35 Burst results for "American West"

"american west" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:51 min | 1 d ago

"american west" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Who works and what's known as cooperative extension which is a part of the university system dedicated to taking science and making it applicable for people every day And so what we didn't realize that day was that we were talking to a community that had just been through a wildfire season that was pretty bad a few months before that there were huge fires burning in Big Sur that summer And then another wildfire complex started in Mendocino county And so the folks that we were talking to had just survived a wildfire and they were dealing directly with many of the issues that we were talking about in a fairly intellectually distanced way For example how to maybe stay and protect your home during a wildfire right Which is clearly an incredibly emotional issue And then just talking about what people can do to make sure they're prepared to evacuate I think brought up varying feelings for people you know some people were really grateful that they had been able to do it and other people had guilt about things they'd left behind There were just a lot of emotions in the room and it was the first time that I let myself kind of really feel that as a scientist and not assume that it was something that I wasn't going to contend with right And so part of that was because a man came up to me afterward and he basically shared with me in not using these words in words that took me many years afterward to figure out what he was saying but he had said your presentation or at traumatized me and maybe rethink how I had dealt with this fire and things like that And I did spend a year or two really thinking a lot about that conversation And it really reset my entire career to kind of try to understand how I could work on an issue like fire that has such direct meaning in people's lives in a way that wasn't so intellectually distanced And what would it mean to be a scientist trying to do that Because in many ways we are very much encouraged to stay neutral objective and not let feelings get involved in the things that we're doing Yeah sure Yeah it's rational You stay up in your head You don't you're not human in a way You're sort of not quite robotic as unfair but dispensing facts Just the facts ma'am kind of thing That was 14 years ago since then the American West has burned tremendously particularly last year in 2020 where millions of people across the American West were inhaling wildfire smoke for weeks at a time You and me included in millions of others So does that mean that everyone is traumatized to some extent by wildfire and you have to think about potential trauma for everyone you're speaking to about wildfires in the American West Well I think the short answer is yes It should be something that is in the background for all of us The longer answer to me is that trauma is a complicated topic as doctor Ethiopia Jackson who I interviewed pretty extensively through the book who is a psychologist practicing psychotherapist and professor at saber university kind of told me you know the trauma bucket is becoming sort of all encompassing These days and so for and it's complicated because for some people trauma can mean something that is lifelong lasting for other people It can mean something that kind of comes and goes And so when we talk about trauma we also have to understand it means many different things for many different people And doctor Jackson's also very careful to say that we shouldn't label other people as being traumatized about something for people to say about themselves And that there are different sort of culturally responsive ways of thinking about trauma So people who've been through a lot of trauma for example might not experience something like wildfire smoke as being at the top of their list of traumas right So I think we have to think a lot and very carefully about how we use that word But on the other hand I do think we are seeing people who all over the state of California and certainly throughout the west who have a very heightened experience of wildfire smoke You know I talk to people all the time who say I smell a barbecue and I you know my Spidey senses go off right Right and there's also there's also a racial lens here There's been some articles lately about how white people are kind of new to this trauma indigenous or African American people are like hey we've been traumatized for centuries This is not new to us We've had all sorts of existential traumas before And the eco anxiety is kind of a white phenomenon Often we don't know what kind of question might be triggering for members of our audience How do we deal with that without being afraid to raise difficult topics to be on eggshells all the time Yeah that's a very good question And I think one I navigate all the time So one of the focuses in the book is also on listening and not as just this sort of empty exercise in listening empathetically which is definitely important but also what does it mean to listen with an with an eye toward justice right And accountability and those are sort of different things But at a sort of micro level I've started to do things like for example I used to during presentations like many people in my field show slides where things were on fire Just to get across the importance of the issue the fear of the issue I've had to shift to that because I think people already get it And so showing people pictures of things on fire to me as a risk that I don't need to take you know in terms of traumatizing people So I've tried to move in the direction of having fire depicted in some other way whether it's graphically or just not even using those kinds of images So that's a very simple thing The other thing I tried to do is say to people in a group you know there may be some people who have experienced this directly and I try to give space for people to bring that up right in the beginning before I launch into things So it sort of depends on how you as a person are comfortable And I think what I'm trying to move in the direction of this scientist as a group or at least those of us who want to do this kind of work being able to handle having those kinds of conversations that may take you off track from what you think you're presenting But to realize that that's part of what we need to be doing as we actually need to be attending to how people feel about these things Yeah I was struck by you talk about Danielle Leah black scientist who traveled to Tanzania where she says she learned that quote listening is good science And that struck me because often think of scientists on the pedestal dispensing wisdom and knowledge not necessarily as listeners unless there may be doing interview and kind of social science Yeah indeed and that's why I really focused in on listening in the book and tried to give these very concrete examples of people who are actually pioneering listening work in the sciences what it means to actually incorporate that And not just how do you listen but how do you also think about issues of extraction How do you think about what you do really with what you hear Because those are two very different things And I think because of the discovery nature of science which doctor Lee is very much talking to we can sort of go in and think oh I heard something and now I get to write a paper about it right And that's not what I'm talking about I'm really talking about what is our responsibility to people and communities.

Ethiopia Jackson saber university Mendocino county American West Jackson Danielle Leah California Tanzania Lee
Kyle Rittenhouse Is Exactly the Kind of Enemy the Left Wants to Create

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 1 d ago

Kyle Rittenhouse Is Exactly the Kind of Enemy the Left Wants to Create

"If you show up to a rally or you show up to a city burning while the National Guard is not there and the police have been told to stand down and you defend yourself because someone's trying to kill you and that someone trying to kill you is a child rapist? You're gonna get tried for first degree murder in your family has to go into debt to try to defend you, which we're seeing right now with Kyle rittenhouse. And by the way, if this was 1892, and it was the KKK trying to take over a city, and it was a black 17 year old that took a gun to go to the burning city. We would have like a national holiday to that young man. Seriously. Not saying that's what we need for Kyle, not saying we'd like a national holiday, but I'm saying that it would be everyone would say this is the most amazing heroic thing I've ever seen. But instead, let's just be let's just be as blunt and honest about it. Kyle rittenhouse tracks a box of the type of let's say enemy they want to create. And we saw this earlier with what happened with the Nicolas Sandman case. You guys remember that the Covington kids? Remember the Covington kids? Where Nicholas Sandman on the steps of the capitol with that lunatic came up with the drum and started banging it in his head, and his head was his face, and we were told that the young kid was the one that's provoking and saying racist things, total lie. Totally exonerated one his lawsuits. But no, the thing that Kyle rittenhouse did wrong is that he fit the perfect type of archetype where Joe Biden came out and said that Kyle rittenhouse is a white supremacist. Said that on Twitter, hope he gets sued for that one day in civil court. There is no evidence of that. But instead, here is the essence of it is that there was a picture, the same thing that happened on the southern border when you had border patrol agents on horseback, and they said, oh, they're using whips to go after migrants, total lie, it's called a bridle or saddle. You ever ride a horse before New York Times weirdo, right? And of course not. Never even west of the Mississippi River, let alone ever mounted a horse, right? No, it's a whip. No, but all they have is the narrative. So Kyle rittenhouse, they had the picture they wanted. AR-15, mouth wide open, young, white, Trump loving, a green shirt and hat backwards, looking like he's kind of playing the insurrectionist. Boom. Put him in

Kyle Rittenhouse Nicolas Sandman Nicholas Sandman National Guard KKK Kyle Joe Biden Twitter Mississippi River New York Times
Musical theater legend Stephen Sondheim dies at 91

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Musical theater legend Stephen Sondheim dies at 91

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting towering musical theater master Stephen Sondheim has died I comic songwriter Stephen Sondheim a giant in American musical theater has died attorney Rick Pappas told The New York Times Sondheim died Friday at his home in Roxbury Connecticut he was ninety one Sondheim who was taught by the legendary Oscar Hammerstein wrote the lyrics for nineteen fifties American stage classics West Side Story and gypsy early in his career six of Sondheim's musicals won Tony awards for best score he received the Pulitzer Prize for something in the park an academy award for the song sooner or later from the film Dick Tracy five Olivier awards and the presidential medal of honor hi

Stephen Sondheim Mike Rossi Sondheim American Musical Theater Rick Pappas Roxbury Oscar Hammerstein The New York Times Connecticut Tony Awards Pulitzer Prize Academy Award Olivier Awards Dick Tracy
What REALLY Happened In Waukesha, Wisconsin

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:19 min | 6 d ago

What REALLY Happened In Waukesha, Wisconsin

"In the last 24 hours, there was a terrorist attack and walk Asha Wisconsin. You probably saw it dominated the news cycle Sunday evening? Where there was a Christmas parade and walk ashore Wisconsin, which is just west of Milwaukee, really good people out there right near where I grew up. There was a Christmas parade with local high schools, bands, color guard, everything seemed to be going as planned. And then, a man driving, a red Ford escape, blitz through the parade. Indiscriminately, running over women, children, where as of right now, there are 5 people that have been killed. That's right, 5 people killed by this terrorist attack. And over 20 hospitalized and injured. Now, it's one thing to kill somebody. It's another thing to drive through a Christmas parade, killing children and everything that comes across your way, I guess you could say. Now, of course, the media was on pins and needles trying to see if they could turn this into a race crime issue. The media is already trying to chatter online saying, oh, I wonder if this is another domestic violent extremist, a white supremacist. You know, CNN over the weekend said there's nothing more frightening in America today than an angry white man that's CNN. CNN is set by John Blake. There's nothing more frightening in America today than an angry white man. The brute, the buck, and of course the thug, CNN writes. These are just some of the names for racial stereotypes that haunted the collective imagination of white America since the nation's inception. The connect with the Kyle rittenhouse story, but of course, the media is going to now memory hole and suppress this entire walk of Shaw story because the terrorist who ran over children and killed at least 5 people and maybe even more, by the way, we're waiting to see how many people have died because of this man. Is a Black Lives Matter activist.

Wisconsin CNN Milwaukee Ford John Blake America Kyle Rittenhouse White America Shaw
Young sets record, No. 2 Bama tops No. 21 Arkansas 42-35

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Young sets record, No. 2 Bama tops No. 21 Arkansas 42-35

"Second ranked Alabama clinched a spot in the SEC championship game by winning the SEC west title with a forty two thirty five victory over number twenty five Arkansas Heisman Trophy candidate Bryce young added to his credentials by passing for a school record five hundred fifty nine yards as he completed thirty one of forty passes for five touchdowns have accounts like that is definitely a blessing but you know that's definitely it it's going to go down and and and it's gonna be written as a something I did in reality that's a reflection of the whole team Jamison Williams caught three of young's TD passes for thirty two yards forty yards and seventy nine yards the latter which proved to be the margin of victory the Crimson Tide wanna step game matching Florida state's record of fourteen straight double digit win seasons I'm Tom Mariam

Bryce Young SEC Alabama Jamison Williams Arkansas Florida Tom Mariam
 12 to stand trial for Kardashian West jewel heist in Paris

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | Last week

12 to stand trial for Kardashian West jewel heist in Paris

"Twelve people want you to stand trial in Paris said the robbery of ten million dollars of jewelry from Kim Kardashian west in twenty sixteen west was tied up at gunpoint and locked in a bathroom also on drug is full so way into Paris apartments up to five years of investigation the case has been sent to trial well then no trial date has been set at the twelve suspects face a range of charges related to the theft west was physically on homes but psychologically shaken the alleged mastermind writes an apology letter to west from his prison cell admitting he regretted his actions and that he realized the psychological harm he had caused I'm

Paris Kim Kardashian
So Many Alerts (MM #3894)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

So Many Alerts (MM #3894)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason I know I've talked about amber alerts before, and they're very important and very beneficial at times. But I found because we live in Tennessee and we have multiple interstates running through Nashville. It's almost like you lose track of these amber alerts because they're going off all the time. Here in Nashville, we've got three major interstates, north and south, you got interstate 65, northwest to southeast interstate 24, and then from west to east or east to west interstate 40. And that means a lot of drug trafficking, a lot of people trafficking and a lot of amber alerts. We'll get amber alerts maybe three or four times a week about things that are going on just north of the border in Kentucky, somewhere over in severe Bill or in Knoxville, or Chattanooga over on the east side of the state, and you can't keep track. You want to believe amber alerts are good things, but I'm afraid that if you get too many in one week, you just lose track of them. The potential for the system is great, but I think they've got to try something different or fix something to make it that much better. Because I'll be honest with you every time an amber alert goes off, I tend to tune out now because I just heard one. Sometimes hours earlier.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nashville Nasa Tennessee Knoxville Chattanooga Kentucky
So Many Alerts (MM #3894)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last week

So Many Alerts (MM #3894)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason I know I've talked about amber alerts before, and they're very important and very beneficial at times. But I found because we live in Tennessee and we have multiple interstates running through Nashville. It's almost like you lose track of these amber alerts because they're going off all the time. Here in Nashville, we've got three major interstates, north and south, you got interstate 65, northwest to southeast interstate 24, and then from west to east or east to west interstate 40. And that means a lot of drug trafficking, a lot of people trafficking and a lot of amber alerts. We'll get amber alerts maybe three or four times a week about things that are going on just north of the border in Kentucky, somewhere over in severe Bill or in Knoxville, or Chattanooga over on the east side of the state, and you can't keep track. You want to believe amber alerts are good things, but I'm afraid that if you get too many in one week, you just lose track of them. The potential for the system is great, but I think they've got to try something different or fix something to make it that much better. Because I'll be honest with you every time an amber alert goes off, I tend to tune out now because I just heard one. Sometimes hours earlier.

Kevin Mason Nashville Nasa Tennessee Knoxville Chattanooga Kentucky
California Gas Prices Soar to Record Highs

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:37 min | Last week

California Gas Prices Soar to Record Highs

"Let me ask you about this. Joe Manchin said this yesterday play cut number 20 for me, Ben. You just back home for a week. Do your voters want this bill, this big massive bill right now? I think my voters in West Virginia, but I don't speak for the whole country. My brother is a lot differently, but they're very much concerned. Inflation has hit them extremely hard. I hear it when I go to the grocery store, or if I go to the gas station, they say or use Matt as I am, not as absolutely. Do you know that gas got up to $4 and I guess 35 cents a gallon in California, senator Blackburn? Oh, yes. Absolutely. I talked to people in California every day that have decided to vote with their feet and to leave that state. Because you've got gas that is through the roof out there, people are paying well over a dollar 50 more than they were paying in January for a gallon of gas. And in Tennessee, it's 1.23 a gallon more. So what you're seeing is this rise and rights for energy cost at the grocery store, you are seeing the cost of Thanksgiving dinner is going to cost you more transportation to get to Thanksgiving dinner is going to cost you more. And people are fully aware of what this administration is doing.

Joe Manchin Senator Blackburn West Virginia BEN California Matt Tennessee
 Police say Liverpool attacker bought bomb parts for 6 months

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Police say Liverpool attacker bought bomb parts for 6 months

"British police say the suspect who was killed in a Liverpool taxi explosion spent at least six months buying components for a bomb and appears to have acted alone bust Jackson the head of counter terrorism policing north west England says Emma also will mean had rented a property in the city in April could have been making relevant purchases for device at least since then Jackson adds investigators so far have not found any of the people of concern detectives are also piecing together details of the dead man's life and

British Police Liverpool Jackson North West Emma England
CNN Publishes Mother of All Kamala Harris Exposés

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:38 min | Last week

CNN Publishes Mother of All Kamala Harris Exposés

"So there's a couple stories that I want to try to put together here. But the first and the most interesting story quite honestly. And it's interesting in a way that you might think is the sudden and unexpected. Kind of shade war and stories that were coming out against cami. Against Kamala Harris. So late on Sunday evening on the front page of CNN were at least 6 or 7 different stories. 6 or 7 separate stories. That we're covering how The White House is at odds with one another. On the front page of CNN dot com last evening, here's where the headlines were this. Harris struggles with her relationship with Biden. Vice president's team tries the distance herself from fraught situation at the border. Harris looks to turn page as she zeros in on voting rights. White House goes into damage control after reports of dysfunction in Kamala Harris's office. 5 stories against Kamala Harris on the front page of CNN dot com. Exasperation and dysfunction inside Kamala Harris's frustrating start as vice president. Now, this is not Fox News dot com. This is not zero hedge dot com. Is that breitbart dot com? This is CNN dot com. That is reporting this. Worn out by what they see as entrenched dysfunction, and a lack of focus Key West west wing aides have largely thrown up their hands at vice president Kamala Harris. And her staff deciding there simply isn't time to deal with them right now. Especially at the moment, when president Joe Biden faces quickly multiplying legislative and political concerns. I continues by saying defenders and people who came for Harris are getting frantic. When they're annoyed, some pass around recent onion stories, mocking her lack of substantive work, one with the headline, quote, White House urges Kamala Harris, the Senate computer all day in case emails come through. When they're depressed, they bat down the Aaron Sorkin style rumor that Biden might try to replace her by nominating her to a Supreme Court vacancy. That chatter has already reached the top levels of Biden orbit, according to one person who's heard it. She is perceived according to CNN dot com to be in a weak position. That top Democrats in and outside of Washington have begun to speculate privately. Her job as number two is to be helpful and supportive to the president and to take work on he asks and who asks her to be intelligence briefing. This is a multi page hit piece. Double sided by the way. CNN dot

Kamala Harris CNN Harris White House Biden Cami President Joe Biden West West Fox News Aaron Sorkin Senate Supreme Court Washington
Mahomes' 5 TD passes lead Chiefs past Raiders 41-14

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Mahomes' 5 TD passes lead Chiefs past Raiders 41-14

"There's a new leader in the AFC west after Patrick Mahomes threw for five touchdowns in the chiefs forty one fourteen dismantling of the raiders I think it was just you guys are getting open I mean guys were being double teams gotta get open and there's own coverages and I'll get the ball to him Mahomes finished thirty five of fifty for four hundred six yards as Kansas city took over first place at six and four he iced the game in the fourth quarter with a thirty eight yard scoring strike to Darrell Williams and a twenty two yarder to Byron Pringle Derek Carr threw for two touchdowns but also had his third pick in two games is Las Vegas fell to five M. four with its second straight loss the raiders were held to eighty two yards in the first half their fewest in a home game in eight years I'm Dave Ferrie

Patrick Mahomes Mahomes AFC Raiders Chiefs Darrell Williams Byron Pringle Derek Carr Kansas City Las Vegas Dave Ferrie
Biden picks ex-FDA chief Robert Califf to again lead agency

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden picks ex-FDA chief Robert Califf to again lead agency

"President Biden has picked an old hand to again lead the food and drug administration the president's nominee the doctor Robert Calif for FDA commissioner a post he held in the Obama administration's final year the agency's been without a permanent chief for months the president says it's mission critical to have a steady hand guiding the FDA as it deals with cold in nineteen backseat authorization and all other issues noting Calif is a leading clinical trial specialist but his first into the FDA was dominated by controversies including surging opioid addiction West Virginia senator Joe Manchin says keyless nomination is an insult to families in his state whose lives have been ravaged by addiction and says he will not vote for Calif Sager or may god he at the White House

Food And Drug Administration President Biden Robert Calif Obama Administration Senator Joe Manchin Calif West Virginia Calif Sager White House
COVID-19 hot spots offer sign of what could be ahead for US

AP News Radio

01:02 min | 2 weeks ago

COVID-19 hot spots offer sign of what could be ahead for US

"Cobit nineteen hospitalizations are up in parts of the western and northern U. S. because of the contagious delta variant virus trends are improving in places like Florida Texas and other southern states but covert nineteen is spreading north and west heading into the winter as people go indoors close their windows and breed stagnant air in recent days a spike was reported at a college in Vermont link to Halloween parties and a Boston elementary school had to close in Michigan the metro Detroit area is considered a hot spot with nearly four hundred coalbed cases and hospitals are overwhelmed in New Mexico and Colorado health officials are lamenting how many people are no longer wearing masks and how many people chose not to get vaccinated Dr Donald Milton at the university of Maryland says we're going to see a lot of outbreaks in unvaccinated people that will result in serious illness and will be tragic I'm Jackie Quinn

Boston Elementary School U. Florida Texas Vermont Dr Donald Milton Detroit Michigan New Mexico Colorado University Of Maryland Jackie Quinn
Renewable Energy Can't Be Achieved by a Ban on Fossil Fuels

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Renewable Energy Can't Be Achieved by a Ban on Fossil Fuels

"Wrote a piece in The Wall Street Journal, which you should all be aware of. How destructive the green activists the fanatics of our day are to poor countries. This is by the president, Yoweri Museveni. President of Uganda, Africa can not sacrifice its future prosperity for western climate goals. The continent should balance its energy mix not rush straight toward renewables. Even though that will likely frustrate some of those gathering, at the global climate conference in Glasgow. I'll continue reading from it, but I want you to understand the issue it's very simple. The west got its prosperity thanks to fossil fuels. No fossil fuel, no energy, no west. Fossil fuels have been one of the greatest blessings in the history of mankind. What the selfish, rich white. That's really who it's ironic that I would use the term, but that's who it is. Selfish, rich, bored, that's incredibly important. That's who make up the environmentalist movement. Selfish, rich, white, bored, people, who need some meaning in their lives, and saving the world is as meaningful as it gets, isn't it? So if you destroy the western west's economy, and make impossible for poor countries to develop. What the hell? Their wealthy enough to withstand it. And I make them feel great to boot. So we're telling countries that now want to get wealthy like the west. You can't. We used fossil fuels. You can't. You and Uganda? You need wind turbines.

Yoweri Museveni The Wall Street Journal Uganda Glasgow Africa
$7.5 Billion Tax Payer Dollars for Electric School Busses?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:37 min | 2 weeks ago

$7.5 Billion Tax Payer Dollars for Electric School Busses?

"Why are senators and congressmen that represent red states? That have massive oil and natural gas production, going along with the following. The infrastructure package will spend $7.5 billion for electrical vehicle charging stations, with which the administration says is critical to accelerating the use of electrical vehicles and to curb climate change. It would also be available for a $5 billion of purchase for electric school buses and hybrids, reducing reliance on school buses that run on diesel fuel. So, for the representatives from states like Pennsylvania, like Brian Fitzpatrick, or from West Virginia, like David McKinley, or from North Dakota, why is there a support of an agenda that will destroy the oil and natural gas production from the Marcellus shale? To the Balkan, isn't that a major job producer in your state? Modernizing the electric grid. By the way, this makes Pete Buttigieg, one of the most powerful people in Washington, D.C.. You are giving him a $1.2 trillion as the head of the Department of Transportation to allocate towards his green energy cronies as he sees it as he sees fit. Of $1.2 trillion of additional spending on top of the trillions of dollars we spend every single year on top of the stimulus packages we've passed in the last 12 months. Is that what we went and elected Republicans to go do?

Brian Fitzpatrick David Mckinley Pete Buttigieg Washington, D.C. West Virginia North Dakota Pennsylvania Department Of Transportation
German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

German rescue boat with 800 migrants reaches Sicilian port

"After days of waiting a German ship carrying over eight hundred migrants has arrived it's a Sicilian polls shouts of joy could be heard from the dock because the vessel tree near the ship full of rescued migrants was finally granted permission to dock at the port of Trapani in western society there were about a hundred and sixty minus on the ship including fifteen of very young children the children will be taken to shelters once most of the adults will have to quarantine on other ships many of the passengers came from countries in West Africa Egypt or Morocco more than half of the passengers have been saved from a sinking wouldn't date to nineteen November I'm Karen Thomas

Trapani West Africa Morocco Egypt Karen Thomas
Iran begins annual war games ahead of nuke talks with West

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 weeks ago

Iran begins annual war games ahead of nuke talks with West

"Iran's ministry has begun its annual war games in the coastal area of the Gulf of Oman the military drill comes less than a month before upcoming nuclear talks with western nations Iran's navy Air Force and ground units with taking part in an area of the the three hundred and eighty thousand square miles the exercises are taking place at the time when Iranian US relations around the nose the US pulled out of the nuclear deal with Iran under the trump administration the Nikkei deal promises a run economic incentives in exchange for limits on its nuclear program its purpose was to prevent to Han from developing a nuclear bomb I'm Karen Thomas

Iran Navy Air Force Gulf Of Oman United States Karen Thomas
O'Connell, Bell help Purdue take down No. 5 Spartans 40-29

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 3 weeks ago

O'Connell, Bell help Purdue take down No. 5 Spartans 40-29

"The last of the big ten unbeatens has gone down Purdue in becoming bowl eligible stage for forty to twenty nine win over Michigan state with boilermaker quarterback Aiden o'connell passing for five hundred thirty six yards goes back to our team our coaches the players on our team just wanted to win and believing that they can win so that's what it's all about you know week after week it's it's a battle in the big ten and every week's gonna be a dogfight Purdue receiver David bell hauled in eleven catches for two hundred seventeen yards eight in one Michigan state tied it at twenty one only to see the Boilermakers score sixteen unanswered points Spartan running back Kenneth Walker rushed for one hundred forty six yards Tom McCabe west Lafayette Indiana

Aiden O Purdue Connell Michigan David Bell Boilermakers Kenneth Walker Tom Mccabe Lafayette Indiana
"american west" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

04:56 min | 2 months ago

"american west" Discussed on podcast – Lawyers, Guns & Money

"And today we're gonna talk about her twenty nine teen book. Outriders rodeo at the fringes of the american west was published by the university of washington. Press rebecca thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me. Would you start by just sort of explaining your.

american west university of washington rebecca
"american west" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:05 min | 3 months ago

"american west" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"You very much for joining us. Thank you for having me. Fermented locust being known as iraq is a traditional seasoning in nigeria. For a while it fell out of favor but now thanks in part to renewed interest from the nigerian diaspora being is making a comeback has this unmistakable cheesy time that hit she before you see it and this smell is essential to its flavor or organ..

"american west" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:21 min | 3 months ago

"american west" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Reality of a warmer drier. future or today's call red river. hydrology is not the same hydrology. This base new a century ago. The west famed joshua trees are already parched and dying making sure that whole ecosystems and citizens don't go the same way we'll take more than just blunt restrictions on usage century old habits and policies will have to change if you travel to lake mead. Which is very close by to las vegas and the biggest reservoir in america it straddles the colorado river. You see this white weird looking strip around the surface of the lake. It's more than one hundred and fifty feet tall erin. Braun is our mountain west correspondent and is based in colorado and that immediately shows visitors. How far the water level has fallen over the years locals call it the bathtub ring and its sister reservoir up river lake powell which is on the border of utah and arizona is similarly depleted. Both of the reservoirs are at the lowest levels. They've been since each was filled in the nineteen thirties in the nineteen sixties and. It's not just the bathtub. Bring there was this declaration of a water shortage at lake meet on the colorado river. What are the implications of that. What that means in practice. Is that come. January nevada arizona and mexico will see cuts to the amount of water that their allocated but because of kind of a patchwork of laws and litigation over the years and the success that nevada's had with water conservation. It's really farmers in central arizona. That are going to bear the brunt of these cuts and going forward. The initial shortage declaration is important. But it's also kind of a harbinger of things to come. And there's a real risk in the next few years of reaching what is called deadpool at the reservoirs and that means they're still water. There that can be taken but not enough to generate hydropower for the region. So that's also a big concern. I know we've spoken on the show before about the mega drought. But let's wind back a bit. How did these water levels get so low in the first place. Well it's impossible to ignore the effect that climate change has had on the region. The water is that fill up the colorado river. Come from snow. Pack that accumulates in the rocky mountains over the winter and then melts into the river during the spring since two thousand when the millenium drought began. The colorado river's flow have declined about twenty percent and scientists have attributed about half of that to human caused climate change and then making things. Worse is the fact that a hundred years ago when the river was first divvied up among seven states in the south west scientists and officials overestimated the amount of water that they would get for the colorado river and so ever since then. The river has never been able to meet those expectations. So folks have gotten used to depending on water that they really shouldn't have and now they're starting to feel the squeeze as the river keeps shrinking. And so how to undo. The mistakes of policymakers passed and how to deal with this problem now. The current rules governing the colorado river expire in twenty twenty six. So negotiations are just starting over. What the next iteration is going to look like. But even while those negotiations are ongoing there things that officials in utilities and lawmakers can take to help people in farmers and businesses adjust to the cuts and that starts really with water pricing water even though it is so valuable especially in the west is delivered really cheaply by governments and utilities and if it was based more on kind of a normal supply and demand structure like everything else. I think it would force people to think more about conservation right now. Really the only incentive to conserve water is your kind of neighborly instinct to help the public good but all of a sudden. If you're being charged arm and a leg for overuse then you might rethink your habits and in order to help with that you would need better metering so americans can know exactly how much they're using and where they can. Conserve water trading would also help if farmers can trade amongst each other and with cities than everybody benefits and finally there's really great options for conservation in modern recycling systems. Las vegas is a great example that utility there says everything that goes down a drain indoors ends up back in lake mead and is recycled. It sounds easy enough in principle. What are the issues in implementing those kinds of policies. Yeah i think one of the things. Policy-makers need to think hard about is in implementing better water pricing how to best help vulnerable communities like poor royal towns and native american tribes. Who wouldn't be able to afford the price of water on an open market but it also brings up questions of governance. As policymakers go into negotiations. There's a question about what modeling they're looking at. And if they're not looking at scenarios that show the river continuing to decline then. They can't plan for that possibility. And that's not to say that things will get dreadfully worse but they need the information in order to plan in case it does get worse and right. Now we're seeing some evidence of that but there are also states that hope to build more dams and aqueducts and take more water out of the river and that just seems slightly tone-deaf at this point it's important to note that the west as a region has always been hot and dry and inhospitable. But if policymakers and utilities act now than it doesn't have to become uninhabitable. and erin. you've also been speaking with our sister. Show checks and balance about water shortages and environmental change in the west more broadly. Yeah i was on the last episode and we talked about how things like. Wildfires and heat.

colorado river river lake powell arizona lake mead nevada red river Braun erin las vegas utah rocky mountains colorado mexico america south west Las vegas
"american west" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

The Projection Booth Podcast

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"american west" Discussed on The Projection Booth Podcast

"Personal detail how particular people did particular things and how they live their lives but the west itself is the great american myth of a historical batch. And that's why the perception of the west in america can change so dramatically and also why the perception of the west. If you're not american can be entirely different because you didn't grow up within that mythology even if you did grew up seeing american westerns and seeing the way in which the west is depicted. Then you also come from completely different completely different. Because americans were were were originally a from a culture in which the west is not perceived in the exact same way. The american west is not perceived in the exact same way because you have a different stake in it. I mentioned more konate. Few minutes ago and the soundtrack for this is so good i would say this is one of morricone's best and it also. It really gives the film such a an interesting field. There are moments in the film that are scored their horror film. I wanna say there's a moment with like a an organ going on where i'm just like. This is really creepy. And it's not never in this film. Do we get the rousing fistful of dollars. Like were riding out kind of thing. It is so sedate in so creepy at times in the music. Especially when loco is coming to town after he goes and gets his whole band of bounty hunters bounty killers it is just. That's the moment that i think we get closest to arousing score is when he is driving across the the snowy plains and again this idea of using the snow as the stark contrast i mean there of course there have been western set have been shot in the snow. Fight this one. It's just amazing. I always go back to andrea Toth nightfall which was a film noir. That was shot in the snow. And just that. It's so brightly lit but yet there are so many dark things that are going on in the world and this is very much that same idea of like everything's great. Everything's great you know you got in the streets and it's all white all over the place those starting to get really mixed in with the mud but you know the under broad daylight and blue skies. All of this furriest stuff is happening on the one hand. Snow is beautifully right and shiny and glittering. But it's also blinding and it's also concealing ec in the slowly. That blizzard is literally blinding snow blindness. You completely lose track of everything you're saying and that's clearly both literal and metaphorical but also that notion of being blinded by the light is interesting because light is generally used as a metaphor. Oh i i can see clearly now and yet. The snow prevents any kind of seeing clearly both literally if you're going through a snowstorm you can't tell whether the town is a mile ahead or whether it's fifty miles ahead because you can't see but also because of the willful blindness of the characters in both this film and in so many italian westerns will linus is a coping mechanism. So way of dealing with the fact that you recognize that there are at the very least iniquities and at the very worst.

konate andrea Toth morricone american west america
"american west" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:53 min | 6 months ago

"american west" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Drought is gripping much of the American West from Washington to Arizona. Now we know climate change. Soaring temperatures and these droughts affect our ecosystem. But what impact do they have on our nation's hydropower system? With us to discuss this is Jordan Kern, a professor at the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. Hey, thanks for joining us. Thanks, Scott. So let's start big picture here. What are the factors We need to think about when we think about the connection between drought, water levels and the power system in the West? Yeah. The first direct impact the drought can have on the grid in the western United States is to reduce stream flow, which reduces the available fuel for producing hydropower. And when the western grid loses, hydropower has to be replaced by something and almost always that replacement is electricity from natural gas power plants, which are both more expensive and more polluting. How bad are water levels at the big hydro dams right now? How much of a dropper we already seeing? You know, I think if you compare what the current drought to what happened in the previous, really large drought that affected California, at least From 2012 to 2016. They're probably comparable one of the interesting things that right now on the West Coast. Water levels at dams in the Pacific Northwest are not as low as they could be. And that makes a big difference. Because California actually imports a lot of electricity from the Pacific Northwest. You know, it seems like this kind of creates a cycle here, right where hydropower is down. That means more natural gas power is needed, and this is coming at a time when it's going to get hotter and hotter throughout the summer. And people are going to be demanding more electricity. Yes, that's right. The timing associated with hydropower production along the West Coast tends to coincide with the period of highest snowmelt, which means April to July. So that means that usually in the summer time there's a reasonable amount of hydropower to help cover this increased demands for electricity that we see during the summer because people are using more electricity for air conditioning. The issue really is what happens after August when the snow melt is really low anyway. The real challenge will be if this drought is associated with a heat wave during those months that are dry. Usually that's what really contributed to the blackouts we saw in California last year. You're talking about California and the Northern Pacific. Northwest is two different levels right now in terms of the severity of the drought and how it's affecting water supply. How much of a gap is there? How long are we looking at before Washington and Oregon are in the same bad places, California, Nevada and everywhere else? Well, that's hard to predict. I think you know when you talk about the interconnection between those systems and the fact that The Pacific Northwest does deliver a lot of extra hydropower down into California and the dependency that California has on that delivered power every year. You know, I think there's a limit to the extent that which California can really rely on that, and that's a risk for them moving forward. You have studied the relationship between drought in California and the cost of power. Can you give us an explanation of what you have found? What specifically is there to time? Yeah. So drought impacts the cost of operating the grid and delivering electricity to customers in a couple different ways. The first, of course, is lack of water, which means you have to replace hydropower, which is essentially free to produce with something that's much more expensive, which would be replacement power from natural gas power plants. The other issue is wildfire, So the cost of wildfire does represent a pretty substantial financial vulnerability for electric power utilities. It has in recent years and is the reason that California's largest utility PG and you went bankrupt. Lot of the Western states we're talking about here have been on the leading edge of making the shift toward more and more clean energy, solar wind things like that. Any sense how that ongoing transition affects the system. We're talking about here in terms of both cost and reliability in a situation where hydropower is dropping. All the evidence we have suggests that you know a grid of the future that's presumably a lot more reliant on variable renewable energy, like wind and solar will be justice. Susceptible to drought for as long as the West Coast is reliant on hydropower drought will represent a vulnerability and the reason is because when there's a drought, you have to send more of something to California to make up for that loss of hydropower, and you can't send More wind speed or more radiance from the sun. What you can send is more natural gas. What are the fixes for the cycle that we're talking about here? Because, you know, right now in Congress were debating an infrastructure bill that is taking months and months And if something has signed his law, these projects would take years and years and years to even get started and be put into place. What can grids and states do to try and be more resilient in this drought situation? Oftentimes the solution to reliability issues is redundancy so you can build back up capacity, more natural gas generators, energy storage that would help get you through shorter term events. So if you build extra natural gas power plants, it doesn't necessarily mean you have to use them all the time. You could just build them in case you have a drought and the advantage of doing that would be that the rest of the time when you're not in a drought, you'd be using hydropower instead of that natural gas generation. But that would represent a cost consumers imagine building a big power plant just to use it every once in a while, during sort of rare extreme events where you need something to turn on in an emergency, you still have to pay the mortgage on that power plant. Ultimately, that bill would fall to consumers. Jordan, current professor at the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources at North Carolina State University. Thanks for talking to us, thanks, Scott and as climate change manifests to self, more and more and weather patterns like extreme drought and wildfires. Many progressives in Congress are increasingly worried climate is getting squeezed out as President Biden tries to craft an infrastructure bill Republicans could vote for a new round of talks is underway among moderate Republicans and Democrats in the Senate. They say they have a framework of a deal. But a lot of details are not known. What is known has many progressives in both the House and Senate, saying they might vote against it if it ever gets to the floor. Among them, Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal, the chair of the Progressive Caucus. Good morning. Thanks for joining us. Good morning, Scott. I'm struck by this. I talked to you around the time that the American rescue plan came to a vote. You were frustrated. Things weren't in it, including a minimum wage increase. But you said, you know what? At the end of the day I'm going to vote for this bill. You were saying something very different right now. Well, that's right, because the proposal and I say.

Scott Jordan Kern Arizona Congress Washington Jordan Nevada Democrats Pramila Jayapal Progressive Caucus Northern Pacific California Republicans Oregon Senate Pacific Northwest July 2016 2012 Department of Forestry and Env
"american west" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"american west" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The American West is burning in California, Oregon, Colorado in Washington state record wildfires air, Leaving behind a trail of unprecedented devastation houses have been destroyed. Tens of thousands of people have evacuated their homes in the air quality of some communities blanketed by smoke and ashes now at dangerous levels. The leaders of those Western states are all pointing in one direction. While our state reels from this horrific firestorm of dry weather, hot wind and drought conditions. This will not be a one time event. We're in the midst of a climate emergency. We're in the midst of a climate crisis. These are not just wildfires their climate fires. Unfortunately, it is the bellwether of the future. I'm Cancino Vega, and that's where we start the take away today. Aaron Ross is a science reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting and Sam Brash is a climate and environment reporter for Colorado public radio. Aaron and Sam. Welcome to the show. Thank you. Glad to be here, Aaron. Let's start with you. We just heard at the top. All three governors saying Anu Semenza Lian Brown all saying that the wire. This is really about climate change. This is a bellwether for our future. Erin, what's happening on the ground in Oregon right now? Well right now, Fire conditions are definitely starting to improve, which is we're all very grateful for and strangely enough, it's actually the smoke. That's really helping that happen. It's kept temperatures really low kept humidity high, and so now we have moisture in the air and fog. It's making favorable conditions for fighting fires. In terms of what we just heard. Aaron are the finger's pointing to climate change specifically in Oregon right now, I mean, is there more of acceptance that that in fact is what's leading the way here? It's a little bit complicated. We do know that without climate change, these fires to some extent would not have been possible. But it's difficult to say if events like this one exactly are going to become more common with climate change. This event was primarily driven by a really extreme windstorm. Kind of which we never really get up here. We had three days of 60 mile an hour plus winds coming down off the mountains from the east and they're very dry winds, and that's very uncommon. What is unfortunately, increasingly common is that really, really drive fuel that we're seeing. And so we had record high temperatures for a large chunk of September are water tables are very low. And the fuel on the ground is very dry. And it doesn't matter how windy something is or how many down power lines you have. If the fuel's not dry, it's not goingto light so that we might not see simultaneous fires burning across Oregon like this again until Hopefully it will hopefully until we get another once in a century storm. I will certainly continue to see her wildfires get larger and hotter and more frequent on Aaron. We know that organs Fire Marshal Jim Walker resigned. We know why. Yes, We just got some of that information yesterday. It seems as though he went into an active wildfires in without permission on I doing a favor for a friend looking for looking for survivors, but he wasn't authorized to be in there and apparently Had been a little bit absentee. During the initial fires from the administrative side. He was going into fire camps, which could be useful in some cases. But when you have fires that are moving 40 miles an hour down a canyon, it's not particularly useful. Sam. Let's talk about what's happening in Colorado. I mean, is this the first time that many folks there have witnessed a fire like this? What are conditions like on the ground right now? I mean, I'll start by saying that we are. We're nowhere near where organ Northern California and Washington are right now. I mean, the disaster. Playing out on the West Coast is pretty unfathomable. And I think the feeling right now in Colorado is that we have largely dodged a bullet last week we had A number of major fires burning across the state, and they were growing. And then we have this free cold staff last Tuesday night, we had nineties one day here in Denver, and then some places saw 50 degree temperature drop. So we had snow.

Aaron Ross Oregon Colorado Sam Brash Jim Walker Anu Semenza Lian Brown Oregon Public Broadcasting reporter California Cancino Vega West Coast Denver Northern California Washington Erin
"american west" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

03:15 min | 1 year ago

"american west" Discussed on KTOK

"Even though I know that Oklahoma's been lumped up with a bunch of other states when it comes to per capita infections are infection rate is down. Our hospitalizations are down. And I see you stays are down, plus total number of cases that are active down all of that worth celebrating on NewsRadio 1000 Katie. Okay, We also heard about this teacher who's diagnosed on Friday in South Carolina and then died on Monday. But they're not saying if she has a pre existing condition and after seeing a picture of her, I'm surmising that with apologies she did. Because she appeared to be livin large. I'm not saying that I'm blaming her. I'm just saying that that is the fact of the matter. And where is this news story is trying to make it sound like you're going to get it on Friday and die on Monday. That's simply another case. Eight. Borland Towels and Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com. Bill O'Reilly has a new book out. It's called Killing Crazy Horse, but it's about the American West, and a lot of it. Deals with what happened here in Oklahoma. Including George Armstrong Custer, who was stationed over in the Black Kettle region, and Ah participated in what had become known as The battle of Washington River. They used tactics in that battle that he later tried to use again at Little Bighorn. That you didn't know that. But that's the kind of things you learn when you read a Bill O'Reilly book. Killing crazy horse will tell us about that and current events to speaking of Corona virus. Why did they hold the vaccine trial? Bill's effort will join us with that information on NewsRadio. 1000 Katie. Okay, eight for a 1000 Leigh Matthews, Katie okay dot com to join in the conversation I see on social media. That the Minnesota Vikings have awarded their first George Floyd Legacy Scholarship. George Floyd, As we all know, is the man who was taken into custody by police. They kneeled on his neck till he couldn't breathe. We recently found out he had enough. He had enough dope in him to choke. Godzilla. And that that contributed to or Could have actually led to his death, even if the policeman had not had him in a stranglehold. But it was the stranglehold that killed him now before I go down this road Once again. I want to tell you. I don't think George Floyd should have died. I don't think he should have had his neck melt on. The man was immobilized Why? That cop chose to continue to do that? I don't know. And I'm sure it'll come out in court. But as far as this Minnesota Vikings scholarship goes I wonder what that's going to help fund. Glasses on How you can Resist arrest. How much Um, actually continued. Khun take until you pass out the best way to try to pass a fake $20 bill..

George Floyd Bill O'Reilly Minnesota Vikings Katie Leigh Matthews Oklahoma George Armstrong Custer NewsRadio George Floyd Legacy Scholarshi South Carolina Borland Towels Little Bighorn Khun Um Black Kettle Washington River
"american west" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"The go to jeans for cowboys railroad workers and others who pioneered the American west today they are on opposite sides of the political divide that's affecting not only help people vote but what they buy reporter Suzanne Capen or the Wall Street journal has been looking at some in depth data Suzanne what we found a consumer base became much more partisan over this period and some of these brands the ship was really quite striking the customer to leave my customers for instance who identified the democratic those those customers became much more numerous leave aside while the number the fight as Republicans became much less humorous really my the other direction and we saw that with a lot of different plans it is really what's going on in this country you know as we become more politically divisive in the media that we consume you know in the places where we live how has some of that data been impacted by companies that really have been recently advocating on social issues because that was not always the norm right right into this trend you know we're seeing more and more companies jumped on the bandwagon of it kind of hot button issues whether to gun control immigration okay right these are issues obviously that big corporate companies wouldn't steer clear years ago but a line in the executive I talked to said that they feel they have to take the stand today because they're shoppers want them to stand for something they want they want it shop at brands and companies that have values that mirror their own speaking with Susan captor reporter at the Wall Street journal she's got a fascinating piece and it's entitled are your jeans red or blue will shopping America's partisan divide all right so what percentage of the population does that when they shop I I guess is enough of an am I mean I'm not somebody who does that but is that enough people do it I guess to make a difference well you know it's always a challenge to figure out you know what people may say they do one thing and then when they actually go shopping they may do another thing but you know and man has it's a big public relations firm that has studied this issue and they say that you know nearly sixty percent of Americans will make me all factors some of these issues into buying decisions and that's up from forty seven percent a few years ago you know when you come to actually buying sometimes people just want to buy what they like they don't always you know by along that you know value Susan Susan captor at the Wall Street journal thirty minutes.

Suzanne Capen Wall Street journal reporter America executive Susan Susan forty seven percent thirty minutes sixty percent
"american west" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

When We Talk About Animals

14:03 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on When We Talk About Animals

"I understood that this is not a matter of partisan For the Party in power but matter of system in that system is vicious rapacious unregulated growth maniac capitalism mirror utilitarian resource a- value only for exploitation use rather than something that has intrinsic value Welcome to when we talk about animals a Yale University podcast devoted to exploring the big questions animals race about what it means to be human I'm Viveka Morris and I'm Lindsay Stern for the past ten years investigative journalist Christopher Ketcham has documented the battles being waged over the fate of the federal publicly ends in the American West catch them has extensively roamed this landscape of deep canyons ten thousand foot plateaus Sagebrush sees mountains deserts and forests places of beauty and wildness he writes where no one person or institution or corporation is supposed to be privileged above the other this land is what he after he wants saying belongs to you and me it belongs to every citizen of the United States but today catch him says in his new book the government agencies and trusted oversee it are failing us the private interest that want the land for profit have planted their teeth in the government the national trend is against the preservation of the comments you'd stretches are affected early privatized public in name only I went west to see what we were losing as a people the National Commons that catch him focuses on our managed on the public's half and with our tax dollars by the US Bureau of Land Management and the US Forest Service some four hundred fifty million acres stretching across twelve western states both agencies operate with multiple use mandate this means they are required to strike a balance between using the land for purposes that generate economic profit such as mineral extraction energy development and livestock grazing while also protecting the health of the ecosystem but today are public lands and the wild animals and plants that depend on them are being pillaged poisoned and assaulted by industries and government agencies that are captured by them according to catch him multiple use he says is now multiple abuse the result he writes quote is ecological impoverishment Biotic Simplification seven and a widespread collapse of biodiversity outside magazine called Ketchum fierce new book this land how cowboys capitalism and corruption ruining the American in west quote the desert solitaire of our time the New Yorker deemed it an encyclopedic expose in this land catch him documents the confluence of commercial exploitation government misconduct in public lands across the West the role of the livestock and Energy Industries and they're spoiled and the impact rampant malfeasance by the Federal Land Management Agencies Wildlife Ketchum a freelance journalist for more than Twenty Years Publishing in Harper's National Geographic Mother Jones and other publications this land is his first book ketchum welcome to when we talk about animals beer so how did you come to focus on the Western public lands I ended up West during a Lotta Camping backpacking and wandering and and was impressed particularly by the simple fact that it was aw my land and your land in everyone's land and you you could camp anywhere now being I'm back east where so much of the land is privatized that is certainly not the case so seeing this incredible public domain in this vast Commons and feeling it as a as my own property if you will I was pretty sickened as I began to learn about how it is being mismanaged by the various agencies tasked with protecting the public interest you mentioned the two main agencies earlier in your introduction of Sa- Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service which together manage something like six hundred million acres thereabouts most of it in the American West and it's these two agencies I that I really target in the book simply because they exemplify the extent of regulatory sure in our land management agencies and again you refer to that as well inch in your introduction of regulatory capture being the process hi which agencies are supposed to be regulating industry become the creatures of those industries and become prostituted due to a business interests and so seeing this being at once ashamed in aggrieved outraged I I decided hey I gotta start writing about it which you know I wrote a there are numerous chapters in this book that began his magazine mm pieces published National Geographic Harper's rolling stone discover magazine like and as time went on and I continued to see these abuses that continued regardless of administrator Asian abuses that were evident under Bush they were evident under Clinton prior Bush there were evident under Obama continued under trump it was understood that is not a matter of partisanship or the party in power but a matter of system and that system is vicious rapacious unregulated growth maniac capitalism and that I concluded it is the main threat to our public lands the capitalist system which sees inland only a mere utilitarian resource Evalu- only for exploitation use rather than something that has intrinsic value so how did these lands come to be public in the first place what -tective them aridity climatic aridity basically there's so much of the West those uninhabitable due to lack of rainfall and so when in homestead was all the race throughout the nineteenth century after the passage of the eighteen sixty two I think it's eighteen sixty two homestead act there were millions of people looking for land but guess what it wasn't land that could be farmed it wasn't arable it was not as I said in running and so the lands basically were never settled in fell into the public domain after period of of you've laying essentially abandoned so in nineteen thirty four base well let's go back to the forest service and the Forest Service gets founded nights you know five prior to the four service in eighteen nineties you have the establishment of the way we're called forest reserves and those forest reserves were the first codification of of public lands in the west of while prior to that hold on prior to that there's establishment of Yellowstone National Park but on a much broader scale the forest reserves created a public land system now what remained unprotected were the vast grazing lands that in the that by nineteen thirty four have been so abused that Congress passed the Taylor grazing act establishing the I grazing service and the years grazing service basically it was designed to steward those lands have been so abused by by the L. Industry and that signal the beginning of the movement of these lands into into purely public hands that is they would no longer be unquote disposed into the private sector into in privatizing homesteaded it will become the the they would become the Commons owned collectively by the American people in perpetuity and you write in the book Chris that everything that you I thought you knew as an easterner come west about cattle out west turned out to be wrong and a lot of the book is devoted to the problem of cows and why they're there corruption behind the livestock industry in the subsidies that these cattlemen are receiving from farmers can you explain what the problem is with cows on this land and how they came to be while the cattle industry gets it started after the end of the civil war with the ending of the embargo on the Texas Cattle Industry Texas being a part of the confederacy and so Texas Open the Texas open range cattle industry have been operating for decades already but on the planes much the Inter Mountain West there is still the quote unquote problem the native Americans the rest of tribes refuse to Refuse to go quietly into that good night and so after the war the army of the West the railroads coming in the army of the West wipes out the Indian the railroads come in and create a a efficient means of transport for beef to be moved back east the bison are wiped out so the main competitor for forge of facing the cattle industry is gone and so you have basically massive takeover of the West by cattle after eighteen seventy accelerate into the eighteen eighties in the eighteen nineties and by nineteen hundred you have a devastated landscape you out a landscape that has been altered irrevocable only because of an invasive species that is not meant to be grazing on arid landscapes much of the West evolved ecologically without the kind of grazing pressure from large bovines the same cannot be said for the Great Plains where you had bison but bison fundamentally different in their grazing habits so you you you can't compare bison to cattle so the the arid lands are just not adapted to deal with with cows and so when you put a cow how out in his landscapes he's fragile dry landscapes you you trample the flora you you The cows I in terms of plant life and so they eat away all the most the richest most succulent plants and then with them on their hooves comes invasive species seeds carried in like a cheat grass for example otherwise known AS Roma's them which is is an evil species are in terms of how it spreads across the landscape and and out competes native vegetation in chokes out the atives so as to create effectively a a ecologically simplified system so the academy is bad all around for the West I mean it'd be better we should better graze them on the Washington Mall or something you know the White House lawn because they would they fair far better in the east than they do in the West and you write in the book about how the cow is actually the oldest measure of wealth in the West just that the word capital derives from the Latin capita which means the head of capital and did even Hans this word of ours fee which comes from the old English word that meant cattle or property I just kind of had learned as a result of of your book kind of houses stomach the idea of house as money is to how we think about the role of our species on land well we regard animals property for the most part em we fear we mostly fear wild animals the simple reason that can't be controlled domesticated right and I write about the mustangs West while horses Nevada and how you know the very word must stanko means ownerless beast an animal that is the property of no one so yeah look viewing land as property viewing land is property it strikes me that there is an analogy to be made in how we viewed humans as property and.

four hundred fifty million acr six hundred million acres ten thousand foot Twenty Years ten years
"american west" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The American west find out why Publishers Weekly says CJ box remains at the top of his game and Booklist calls in the dominant thriller author read the bitter roots by CJ box the ties that bind can burn the bitter roots is available now wherever books and audio books are sold from minutes or books a lot of folks ask me why Marty speeds pretty easy fetal taste great whatever shape it is but if you're really thrifty you'll be happy to know that are twelve inch square pieces are twenty seven percent larger than the other guys twelve intro pieces bigger pizza means better value more info feel there's nothing like that day at the ballpark but to me the fun begins well before the first it is for you to grow up the usual fare but you know it's not a bad idea to call Marty's I mean we have a great pizza OR one party subs for why not celebrate a big win at Marty suddenly hole either way a trip to Marty's pizza is always old Marty St so feel Delafield for online dot net before nine what about the general had a short one eight six six five oh gimbals weeds out of the latest of the tweet storms this time involving president trump and did two democratic congresswoman Muslim Americans bar and the two leave and though we have our guest of Michael Friedman from.

Publishers Weekly Marty Delafield trump Michael Friedman president twenty seven percent twelve inch
"american west" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"American west find out why Publishers Weekly says CJ box remains at the top of his game and Booklist calls him the dominance thriller author read the bitter roots by CJ box the ties that bind can burn you the bitter roots is available now wherever books and audio books are sold from minutes or books so two weeks before up thing is found dead in the cellar we still don't know how he died in his cell notice this the world is watching but the arrogant elites who run the world are saying to the people drop dead go watch a sporting match drop dead you idiots UP on you mean nothing to us we can kill anyone we want anywhere at any time and nothing will happen most recent inmate assigned to abstain cell was taken out of the cell on Friday just hours before his death right out of the godfather should they remove the muscle bound cop who's in jail for killing four people a hulking ex cop face the death penalty on a federal murder drug drug charges Nicholas stop probably only Nicholas that talk we only was the roommate or the cell mate for our apps thing and then if things file with marks on his neck and he says he doesn't know what happened he tried to kill himself that was two weeks ago so they transfer talk talk we only out of apps thing selling the facility special housing unit which is the most heavily secured part of the MCC that separates the other high profile inmates for the general pop that this is the tightest present in the world no one knows why talk talk we only was removed from the cell actually was placed on suicide watch a new inmate is assigned to abstain cell and this new inmate is taken out of his cell on Friday just hours before apps things found that is there a fiction writer listening to the show you know I've written three best selling novels abuse of power and others if you were writing a movie version of this would this be happening in the nation with so many educated people with such a high level level of literacy could this even be possible in a nation with such a high level of literacy huh or you think it's just actualizar the people calling you never believe this is there a listening to the show once the call from New York City who works at the MCC okay let's take calls around America nearly no one knows anything in New York Wisconsin the correctional officers calling call line three what do you think about this whole story doc savage twenty one years in corrections I work with Stephen Avery plan in that scene most cameras do not get turned off by the Warner anybody that's gonna come from a higher power cameras are on twenty four hours a day seven days a week no recording ability this is an inside job some of this saying that they don't record inside the cell they say the only record outside the cell I don't believe that's true isn't well that's that's absolutely false the two record well that's being reported by Murdoch's the press the the New York Post he's actually having his report is saying that they're lying they are lying to the American public that is just one more thing the government's covering up on us why why do you think that sting was off so my probably high power people rather than he was going around on all right let's say there are we all know that there are we've seen all the names you don't have to say that again but the names are still there in a locked in a notebook he kept of all of the trips on this plane and with the girls those notebooks and now the issue what how what are they going to disappear exactly exactly who is when will the island be blown up by accident by a of hydrogen bomb it falls out of the U. S. jet the private eye level disappear from from the Bahamas as an American jet laden with nuclear weapons accidentally crashes into.

Publishers Weekly two weeks twenty four hours twenty one years seven days
"american west" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"American west find out why Publishers Weekly says CJ box remains at the top of his game and Booklist calls and be dominant thriller author read the bitter roots by CJ box the ties that bind can burn you the bitter roots is available now wherever books and audio books are sold from minutes or books so two weeks before actually is found dead in the cellar we still don't know how he died in his cell notice this the world is watching but the arrogant elites who run the world by saying to the people drop dead go watch a sporting match drop dead you idiots UP on you mean nothing to us we can kill anyone we want anywhere at any time and nothing will happen most recent inmate assigned to F. thing cell was taken out of the cell on Friday just hours before his death right out of the godfather should they remove the muscle bound cop who's in jail for killing four people a hulking ex cop facing the death penalty on a federal murder and George drug charges Nicholas but probably only Nicholas thought talk we only was the roommate or the cell mate for our apps thing and that actually is fraught with marks on his neck and he says he doesn't know what happened I try to kill himself that was two weeks ago so they transfer talk talk we only out of apps thing selling the facility specializing in it which is the most heavily secured part of the MCC that separates the other high profile inmates for the general pop that this is the tightest present in the world no one knows why talk talk we only was removed from the cell actually is placed on suicide watch a new inmate is assigned to abstain cell and this new inmate is taken out of his cell on Friday just hours before apps things found that is there a fiction writer listening to the show you know I've written three best selling novels abuse of power and others if you were writing a movie version of this would this be happening in the nation with so many educated people with such a high let it level of literacy could this even be possible in a nation with such a high level of literacy huh you think it's just an accident this is the people calling you never believe this is there a listening to the show once the call from New York City who works at the MCC okay let's take coalition around America nearly no one knows anything in New York Wisconsin the correctional officers going call line three what do you think about this whole story doc savage twenty one years in corrections I work with Stephen Avery friend and asking those cameras do not get turned off by the Warner anybody that's gonna come from a higher power cameras are on twenty four hours a day seven days a week now recording ability this is an inside job some of this saying that they don't record inside the Sally say the only record outside the cell I don't believe that's true is it no that's that's absolutely false the two record well that's being reported by Murdoch's press the the New York Post he's actually having is report is saying that their line they are lying to the American public that is just one more thing the government is covering up on us why why do you think that acting was off there's so many probably high power people that are that he was going around on our site let's say there are we all know that there are we've seen all the names you don't have to say that again but the names are still there a locked in a notebook he kept of all the trips on his plane and with the girls those notebooks and now the issue what how what are they going to disappear yeah I exactly exactly who the man with the island be blown up by accident by a of a hydrogen bomb it falls out of the U. S. chat the private eye level disappear from from the Bahamas as an American jet laden with nuclear weapons accidentally crashes.

Publishers Weekly two weeks twenty four hours twenty one years seven days
"american west" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"american west" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"The west and who knows where their relationship would have led to. But circumstances led otherwise. Yeah. Hitchcock gave hearten nickname while. You're probably familiar with it. And I always wondered nobody seems to know why he called hardened the little Arkansas. There is an interesting the. Some of them were nicknames that came along and the American west who knows where some of them came from. I mean, buffalo Bill is an obvious one. And and and who had and wild Bill get cold while Bill, but it's just something that that harden was a name name that he gave him. He he might just made it up one day. I couldn't really find something that was really specific explanation for there may be one. But I just couldn't find it, and Peter I gotta let you go because I'm up against it for the news. But the call thank you for calling. Keep listening. I gotta break for news in about thirty seconds or so Thompkin and keep you just for a couple of minutes into the news after work. Just to wrap things up and let people know what's going on next project, and it was so much more to talk about in the book as well. They will continue our conversation for a few minutes is the next hour. Again, the authors Tom glavin the book is wild Bill. The true story of the American frontiers. First gunfight him fun. Read a good read. Trust me. You're really going to enjoy really is a bigger than life kind of book, except it's all true. We'll take a break for news. And then right back the conversation here at WBZ NewsRadio. Ten thirty to say just take care of the patient that we've made it so much more complicated than it has to be patients have to go through..

Bill harden Hitchcock Tom glavin Arkansas Peter I Thompkin hearten thirty seconds one day
"american west" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"american west" Discussed on KCRW

"Now, I might be a bit biased. But seeing some of the most expensive real estate in television used to remind America that journalism is a key to democracy seem like the best use of a Super Bowl ad that I've seen in quite a while. I'm eric. It's NPR news. And you're listening to morning edition on KCRW. Now this from KCRW news California's among a couple of states and the American west that missed a deadline last week on a plan to combat the shrinking supply of Colorado river water for two million people. Depend on the Colorado that meanders its way through the west as KCRW Steve tickets reports the Golden State has some work ahead of it to get to some kind of agreement. The river's upper basin includes Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming. The lower basin includes Arizona, California, and the Vada now all of the states mentioned approved the drought contingency plans except for Arizona and California the interior department's reclamation bureau Commissioner Brenda Berman says those complex agreements among water users in both states have yet to be signed even as a deadline passed last Thursday, and that could allow the fed. Federal government to step in and decide the rules going forward. Arizona's closer to approving the agreement with lawmakers and the governor they're giving the thumbs up and only big stakeholders left assign in in California. The work is up to four entities that deliver the river's water, the metropolitan in Coachella valley, water districts, and the imperial and Palo Verde irrigation district. Jeff Highlander heads up the end WD. He says he's confident everyone will get on board because climate change is about survival imperial for its part says it's approval is contingent on final review on federal legislation in millions of dollars to manage the Salton sea for KCRW tickets. Southern.

KCRW California Arizona Colorado Colorado river Federal government Commissioner Brenda Berman NPR Jeff Highlander Palo Verde America Utah Wyoming New Mexico
"american west" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"american west" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"That's across the street and three doors down from his old Trump administration co worker the new house is also just a short walk. To the beach. Dave Schreiber ABC news. And the daughter of a tennis sensation delivers her own famous offspring CBS's. Deborah Rodriguez explains. Quake quake has become an integral part of Serena Williams, family or one and a half year old daughter Alexis Olympia brings her mixed race baby doll, whether wherever she goes way has her own Instagram page with more than eighty seven thousand followers and today at the Australian official WTA tour Instagram page posted a video of quake quake riding the electric chair. Serena Williams says she wanted a Lexus to have a black doll because she didn't get to play with many as a kid. Tennessee says it'll help teach her daughter, humans should always have love for each other. And matter what color they are. Deborah Rodriguez CBS news, and both Serena and Venus Williams made it through to the second round of the Australian Open today this story now the publisher of the popular video game red dead redemption to is now suing the Pinkerton security company after Pinkerton sent a cease and desist letter over the use of its name. The game is set in the nineteenth century American west. And two of the game's characters are Pinkerton agents. Pinkerton argues that take two interactive is trading on the goodwill link to its names and trademarks about this one a billboard number one album with a few is number of actual albums sold..

Serena Williams Pinkerton Deborah Rodriguez Venus Williams Dave Schreiber CBS Alexis Olympia tennis Lexus Tennessee publisher official
"american west" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:09 min | 3 years ago

"american west" Discussed on KCRW

"Of the American west. Now, presenting the final weeks of LaRosa an exhibition of photographs taken during the tocado rights movements of the nineteen sixties and seventies. Experience images of protest, activism and community building that the New York Times hailed as vivid and compelling last chance to visit LaRussa is Sunday February tenth at the Autry museum in Griffith park. Details at the Autry dot org. This is press play Madeline brand we are now in day seventeen of the government shutdown. The sticking point has been and still is billions of dollars for President Trump's wall and Friday, he told reporters he's found a way around the Democrats intransigence Trump says he could declare a national emergency along the southern border, and that would allow him to divert money from the military to pay for the wall, and he'd use members of the armed services to build it. Well, that might not be legal it's Monday. So Jessica Levinson is here to break down the legality of that. She's a law professor at Loyola Law School and a regular legal eagle, welcome. It's rain on your parade. President Trump day here on a on a lovely rainy day. Well, why would that be illegal? So there's a couple problems one. I think it's not permissible to use the people to use the military to enforce domestic law to. I don't think it's permissible to use the funds to try and divert military funding to build this wall in three I think. You have a problem using the property. So there is some case law that says by imminent, domain, you can take private property, but it doesn't dictate in these situations. It's more about enemies, for instance, taking our property which Mexico still is not defined as an enemy. So he did say that thousands of terrorists were crossing our southern border, which is not true. But he did say that he did say that. And so what I think he's trying to do is get at basically an exception to all the rules. I talked about the rule saying you're not allowed to use the military to enforce domestic law. There's an exception. That says basically, you can detain certain terrorists if they're if elated with al-qaeda or the Taliban. So I think he's trying maybe to make that stretch that the refugees who are crossing the wall to try and ask for asylum or other illegal immigrants would be terrorists. But if that entered into a court of law, the problem is he said is there's really no evidence to indicate that because most of the suspects for internet. National terrorism are arrested at airports, exactly inter inter knock crossing the southern border. And what is the actual legal statute? That says you can't use the military for these purposes yet. So there's a couple of statutes that were codified actually fairly recently like in the nineteen fifties in the nineteen eighties. And they basically say president you're not allowed to do this. What he's looking at. I think is the national -mergency act which actually does provide the president with an enormous amount of discretion. So this is one of the things that's interesting about the Trump administration is we didn't used to talk about things like well is there anything in the constitution that says when the president can declare a national emergency. Or is it really laid out in any statue. And the answer is no. So the president really has enormous authority except for some of the limitations. We talked about limitations which happened to hit exactly what he wants to do. He has to really define the national emergency. He has to actually prove it. Well, I think even if. He said there is a national emergency. Given the facts that we have right now, there still is an exception to the law that would say yes, you get to use the military to build that wall. What if he says, okay, I'm not going use the military. Oh, he's private contractors? Yeah. I think that that would be seen as just like a little hop skip. And a jump around circumventing the spirit of the law. But I like where you're going with this counselors, it would be very persuasive argument. Okay. Let's go to another shutdown story in the news. The National Park Service says it's going to take the unprecedented step of using money from park entrance fees to bring in some additional staff to clean up the disgusting toilets and campsites. Right. So another little legal hiccup here. Let's say is that the money for fees is actually designated for visitor services. And so you would think well if a law says money for fees use for visitor services, certainly cleaning up trash per patrolling open areas that sounds like visitors. Services, but it's actually not that money is supposed to be used for general operations. So the reason we haven't talked about this in the past it sorry. I see you just thinking about visitor services because that seems like a broad definition it does. So this is one of those kind of devil in the detail of how the statute defines words that in the common vernacular may mean different things, but visitor services would be like showing a film would be like making your experience better with respect to hunting camping photography. It doesn't even cleaning toilets. One visitor. So yes, those very kind of basic like take out the trash clean a toilet. Make sure that you're safe, for instance. And what has happened in the past is presidents have said during a shutdown President, George W Bush said this President Obama said this. We're not going to keep the national parks open. President Trump said we're keeping them open maybe in part because the shutdown started over holiday, and but he's not giving any money in order to keep that open. And so the park services said this is totally untenable, but they don't want to dip into those fees. Because what they have said is basically we don't want to blur that line. And then have congress say to us later when they're trying to budget. We have those fees over there. Why don't you at least try and dip into those? And then they'd have to give them back right raise fees. And then that's another problem. Exactly. And we're we're actually talking about a very small percentage of the money that congress gifts national parks. We're talking about. Maybe like two hundred ninety nine million dollars in fees. A budget of about three point two billion finally Ruth Bader Ginsburg missed arguments today for the first time in twenty five years. Yes. Do you make of that? Well, when I make of that is that she suffered some health issues that she had surgery dealing with lung cancer and that she's in her eighties. And I think that for any other person if she was not the notorious RPG, we would not be saying, oh my God. She missed oral arguments. It really is that she's basically set the bar so high that I mean, this is kind of a ridiculous example. But I think she set the bar at the place where people think she can be run over by a truck on the way oral arguments, and she'll just tell the ambulance. Wait right there. I just need to hear this case and ask a couple questions. And then I'll be in there with you. Now, of course, this raises. The question of is President Trump gonna get a third appointment to the supreme court. And that would obviously if he was replaced. Facing Ruth, Bader Ginsburg solidify, a conservative conservative majority for the foreseeable future..

president President Trump Ruth Bader Ginsburg Loyola Law School Jessica Levinson New York Times Madeline Taliban National Park Service professor Autry museum LaRussa Mexico supreme court Griffith park George W Bush Obama two hundred ninety nine millio twenty five years