to not feel so great. Sometimes it goes in cycles Sometimes I think we might look like we've got it figured out. Don't days where I I don't feel so great But that comes with the territory otherwise you just become you know. Listrik dead inside emotional. Honesty exactly emotionally are big believers in emotional honesty right. This is why we cuss cousin. Is Great exactly can love it. Oh my mom and doesn't listen to podcast. Thank you all right. Thank you okay. That's it for this time. I hope you enjoyed that conversation. We'll be back to you in a couple of weeks with a regular episode. In the meantime you can follow us on twitter at real hot take where we curate. All of the climate storytelling. That's happening on a regular basis. And you can follow US individually as well Mary as Mary Heller. H. E. G. L. A. R. I'm at Amy Westervelt and we'll see you next time..

twitter US Umass Mary Heller Philippines Indonesia Greta Thunberg writer Amy Westervelt H. E. G. L. A.
"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

Hot Take

12:25 min | 10 months ago

"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

"Dominant narrative about climate change tells us that is our fault. We left the lights on too long. Didn't close the refrigerator. Door didn't recycle our paper. I'm here to tell you that. That is bullshit if the light switch was connected to clean energy who the hell cares if you left it on. The problem is not so much. The consumption is the supply and your scrap. Paper didn't hasten the end of the world don't give into that shame is not yours. The oil and gas industry is gasoline. Which is one of my. Most favorite metaphors have written. Yes yes but yet you were talking earlier about you know when when I wrote that in tag do you were actually. I was not a sexual. It's not uncommon for authors. I got to speak number of places and do a lot of interviews in that fall of two thousand fifteen everything and then January December and January. Things got really slow really quiet and I had no idea what I wanted to do. Next and meanwhile I'm watching the rise of Donald Trump. It was a dark time. There was a dark time. And now this you this came later but I so I tried to write another book proposal which which I'm actually really glad I didn't start reading that book that I did not pan out now. Oh Yeah Actually. Read an essay of mine that ran in. La Review of books called learning to live in the dark about reading. Hana aren't in the That was sort of jumping off place for that book. And what kind of realize is all I really had was one essay. I didn't really have a book so a lot of writers. Discover this. Yeah better to discover it before you get the book contract then after so anyway. Yeah no when I when I when I read your piece in and realized that my book had had met this to. You had had helped you in that way. That was a really profound and helpful. Moment for me You know and we. We talked about this a little while ago as all white guy in a left sort of you know left political spaces. I can be pretty self conscious about my identity and my privilege right and and I was self conscious when this book came out for sure. I mean here I am. I'm not exactly the best spokesperson for climate justice. Order the one writing a book about climate justice. And and you know it's not like I got a whole lot of light like blowback on that. I didn't really when the book came out. Now that wasn't really an issue. I think people understood the way I was writing the book and how I was approaching it but when I when I realized that my book had helped this Younger Black woman from Mississippi. I come to terms with this stuff I was like. Wow you know like okay. Maybe I shouldn't quit quit but I think if if only people of color are caring about people of color if only women are carrying about women that we never really get anywhere so like. I think that there is a way to be part of the conversation without taking. You know space or making it all about yourself. Which is why I think you do such a good job in. This book is really not a whole ton of you like. There's a lot of home right here to say that book into my store. Yeah Yeah they ended up conclusion right but the reason I was drawn to is because I saw myself in in the characters. That are what you're not characters. A real so yeah. I think that there is a way to participate and be part of the whole. I think the problem has been. The conversation is not just been dominated by white guys. It's been dominated by white guys who are like low key narcissus or maybe Heike Maybe Real Heike like screeching pitch think. I don't worry about being self. Yeah worse I mean I'm sure I. I actually try to police my own privilege to write because I'm a black moving from Mississippi but like I'm able bodied I'm straight. I have a US passport. I very plenty of things that I need to be conscious of when entering certain spaces and I think like you'd be hard pressed to find somebody who like got the disadvantage Bingo and has nothing that they need to be. You know self conscious about it at all but you know at the same time you do need to if you care about other people and needs to show up in the things that you say so you don't stop writing trying not to because it's not entirely my choice. I do their head. You have to be editors who are willing to publish my crazy shit. Well the nation stuck with you this law l. The Nation. Yeah I do appreciate the nation yet I do it. Yeah I mean believe me. I'm not joking. Well speaking of the nation days published another one of your pieces which kind of goes along the same lines as your book and what when is really good at is getting the best quotes out of people in this species like a whole string of of quote so tell us a little bit about the protests was and then? I'm GONNA graduate on some of these a one thing. I didn't mention in describing my approach to my book and my writing. My book mostly grew out of articles that I wrote for The Nation Magazine In those years and and other places those years but you know I dove in as an activist in two thousand eleven basically and And so I'm writing this book about the Climate Movement from the inside as a climate activists and a journalist but trust me my old colleagues in the mainstream journalism. You can't really be journalist in an activist at the same time. Those two things are not supposed to mix and so the writing in the book you know the the Greta. Those nation pieces were largely built around my profiles of my fellow activists like people I was working alongside or people I sought out. Maybe I hadn't worked with them but I was seeking them out because I could tell the head interesting stories And then really going deep with them interviewing them at length and trying to write in a kind of documentary style or a kind of almost like an oral history style right where the words really prioritizing the voices of of the people. The grassroots organizers and activists themselves so while there are parts of my book and my and my essays might my my articles that definitely foreground my own voice. You know that are like there are essays. And that I'm making an argument. There are other parts. Were my own voice. Really Recedes And it's and it's really about The voices of the movement itself so this latest piece nation is kind of return to form in that way. I hadn't done a piece like that in quite a while but I also hadn't engaged in a in a serious Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign in a while and so I got involved again in that that kind of work with Friends of my people who are actually whose stories are told in my book The founders of the climate disobedience center so people like Tim to Christopher j O'Hara of of lobster boat blockade fame here in Massachusetts and Marla Markham on a dear friend of mine. Who's really one of the? The heroic climate organizers certainly here in New England and so anyway I joined I got together with them and a bunch of other people and join this effort call Dino coal no gas campaign which is basically. The overarching goal of the campaign is really to end fossil fuel use in New England. It's a New England based grassroots campaign. Right we live in New England. We're focusing on New England so But it starts out by. We start out by focusing on the really the last remaining big coal plant coal-fired power plant in New England. Up In bow New Hampshire Miss also. No accident that while there was a primary campaign going on this fall and we may have so back in September people started showing up at that plant and removing coal from the huge reserve coal pile for the purpose of removing fuel from the fire so to speak right literally and symbolically and then a whole bunch of showed up hundreds showed up at the plant on September twenty eighth and about. I don't know what it was ninety or one hundred of us. Were ready to risk arrest and going into the plant with buckets and shovels to remove more call from the plan. Of course they were ready for us. This time and about what was sixty. Seven of us were arrested so I joined that I was full part of that that effort but I also at that time had an assignment from the nation to report a piece about this campaign as it developed over the next few months and so it moves on from Focusing on the coal plant to over in starting in December we started blockading the Trains Freight Trains. That supply resupply the plant in bow with coal during the winter months and ended up blocking three trains and so That was the next phase in this campaign goes on it's a sustained grassroots campaign regained a lot of attention. We're starting to get some political traction and there's legal. Oh Yeah we're getting. A lot of us have gone arrested multiple times. And we'll see what happens. Well I thought the quotes in here were fantastic and there's so many of them. There's like six people six different people who give like a whole you know four or five paragraphs yes six or seven voices. Yeah it's kind of oral history style. My part is very straightforward documentary style. Just the Max and then I let these voices tell the story. Yeah so I'm going to read a few of my favorites and then you can tell me who set them. Oh sure and why you chose them Unless you're never them picks out Hannah. Yeah it's totally attest. Swearing in classroom on my brain. Not possibly okay. I one I remember feeling a sense of freedom. We are removing consent from the system and we are not asking for anyone's permission. I definitely have the financial privileged to do this. My parents were like we will bail you out of jail by a young woman of color and I felt like I really needed to do it that I didn't want to rely on everyone else to do. I think is necessary right now. Emma Shapiro Weiss. Yeah so young organizer with three fifty New Hampshire You got it right by the way do you want. Do you WanNa know more or yeah. Okay she was born near Medellin Colombia. And and then was adopted as a baby and grew up in Connecticut and And the thing I I really loved about her interview all first of all. I loved her honesty there about her own privilege right. I mean there are many. You're saying earlier many different kinds and degrees of privilege. And so she says yeah. I have the financial privilege to this right And then the other thing that I really light about that statement about. But I'm a young woman of color and I didn't WanNa let rely on other people to do what I think needs to be done. Well she's expressing. Their is her agency as an individual her moral agency her political agency. Again guys like me and white activists who engage in nonviolent direct action..

New England Mississippi Heike Maybe Donald Trump US Dino coal The Nation Magazine Hana Emma Shapiro Weiss Medellin Colombia Connecticut Greta Massachusetts Hannah Marla Markham
"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

Hot Take

03:12 min | 10 months ago

"amherst" Discussed on Hot Take

"And environmental justice for decades? So six years later. How you feeling a little vindicated own and people have told me that this book was maybe a tiny bit ahead of its time but I was far from the first to make these arguments. I'm mostly a reporter in this in this book and I'm talking to the people like Robert Koehler to go on in profile. Dr Robert Ballard at Texas Southern University in Houston and Beverly Right at the at Dillard University in the deep South Center New Orleans. Who were really the pioneers of the of the US Environmental Justice Movement? So yeah I think that what's interesting. I mean in some ways I I do feel encouraged because we now hear phrases like climate justice in environmental justice in the mouths of presidential candidates that was unheard of certainly in the last election cycle. I think it was unheard of even two years ago. Yeah Yeah Yeah I think the the AFC influence other Sunrise exactly yeah exactly. It's really changed the conversation. And there's a whole back story to that. Which if you want to understand the backstory one thing. You could read my book shameless. Look but we'll go on to further plugging saying that so the way that we actually this is our first time meeting in person But the way that we connected on the you know the twitter machine which you can actually have meaningful relationships with people on the twitter but I have. Hey but yeah the way that we can act. There was I wrote a piece on my little medium. Blog called wing. Climate Change broke my heart enforcement to grow up and I. It's in that piece. I talk about the process of finding Lind's book and the the sort of way that it took me out of my fuck And there's a quote by James Baldwin that I love this call. You think you're alone until you read. And then you realize that everything felt before someone else's felt before and then suddenly becomes less overwhelming and less debilitating and he says it way better than that and I was supposed to Google it before I got here but I didn't So but I am going to read a piece from my piece that actually because I tagged win in that he talked about it and that got me on the radar. Vox and that's how it got involved and I don't know how long it would have taken for anybody to read anything I wrote before that. So here we got anyway Vox retitled at the big lie. Were told about. Climate change is our own fault. The.

US Environmental Justice Movem twitter Vox James Baldwin Robert Koehler decades Dr Robert Ballard Lind Dillard University AFC reporter Texas Southern University Houston South Center New Orleans Beverly Right Google
Garrett's career-high 24 points lead No. 3 KU past Oklahoma

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 10 months ago

Garrett's career-high 24 points lead No. 3 KU past Oklahoma

"Kansas OB topping guard Marcus had nineteen Garrett points scored and a career seven rebounds high twenty and jailing four points Crutcher scored in an seventeen eighty seven the to lead seventy number six win Dayton for to the its third fourteen ranked straight Jayhawks win over seventy Oklahoma one to sixty three over Massachusetts Garrett was effective Crutcher from scored three fifteen point range of his seventeen with in six the second made half to and help nine the flyers attempts hold on only after the care minute about men cut a double defense digit deficit plan I know to we're four trying in to the do final office minutes on my and team I just took this needed us to so he I also just had had to go out seven there assists you know so and I do four was steals best for the team at the time the lead changed when eleven I my first times site in the this first when I was half with me before so the Jayhawks it was on closed from there out Dayton the first hasn't half lost since with the seventy an eleven eight to seventy three six run overtime defeat then K. against you opened Colorado up on its December lead further twenty first to open Trey the second Mitchell half had twenty six Greg and Eklund ten Lawrence rebounds Kansas for you mass Geffen toolbar Amherst Massachusetts

Marcus Crutcher Dayton Oklahoma Jayhawks Colorado Trey Kansas Amherst Massachusetts Garrett Massachusetts Mitchell Greg Eklund
No. 6 Dayton tops UMass 71-63 for 14th straight win

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

No. 6 Dayton tops UMass 71-63 for 14th straight win

"OB topping had nineteen points and seven rebounds and jailing Crutcher scored seventeen the lead number six Dayton to its fourteen straight win seventy one to sixty three over Massachusetts Crutcher scored fifteen of his seventeen in the second half to help the flyers hold on after the minute men cut a double digit deficit to four in the final minutes on my team needed so I just had to go out there you know so I do was best for the team at the time when I my first site this when I was with me so it was on from there Dayton hasn't lost since the seventy eight seventy six overtime defeat against Colorado on December twenty first Trey Mitchell had twenty six and ten rebounds for you mass Geffen toolbar Amherst Massachusetts

Crutcher Dayton Colorado Trey Mitchell Amherst Massachusetts Massachusetts
Emily Dickinson's Gardening Life, Marta McDowell

Cultivating Place

09:00 min | 11 months ago

Emily Dickinson's Gardening Life, Marta McDowell

"Emily Dickinson was a gardener. She was also an iconic poet. And and this week we enjoy a conversation. With Garden Writer Marta McDowell to hear more about how the two callings intermingled in the life of emily only Dickinson. Welcome Marta arm so happy to be back Jennifer. I also happy to have you. I will note that this makes you the all all time. Most interviewed person on cultivating place. Marta so we should have like a drum roll. Happy to have Marta back back. So I have given you a little bit of an introduction but remind listeners and tell new listeners of whom there are a great many a little a bit about your own current practice in what you do as a writer what you do as a gardener of course while I consider myself self a garden writer and really I do a lot of things that you can append the word garden too you so I teach about gardening. I lecture about gardening. I they do some consulting on gardening and I very much garden myself as well and tell tell us just a tiny bit about your current garden and partly why I want you to describe this for listeners is that it bears the beautiful traces traces in threads and clues of almost all the books you have worked on which I think you like to describe as being at the sort of intersection of the pen and the Trowel trowel. Yes so the reason my garden is overcrowded. Just definitely read too much and so when I read about a an author who likes to garden I want to grow. Grow what they grew it. It's like a little link through time as if I could reach out I- fingers and touch them. I'm in a way that is not the into page which you know we so often encounter a writer through the printed page but actually through this medium medium of plant yeah give us an illustration of how this has worked for you. So and I I say this again to just illustrate this wonderful crossover that you include in all the books that I have read of yours. which is sort of how to have a garden in like this person would have had a garden and this was true in the Laura Ingalls Wilder Book and this is definitely true in the Emily Dickinson Book? And I believe it was true in terms of at least plant lists in all the president's gardens as well. Yes I seem to like to count. Things are always very long-planned implant list. must be some like personality type but my garden is. Let's see it's a garden of about a half an acre occurred. It is in a suburban neighborhood. My house is not new. It was built in nineteen twenty nine. Which means it's approaching one hundred years old? It sits on the front of the property so in the front. I have only only things that aren't lawn in the back. I have a tiny so-called lawn although most people who who look at it probably wouldn't call it that and I have many trees my one little patch of son I have flowers ars and herbs and then I have a woodland garden in the back and I think that's the one. Interestingly that Emily Dickenson has influenced the most because she did do a lot of wildflower collecting in wildflower walks and so in her home in her letters there so many wildflowers and she's she's from Massachusetts. I live in New Jersey. You know basically. That's a little colder where she is but I can grow most of the things that she would have found and in the woods around amherst Massachusetts so things like blood route. You know what a what a great emily Dickenson glanced right. Yeah you know You know just so many of those little spring ephemeral the things that bloom in in the spring and then completely disappear at least in my garden by the end of the summer. And then don't pop up again until next spring Burton. Yeah so you've been a gardener far longer than you've been a garden writer and you've been garden writer for a very long time now. How did one become the other and tell us about emily? Dickinson's role in that. So the the minute I had a little patch patch of earth which was round. I duNNo. Let's say nineteen eighty. I started to garden and started to just WanNa grow growth things in in a way. It didn't matter what the thing was. I just really discovered this connection to the soil and and Emily Dickinson happened entirely by accident. It was when I was in a completely different life I was. I had a job in corporate America. I would go on these trips from Lil. You know the head office in New Jersey and go out to visit insurance agencies at in this case ace and I was going across Massachusetts visiting agencies and I had a spare afternoon and I I literally told off into a higher a rest area and stared at the brochure wreck. Can you picture that yes again right. And so there was the thing for the Emily Dickinson Concerned Museum and I thought Oh hit studied Emily Dickinson you know. Let me go up to the museum and so I called. I'm sure on the pay phone and and said can I still make it. And she said Yes yes come and I found out that day Emily Dickinson had been a gardener and the door opened opened for me. I'm I suppose was poetry. It was like you know two roads diverged in the Ray Right right and so I just I. I absolutely became obsessed with Emily Dickinson and her gardening interests. And so that was a round nineteen eighteen ninety eight Two years later I I left my corporate job. I published an article about Emily Dickinson. I you know I just. I took another track. I started studying gardening. You know more seriously and you know kind of building up. I don't know and then you know I published a book in two thousand five and two thousand ten. I worked with the New York Botanical Garden on a big shows. You would think I had planned it right but I did just happen. It just happened. And and somehow the universe the collective consciousness the the seeds dormant in your own soul Found you took took you and grew you along this path and it was It has taken several kind of guises since then But Emily Dickinson was definitely the start. And when you say you published a book in two thousand five. That was your first book on Emily Dickinson. The first edition of this book is that correct. Yes and that was my first book about gardening and the same likewise with the big exhibit at The New York Botanic Tena Gardens. That was all sort of botanic garden exhibition about Emily Dickinson her gardening life and her gardening hardening motivation as well. Correct yes and I should say you know. This is the value of going to a museum right right. You know it's like you may not think anything in particular about a museum but you know it really something can touch you. And I've stayed involved with the museum really from the start. So that's been a continuous thread.

Emily Dickenson Emily Dickinson Book Emily Dickinson Concerned Muse Emily Writer New York Botanical Garden Marta Mcdowell New Jersey Massachusetts Laura Ingalls Wilder Book The New York Botanic Tena Gard Jennifer Wanna President Trump America
"amherst" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"amherst" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"To head space in the Amherst orchard park or in the Elmwood village you'll find a wide selection of therapeutic Creighton products and an array of other legal supplements learn more about freedom in all of the oils and supplements available for purchase at headspace glass dot com buffalo's highest and smoke shop is headspace stopping and stock up when you shop the give me three items at outlet liquor by three or more bottles of select spirits like Tito's handmade vodka twenty nine ninety nine a bottle for southern comfort for just twenty eight ninety nine when you buy three or more give me three every day at outlet liquor I'm frankly Tempe the third if you're facing a separation or divorce protect your family law right get complete attention complete answers complete counsel from what temp your PC log group call eight five five thirty seven sixty one Google atap your PC dot com Hey itself apart you know there's a lot of numbers thrown around during football season but there's only one number you need to remember year round now grab your phone and save this two nine three double oh sixty six that's the number for master plumber and veteran Jim love grow at infinity home plumbing we're we treat our customers with infinite respect in your home with infinite professionalism save two nine three double oh sixty six your phone right now then when your home needs a plumber. W. G. R. sports radio five fifty. welcome back to the show one bills live from our our Senate get a studio in.

bills amherst
"amherst" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"amherst" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"You and me Elmer from Amherst one hour heating and cooling and this is Amy Hey armor so everyone about our new AC offering me well basically ellers gonna by your old AC system for a big discount on a new position AC system installed the elder way with no money down and no interest for up to sixty months this is you know if you need a new AC system is the company that how to do it at called Elmer's dot com petticoat we make the finest handcrafted western boots from the highest quality materials sold only direct to you for a fair price we did all this so you can have both so what's the deal did you know you'd be comfortable in the being taller do you hate your feet will they ever do to you well we'll help we'll work it out open your mind because the west is now find your fair at to go this dot com D. E. C. O. V. A. S. dot com if you nice I her reading using festival the only way you can be closer is if you were the one thing got your attention here's the easiest way to win first like you're free I heard radio account any Alexis nextel Alexa play the I heart radio music festival station playing I heart radio music festival radio that do it now and you could be in the front row both nights or twenty nineteen I heart radio music festival in W. O. A. R. he's in I heart radio broadcasting from the confines of an abandoned radio station in the secluded ghost town of high strangeness just downside of area fifty one it's time now for full disclosure.

alexa company amherst
"amherst" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"This. Is, John and the People's Republic of Amherst Massachusetts Litchfield names Wichita, Kansas I was shocked at. The level of vitriol that was aimed. Your way last night give us an idea of what it felt like to be in. The middle, of, it Well SEM honestly it, felt like, we, weren't in America anymore I I don't know. How to put any more plainly than. That Americans should not be treating their fellow Americans in this way of but unfortunately we Was brought ball when interviewing Jemma Costo already pile now he's got some vitriol coming is way? He, got shot, by Japanese sniper during World War Two was. She, interviewing Jake Jake Lingle from the Chicago Tribune who got shot. Down by one Al Capone's gangsters was she interviewing Victor Risal who, had SE, Cup Had acid thrown in his face by. A goon was working? For the for I think Albert Anastasia the boss of murder incorporated those were guys who what vitriol was all about be getting Hackel Come on is anybody ever been on like I'll. High school football team don't you get heckled the. You know the Thanksgiving Day game when you're playing your traditional rivals Man Talk about.

Jake Jake Lingle John Amherst Massachusetts Litchfie America Albert Anastasia Al Capone Chicago Tribune Kansas Jemma Costo Wichita Victor Risal murder football
"amherst" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Was that and we hawking no was it or was it in lake amherst it wasn't we hawkin where was it no it wasn't we hawker it was in new jersey that's we hockey no i wanna say it's in lake amherst i don't know why and sticking in my head we hawk in new jersey history why don't you just looking at hindenburg should look that up because it didn't pop up in in berg it's like it's you know how it always it'll be a famous event or something we hawking his famous for and no often what is it famous i'm not a lot of american revolutionary so don't you feel like when somebody says we hawkin you you've heard of we hawkin it was used as a lookout for the patriots to check on the british so maybe it's just like revolutionary history we hear about we hawking was yeah i think so we hawkin to a nine ding ding ding ding ding lyndhurst new jersey for the hindenburg yes okay thank you lyndhurst is compared to we honking well i'm going to map out you go ahead yes we'll do two things at once back in a dual held in we hawk in new jersey vice president aaron burr fatally shoots his longtime political and tagging alexander hamilton hamilton leading federalists and the chief architect of america's political economy dies the following day alexander hamilton born on the caribbean island of nevis came to the american colonies in seventeen seventy three is a poor immigrant there some controversy as to the year of his birth but it was either seventeen fifty five or fifty seven in seventeen seventy six he joined the continental army and the american revolution and his relentless energy and remarkable brought him to the attention of general george washington who took him on as an eight ten years later hamilton served as a delicate to the constitutional convention and he led the fight to win ratification of the final document which created the kind of strong centralized government that he favored in seventeen eighty nine he was appointed the first secretary of the treasury by president washington and during the next six years he crafted a sophisticated monetary policy that saved the young us government from collapse with the emergence of political parties hamilton was regarded as a leader of the federalists aaron burr born into a prestigious new jersey family in seventeen fifty six was also intellectually gifted and he graduated from the college of new jersey which is now known as princeton at the age of seventeen he joined the continental army in seventeen seventy i'm sorry in seventeen seventy five and distinguished himself during the patriot attack on quebec a masterful politician he was elected to the new state assembly in seventeen eighty three later served as state attorney in seventeen ninety he defeated alexander hamilton's in fatherinlaw interface for the us senate hamilton came to detest burr whom he regarded as a dangerous opportunist and he often spoke ill of him when burr ran for the vice presidency in seventeen ninety six and thomas jefferson's democratic republican ticket which was the forerunner of the democratic party hamilton launched a series of public attacks against burr stating quote i feel it is a religious duty to oppose his career john adams won the presidency and in seventeen ninety seven burlap the senate and returned to the new york assembly in eighteen hundred jefferson chose bur again is his running mate burr aided the democratic republican ticket by publishing a confidential document that hamilton had written criticising his fellow federalist president john adams this caused a rift in the federalist and help jefferson and berlin the election with seventy three electoral votes each under the electoral procedure then prevailing president and vice president were not voted for separately the candidate who received the most votes was elected president and the second in line vice president the vote then went to the house of representatives what at first seemed but an electoral technicality handing jefferson victory over his running mate developed into a major constitutional crisis when federalists in the lane congress threw their support behind burr after remarkable thirty five tie votes a small group of federalists changed sides and voted in jefferson's favor alexander hamilton who had supported jefferson as the lesser of two evils was instrumental in breaking the deadlock burr became vice president but jefferson grew apart from him and he did not support burs renomination to a second term in eighteen o four that year affection of newark federalists who had found their fortunes drastically diminished after the sentence of jefferson sought to enlist the.

lake amherst eight ten years six years
"amherst" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"We've got some university of massachusetts at amherst information for you because they're offering informational handouts to guide students through topics like gender normative privilege okay you're you're privileged if you just feel like you're if you're a man and you feel like you're a man well then you've got privilege if you're a woman who just feels like a woman identifies that way i guess you've been handed a special privilege the stonewall center which is the lgbtq a plus resource at our on campus offers eventually we're not going to be able to say that in one show it's gonna take two shows to give you all the letters in this special interest group is it is going to be more than a three hour process to get through every letter now belongs to this group closing music of our play squeeze in the last all right say tomorrow to we did to all ready other q and we're clear all right it's gonna take two shows boy so the stonewall said are is the lgbtq a plus resource center on campus can't and it offers a series of twelve handouts on its website aimed at teaching students about transgender issues including transgender terminology how to be an ally to transgender people transgender films and more now i want the handout on the transgender films because i don't i haven't seen a good transgender film at a while the last time you so dan wasn't it like never o'clock think it was yesterday ever i remember a big transgender movie from the i didn't attend but it was from the nineties i think i can't remember what the name of it was but i'm sure people would be horrified by it now because if i remember correctly.

stonewall center stonewall university of massachusetts amherst dan three hour
"amherst" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Hi this is john and the people's republic of amherst massachusetts litchfield wichita kansas the number is eight four four five hundred forty to forty two this is the howie carr show i'm grace as our show can't we did that i did a double sign off like a big loser guys i was so hyped up i could have said it one more time to probably would have felt right in the moment no more i'm not gonna plug the show anymore but this is grace filling in for howie carr and this is how we car show so we have to talk about the big story that took up a good part of my weekend i had the honour of watching the royal wedding got up at six fifteen and i live tweeted the entire thing i noticed that no one else on my twitter timeline was talking about the royal wedding except for maybe one or two people so i don't i didn't get the sense in a lot of people were watching but how he set up a beautiful story for me meghan markle's nephew tyler duly caught with knife in london blames trump so here's what happened so what did trump like stick the knife in her in his backpack he claims he heard from donald trump that london is a very dangerous city have been a lot of acid attacks lately.

john howie carr meghan markle tyler donald trump london amherst massachusetts litchfie twitter
"amherst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"College to umass amherst wbz's carl stevens takes a look students and staff at umass boston are upset that umass amherst is buying mount ida college and some lawmakers might grill umass officials about that at a state house hearing today but statehouse news reporter matt murphy tells me there's not much those lawmakers can do amherst pursuing this with its own money coming out of some broader budget so i if hard to see where it might step in to stop that the sales expected to go through today after attorney general maura healey ruled that umass amherst is pain fair value her office will continue to investigate whether mount ida college officials violated the law by allowing the school to get to the brink of bankruptcy carl stevens wbz newsradio ten thirty time may be running out on the meal shape meal shaming bill it looks like a dead end but at least for the time being the bill goes into a study order state rep alice pike co chair of the education committee said she believes this is not dead yet in order to recommend bill that actually robbing we need more time the bill's sponsor representative andres vargas says they will keep fighting for the measure the next session which would stop the practice of denying students hot food due to their parents meal debt with the school still to come this morning on wbz a new study finds the pop music is trending sad explain coming up wbz news time seven thirty three time for traffic and weather together on this wednesday the subaru retailers of doing.

umass boston mount ida college matt murphy maura healey andres vargas carl stevens umass reporter amherst attorney mount ida state rep alice pike representative
"amherst" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"In the era of the metoo movement and all the big revelations about some of the very high profile wealthy and powerful predatory men out there but it also reminds me back of back when i was at amherst my first week and their official college campus guidance was at each stage i'm just telling you this is what they told me you might be sitting there like buck this bizarre and i'm telling you i agree but they said at each stage of the sexual escalation process you had to verbalize your next move before taking it and i'm i remember actually i was there i was a little bit subversive even early on in my college career i said so so if you're kissing a girl and you wanna put your hands in the up stairs area you've gotta like ask first they said yes so what if you wanna go for like the small back or you know you're you're kissing and you're gonna go for you know you're going to slide the head down around around the the the bush yes you have to ask as so so you guys mean you don't mean like for the big things we're all adults here you know we know we're talking about you ask right that's under said you mean literally every body part every move you want verbal consent beforehand that is your guidance the answer was yes and i was like this seems like not a particularly romantic approach to male female relations i've gotta say that all said turns out not only amherst in the early two thousands and many other colleges had that today near twenty eighteen the pentagon gone has spent almost seven hundred thousand dollars on quote can i kiss you training so the training event according to the free beacon here is aimed to provide soldiers with skills to build respectful sexual.

bush pentagon amherst official seven hundred thousand dollars
"amherst" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WEEI

"The city philadelphia city of philadelphia and the city of amherst massachusetts which is also burning it is a matter of fact yeah you know why because they have some pennsylvania kids from philadelphia at new jersey error that in i say yes obvious did not phillies up in his crazy i know you on this you don't think so nobody's died his are you watch and well nominate sonny i've no debts you the desa common excel it already updates chris so we have three arrests as the vets our only now you have more arrests in amherst than than filled i realized i reached out to their police department are still tab i'm talking lammers is crazy the philly right now it isn't a mom looking all these videos parcels get a lot of them um there jumping off of in a light poles in the root some guy he was on the awning outside the ritz before ripped down and he literally like fell off i saw it on purpose sight to see if his friends would catch him and i'm not sure they did for the last championships in philly there were seventy six fans arrested that's way that's what i need to see well it's a limit one at all so i would anticipate over a hundred good hints that trashed or huahua they trashed macy's yep and when the cup showed up there was a guy taken a selfie with a mannequin in the window that they that they smashed right like in the display yeah and they arrest them crazy announced to gather the manneken raise video of a of illegals fan eating horse see that to me now we're talking bleep yes feces be successful can safely be using of course a matter of horse right horse dawn yes there you go yes let's not as crazy as you thought tell these night okay well why would what may i could pretending jeremy what do i didn't care lots of examples of fed fenced of your way wanted the fan philly fence up something you don't have to find it interesting it's why host showa should probably wild kid underrated amherst muses i'm not surprised surprised by amherst.

philadelphia massachusetts phillies sonny lammers macy amherst pennsylvania philly
"amherst" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"Year he's not entering amherst as they all expected and then it was really only because of a few loopholes in a recession that coolidge did get into amherst there was a loophole uh a school called st john's berry a wonderful school that still exists dumb had a system whereby one could get a certificate of entrance to amherst if you went up there uh and were a student dundee his old had the from his his school on which is a love the wrote st john's maria and coolidge went up there in the school needed the money so they took this young man and prepped him for amherst and with that search to get coolidge got in and then was promptly basically ignored by every fraternity in this intensely greek school amherst so we got into amorous but he certainly didn't get into the centre of the social life he's surrounded by men who will go on to be prominent i just want to get him back to graze before we turn to his life as a politician grace finds a man who was older than many he has not married although he has political ambitions here a north hampton does she just she approve of his political ambitions i i think she does which he sees as the essential seriousness of calvin whatever party he is and it's a different kind of marriage it's an oldfashioned marriage she called their marriage a harness which sounds on romantic for two um and that they h she said they had to work together and one horse had to be the stronger horse and but there is also a great love story because she subordinated some of herself to him he also subordinated some of himself for her and aussie went uh when they did get together the the um people were appalled that uh such a quiet guy is calvin this young lawyers a young attorney just recently read the law got the most beautiful girl in town let's let's say she's not just somewhat pretty she was beautiful she it perfect complexion you read all the friends of calvin who kinda thought they were the only ones who like him were surprised calvin got grays harbor book is coolidge as the author when next we make cal coolidge he is lieutenant governor of massachusetts being celebrated by the amherst alumni i'm john batchelor this is the john batchelor show.

amherst dundee maria north hampton calvin attorney lieutenant governor massachusetts john batchelor coolidge st john
"amherst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Amherst this it was brought on by the committee for a public council services and the aclu of massachusetts they also claim misconduct by the state attorney general's office and by da's across massachusetts president trump is distancing himself from a former campaign foreign policy advisor who pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi it's all part of special counsel rubber muller's investigation of russian meddling in last year's election as we hear more from cbs's steven portnoy a tweet the president blasts his former campaign aide as a proven liar aiming to minimise george pompidou topless he writes few people knew the young low level volunteer but mr trump seem to know him in march 2016 session with the washington post he called him an excellent guy papa dopoulos has admitted lying to the fbi as it investigated his contact with the kremlin connected professor who claimed to have dirt on hillary clinton and white house chief of staff john kelly is calling for a special council to invest to gate a uranium deal made with a russia a company during the obama administration as well as a dossier compiled on donald trump's during last year's election senator tim kaine hillary clinton's democratic running mate last year says he sees nothing wrong with how that dos year was compiling hired a affirm those working with the british secret service age and then when they decided to drop it apparently we now know that some of the funds to continue the investigation were paid for by the clinton campaign but we all do oppor research every candidate does apple research on their opponent you can ask any candidate for office they do it and hiring a firm to do oppor research is pretty common practice that's on any evidence of collusion that's what's done appointing a special council is up to the justice department wbz news time eleven twelve time for sports well very good news for patriots receiver cris hogan he will not need surgery on his injured shoulder instead hogan will just be out a few weeks recovering this according to the nfl network mark now last night a past trade of backup quarterback jimmy garoppolo to the forty nine ers for a 2018 second round draft pick ahead of today's nfl trade deadline and the bruins have a nice day off after a.

jimmy garoppolo nfl cris hogan justice department apple clinton dos senator john kelly chief of staff professor washington special counsel foreign policy attorney bruins massachusetts hogan tim kaine hillary clinton obama administration russia white house hillary clinton papa dopoulos george pompidou president steven portnoy cbs rubber muller fbi
"amherst" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"amherst" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In 1919 forty years after the events surrounding estern her possible poltergeist dr walter f prince published a critical study of the great amherst mystery in the proceedings of the american society for psychical research and in this paper prince makes pretty clear a case that hubbell exaggerated the details of esters case a hubbell he pointed out first published his notes on the esther cox case in eating seventy nine so the year after it began in the same year that some of this was still going on he then published a total of ten editions of these notes augmenting them with each printing and making quite a happy sum of money in the process the summer after the alleged poltergeist started its disruption of esters life rob haunting was still happening she went on its horror to talk about the phenomena walter hubbell and john white with her but this tour was really a bust in the first two stops the audiences were really belligerant and heckled them all of the other dates were cancelled and the tour abruptly ended so as you recall john way was the person that her brotherinlaw daniel went to desperate and said will you please take her in and this is where we mentioned that that lecture tour was actually agreed upon as a business venture by those two men before hubbell had even set foot in amherst it begins to be very obvious that from the beginning walter hubbell saw esther cox as a moneymaking opportunity.

dr walter f prince daniel hubbell walter hubbell esther cox amherst john white 1919 forty years