18 Burst results for "Amhara"

"amhara" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:55 min | Last month

"amhara" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"First up, though. After 17 months of fighting, Ethiopia's Civil War has claimed tens of thousands of lives. As food has become scarce, famine has blighted the northern Tigray Region. Medical supplies have become scarce too, and people are dying unnecessarily in tigray's main hospital. The government had announced an indefinite humanitarian truce on the 24th of March. And leaders from the tigrayan people's liberation front or TPLF accepted the terms of the ceasefire. Now, after much delay, a convoy of trucks loaded with food will soon be on its way. But it's a fragile peace and worries about renewed fighting have until now kept relief just out of reach for tigrayans. The government has allowed shipments of food to travel along just a single road into tigray. Tom Gardner is our Addis Ababa correspondent. But since the middle of December, there have been no convoys of food aid until the beginning of this month, when the first shipment of just 20 tracks arrived in the region. So the famine is getting much worse. But if the point of this ceasefire was to deal with the humanitarian crisis, why haven't supplies been actually making it there? So aid workers are waiting for security clearances from the authorities in the FR region to stop moving aid trucks down the road into tigray. The problem officially, at least, is that locals in afar who are angry about TPLF attacks in the region which have left hundreds of thousands of homeless and hungry in the last few months. They've started attacking shipments of aid that are traveling down this road. They are demanding that the afar region receive food aid before T grows. One of those calling for aid to be delivered to a far region first is the local opposition leader Musa Adam, who I spoke to recently. The federal government mentioned nothing about the afars humanitarian crisis. We are facing the same problem. Our people are dying out of hunger. So there are huge starvations, almost nearly 7. But what are the contingencies here? If the ceasefire hinges on these 8 packages arriving, why haven't there been more arriving? So there's currently a standoff which stems I think from a lack of agreement about what the ceasefire actually means. The TPLF controls the region of tigray almost to the region, but occupies part of the neighboring region of afar as well. And they basically indicated they won't withdraw their troops fully from these areas until aid starts flowing properly for a sustained period. It wants humanitarian access to be decoupled from political negotiations. The government seems to want their TPLF to withdraw fully or at least begin the process of adoring back to tigray before that. So there's a lack of clarity about what exactly this sequencing should be and no real transparent terms. Now, the latest is that the TPLF has announced it will withdraw from one district in a farm. That shouldn't theory make it harder for the government to refuse those clearances for aid convoys. And indeed, just in the last few hours, another convoy was given permission to travel, though it's not many trucks. It's worth stressing, though, many people don't believe Abby is genuinely committed to this process that he's simply buying time in order to stave off the threat of American sanctions. So we're really going to have to wait and see now if this is really a breakthrough or not. So what to make of this then if the tide seems to be turning, do you think there's hope for the ceasefire in the long run? In the last few months fighting has been much less intense than it was last year. And I think there has been some progress when it comes to these indirect talks, mediated by America in the African Union, military commanders have made contact, both sides have toned down their rhetoric since January, the government has released many tigrayans from prison, including some TPLF leaders and lifted a three month state of emergency in February. So in some respects, yes, there are grounds for thinking that the end of the war is inching closer. And that's been contingent on the TPLF coming to the negotiating table. Why do you suppose that after all that time they decided to do so? Last year, it looked like the TPLF was going to storm the capital ladders ever but their forces came within a 160 kilometers of the city and the prospect was of regime change. Since then, it suffered setbacks on the battlefield and has called openly and repeatedly for negotiations. I mean, it unable to relieve the suffering of civilians in tigray, apart from the food shortages there is barely any medical supplies throughout the region. There is a kind of commercial blockade imposed by the federal government, they can't do much about, so no telecoms, no banking services, barely any electricity, tens of thousands are crossing into the neighboring amhara region to escape. The U.S. officials I spoke to told me they were seeing around 700 people a day fleeing from tigray to amhara, perhaps a 120,000 in total. Now, all of that highlights though truly desperate condition that tigrayans now find themselves in. And that being the case wouldn't the government think that the TPLF is in some way on the ropes. What's their negotiating position? That's one of the reasons for skepticism. That's why some people don't believe the government's word when it says it wants peace. That said, the government is in its own tough position. And a senior official from the ruling party told me recently that diplomatic pressure, the economy war weariness in that order were the reasons behind the government's shift. So take diplomatic pressure to start with. The U.S. special envoy for the Horn of Africa was in Addis Ababa just before the ceasefire was announced, America's already suspended duty free access for Ethiopian goods. There are two more sanctions bills currently before Congress, then in addition to that, the economy is in a dire position, spending on the war over the last year has severely exacerbated a shortage of foreign currency, banks are running dry, factories are cutting back for want of imported materials and inflation, which is already topping 34% is set to rise further thanks to Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which is going to have significant spillovers throughout the region. So in a sense, we may reach peace in this at last simply because war it is too expensive for both sides. Well, yes, exactly. The cost of war is going up. The chances of a maximalist military solution achieved by either a side is looking quite unlikely. However, we're very far off, I would say, from a lasting political negotiated settlement, there are many tripwires yet, which may cause this progress to founder in recent days, lots of buses of Ethiopian troops were seen moving north towards tigray. There are reasons to believe this is just contingency planning, but there are many in tigray who are worried about this and may see this as an act of aggression. Similarly, TPLF leaders, for that part, they've warned of launching a new offensive of their own should aid, not arrive soon. A tigrayan diplomat told me people are losing patience and even said that if they didn't arrive, it would be a matter of days, not weeks before the two sides went back to war. There is certainly a high risk that the road from afar has a fork that leads straight back to war. There are still some grounds for cautious optimism, but unless aid moves down that road very quickly in large quantities, it seems inevitable that war will return. Thanks very much for.

TPLF tigray Tom Gardner Musa Adam afar amhara government Addis Ababa federal government Ethiopia U.S. African Union Abby Horn of Africa Ababa Addis Congress Ukraine
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:56 min | 4 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Should be a music and laughter and sadness and it's all and they seem to have done it never simply And Kay's niece Julian Campbell thinks the white hiker chief is a masterpiece of drama I think it would be worthy of the way I stand or Broadway I don't really hope that somebody out there would see it I want that on my stage It's that part of the world class You stand here that is a highland correspondent Chris page You're listening to new Tsar from the BBC on Julian Marshall And we go now to Ethiopia where nearly 15 months of conflict have failed to resolve the differences between the government in Addis Ababa and rebels in the northern tigray ridge and but have left hundreds of thousands suffering from what the UN calls an extreme lack of food It's a conflict that has ebbed and flowed since November 2020 when government troops began an offensive in tigray after rebels of the TPLF attacked a military barracks after initially losing control of tigray's towns at the TPLF regroup to retook tigray before launching offensives in neighboring amhara and afar regions At one point the rebels were advancing on at a suburb of last November retreated to tigray where this week they announced another offensive in afar region The conflict is left tens of thousands dead displaced millions while a de facto blockade of tigray by the government has left its people without much needed aid So what had they tigrayans achieved after 15 months of fighting It was a question I put too deep breath in Gabriel Mikhail in a rare broadcast interview he's the chairman of the TPLF and current president of the Tigray Region The most important thing is that we have survived the genocidal war that have been unleashed by the federal government the government and amhara government on I think I saw the last 15 months as you know have suffered unspeakable horrors who are living in a health but who have managed to survive So the most important is where our life and we're already the go to the village Surviving is that enough surely when you or when this complex started nearly 15 months ago you had political objectives of course I'm not saying that is enough this collision has come to finish us not just to subdue and rule us So the most important challenge was that we have to pass through all these atrocities All these crimes and make sure that we as people we as government survive but the most important is still we have to restore our basic rights process has to be accounted and there are many political issues that we have settled But that's why we are on the way and we have to go to the finishing line Atrocities must be accountable is that atrocities by Ethiopian and pro government forces and atrocities by tigrayan fighters as well because you do stand accused of human rights abuses rape in the course of the conflict We say we're ready for the scrutiny already for the investigation but there is no parallel In tigray integral they have done atrocities It will take you back to the medieval ages if there are any parallels to other integrity They are looking to say that has been committed integrase similar part has been done in other areas Has been done integrate has been done also in other areas in afar and in ara No It's a completely different Whatever has been done as an area it will be indie discipline issues but has been done integrated with a systematic destruction You mentioned that far and I wondered what tigrayan forces were doing at the moment in afar we spoke to somebody last night who was there and they painted a picture of tigrayan forces destroying villages communities attacking civilians So what are the Graham forces doing there Mission was there a very limited for several time for several weeks from afar A militia and Air France forces were conducting operations against our forces They were crossing tigray They were obstructing the humanitarian supplies as they have of killed hundreds of tigres They have looted their properties thousands have been arrested and so finally we have to respond for security reasons So we have to remove loss across the territory We have to remove and attacks There's also a proximity of the grain So that's not just a springboard for that position That was a mission and the scope is very limited Okay so part of the molecule operation in our far is to try to clear the road and to enable aid to be delivered to tigray just how bad are things at the moment in the region People are dying because of lack of medicine and communication with ground or air transport There is no cash backing services has been suspended There is no telecom there is no Internet There is no power You can imagine the hell are people living in The government is using hunger as it were This is a war crime Do you accept that all this suffering can only come to an end when you make your peace with the government of abiy Ahmed Are you prepared to do that Yes we are prepared but I would like to add in our perspective We have to give a chance for peace without this forget about the political resolution of the conflict We can not supply our people The necessary food they will perish because of the city and plugins So all the way out is to give peace a chance That was the reason also for our withdrawal And we are collaborating also with all the initiatives of AU Kenya and so you pulled your forces back to tigray to give peace a chance What are your conditions for peace Things that have to be done will have to stop fighting or whatever we are The federal and our forces let's stop fighting and give a chance for peace not only that but those supplies the necessary supplies must arrive Unfortunately we have a government that kills its own people So we say let's stop This next day we have to go to the negotiator a formal ceasefire Core enforcement must be withdraw the transfers are still integrated They have to withdraw the mahara militias are integrated They have to withdraw any other foreign intervention must stop then we have to continue to national dialog Are you talking to the federal government at the moment if not openly perhaps through intermediaries Yes we'll have started talking with the federal government of course there are shuttle communications and discussions So we'll see but there are signs of improvement but we are still waiting We are waiting for this.

tigray TPLF afar Julian Campbell Chris page Julian Marshall northern tigray ridge amhara Gabriel Mikhail Tigray Region amhara government Ababa Addis Kay Ethiopia BBC UN federal government ara government
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:50 min | 5 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Going to be processed into heroin The Taliban are not stopping drug production In fact they've been taxing it for years They don't want journalists seeing it being traded That's why we're filming from inside the car At the market outside the city of Kandahar stall holders have thick plastic bags filled with black opium paste laid out in front of them Under the previous government trade is paid off corrupt officials but sold their goods in secret Now under the Taliban there's no need to hide One opium merchant agreed to speak to us anonymously Since the Taliban take over we have become completely free but the prices have raised a lot They have doubled both of opium and hearing because it's possible the Taliban will ban it at some stage They destroy lots of people's lives around the world Do you feel bad when you're selling it It is not to go to work to be honest but people are badly affected by 40 years of war in our suffering If the international community help us in antifreeze Afghanistan's fund the Taliban could ban it like they did when they were in power before In a remote field in southern Helmand province farmer RAS Muhammad and his young nephews are digging small water channels His bare feet and clothes are caked in mud Life here is a struggle They grow wheat for food and opium to sell And there is nothing else that earns us money like this Governments have come and gone but they didn't do anything for us They haven't provided us with other seats to grow That would help me buy food for my family We don't like them but there is no other choice For now with Afghanistan's economy collapsing in a drought in large parts of the country it seems they'll be more drugs planted and more on the streets Both here and abroad Secondary reporting from Afghanistan Nala Bella is a town in the amhara region of northern Ethiopia known for its distinctive rock hewn churches dating from the 12th and 13th centuries it was captured in August this year by a tigrayan rebels after they defeated an Ethiopian gum defensive in their neighboring Tigray Region a government forces recaptured lalibela earlier this month and went on to push rebels out of several towns they'd occupied on the road to the capital Addis Ababa but now the tigrayan rebels are reported to be back in control of lalibela after apparently meeting their resistance from government forces Alex Tavares executive director of the world peace foundation and a research professor at the Fletcher school Tufts University joins a slide from the United States and mister Duval how do you explain this flip flopping of control over lalibela Well I think what it shows is that the tigray defense forces which had advanced to within about a 140 kilometers of two weeks ago and which then withdrew withdrew in actually quite good order largely undefeated They withdrew because they were came under relentless attack from the skies from drones which have been provided by turkey Iran and China through the UAE which made those forward positions unsustainable But essentially what I think we see is that their army is still intact quilt still quite capable of fighting So we may be in for a very long war So would you say that this month the beginning of a counter offensive by the tigrayans and can we expect to see them pushing back down the road to adaba It's not at all clear what is in prospect While the drone arsenal remains intact while the government of Abby Ahmed can maintain that level of swarms of drones It would be a remarkably difficult for the tigrayans to make that sort of advance And I think the prospect of there being a battle for Addis Ababa in the near future therefore is improbable I mean there have been a lot of reports from the tigrayans previous occupation of la la Bella that it was very oppressive that it was very cruel They don't seem to be winning any allies If indeed the objective is finally to march on Addis Ababa and possibly take control of the whole country The I think what we're seeing is what was feared some months ago after the tigrayans one control of tigray And of course the grid defense forces were immensely popular within tigray But what happened subsequently was it became really a people to people war between the tigrayans and the amhara And this is a war in which no one can win and in which the brutality will be and have been inflicted on the civilian population on both sides The to grants have not made their ultimate political objective very clear and one of the difficulties that the army was having as it did advance south towards Addis ambas was that the political leadership had done really nothing to assuage the concerns of the general Ethiopian population of the intent was not to install that he grants in power They gave some indications that it would be otherwise but they hadn't clarified their political agenda to the public as a whole And very very briefly mister Duval any prospect of a diplomatic solution a lot of publicized efforts to negotiate between the two sides but anything happening off the radar The efforts by the Nigerian former president and AU special envoy all the segment up appear to have been rebuffed recently by abiy Ahmed But president Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya has a very discrete low profile initiative which we hope will yield some fruits the Ethiopians really need peace Thanks Alex Duval executive director of the world peace.

Taliban RAS Muhammad Afghanistan Nala amhara Addis Ababa mister Duval Tigray Region lalibela Afghanistan Alex Tavares world peace foundation Fletcher school Tufts Universi Kandahar Helmand Abby Ahmed tigray la la Bella Ethiopia
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:14 min | 6 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Gonzalez is a conflict analyst In 2021 the situation is critical in only 71 municipalities So we can say we're in the same warriors before because that covered most of the country Instead we've moved on to localized fragmented conflicts that no longer ever national dimension Our last quarter there was an immense sense of optimism during the ceremony 5 years ago when then president Juan Manuel Santos and fart guerrilla leader Rodrigo londono shook hands and signed the peace agreement But a peaceful life still eludes many Colombian families Matthew Charles reporting from Colombia You'd have thought that Ethiopia has quite enough going on what was a spreading conflict in the north against fighters from the tigray people's liberation front and militia from the oromo Liberation Army and even though prime minister abiy Ahmed was pictured near the front line in army fatigues last week claiming imminent victory rebel forces say they are gaining the upper hand and now we're hearing that Ethiopian forces have killed several Sudanese soldiers along their common border The Horn of Africa analyst Rashid abdi has been telling me why this clash is dangerous for the region Relations between Ethiopia and Sudan have been up and down throughout the decades In the last 30 years we have seen periodic tensions between the two countries over a whole host of issues But during the EPRDF and Bashir times there was I think an attempt by both steps to find some kind of a model that's within the border tensions After the overthrow of Bashir and the takeover by the military and the coming in of abi the old system of managing both attentions collapsed And remember there is a big territory between Sudan and Ethiopia called faca which is a fertile agricultural land which is coveted by people from the amhara region of Ethiopia who have encroached on this territory for decades But the Sudanese during the time of Bashir did not expel them What they did essentially was to have a sort of a co habitation and a system of sharing revenue and also exploiting the resources there collectively And this system worked very well But then in the last two years tensions have been building up and the Amara state sent in militias to try to rest control of that territory from the Sudanese farmers And that is why these tensions have now escalated to a very serious border crisis Well the Ethiopian army is said to have killed at least 21 Sudanese soldiers And that's at the time when Ethiopia is actually fighting a very vicious conflict in tigray It's fighting wars on other fronts What does this mean Does it create more conflict in the region It speaks to just this very I think conceived conflicts multiple conflicts across Ethiopia Ethiopian army has basically collapsed The state is reliant on ethnic militias and actually the conflict border tensions with Sudan have been prosecuted largely not by the conventional army but by the ethnical issues And I suspect that this is probably a way of the amhara state setting its claim and saying that you may think that is now weakened but we will fight this we will fight you and we will stack our claim to this territory What does it tell us about Sudan though Well Sudan also has its own turmoil but there is I think some confidence and some kind of unity between the political parties as well as the military on the need to retain fascia as soon as editor And I think if you look at also conventions and the long history there is a strong support for Sudan's position even at the AAU So that explains why the Sudanese are confident and they went last year to start reclaiming fascia Rashid abdi talking on New Zealand Distribution of the BBC World Service news hour in the United States is made possible.

Ethiopia Juan Manuel Santos Rodrigo londono Matthew Charles Sudan oromo Liberation Army abiy Ahmed Rashid abdi Ethiopian army EPRDF Bashir amhara Gonzalez Horn of Africa Colombia tigray AAU fascia Rashid abdi New Zealand
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:53 min | 6 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Store online or on the app Spirits not available in Virginia or North Carolina It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Steve inskeep and I'm a Martinez Ethiopia Civil War is entering a second year It's a complicated conflict with origins that are centuries old And a dispute over land has spiraled into a brutal conflict within the region NPR's eighter Peralta has traveled near the front lines to report and a warning this story does contain graphic descriptions of violence In the middle of all the green vegetation villagers show me a clearing dotted with mounds of dirt Muscular A mass grave We keep walking and no matter where we turn We smell decomposing bodies with somebody here Another mound of dirt We see them everywhere we walk under trees on the side of the road out of one mound There's a skull dragged out by wild animals so all that is left our teeth and bones So many soldiers died that they were buried in a hurry Is one of the town's Ethiopian orthodox priests He says the town chenna in the amhara region of Ethiopia saw intense fighting He says rebels from the tiga people's liberation front took over the town and then a counter attack from the government pushed them out And just before they retreated he says they looted the church and killed indiscriminately They don't have any respect in their world When we get to the church we see more graves They estimate about 200 civilians were killed here dozens of villagers stand around the graves looking at the rocks that keep the body safe from hyenas Mulu and Dale lost her husband She wipes her tears with her black headdress She can not understand why this happened Her husband wasn't fighting He didn't even know what this war was about He was only a farmer she keeps repeating He knows nothing He doesn't know anything about the kill him and they left If you could talk to the men who are leading this war What would you tell them I will explain to them all the pain I am going through This conflict started as a power struggle between the former rulers of Ethiopia and the new ones But ethnic and historical grievances added the fuel which turned it into a Civil War Specifically I think I'm paras against ethnic tigrayans Their emperors have contested these lands since biblical times If you talk to the political elites here in the amhara region they frame the.

NPR news Steve inskeep eighter Peralta Ethiopia amhara NPR North Carolina Mulu Virginia Dale government paras
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:47 min | 6 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And I'm a Martinez Ethiopia Civil War is entering a second year It's a complicated conflict with origins that are centuries old And a dispute over land has spiraled into a brutal conflict within the region NPR's Idaho Peralta has traveled near the front lines to report and a warning this story does contain graphic descriptions of violence In the middle of all the green vegetation villagers show me a clearing dotted with mounds of dirt It's like muscular Yeah A mass grave We keep walking and no matter where we turn We smell decomposing bodies Another mound of dirt We see them everywhere we walk under trees on the side of the road out of one mound There's a skull dragged out by wild animals so all that is left our teeth and bones So many soldiers died that they were buried in a hurry A better damas is one of the town's Ethiopian orthodox priests He says the town China in the amhara region of Ethiopia saw intense fighting He says rebels from the tigray people's liberation front took over the town and then a counter attack from the government pushed them out And just before they retreated he says they looted the church and killed indiscriminately They don't have any respect in their world When we get to the church we see more graves They estimate about 200 civilians were killed here dozens of villagers stand around the graves looking at the rocks that keep the body safe from hyenas Mulu and Dale lost her husband She wipes her tears with her black headdress She can not understand why this happened Her husband wasn't fighting He didn't even know what this war was about He was only a farmer she keeps repeating He knows nothing He doesn't know anything about the kill him and they left If you could talk to the men who are leading this war What would you tell them I will explain to them all the and I'm going through This conflict started as a power struggle between the former rulers of Ethiopia and the new ones But ethnic and historical grievances added the fuel which turned it into a Civil War Specifically ethnic against ethnic tigrayans Their emperors have contested these lands since biblical times If you talk to the political elites here in the amhara region they frame the.

Ethiopia amhara Peralta NPR hyenas Mulu Idaho tigray China Dale
"amhara" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:06 min | 7 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WBUR

"Industrial levels But they didn't spell out what that would actually involve Even Antonio Guterres the United Nations secretary general struggled to sound optimistic he left Rome for Glasgow he said with his hopes unfulfilled but not buried The Algerian president Abdul majid taboo has ordered the state energy company to stop exporting gas through a pipeline that crosses neighboring Morocco because of a dispute between the two countries The pipeline supplies more than half of Spain's gas as well as much of Morocco's Australia has allowed the resumption of international air travel without the need for quarantine for the first time in more than 18 months Australia imposed some of the world's toughest COVID travel restrictions last year from Sydney his shimmer Khalil In a very emotional day here at Sydney airport at one of the arrival gates and we're just looking at families now arriving This is one of the flights People are just making their way back Some people have said that after waiting for such a long time it doesn't seem to feel real People have arrived here to embrace this to cheers And of course tearful reunions fully vaccinated Australians and Australian residents have now been able to come home from overseas quarantine free for the first time in nearly two years You're listening to the world news from the BBC Ethiopia's prime minister Abby Ahmed has urged his supporters to use any weapons they have to stop an advance by tigrayan rebel forces He issued the appeal on Facebook after the rebels said they'd made further territorial gains in the amhara region taking them closer to the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa Japan's main stock index the nicaea rose by more than 2% in early trading on Monday After the governing liberal Democratic Party held on to power in a general election The pole was considered a test for the new prime minister fumio kushida who won the LDP leadership contest in September The party lost some seats but performed better than predicted The LDP has held power almost continuously for more than 6 decades 9 firefighters training inside a cave in Brazil have died after the roof collapsed They were part of a larger group of almost 30 taking part in the exercise in São Paulo state The remote cave isn't accessible to vehicles or heavy machinery The publishers of the Oxford English dictionary in Britain have chosen the word vax as their 2021 word of the year The lexicographers pick an annual expression which they consider reflects current preoccupations more details from Elizabeth Needham Bennett The word vaccine is first recorded in English in 1799 Words related to it have spiked in frequency this year with a surge in the use of vax as well as double axed unvexed and anti vaxxer Oxford languages and Collins each decide their own word of the year Last year Collins chose.

Antonio Guterres Abdul majid taboo Morocco Abby Ahmed Australia amhara Sydney airport Khalil governing liberal Democratic P United Nations Glasgow LDP Rome fumio kushida Spain Sydney Ethiopia Ababa Addis
"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:58 min | 7 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As the TPLF claim a hospital among the targets Definitely not And do you have any information about casualties whether they were casualties as a result of these attacks No specific information on that but this air operations by the Ethiopian defense force are taken in a very very careful and also very surgical manner and have no civilian target whatsoever so far But you can also hear that the TPA left terrorist groups multiple saying and trying to manipulate the fact that they deceived the international community But the fact is the operations are all successful and only targeting the military groups operational and training basis They say that you have drop bombs from four kilometers in height which would suggest if that is true that you may well have caused casualties because that is much higher than one would think a precise bombing campaign would be I can not go into the details of the military operations as you can obviously imagine But as you can identify so far there have been producing falsified informations about targeted civilians which didn't actually happen so far And in today's operation itself this mouthpieces might keep saying that to manipulate the fact but that is not absolutely true But you don't know what's absolutely true either you're saying that you don't know whether they've been casualties which means there might have been You can identify the trends of this information coming from the TPLF group which they have been falsifying information This is not about trends This is about the government you carrying out air strikes and being able to tell the outside world with certainty that it is not caused civilian casualties and as I understand from what you've said you can not tell us that for certain The year operations are only targeting communication facilities of the group military training centers and only an institution that are used by this group to manufacture manufacturing military equipment and gears Are you saying that there will then be you will be offering proof that these targets were the ones that you say they were that there were no civilian casualties I will not actually go through the detailed military operational informations which is not my place Right What about the ground war What can you tell us about that Well at this moment TPLF errors group is actively still attacking the neighboring regions of amhara and afar And in the recent attacks they are still causing and commuting in human acts and violations of human rights You can remember that the killings of civilians enter in our far region and also in which early amhara regions which can count the casualties can be counted for more than 30 people in a few examples of this heaviest acts of the group And as the TPLF continues to attack this neighboring regions it's you know the federal government has the responsibility to uphold then the well-being of it citizens to remove this stereoscope from causing more damages to the Ethiopian people Can I ask you about the decision by the United Nations to suspend its aid flights into Michele following the air strike on Friday which caused it to abort a landing there Are you in communication with the United Nations to avoid that from happening again Are you working with them to get their flights up and flying again The Ethiopian federal government continue is continuing to address the humanitarian needs and to grow in amhara in afar regions not just in great regions which most people kind of ignore But hundreds and thousands of people are displaced and are actually dire need of humanitarian assistance which is caused by the TPA left terrorist group To your question there are two age planes licensed by the federal government returning to Addis Ababa After only being denied permission by the local air traffic controllers to land in Mike LA not the other way around But you can see from the UN spokesman Stephen Drake also reportedly said that the planes had been cleared by the federal authorities in only reason they returned because they were denied clearance So we are trying to affirm this information to the UN and clear the misunderstanding And try to continue Right so just to be clear then that the reason those flights did not land was because they were told they couldn't by the people on the ground there Because that does not tally with what the UN said last week They said that they were forced to return because of the air strikes in Michele Now the airplanes has nothing to do with air strikes You can get that from the time And from the locations itself the edge planes only came back because they were denied permission by the local air traffic controllers to land in megali They have nothing to do with their strikes So will the UN planes be able to return No there is no reason for them not to fly because the federal government collaboration with the international community is still committed to address the humanitarian needs into the heart and also of our regions That was salaman with Casa Spokeswoman for the Ethiopian government You're listening to the BBC World Service This is news hour coming to live from London with James to Mars army.

amhara TPLF Ethiopian defense force TPA afar Ethiopian federal government United Nations federal government UN Mike LA Stephen Drake Michele Addis Ababa salaman Ethiopian government BBC London James
"amhara" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

05:18 min | 7 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Every team Learn more at data iku dot com and from the Annie E Casey foundation This is weak introduction from NPR news I'm Scott Simon The Civil War in Ethiopia is almost a year old now Government forces there are on a new offensive millions of people have fled their homes and the United Nations says parts of the country are on the verge of famine And piraja Peralta has been traveling through Ethiopia this past week and joins us now from adesa Baba Thanks so much for being with us Thank you Scott You were just near the front lines in the north of the country This will be rough to hear but tell us please what you saw and heard Yeah I went to a little town called Jenna And it's in the mountains in amhara These are huge mountains and it's not far from the front lines and it was a town that saw some of the worst fighting in the past month And what we saw was just more evidence of just what a cruel wore this is We walked about two or three miles and we saw shallow graves everywhere on the side of the road under trees in ravines and some of the bodies had been dragged out by animals So all that was left of them was bones and teeth and the bodies we couldn't see We could smell this whole mountain smell of rotting flesh And the people in this town say that the rebels stayed for 5 days They say that they ate their food that they killed their animals And that they shot anyone they suspected of being affiliated with the government I spoke to move on dala a woman in her 30s and she says that the rebels shot and killed her husband in front of her And she couldn't make sense of it She kept saying that her husband was only a farmer Let's listen We did not He knows nothing He doesn't know anything about the kingdom and they left If you could talk to the men who are leading this war What would you tell them I will explain to them all the way and I'm going through So she wants them to know her pain Enter this truly sounds like hell What's the fighting and killing about You know this is a question I've been asking everyone And among the people who are suffering the most in this conflict the people who have lost loved ones I keep hearing that they just don't understand why this is happening This is a war They tell me that is between brothers and sisters People who look like each other who married each other who share a religion and a history but when I talk to the political elites I hear and entrenched bitterness and resentment This war is about taking back land and imposing their vision of what they think this country should be in the future And the two main fighters in this conflict the ethnic tigrayans and the ethnic amharas say that this is an existential fight The tigrayans who are the rebels say that the government is trying to starve them to annihilation the amhara say that they've already been slaughtered when the tigrayan led government was in power And if the tide turns in this war that they will be destroyed I think what that tells you is just how far away a peace process feels like in this country And help us understand how desperate the situation for food is now It's terrible I mean the UN says that things are terrible that malnutrition among pregnant and lactating women is at levels that the UN side at the beginning of the feminine Somalia in 2011 And more than 250,000 people died during that famine And the government of Ethiopia the UN says continues to severely limit the number of 8 trucks that are allowed into the rebel held region So things are not getting better and the rebel controlled region is still on the verge of famine In perugia Peralta thanks so much Thank you Scott Help on a change in restaurant windows promises of signing bonuses higher wages owners and managers are struggling to try to get employees back full-time after the pandemic's disruptions but for some of those workers the time away from the service industry has opened new doors Time and M is Nicolas vanneck I live in Portland Oregon and I make custom furniture Nicolas van eck was a chef for nearly a decade He also co owned a small restaurant but lockdowns ended that and left Nicolas van eck with something unusual for a time The first thing that I did is exercise Which is something that I had wanted to do but when you're working a 16 hour shift every day you can shoehorn.

Annie E Casey foundation NPR news Ethiopia amhara dala Scott Simon UN Peralta Jenna Scott perugia Peralta Scott Help Nicolas van eck Somalia government Nicolas vanneck Portland Oregon
"amhara" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

03:06 min | 9 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Welcome to news day from the BBC World Service with bottom Asaro and James Kopp No in this half hour allegations that Ethiopian rebel forces them to grow. I have carried out a massacre transport regimes on a key road from the Ugandan border to south Sudan's capital. But is it safe? We'll hear about the removal of a prominent statue of a Confederate general in the US and examine South Africa's unemployment problem. First vote this news BBC News with Daniel. Yeah, The chief justice of the Brazilian Supreme Court. Luis Fucks, has accused President Jacob all scenario of encouraging people to defy the court's rulings. His comments came a day after Mr Bolsonaro told supporters he would not obey the decisions of one of the judges. He was investigating the president for allegedly spreading misinformation. At least 10 people have died in a fire at a makeshift coronavirus hospital in North Macedonia, calling it a huge tragedy. The Prime Minister Zoran Zaev, said that an investigation was underway. North Korea has held a military parade to mark the anniversary of its foundation, but none of the countries ballistic missiles were on display. A slimmer Kim Jong UN was seen on state media waving at the midnight parade in Pyongyang. Morocco's governing Islamist party. The PJD has suffered a crushing defeat in parliamentary elections slumping to eighth place. The liberal are any party came first, followed by another liberal party. The P A. M. The former U. S. President Donald Trump has criticized the removal of a huge statue of the Confederate General Robert E. Lee, who fought to preserve slavery in the American Civil War. Mr Trump said America's history and heritage both good and bad, will being extinguished by the radical left. Facebook has been accused of breaking equality law in Britain in the way it advertises jobs. An investigation found that Facebook's algorithms showed ads for mechanics almost exclusively to men. While nearly all of those seeing ads for nursery nurses were women. And the Australian Cricket Board says it will have no alternative but to cancel hosting a historic test match against the Afghan men's team if the country's Taliban rulers don't allow women to play the sport. Senior Taliban official has said it was not necessary that women should play cricket or any other sport. BBC news Thank you. Hello. Welcome to news day on the BBC World Service with Polar and James. Coming up this half hour, we'll head to Ethiopia, Uganda and South Africa and the U. S to to find out why the removal of the statue is making the headlines that Isaac has all the sports, So let's get going. And first we go to Ethiopia, where the government says more than 100 civilians have been killed in the Amhara region, biting grain rebels. BBC's Kakitani battle joins us Now He's been looking into these reports from Addis Ababa morning to you, Calculon! So what, exactly.

Ethiopia Daniel Isaac Amhara Addis Ababa BBC Uganda BBC World Service Australian Cricket Board Pyongyang Trump Facebook North Macedonia Bolsonaro Luis Fucks American Civil War James south Sudan Asaro BBC News
"amhara" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

WBEZ Chicago

05:49 min | 9 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on WBEZ Chicago

"Lawrence with you. Lawrence is standing by to hear about a deliveries to to great. And then we'll hear about a grizzly spate of killings in Uganda also bringing news of the role of agriculture and helping Africa recover from the pandemics, economic damage all that plus Isaac with a sport that Tuesday Yeah, let's start by turning to Ethiopian and particularly the war hit region of Tigray. We want an update on the food aid, which apparently some 100 trucks of it has reached the capital to Kelly. It's been a pretty tortuous way to get there, according to the U. N as well. There are millions of people in need of humanitarian assistance in Tigre. Let's speak now to the World Food Programme's regional spokesperson, Gordon Vice Gordon, first off We've we've been following the story on and off. They have been convoys which have been obstructed. There have been convoys that pretty awfully have been shelled as well. Not clear. By whom. What were these trucks and how much has got through This was 100 trucks that got through on Sunday. Um it managed to cross the conflict lines and get into Tigray Province, where it it reached our warehouses in in MMA Kelly. Carrying food aid like predominantly food aid about 90% of it, plus other humanitarian items, Right how big is the need? Just remind us would you where this is going, And if it's a drop in the ocean? How much of a difference is it going to make? Well, it's going to make something of a difference. It's about a week's worth of supplies. But of course, it's not just about Tigre. Now The conflict is spreading, and it's spread to the neighboring provinces of Amhara, and a far so just over the past. Sort of six weeks. We've added another 1.7 million people that we've managed to identify on on top of the caseload that we already had into grave about 5.2 million people. How long does it take to because obviously the practicalities of distribution. Okay, you've got to the capital Mackell. A A lot of the need is out in the country. What are the possibilities of that aid actually getting out there to people in rural areas rather than in large cities. Well, it's a very murky picture, as you can imagine, because this is a This is a raging conflict, but we think that we can get a doubt too many people, But it's only a week's worth of of of age. We need about 100 trucks going into Two grey every day to to stay on top of the about the enveloping crisis, but but now we have Amhara and a far as well, so it's a highly complex operation being carried out across lines of conflict. And you know if there's one thing that we know about the Horn of Africa, food disasters like famines happen slowly. And then they happen all at once. And that's why prepositioning stocks is so important In these conditions. You mentioned the line of conflict. They aren't always that clear, and I know that a lot of aid delivery has suffered appalling. Attacks and so on. How long did this convoy take to get through? I'm just trying to get an impression from you about whether this could be a way through that has been smoothed. Having done it once you're going to happen, it's going to happen again. Or was it a struggle to get it through? No Getting getting getting two convoys through has been difficult all along. I mean, the government of Ethiopia is very nervous about sending supplies into an area which is controlled by by enemy to grain forces. Um, but, you know, so it's it's a complicated negotiation. And as I said, You know, we've got one convoy through. That's the first convoy have got through since August. The 22nd. There are many more that we need. We need 100 trucks going Justin to degrade every day every every day to stay on top of the operation. And then we have the additional provinces of Amhara and a far so the conflict is spreading. It's becoming more complicated. Front lines are shifting all the time. That means our operations and our operational planning changes almost every day. And presumably, it means that you can speak to people at the top. That doesn't mean that those opinions are necessarily shared or reflected at ground level. I mean, how much longer than what you'd expected it take to get through. Is it negotiation at every point Going through these as you say, the shifting lines of conflict. Yeah, well, I mean, there are obviously different views inside the government of Ethiopia. And then there are their state level. Um, complications and then and then it goes down to the village level. Um, and there has been a very ugly perception that the UN has has been biased in its delivery of food. This, of course, is not true. We operate on principles of neutrality. But we have to deal with those with those perceptions as well. And that often translates into things like attacks on our truck. Of course, I mean, the You know you are neutral, but the perception means that your work is used by both sides or all sides to their own. Advantage, frankly, isn't it? Well, absolutely. I mean, that's that's why we are so persistent in asserting our neutrality and the neutrality of aid and the neutrality of reaching people who are caught up in the conflict. We are not engaged in the conflict. Important point to make Thank you for coming on the line. That was at the World Food Programme's regional spokesperson Gordon Vice on the line from Nairobi, talking about the arrival first time in a long, long time in weeks, actually the arrival of 100 trucks of food aid in Mackell, a integrate News day. BBC World Service can take you to Uganda. Now we're two members.

Gordon Vice BBC World Service Uganda Lawrence Nairobi Tigray Province Tigre World Food Programme Amhara two members six weeks Tuesday Tigray Isaac Gordon Vice Gordon August Sunday about 90% Horn of Africa first convoy
"amhara" Discussed on The President's Inbox

The President's Inbox

03:02 min | 9 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on The President's Inbox

"Welcome to the president's inbox and see if our podcast about the foreign policy challenges facing the united states. I'm jim lindsey director studies at the council on foreign relations. This week's topic is ethiopia's civil war. With being discussed the fighting in northern ethiopia between federal government forces in regional tigray enforces is michelle gavin. Michelle is senior fellow for africa studies at the council. She was previously managing director of the center from two thousand eleven to two thousand fourteen. She was us ambassador botswana where she served concurrently as the us representative to the southern african development community before that michelle was a special assistant to president barack obama in the senior director for africa on the staff of the national security council michelle. Thanks you being here. Thanks so much for having michelle. Afghanistan is dominated news. As we're speaking so i think a lot of people haven't heard or followed what's been happening in ethiopia. Maybe we could just start by laying out for us. How things currently stand in ethiopia. Sure well unfortunately the situation ethiopia has really gone from bad to worse so fighting that began last november between the two gray enforces in the state of tigray in ethiopia and federal government forces very quickly brought in additional armed groups that would be military of country of eritrea. But also some emperor militia what we have now are even more actors even more armed groups involved in the fighting and we have a geographics sort of expansion of the conflict beyond the borders of tigray itself into a far and amhara states that border on tigray so essentially you have more armed elements in the mix fighting over a larger swath of territory the humanitarian crisis. Which is captured so much of the world's attention persists and in some ways has gotten worse as the sort of chokepoints for bringing food and other types of assistance to people in need have essentially narrowed down to one. There is one way that we're getting humanitarian assistance to tigray and it's not getting in fast enough with talk about how we got to the stage later. We can talk about where we're likely to go. Potential for diplomatic mediation the rest. But i'm trying to understand why the fighting broke out in the first place. Now ethiopia's the country of roughly one hundred ten million people. I have seen estimates that ethiopia has as many as ninety different ethnic groups tigray estate in northern part of ethiopia tigrayans constitute about five percent of the ethiopian population. How is we ended up in a situation which such a small group of people is in a battle with the central government. Well you have to step back in ethiopian history. A bit history is going to be love history on the presence. Inbox great stuff..

ethiopia michelle tigray jim lindsey michelle gavin council on foreign relations africa united states southern african development c amhara national security council botswana barack obama eritrea Afghanistan central government
"amhara" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

05:50 min | 10 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on Here & Now

"If we don't do it. okay. Larry summers former treasury secretary under president. Clinton director of the national economic council under president obama the president of narrative of harvard university. Larry thanks for the time. Thank you ten months. After civil war broke out. in ethiopia. The conflict there continues to escalate today. Amnesty international released a thirty six page report stating that ethiopian troops and eritrean troops aligned with them have raped hundreds of women and girls during this war and yesterday prime minister abi ahmed called on all capable citizens to enlist in the armed forces and join the fight against the rebels led by the took ri- people's liberation front in recent weeks the fighting which began in the country's northern region of terai has expanded to the neighbouring regions of amhara and afar for more. Let's bring in max berek. He's the washington post nairobi. Bureau chief max. Start with this news from amnesty international. What are survive. you're saying well it's really horrific. It's not the first of reports from amnesty and other human rights organizations that have detailed months and months of abuses mostly committed or allegedly committed by the theo pinson government's forces and those aligned with them from neighbouring eritrea and other regional militias But of course the testimonies are awful and speak to a months-long campaign of of using rape as a weapon of war against mostly to grind women which is part of what many in the international community have been been saying is is is a component of an ethnically targeted campaign against that includes cleansing them from certain regions that they inhabited before the war. We've been following this for a while but for those new to it. Can you just give us a very brief thumbnail. What is each side claiming in this conflict. Well the european government is claiming that the teepee leff. The people's liberation front has attacted and is is attempting to commit terrorist attacks around the country aiming to destabilize the country and overthrow the government. The government has classified them as a terrorist organization. The tip off is claiming that this is a vindictive campaign by the central government to try and wipe out a rival political group that is That was genuinely elected by. Its people deserves able to govern. Its own autonomous region. And how are the people literally trapped into. Gripe doing well it's it's one of the most dire humanitarian catastrophes in the world and it has a it's all taken place in the past nine months or so. There are huge numbers of people who are currently in famine or famine like conditions. And there's of course you know all the other things that come along with that difficult to get food difficult to get electricity water. Life is obviously incredibly hard and tigray right now well what about. Us relations. We know the us's largest aid donor. There's some thought that the us reduce that eight it might pressure. Prime minister abi off. Mid to deescalate samantha power is in charge of the us agency for international development. She of course has made her bones on humanitarian issues. Just like this conflict. So what is the sense of what might happen. I think that the the biden administration is is well aware that they don't have many good options. In this instance reducing withholding aid would probably be disastrous. Not just for the people in ethiopia who desperately needed but for the united states standing in the region. I think the question that they are asking that you have to ask is what would pulling eight achieve. I think it's a long shot to say that it would push ethiopian government's hand. The government is clearly committed to fighting this war at all costs and i think that the loss of aid would would change that. What are the implications of a prolonged war of this kind. In this region people in the region are mainly asking can ethiopia survive in its current state without disintegrating especially if the government were to fall and each of the constituent regions was to follow diverging agendas. But that would have implications in an already unstable region where you have countries like sudan and somalia and eritrea that there would be deeply affected by instability at that level in ethiopia. Has there any with of us military participation in any way. No.

abi ahmed amhara max berek theo pinson government national economic council Larry summers european government ethiopia terai harvard university president obama treasury afar eritrea amnesty international nairobi Clinton Larry us biden administration
"amhara" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:47 min | 10 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"First up on today's program parties each seemed to believe that they can win this militarily and the people who are getting caught in the crosshairs of course as always are the civilians that was the senior. Us diplomat samantha. Power speaking just a few hours ago from ethiopia. We'll be unpacking. One of the roads most intractable conflicts with cnn. Senior correspondent named elba. Here also ahead will be getting an olympics update with our tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson and we'll also examine. Why germany's social democrats are gaining ground. Less than two months before the german general election. And if all of that wasn't enough we'll be turning to andrew mother for his thoughts on what we know this week that we did not know seven days ago back in the uk. We learned that. I slice of cake is to go under the hammer by which we mean being proffered for auction. Next week is a slice of icing off the wedding cake. Dished up. In honor of the nineteen eighty-one. Betrothal of prince charles to even lady diana spencer andrew muller and a slice of old cake. What more could you want. That's all coming up here on the briefing with me chris. Tarmac to ethiopia where memories of a nobel peace prize for its leader abi. Ahmed are becoming increasingly distant. Triumphant rebels from ethiopia's northernmost region of to gripe have taken control of the town of alabama a unesco world heritage site in. I'm hara the country's been ripped by fighting between rebel militants and the ethiopian army since november resulting in the displacement of over two hundred thousand people. What if anything can the international community do well this week. The united states is sending a senior official to baba to put pressure on the ethiopian government to ease first of all a blockade of humanitarian aid. I'm joined now on the line by nemo elba an award winning journalist and senior international correspondent for cnn nemo. Thanks very much for joining us. I just bring us up to speed if you could with the situation on the ground and particularly in amara while the military campaign continues on the part of the two gray forces they launched an incredibly successful campaign to retake the territory that they said was under the if european governments control with the support of the eritreans and the unharmed militia. So the latest. We're hearing is that the town of alabama which is a a an international heritage site has since been re taken by grain forces. but we're also hearing very worrying. Reports of the amassing of amhara militia. An era train sources into the west into guy region and there are also been incredibly worrying reports of the Washing up of bodies of grains from the west of guy into sudan horribly. Defaced bodies with what doctors are telling us is evidence of torture on their bodies. Some pretty horrific stories coming out of sudan hands tied. What a lot of the witnesses on the ground that people have been speaking to including our own investigative researchers say is that it appears. Obviously this is ahead of subsidies but it appears that these two grains were tortured their hands tied and then quite possibly they were thrown in the river while still alive although that obviously will need an autopsy to decide the broadest sense is that the conflict continues to degrade forces continue to retake territory from the european forces while there is very much sense. That a solution and go she hated. Solution is very far away in the international community has abdicated its responsibility. Russia and china have been for months blocking the un security council resolutions on this in addition to some members of the african eight three at the highest levels. There is a sense that the european meant and the nobel prize winning prime minister being given cover by some members of the security council and that censure is not being enacted against the ethiopians in the way that it should be well As you talk about the international community there you mentioned. Russia and china on the one hand on the other hand is the us which has sent samantha powers to the region. She's not only a senior official. But very you know a veteran of the region. What's she going to be doing their well. One of the things that administrates a power. The usa chief is is focusing on. Is this access. Issue the european government and the airtran choices. And i'm militia have and this. Is you know we witnessed on the ground rules. Also the un. According to their own internal reports have consistently flagged the fact that they are obstructing aid. Which would meet the criteria of a war crime the use of starvation as a weapon of war and what power was arriving to do was to push for access for many of these. Un food trucks. These usa id funded supplies and addition into other international community supplies being given access. We spoke to our stringer in mckelway a few days ago and she told us that she herself and her family have run out of money to purchase food so the ethiopian government has blocked the banks from operating. They shut down the network that the banks us so people are not able to access their own money and there is food in the shops. That people are not able to buy so this food aid. It's not just about the front lines of this conflict. It's actually about people in the cities that have been taken by the grain. I think it's important to note that when we speak about the speed with which the to grain forces have retaken this territory. It's not to lord the tegray ins or to say oh look how well the two grand forces are doing. It's to point out as the un has that there that clearly means that there cannot be a military resolution to this because we've seen how quickly territory can and does change hands. And so what. The international community needs to do is find a way to censure ethiopia and forced the two sides to sit in negotiating table. Make sure that there are consequences to both sides if they don't well as as you kind of alluded to their. I mean this is such a long standing conflict. It's in many ways quite personal in a even for for ibm who of course ousted the tegray in people's liberation front from leadership in ethiopia. You talk about the international community there. I guess the question is what kind of influence or leverage does the international community and someone like samantha. Power have to to bring these two sides to the table. Why it's actually really interesting. We've kind of seen both extremes in that on a macro level international community has not been able to stop the conflict regardless of the fact. That what i say. The international community. I mean those who have chosen to act right because the un security council has not chosen to act at its highest levels because of russia and china and other actors but the us has placed sanctions. They have blocked and they are the largest contributor foreign aid to ethiopia. They have blocked a lot of that aid to ethiopia and yet they have not been able to stop what the us themselves. An ethnic cleansing at least but what we have seen in our reporting is for example. We did a story about these hundreds of young men who are being detained and tortured and she and we were able to pinpoint using satellite imagery. Exactly where they were being held. When senator chris coons who is very close to president biden and was sent as a personal mistry by biden to if you're if you're when he spoke senate foreign relations council when others within the un spoke out on the american side but also on the us side locally..

ethiopia ethiopian government Chief fiona wilson andrew muller ethiopian army nemo elba samantha cnn amhara militia us diana spencer alabama un security council sudan prince charles hara european government amara un
"amhara" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

The World: Latest Edition

02:08 min | 10 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on The World: Latest Edition

"Is being as a brutal propaganda war as well as brutal real war makes. It's hard to name a single incident whether or not you know something like completely opposite interpretations or all versions of of what's occurred. Yeah i mean it's hard to find a hopeful narrative here with the fighting tigray. What does this suggest about where the conflict is headed very significant developments on the battlefield but in many ways why it hasn't resulted the core and it's disputes. What are the core reasons for that is the federal blockade to grind forces. Say they are on the offensive to get round the blockade. The federal government says win over moving the blockade. Because it's a great enforces the aggressive here. There was also a massive problem in west tick right. That is the region that's amhara regional forces on have taken over and claimed as rightfully i'm horror regional territory. They are still in control of that. Lodge swathe of land which is adjacent to to saddam. Saddam and disagree enforces. lead does Intent on taking back that line from our control so that is a massive obstacle to a ceasefire hit so with the ethiopian government. Suspending the norwegian refugee council and doctors without borders from conducting aid operations and tigray. Help us understand. Why would they do that. And what do you think. Means for the overall relief effort as a grand forces have become resurgent and and as has been increasing reporting human rights abuses on humanitarian crisis. Inside right that has led to increasing allegations inception in Saba ethiopian more generally including amongst the official stats cooperating and actively supporting the Forces i think those are very overblown claims and it is simply products of this conflict situation that those agencies are committed to providing humanitarian relief. They want to do so in all areas mansa when they pushed to get access to rebel held areas. The governments will act is connected to the government might perceive that as offering support to those opposing forces. You as the federal operation has faced such massive problems integrate.

tigray ethiopian government norwegian refugee council federal government saddam Saddam Saba government
"amhara" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:53 min | 11 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The Brits have crowns, and the Crown is a popular television series produced by Brits. Their movie and TV industry, though, is going through some other kind of drama will explain next time on marketplace. And you can hear marketplace that's coming up at four o'clock this afternoon. It's 2 49 and the world continues on KQED Public radio. Marco, where manure with the world The civil war in northern Ethiopia has taken another turn to gray and rebels pushed into the neighboring Amhara region on Tuesday. Now the Ethiopian government says it's ending a ceasefire. And going on the offensive. It is a complex chessboard with quickly moving pieces. We turned to Michelle Gavin, a senior fellow for African studies at the Council on Foreign Relations to try and make sense of things. My colleague Carol Hill spoke with her earlier today. Michelle. The Ethiopian government says it's ending the ceasefire with two ground forces and going on the offensive. Why did they make that decision? Well, it's clear that the two grey enforces intend to try and recapture territory that used to be understood as part of Tigre and that since the fighting broke out last November, has been taken over by AM Hora Forces, another ethnic group in Ethiopia and Claimed as part of Amhara. So though there has been a unilateral ceasefire on the part of the government, the fighting has not actually stopped to grain. Defense forces have continued to try and reclaim territory, so this appears to be something of a red line or the federal government. Orient me on this. We hear about the Amhara to dry the Ethiopian forces kind of who are the players and where geographically, do they? They sit here. So you have the two grand forces. Then you had the federal forces of Ethiopia. You also had Eritrean military forces crossing the border and assisting those federal Ethiopian forces. And finally, you had and horror essentially militia forces. Local Forces from the Amhara region, which does border Tigre. And there's long been tension about whose land is whose, particularly in that Western part of what on a map you would see as teak, right? The Tigre enforces. Having you know, recaptured a great deal of their territory from the Ethiopian federal forces have pledged to sort of continue their campaign to reclaim territory and to push out All of these armed groups that were essentially aligned against them. That means the Eritreans and it also means those Amhara forces. So should we understand at this point that since Prime Minister a B Ahmed has has Ended the ceasefire that he's going to again sand Ethiopian federal forces in to try to kind of quell this mess well, it certainly looks that way. It's very clear that the Amhara are not interested in relinquishing the territory that they had gained control over without a fight. There are reports even that other forces perhaps some Romo armed forces, who are not typically part of the federal military might also be brought into the fight to push back on the two grands. So it's it remains to be seen exactly what Prime Minister Abby can muster in terms of a coalition to re engage this fight. But what is sort of painfully clear is that the violence is by no means over. Okay, let's look at the to grind rebel forces for a second, you know, after really being diminished by Ethiopian government forces and also those who came in from Eritrea, they then regained their capital medically. I mean, to be kind of blunt. Why weren't they satisfied with retaking the capital of the region and just being done with it? Well, I think there's a tremendous amount of resentment in Tigre about atrocities that have been committed during this campaign. I certainly am. I'm not suggesting that any of the parties to the conflict are completely innocent in terms of war crimes, But it is very clear that some truly horrific crimes have been committed against the tea green people against to grant civilians. Sexual violence, war crimes by any definition. And so I think perhaps there is also a sentiment integrate that is intolerable essentially to allow any of the forces associated with those crimes to continue operating on what, what they believed to be two grand soil. What are the chances for a peaceful resolution here in your mind? What has to happen to kind of stem this from growing into something really, really tragic. It's clear the air a trained forces have to get out of of Ethiopia. That's just a a toxic element to this equation. You know, Ethiopia just came out of federal election process that was not inclusive entirely of because obviously there was no voting in Tigre that wasn't voting in some other restive Parts of the country. It's going to be important to acknowledge that that electoral process was insufficient right to address this kind of underlying Political tensions, arguments about the autonomy of individual regions. These are incredibly important issues that at their heart are political, so there has to be some kind of political process, rule governed process to work through them, and that's particularly difficult right now when You still have a situation Where that the Tigre ins are considered terrorists by the federal Ethiopian state. It's very hard to engage in a rule governed process with a group you've totally delegitimized. So there are a lot of roadblocks to what ultimately, I is the only avenue out of this mess that I can see which really is about political dialogues. Michelle Gavin. Thanks so much. Thanks for having me. That was Michelle Gavin, senior fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, speaking with my colleague Carol Hill's about the conflict in northern Ethiopia. Finally today, a tale as old as time. That's how musician Marvin Brooks starts his latest track. One breath really saw this time myself is told so all the told itself more..

Carol Hill Michelle Gavin Michelle Marvin Brooks Ethiopia Tuesday Eritrea last November Council on Foreign Relations AM Hora Forces today four o'clock this afternoon two ground forces KQED Public two grands Tigre Eritrean Amhara northern Ethiopia two grey
"amhara" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

05:46 min | 11 months ago

"amhara" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Immediately. Certainly, humanitarian assistance has to flow easily. Human right violations in atrocities has to start to be investigated by the United Nations. And people have to be accountable for all these kinds that have been committed amongst others. These are major things that need to be done. And what is the end goal for you? I mean, is it independence? Or can you see The guy remaining part of Ethiopia. The people of the dry like everybody else in Ethiopia based on our constitution, they have to decide on their faith. What does that mean? A plebiscite? Yeah, it could be a referendum. It could be anything that people want. So there is always in our competition. There is a right to self determination of people so video, but this is a federal arrangements that we have. Based ones that any people can practice their right as to how they want to relate themselves with each other and how to govern the future. Being in mind. G major problem. Political problem we have in Ethiopia is How the state Could be shaped and built up in the future. The government that we have is focusing on highly Unitarian assimilation, intentions and goals. On the other hand, different peoples in Ethiopia are saying that their rights should be respected their language history and so on Recently, it should be respected and they should have self rule. And common role as well in the center. And that was Bahana Gabri Christos, a former deputy foreign minister of Ethiopia, and now a representative of the regional, T great government, and we should say at this stage we have been bidding for the Ethiopian government all week and did so again today, but nobody Was available to speak to us well for some analysis of what we've been hearing. Let's speak now to Martin plot is, of course, the former BBC Africa editor, now a senior research fellow at Kings College, London. And Martin clearly a significant victory for the two grey enforces this week in Makelele, Where do you think the conflict is at this point? Well, it's situated in the far north of to grow the two grounds they were taken back a number of the northern towns, but the air trends are still on part of their territory. And then there's a major battle going on in the in the West, as the ambassador was saying. Where the Amhara on territory that the air trends sorry that the Tigranes claim as theirs and the Amhara claim as theirs as well. And that's one of the great problems in Ethiopia is that more or less everybody can claim a bit of somebody else's territory and who is right and who is wrong is is, you know extremely complicated And then there's some fighting in the in the South, the South as well. So there are there's a lot of fighting still going on, and there certainly isn't a ceasefire. Were you surprised that the two ground forces of managed to push back folks so strongly? I mean, we heard there from the representatives that they haven't had any assistance from abroad. Is that the case? Yes, There's no indication they got any assistance from abroad. But really, they didn't need it. I mean, when they began this war, they already had the largest section of the Ethiopian army was based, integrate a and, uh, chunks of them where that went over to the T grounds immediately Others Fort But there were very substantial. Um shall we say artillery. There was a lot of artillery a lot of equipment and ammunition in the basis that that the grounds took over, so they're quite were well supplied. And although Quite a lot of that was lost from drone attacks from air attacks. Nonetheless, they had a lot of equipment so they didn't really need outside assistance. That was I surprised. Let me be honest, Yes, because in November last year, they were pushed out of the capital McKell er, the regional capital and headed for the hills, But they fought there for many years in the 19 eighties. And they know that the back of the land like the back of their hand, and they certainly mounted a very substantial gorilla operation. Then on the 18th. They launched a huge offensive which nobody was really ready for, and I was certainly surprised by the ability and they pushed the air trends in the Ethiopians right out of a huge chunk of two grade north South. And took Makayla and, well, you saw the results there. The parade of the the captured prisoners of war through the city. And Mr Bahati spoke there about the self determination clause in the Constitution. Do you think two grains will now? Demand independence. Well, that is you could hear him struggling with that. Answer. Uh, Don't forget that. The first manifesto released by the two Great People's Liberation Front, which is still the ruling party in integrate 1976 called for the Said that the first task of this national struggle with the establishment of an independent democratic republic of too great After a few years. There was then a long discussion internally about about whether to proceed with this, and they moved back from that position and became integrated into Ethiopia. But it was a long, hard struggle, so we'll have to see where that develops in cloud. Martin Clarke, now a senior research fellow at Kings College, London. The.

Martin Clarke Bahati Martin 1976 November last year Bahana Gabri Christos United Nations 19 eighties McKell er Amhara Great People's Liberation Fron two ground forces BBC Africa two grounds this week Kings College Ethiopia today two grains one
Ethiopia denies trying to 'suffocate' Tigray region

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 11 months ago

Ethiopia denies trying to 'suffocate' Tigray region

"Ethiopia has denied to trying to fulfill the Tigray region by denying access and aid Ethiopia's government has rejected accusations is trying to suffocate the Tigray people by denying them urgently needed food and other aid even as transport and communications links remain seventh in the region the country's foreign minister spoke to reporters a day off to a bridge that's crucial for accessing much of the area was destroyed and the U. N. indicated that special forces from the neighboring Amhara region were to blame I'm horrible authorities about keepod western Tigray a full start hundreds of thousands of ethnic two grands I'm Charles the last month

Tigray Ethiopia Amhara Charles