35 Burst results for "American West"

Final Sentencing Set For Man Who Claimed To Be Missing Aurora Boy, Chicago

WBBM Morning News

00:19 sec | 14 hrs ago

Final Sentencing Set For Man Who Claimed To Be Missing Aurora Boy, Chicago

"A federal judge has scouted the final sentencing date of December 15th for an Ohio man and falsely claimed to be a missing West suburban boy. 25 year old Brian Greenie was has pleaded guilty to a charge of aggravated identity theft really claim to be Timothy Pitzen Aurora boy who disappeared back in

Brian Greenie Ohio Timothy Pitzen Aurora
Man of the People

Reply All

04:23 min | 18 hrs ago

Man of the People

"And the story. You're about to hear it takes place in nineteen seventeen but almost everything that happens in. It feels like it could have happened this week. Basically it starts with this young doctor john. Brinkley he's just married the love of his life many and they decided to go find a place where they can just settle down. He's going to be a town doctor and then they set out for kansas because they see an advertisement that says milford kansas population. Three thousand when you doctor. And they're like okay. We'll go west. So they travel west get milford and three thousand was a typo in fact it was population. Three hundred which say it's like the middle of nowhere. There's nobody there. This is penny lane. She's a filmmaker. She made a documentary about john brinkley. Brinkley moved to milford and they set up shop. This elderly farmer named bills. It's worth comes into the office and you know after much hemming hiring kind of manages to spit out his problem. Which is that. He's a flat tire Get it get it you know and finally the brinkley's like oh. You're impotent okay. Gotcha i'm so sorry. We have nothing for that. Like modern medical science has not solved. That problem. I'm very sorry according to brinkley. What happens next is that he and the former get into small talk and they start talking about goats talking about. How goats never seem to be impotent. They're always zero. And the farmer says something to brinkley. That will change his life. he says. Gosh it's too bad. I don't have billy goat nuts and then brinkley laughs. And then after hours of brinkley's saying no i didn't learn that in medical school. That's not how we do. Things that might now work could be dangerous. The farmer infuses to leave until brinkley agrees to try to fix impotence by giving him go testicles. There's the strangest eureka moment so then of course he tries it and it works. It works according to brinkley. Brinkley tells the world that he has created the goat gland cure. Meaning he will take goat testicles. Insert them into your scrotum and you'll be healed and not just of impotence either. He says it'll cure flatulence emphysema stomach cancer. He's got a version for women which he says will cure female infertility. I talked to this redder. Pope brock who wrote a book about brinkley charlton. He said that when patients came to bring you get the surgery it was set up so that the patients would know that they were getting exactly what they paid for right so the patient was it was local anesthetic so that he could be assured that was actually getting the goat and then Many brinkley usually brinkley's wife would do the snipping on the goat. They would bring the goat balls over opened a guy up toss them in so him up and send him out so just to be clear. This surgery is bogus utterly bogus and privately. Brinkley knows this but he's extremely good. Commencing the public that he believes in what he's selling that goat gland surgery really works. It helps that he looks extremely professional. He's got a three piece suit. He's got round glasses. This neat blonde goatee. He's everybody's idea of what a smart doctor looks like. And so they start showing up at the clinic. These nervous guys ready for the surgery their own goats in tau like you bring the you want this just clutched in your arms and your pounding on the door About pretty soon he He got his own heard out back. Because it was you know was a volume business. By that point the patient would come out browse the herd and pick one the the the goat with which he felt the most connection you know whatever. He felt simpatico. That's the good he. He chose lobster at a restaurant exactly exactly exactly so. Business is booming. Brinkley has found a great scheme. Because what happens is there are men who are impotent. Who get the surgery. And because there are evidences psychological diplo cbo effect saves them and they thanked dr brinkley and for the men that it doesn't work on their generally too ashamed to say anything about it so no matter what he wins

Brinkley John Brinkley Kansas Hemming Pope Brock Brinkley Charlton Milford Stomach Cancer Emphysema John Billy Infertility Dr Brinkley CBO
Why We Need to Quit Coal

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:42 min | 19 hrs ago

Why We Need to Quit Coal

"In nineteen forty eight. The british politician emmanuel shin well appeal to people to avoid wasting coal. But just as i am asking the minor but a greater effort to give you the coal you need. I also asked uses fuel at work and at home to burn coal catholic and to avoid way then cole was seen as key to a prosperous future Now seen as a means to a hotter and deadlier one it accounts for nearly half of the global energy systems carbon dioxide emissions this week a united nations report laid out how coal use must be drastically reduced. If there's any hope of reaching the paris agreements target of limiting warming to one point five or two degrees above pre industrial levels the un secretary general antonio gutierrez urged the world to get rid of it. It is time to put a price on carbon to phase out fossil fuel finance and then fossil fuel subsidies to stop building new coal power plants and co power financing domestically and overseas the report this week from the united nations and a group of international climate. Researchers laid out how difficult it might be to meet of these targets. Charlotte howard is the economists energy and commodities editor. So to meet the one point five degree target coal use would have to drop by eleven percent each year for the next decade to meet two degrees would require coal demand to drop by seven percent. That's about the same decline that we are expected to see this year and twenty twenty which was really a historic bad year for coal amid a global pandemic and so that lays out just how hard it is to achieve these goals but even safe the knowledge that it is a terrible fuel. It is still widely in use right. What what is the the global picture of coal consumption look like well. This has been a really interesting year because in some ways it has eliminated both the progress being made against coal as well as illuminated. Just how tricky. It's going to be to get rid of it. In parts of the world in the west and in europe you've seen coal under consistent pressure due to this combination of factors that are mutually reinforcing from government policy which promotes renewables investors becoming increasingly wary of stranded assets and the risk of investing in coal. As well as really good alternatives to call in america this wave of natural gas that was unleashed by fracking. Helped retire a lot of coal plants and now the cost of renewables have declined by so much that in most of the west new solar new wind is actually less expensive than coal from existing. Coal fired power plants so caused really struggling to compete. And the question is how you can start to drive down coal and other parts of the world where it continues to grow if co falls in the west but rises in asia which already counts for three quarters of coal consumption. You're gonna blaze right past the goals of the paris. Climate agreement and yet the question around fossil fuels more generally has been developing economies can essentially catch up to the west without making those same mistakes while while the west is taking. Its foot off the gas as it were. It's worth remembering that american europe. Of course their own economic development was powered by coal and that even now coal consumption per person in india which is the world's second largest coal consumer is less than half the coal consumption per person in america. And so there's this question of. Why should we limit our own economic growth and limit access to a cheap and reliable form of electric city and so you see countries starting to reckon with this trying to find ways both to meet their climate targets as well as continued to support rapid growth. But you say that. Asia is sort of central to to this equation and yet even china for example is is making very ambitious promises about zero carbon output. That's right you saw decision. Paying set out a goal of carbon neutrality by twenty sixty in september and that is a really big deal. China accounts for more than half of all the world's coal consumption. It is the world's largest emitter so having that level of political commitment from government that essentially controlled is very important and the question is how soon china may act to set in motion plans towards limiting its emissions. There are few really key documents that are coming up. So china's five year plan will be published next year that could include a net cap on coal. Which would allow new installations of coal plants. Only as they replace older ones that are more polluting and then also by the end of december china has to make a fresh pledge to fight emissions under the terms of the paris climate agreement of two thousand fifteen. So i think we'll get some more clear direction soon but it's part to overstate just how important it is to think about china and coal just because of how large the emissions are will. That's the story for china. But you you said. Asia more generally is really the the big piece of this puzzle. Some of the forces that are helping to drive down coal in the west don't fully apply in asia and that's largely because of the degree of government intervention. Obviously in china you have state backed coal companies elsewhere in asia to you have governments that are involved either and owning national electricity companies in india coal. India limited is the state-backed coal company. That is the world's largest coal miner. There's a very difficult political challenge. Which is that. The interests of the state and the interests of the coal industry are very closely intertwined and so even when private capital begins to fall away from coal you can have public support for it and that means that it can be more challenging to make this transition. That in parts of america are parts of europe so with all that in mind then. What prospects do you think for reaching the targets that are laid out in this week's u report. I think there are a few really promising things that have happened. One is just this extraordinary decline of coal fired. Power in the west shows that it is possible. Five years ago. Coal accounted for about a third of britain's electricity generation and in the second quarter of this year accounted for zero point five percent. The other thing is that in the five years since the paris agreement you seen real progress on a number of levels you've seen market forces evolved such that renewables really are competitive in much of the world. Even some middle income countries like indonesia where coal is still technically cheaper than renewables. You've also seen a really big ramp up in commitment from global leaders not just xi jinping but india's government has set very aggressive targets for renewables. Of course you have now. In the form of joe biden someone who really views climate as a key part of his presidency. He signalled his commitment to fighting climate. Change the appointment of john. Kerry's climates are and. I think that having the person who was america's seniormost diplomat a secretary of state during barack obama's presidency is important signaling to the world that a new round of leadership on climate is coming and one of the most important tasks in thinking about climate. Diplomacy is how to encourage this shift away from coal and that includes how to support those who suffer from the shift the workers of course also some of the patients that have vested interests in call.

UN Emmanuel Shin China Secretary General Antonio Guti Charlotte Howard Paris Europe Asia America Cole India
2 dead, 2 injured after shooting, crash in Lawndale, Chicago

WGN Programming

00:36 sec | 19 hrs ago

2 dead, 2 injured after shooting, crash in Lawndale, Chicago

"Two people were killed in two hospitalized after shooting and car crash in the Lawndale neighborhood. It happened in the 4300 block of West Roosevelt. Police say shots were fired from inside a Chevy at a white Kia. Care crashed into a pole. Two occupants of that car. A 21 year old woman in a 23 old man died but it's not clear if they were killed by the crash with shooting 25 year old woman is in critical condition with a bullet wound in injuries from that crash, and a 25 year old man is a good condition with crash injuries. Chevy kept driving and smashed into another vehicle in the 5800 block. Please say four people got out of that Chevy and ran away known is in

West Roosevelt Chevy
COVID-19 relief bill gains support from lawmakers

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 19 hrs ago

COVID-19 relief bill gains support from lawmakers

"A bipartisan coronavirus relief bill in Congress is gaining more support from lawmakers and President elect Joe Biden. Democrats in the House and Senate describe the $908 billion aid package as a basis for negotiations. Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia help put the bill together. He believes most lawmakers now support it as the best option available. I'm giving it better than a 50% chance. I think I'm well over 50% moving to 60 or 70. This latest proposal includes more expanded unemployment benefits for those who've lost their jobs during the pandemic. But at $300 per week it's half the $600 benefit that expired in July. The top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell has so far been unwilling to shift his support beyond the $550 billion Republican a package

Senator Joe Manchin Joe Biden Senate Congress West Virginia House Mitch Mcconnell
U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Monocle 24: The Globalist

08:44 min | 22 hrs ago

U.K. becomes first country to approve Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

"The uk government appears to be trying to use the news that a covid vaccination has been licensed for use in this country to create good pr around brexit but england's health minister matt hancock who claimed fast tracking the pfizer vaccine was only possible because the uk was able to act outside of european union. Regulations has been firmly contradicted by the chief executive of the h. r. a. the body that handled the process. Well joint for more. On this by vincent mcilvanney. He's a political reporter and one of monocle twenty four regular contributors. Welcome back to the globalist vinnie. Can you tell us how. The story unfolded i. We had the great news that the vaccine had been licensed then matt. Hancock really dived into controversy. That's i think there was a genuine needle relief and celebration yesterday that the government made this announcement and they'd obviously planned this. Kathleen they have. The scientists going through detail televised press conference yesterday morning just to the public in very layman's terms. How the vaccine had been approved what it would do how it would be rolled out and then we have prime minister's questions where boris johnson and stone had a pretty friendly about They did simply questions about how the rollout would happen. it was. It was quite a public education session then in the afternoon the government seem to trip over itself They started to say. There was a bit of pushback from the germans at the brit. Saying that this was you know a real day for british signs that this was great for. They don't this and then. My ankle comments on braxton. Also jacob re smog sang we could only approved vaccine so quickly because we've left the eu last month we change regulations vaccine didn't need eu approval which has slower and this ready then lead them into problems because that has been debunked has been fact checked by various organizations to say that. That's not the case. It was actually permitted under eu law And that was the point. Made as you mentioned by the head of the ease at medicines regulator on wednesday that this states could act unilaterally and false tracking it. So it's very strange that they have tried to do something which shouldn't be political. Shouldn't be kind of you know doused in one camp or another particular when it comes to leave or remain when it comes to brexit which is still divisive issue here in the uk at a point where we still don't have a brexit deal and then negotiations are ongoing to try and sully it somewhat by putting it in minds of some of the public with brexit is not a good idea and as you say germany took exception to this. Yes they did. They perspective said quite rightly in this european achievements. And perhaps the british government's if they done this. I with the oxford astra zeneca vaccine something which we expect to happen in the next ten days or so then they could claim you know a real big moment for british science and claim that the own but to claim that this landlocked. Because you've fast track vaccine that was developed at the over. The you know in the comfort. And that's gonna be coming from. Belgium is a bit of a strange move by the government. This is the government absolutely desperate for some good news. We have the worst death figures in europe and yesterday was another six hundred forty will so debts in the previous twenty four hours we the west infection rates and so you know they are really desperate now to make sure that they can trump it some of these achievements as their own and i notice. Boris johnson appear to roll back a little bit when he was asked about it later and he talked about international efforts and really quite successfully dodged the question. Yes he did. i think he knows. And perhaps the scientists said got to them that you cannot tie this to to brexit something. That is incredibly divisive and that pass. It wasn't true you know. There's enough missing formation going on about of cave nineteen vaccines that. The government really shouldn't be contributing to it and this something that she came up pm cues and the prime minister sort of echoed that said labour had put out last month and m seems the government will be moving forward that there will be some kind of penalty and fines in put in place to stop the misinformation and the spreading of anti vaccine summation on social media and on the social media platforms themselves. Something that they will have to watch out for. We're waiting for details on that still but it's not a good idea that the government would be putting out false information itself on that same day. Of course this isn't the kind of stuff damaging stuff that we're seeing spreading conspiracies about what the vaccine will do to you. But it's still doesn't help you sell your message somewhat. Absolutely i mean this. I suppose was an attempt just to trumpet. britney's truly global. Yes to trumpet global britain. Something that trying to do. It's also you know the final few days really off. The brexit negotiations going on central london images lost night if boxes and boxes of pizza being delivered to the negotiators so they won't see talking late into the night prisoners facing a real problem and i think part of why the government probably wants pasta quickly. Is that if by the end of this week. We don't have a deal. One becomes very unlikely and so at the end of this month. The uk will leave the european union now. All countries have struggled with their economies. Jerry the pandemic but imagine the double whammy in twenty twenty one of britain also suffering the effects of that no deal brexit. We know that it would be hugely detrimental to the economy and so britain than any country around the world needs to get its workforce vaccinated. Needs to have them feeling confident. Needs the well to think that this is a place that you can come and trade and do business in because it's safe and they need people back out there as much as possible working and so the vaccine really is so critical to be rolled out here to make sure that life can get back to as much as normal as possible because the economy is facing this double threat unlike any others around the well. The yes are repercussions in europe full brexit but not to the extent of the areas here in the uk. I mean the prime minister has warned that there may be logistical problems. Getting the vaccine out particularly to care homes. Yeah that's right. And i think we have to look at the separate vaccine. Say of the fis at biotech. One has very specific needs so has to be stored at just under minus seventy degrees centigrade and has a lifespan of about a month as well and so they don't want basically it cannot be moved again so we're getting the first eight hundred thousand off the forty million order coming from belgium in the next few days. Now that number you have to divide it by two. Because you need to inoculation say britain's ordered forty at that means twenty million people can be vaccinated and the clock is ticking to make the most of that investment in this vaccine to get it to the most critical people but because of the coach storage requirements. It seems that they're going to need to put it into key. Sentences rather than sending out in small batches perhaps to you know local pharmacy. Or a cabaret miss. They thought they would. So what will happen is it will go to places like hospitals where they have that cold storage than going to put it into centers so the nightingale hospitals that have been built and also places like sports stayed the emc. Say think as well in those kind of facilities and instead of bat say you have in town eight also cathodes instead of the vaccine going in small batches of the cabins because of these requirements on the storage. Because it doesn't like they moved too much you will instead means academy ten dis on trips to those senses to the hospital in order for them to get inoculated. Have to do that twice at intervals of two weeks. And after the second vaccine injection seven days later they will then be a not some killer's this they will then not be able to for the effects that there's a slight effects of the vaccine it's being described as a bit like hanging over by some participants in the study. But you will then be guarded against covid nineteen but they used the is one for the most critical people. Nhs staff a care home staff the most elderly in society those most at risk and they need to use as much as possible as quickly as possible at because then what i think will happen is the much cheaper and easier to store and distribute ox sudanic vaccine which is the one that britain has invested. Most in will be the one that most of the population gets

Brexit EU Matt Hancock Vincent Mcilvanney UK Boris Johnson Zeneca Britain Pfizer Braxton Hancock Kathleen British Government Matt England Stone Europe Oxford
Houston Rockets, Washington Wizards agree to Russell Westbrook-John Wall deal

Afternoons with Marcellus & Kelvin

02:08 min | 1 d ago

Houston Rockets, Washington Wizards agree to Russell Westbrook-John Wall deal

"But we do have a whoa bond and the wo- dam is we have a trade and we have houston agreeing to trade russell. Westbrook to the washington wizards for john wall. And a first round pick momo. What are your thoughts on the. That's an amazing. That's an amazing trade for the wizards still russell westbrook. You're talking about. That's still russell. Westbrook man like i'm i know. He didn't have the greatest year the second half of the year. He's really good. It's going to be reunited with scotty brooks. He was you know i voted him. Thirteen mile. mba last year just raced off his second half. I still think he can play to your point real quick before you finish it from january to march before the stoppage he was fan freaking tastic. Yeah i mean us. Great and i think that they. They didn't give any first round picks. Get to get off that contract. The say they had to get to give one for trump. Pick just one of the wizards right just to get off the john walsh. John hasn't played in two years I mean no more recent. Yeah i mean you know in two years doesn't really want to be there doesn't get along with bradley beal. You've just got off of massive problem if you're washington for the low low price of a first round pick and you get russell westbrook and return to play for the for the coach. He's had the best relationship with i mean for washington. It makes all the sense in the world. I'm looking at houston going west to plan your me to blow out your doors and kick out your gm and your coach. You have a plan right. Yeah did you see a player. No i think that the plan will reveal itself. The plan is now either repair. Your relationship with james harden hope that he and john wall workout or your trading hardin next.

Westbrook Scotty Brooks Russell Westbrook Russell Wizards John Wall Washington Wizards Houston Bradley Beal John Walsh Washington John GM James Harden Hardin
NFL Week 13 picks: How far can the Saints go with Taysom Hill?

The Phinsider

01:40 min | 1 d ago

NFL Week 13 picks: How far can the Saints go with Taysom Hill?

"Next game is the new orleans. Saints in the atlanta falcons saints favored by three I will take the falcons in this game with three points at home. I will take the saints this. Because i think the falcons aren't as good as they looked yest- last week agreed. Alright los angeles rams favored by three at the arizona cardinals I like the cardinals getting those three points I don't know if it's the shoulder. What murray does not look right. The cardinals are kind of looking. We're all of the this. The division games in this in this in the nfc west are always bizarre. I'll take the rams. I'll give the three and take the rams i'll right next. Game is new york giants plus ten at seattle I think we both seattle in this one. Giants are playing better of late. I think there may be the front runner in that division but the the seahawks are A much better team here. Yes if they would be winning the nfc east they were in it. Yeah New england patriots Against the los angeles chargers. The team. That i i like how you build this bowl. The team that should lose versus the team. That should win the team. That should lose but doesn't as often versus the team. That should win but never wins. I phrased it better. But that's the think you did as well. What do you want to go ahead and give it a shot. No now i who knows what it is but yeah the chart. The chargers can't win can't win games. They should and the stupid patriots. You know they they win games. They shouldn't

Rams Falcons Saints Cardinals Atlanta Falcons Arizona Cardinals Giants New Orleans Seattle Murray Los Angeles Seahawks Los Angeles Chargers NFC Patriots New York New England
Iran's president opposes bill that would boost enrichment

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 d ago

Iran's president opposes bill that would boost enrichment

"He opposes a bill to suspend U. N inspections and boost uranium enrichment. The tough of war over the bill, which gained momentum after the killing of a prominent Iranian nuclear scientists last month, reflects the rivalry between Ronnie a relative, moderate aunt, hardline lawmakers. Who dominated the parliament on favor a more confrontational approach to the West. Speaking at a Cabinet meeting, Rouhani said his administration does not agree with the bill and considers it harmful for the trend of diplomatic activities. He implied the lawmakers are positioning themselves ahead of elections planned for June. I'm Charles Villa Desmond, the Transportation Department says. When it comes to air

Rouhani Ronnie Cabinet Charles Villa Desmond Transportation Department
U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

KYW 24 Hour News

00:58 sec | 1 d ago

U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

"Just just became became the the first first country country to to authorize authorize the the Fizer Fizer covet covet 19 19 vaccine vaccine for for emergency emergency use. Now can what abused him? A menace has more on the timeline for distribution there and what the status is here in the U. S. U K Health Secretary Matt Handcock, in an interview with the BBC says they're ready to move things along and get people vaccinated very soon from next week. We'll be able to start rolling this out, will start with those who are most vulnerable toe coronavirus. That means those in nursing homes, long term care facilities and health care workers would be the first people not in clinical trials to get their shots, and that type of rollout could happen here in the U. S as well. After a CDC advisory panel made similar recommendations yesterday. Ultimately, it's up to the states on how to handle distribution, but first the FDA needs to give the go ahead which may come after an independent advisory board meets to discuss emergency use authorization of the Fizer vaccine on December 10th Tim

Matt Handcock BBC U. CDC FDA
Putin orders 'large-scale' COVID-19 vaccination in Russia

KYW 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Putin orders 'large-scale' COVID-19 vaccination in Russia

"Vladimir Putin has ordered the start of a large scale vaccination of doctors and teachers against the coronavirus. Late next week with the Sputnik V jab, which has yet to complete advanced studies needed to ensure its effectiveness and safety. Putin's statement today came hours after Britain became the first country in the West to authorize the use of a covert 19 vaccine from U. S drugmaker Fizer. Sputnik five, has been touted in Russia as the world's first registered cove it 19 vaccine after it received regulatory approval in early August, But the move drew considerable criticism from experts. Because at the time the shots had only been tested on several dozen people. It's

Vladimir Putin Putin Britain Russia
U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

Dennis Prager

00:40 sec | 1 d ago

U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

"Meanwhile, the U. K is approved visors Cupid vaccine for emergency distribution becoming the first nation in the west to do so. Correspondent Bernie Bennett with the UPDATE Britain gave emergency approval Wednesday defies his American developed Corona virus vaccine leaping ahead of the United States to become the first Western country to allow its health service to begin mass inoculations against a disease that has killed more than 1.4 million people worldwide. Their approval kicks off a vaccination campaign with little president in modern medicine. Encompassing not only ultra cold ice and trays of glass vials but also crusade against anti vaccine misinformation for each person in Britain, the government has brought more than five doses of catalog of different vaccines.

Bernie Bennett Britain United States Government
Iran's president opposes bill that would boost enrichment

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 1 d ago

Iran's president opposes bill that would boost enrichment

"Iran's president Hassan Rouhani says he's opposed to a bill approved by the Iranian parliament to suspend U. N. inspections and boost Iranian in Richmond saying it would be harmful to diplomatic efforts the type of war over the bill which gained momentum after the killing of a prominent Iranian nuclear scientists last month reflects the rivalry between Rouhani a relative moderate and hardline lawmakers who dominated the parliament in favor of a more confrontational approach to the west speaking at a cabinet meeting we want he said his administration does not agree with the bill and considers it home full for the trend of diplomatic activities he implied lawmakers are positioning themselves ahead of elections planned for June I'm Charles the live as much

Hassan Rouhani Iranian Parliament Rouhani Iran Richmond Parliament
UN: 20,000 foreign fighters in Libya are a 'serious crisis'

Rush Limbaugh

00:18 sec | 1 d ago

UN: 20,000 foreign fighters in Libya are a 'serious crisis'

"The top U. N official for Libya says there are at least 20,000 foreign fighters and mercenaries in the country and warned of a serious crisis as weapons continue pouring in. Libya is split east to west between two rival administration's each backed by an array of militias and foreign powers.

Libya U.
U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

Dennis Prager

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the West

"Visor and bile in tech say they've won permission for emergency use of their covert 19 vaccine in Britain. World's first coronavirus shot that's backed by rigorous science correspondent Charles Dillon. Asthma reports. The Green Light allows Britain to become one of the first countries to begin vaccinating its population as it tries to curb Europe's deadliest outbreak, the Department of Health and Social Care says in a statement. The vaccine will be made available across Britain from next week. Other countries aren't far behind. The regulators in the U. S. And the EU are also getting the Fizer shop along with a similar vaccine made by competitive Madonna. British regulators also considering another shot made by AstraZeneca, on Oxford University,

Charles Dillon Britain Department Of Health And Socia Asthma U. S. Fizer Shop Europe EU Madonna Astrazeneca Oxford University
U.K. Grants Emergency Authorization For Covid-19 Vaccine

WSJ What's News

04:55 min | 1 d ago

U.K. Grants Emergency Authorization For Covid-19 Vaccine

"As we told you earlier. Britain is the first nation in the west to grant emergency use authorization for a covid nineteen vaccine ahead of the us and the eu clearing a shot jointly developed by pfizer the us and biontech of germany. It's expected to be distributed in limited numbers within days. The decision is of interest far beyond its borders. Let's bring in london based reporter. Jenny strasbourg jenny. Good morning good morning. Thank you mark jennings. Let's break down the news itself. What does authorization by the uk. Government mean and. How does this compare to. It's currently happening in the united states so the uk and it's pretty brexit transition period has taken the power it has to basically say look. We authorize this for emergency use. There's a pandemic we don't need to wait for the eu medicines regulator. We're going to do this ourselves. And we're not gonna wait for the european regulators to decide so this is not going to be the last authorization we're going to hear about. We're likely there's a lot happening in the in the us. With the fda in europe with the european medicines agency that oversees similar authorizations of medicines across europe. They've got hearings public hearings in the us and in europe coming up in december to discuss this and we could see more of these such decisions before the end of the year with that said distribution will begin immediately correct. The uk government is saying this morning that they expect to start putting shots in arms next week and so the uk has prioritised people. You know this is a bit morbid. But it make sense. According to essentially their vulnerability to dying so they've said look people in care homes the people who care for them who also could carry the virus to the folks in care homes. They'll be first and then you've got frontline. Healthcare workers the nhl of the uk. A the people who are caring for people on hospitals and then people over eighty nine groups that the work through. And you know there's only going to be so much vaccine to go around but they are going to move. You can be sure that the uk will move as quickly as possible. Will this decision influence or even perhaps speed up the process in the united states. You know our headline is uk. I right this is the first time. A western nation has granted emergency use. The uk government is saying eight hundred. Thousand shots will start rolling out next week. There's going to be major coverage of people in uk care homes and you know the workers caring for people the most vulnerable getting shots. You can imagine that's going to have an impact on a world devastated by this pandemic but you know in fairness like the regulators in the us and in europe have been moving very quickly. Like i don't want to portray this as like a competition among regulators. I think we need to keep in mind that they're all trying to uphold the standards of safety. Make sure this vaccine is effective. Make sure that manufacturing is up to quality standards and keep in mind. There's different manufacturing happening around the world. It's not a simple thing to make. A messenger are a vaccine. It's actually quite difficult task. And finally jenny. You've covered a lot of this from the start. What are the unknowns. What are the questions that you're still asking. You know how long until vaccines will will bring some greater sense of normalcy to our world and you know this is just the start. I think people need to keep in mind that we're not gonna just immediately stop wearing masks and needing to distance needing to take care of each other. This is just the start of a long process. The you know there are a lot of questions about like how long immunity lasts and how long the impact on the human immune system lasts from a vaccine. I think all of us wanna know the whole herd immunity. Will this help us be able to hug each other. What mean that people can see their loved. Ones can get on planes. Feel a little safer. It's gonna take time and also frankly developing nations and poor countries. I mean this. This is a complicated vaccine to store it. Long periods of time the requires very cold temperatures. You know the hope is that there won't be a division between rich and poor countries and that we can take care of the entire world and not just the was countries

UK United States Jenny Strasbourg Jenny Mark Jennings Europe EU European Medicines Agency Pfizer Britain Germany FDA London NHL Jenny Cold
Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

Too Many Podcasts!

06:49 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

"Welcome to many podcasts. The podcast about podcasts. Now podcasting from the sherpa chalet on matt podcast era. He's your host jim. The podcast shah rebels in too. Many podcasts the podcast about podcasts. And so much more. You know who you're listening to right. Seen five me. Jim the podcast sherpa bringing you another wonderful interview. And i think you're really gonna like my guest today. Who's out guest today. show pa. He was a lot of fun to talk to. His name is michael sped. And many times that i get his name wrong in the interview. He told me what the name is that he uses for his podcast. And that is the name. Obviously us and i misheard him and hello sherpa. These name was right on the little zoom screen. I could've just read it right there but we were just talking and having so fun. I wasn't paying attention to the name on the little corner. Zoom screen play. It happens but michael is such a great guy. We're actually close in age. And he said it was fun talking to someone who was close in age because he was making references that i understood and to return the favor i actually appeared on his podcast called foul players radio. And you got to check that out. That's a lotta fun on that. Show mike a great guy had a super time on his show. And i think he had some fun over here to didn't even have to make him pay to come on it or anything like that. He did it absolutely free. Free didn't charge them a dime. If you want to listen to michael's free interview on this show how to listen. Hello rebels i send something foul. No it's mike stagnant from foul players. Radio is my guest. He's a musician. A podcast an actor and we're gonna be talking about his career so we can get to know him so you guys might want to check out his podcast you mike. Welcome to the sheriff. La it's great to be here with you tonight. greeting from maryland. All the way up to long island great to talk income. I appreciate you having me having pleasure to have you here sir. I always like to start off by asking. I guess to tell a little bit about themselves. So if you can k- Right now i'm the host of foul players radio. That's f o w l like the bird It's named after my murder. Mystery company called the foul players of perryville. Perryville is where. I live in maryland. Were about fifty miles northeast of baltimore. The reason why we make that ton or whatever you would say it would be for. Foul is because The town i live in is right on the susquehanna river which is known for its multiple species of waterfowl people. They have actual waterfowl museums ear to talk about that stuff so we figured it'd be a nice play on words for foul play my head. The murder mystery company for a couple of years. Now we perform on boats and on trains office parties and vineyards and whoever have us. I also am a musician. I right now have an acoustic duo. That i've had for about fifteen years and we're kind of comedy act sort of similar to the smothers brothers. It's two of us. We play acoustic guitars and the humor isn't as much when with the banter between us as it is with the humor's actually in songs so that's called. The uncle moldy show. And we perform a in the maryland area a wide knob sometimes in pennsylvania to most recently. You may know me as the viking. And the jim what worth commercials while riding around on the bus. I was the big viking. That came out of the back You've also seen me this year on kimmy versus the reverend if you haven't seen that movie it's based on the unbreakable kimmy schmidt and it's there's a scene where kimmy and tight us. The two main characters are way out in the country and they come into a bar. There's a leonard skinner ban. they're playing. And i'm the bartender in there. I won't give away the movie. But it's an interactive movie but no matter what choices you make in the movie. You always get to see me. So that's the good part about it. You know it's it's not like that movie revolved around me or anything like that We have been nominated nominated for a couple of emmys I believe it was for best special perhaps and then Titus burgess has been nominated for an emmy for male performance. I believe as well. I'm excited about that. I'm also appeared on gotham. I wish unseasoned. Five episode eight played one of the penguins henchman named dale. I was shot to death in the third scene. I was in. And i've also done a number of discovery. Id shows and some mom commercials down here in maryland. When i was starting out and everything. I'm also years ago. I was in the hair bands of the eighties. I had a big hairband back. In those days. I had a band that was kind of more like the call to little bit. After that when the hairband started going out we were called orange seed parade we played. Cbgb's in new york a number of times. And you know open for a couple of national acts over the years. So yes so. That's me in a nutshell so we can get a little more specific if you like Depending well you know the first thing that you said that caught my ear was the susquehanna river and i was thinking of that old. Avidan castillo routine about the susquehanna company. All right right squad at company there may have been years ago but the majority of there's only a couple of miles of the susquehanna bets in maryland and it actually goes all the way up to near upstate new york so there could be something on the way you know that river goes through lancaster and harrisburg and it goes quite a ways up. I believe almost up to upstate. New york if it doesn't start up there somewhere along the line. I'm sure there was and with your murder mystery troop you. You're an actor in the troupe. Right yes i am. Yeah okay so basically your book like for parties and stuff like that and there's someone who's been killed in they have to figure out if it's you or one of your co stars did it. Yeah yeah exactly. Exactly exac- i'm normally the detective and the host i'm normally the host and the narrator at the beginning and i have a row i have roster i would save about fifteen or twenty really good actors from this area here and we we kind of rotate. We were on trains. One of our biggest clients is the western maryland. Scenic railroad all. the way out and cumberland. That's all the way out. The panhandle of maryland out west year west virginia. But we also do the pride of or not the pride of the susquehanna we do. The black eyed susan riverboat. We do Slate form brewery. We do some microbreweries. Mount felix winery a lot of the tasting rooms where they have events and trains and boats and office parties corporate events. Whoever will have us

Maryland Michael Mike Kimmy Susquehanna River Kimmy Schmidt Leonard Skinner Perryville Titus Burgess PA JIM Baltimore Avidan Castillo LA The Susquehanna Company Emmys Pennsylvania Emmy
Body of missing Instagram influencer Alexis Sharkey found on Houston roadside, authorities say

Sean Hannity

00:28 sec | 2 d ago

Body of missing Instagram influencer Alexis Sharkey found on Houston roadside, authorities say

"Social media. Influencer say they're certain foul play was involved in her mysterious death. Alexis Sharkey's mother, Stacy, Robin all says her she believes in her gut. The 26 year old was murdered over the Thanksgiving weekend, but doesn't understand why a friend reportedly claimed Sharkey had expressed fear for her life during a recent trip to West Texas. Nude body was discovered Saturday in the side of a West Houston road. Police say there were no visible injuries. Five Houston

Alexis Sharkey Stacy Robin Sharkey West Texas Houston
"american west" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

07:52 min | 3 months ago

"american west" Discussed on Post Reports

"So the person who's at the center of this Whistle Blower Complaint Brian Murphy remind me who exactly is sky. So Murphy, is a former FBI agent who until recently ran the intelligence office at dhs he was removed from that post following reports that we broke that his office was compiling intelligence reports on tweets by journalists who were covering the protests, and this sparked outrage from both political ends of the spectrum and he was removed by the secretary of the department over this. Now, Murphy's allegations have raised a lot. Of concern among people who know him and who have worked with him who say these are valid legitimate things to worry about. But Murphy is a flawed Messenger. He has a long history of being as they describe it hotheaded going his own way defying his boss's instructions a kind of self righteous streak as how they describe it. There have been people who say that the morale in his office has been. Very low that he's a poor manager and he was essentially fired over the work that his office was doing. That was arguably inappropriate. So I think that you have to take that into account when you read this document that you could fairly read as score-settling potentially in some way, he has an axe to grind ready he an ax to grind that doesn't mean his claims can't be verified they are so. Specific he brought receipts essentially that in investigator will be able to go verify whether these are well-founded or whether they're off base but he's aired these allegations they've been made public. He's taking the fight public. He has a lawyer so you gotta think about his motive but at the same time, he's laid the facts out there and they can't be verified when he says abuse of power what does that mean? What he says is that these officials have systematically on many occasions. Try to put their thumb on the scale and pressure his intelligence office to write reports. That don't actually comport with the facts and to do that in order to politically assist president trump. To assist him with countering narratives, that Russia is trying to interfere in the election. This official Brian Murphy alleges that he was pressured to inflate the number of suspected terrorists crossing the border with Mexico in help bolster the president's case to build a border wall with Mexico and he also says that during the recent protests. In Portland Oregon over police violence and racial injustice that he was told to essentially amp up the language about Antifa anti-fascist left groups and their presence in these protests in a way that he thought did not comport with reality. But of course would have handed president trump a potentially useful talking point as he tries to push responsibility for those protests onto the far left and to. Link importantly, Joe Biden to such groups and according to what this whistleblower Brian Murphy is saying when it was communicated to him that he was supposed to either obscure the things that his intelligence department was finding or to kind of amp up the language about certain things how explicit was it that you know you need to do this because it's going to make the president look better. In one case he was actually told he says by acting secretary for Wins, Kirti Chad, Wolf to stop compiling reports about Russian election interference because it would make the president look bad. So he was explicitly told there he says that these reports are unflattering to the president and we don't want to do them in another instance. He says that he was also told to essentially back off reporting on. Russia at the direction of Robert O'Brien the White House national security, council something O'Brien has denied to us so he says. That there is a explicit link to the president in some cases and in others I think it was yes he describes the trust subtler. It was understood that the president was out there talking for instance about Antifa and the far left as being behind all of the protests and at the same time, he's being told to modify the language in intelligence reports about those protests and is there an indication that this was even more widespread than just things that were told to this one Guy Brian Murphy in his office. I think so in so far as I've talked to other sources who are familiar with what goes on in the intelligence office and they have told me, they've also felt pressure coming down from the top I. think it probably is to their minds filtering down through Brian Murphy, who is their boss, but Murphy is saying it's coming up from above him and we also seen instances in another agency the Office of the Director of National Intelligence put out. A statement recently about foreign election interference in which it talked about Russia but also China and Iran as interfering in the elections and this prompted rebukes from Democratic lawmakers who said, look your statements are, how could they look like they're equating the activities of these three countries and that by doing that you're minimizing the far more severe and active role that Russia is playing trying to hurt Joe Biden China in Iran or kind of in their own categories. In interference, but it's qualitatively and quantitatively different. So those allegations that characterization that the DNA is office is sort of blurring the lines in a way to dilute the importance of the Russia's story that does track with what Brian Murphy says was going on at the Homeland Security. Department where his bosses to were trying to get him to downplay the Russia threat and in one instance told him to start paying more attention to China and Iran and tell me more about what we're hearing now about those threats from Russia and how they're trying to influence the election especially when it comes to things like melon voting. So I, guess it would put the threat from Russia kind of in two buckets. One is the the propaganda bucket that is more being spread on social media than through kind of more traditional media channels. So there we've got you know Russian twitter accounts, for instance, like or fake accounts that are being run experts think by by people in Russia that are you know spreading disinformation hosting about? Divisive topics, turning people against each other. You know basically being menacing the way they were in two thousand sixteen. Then there's also been documented cases of Russian media sources picking up either fake stories or stories that kind to have a kernel of truth and then blowing them out of proportion. So there was this really interesting example for instance of a video of a protester in. Portland burning a Bible. And this kind of got picked up and went viral in American media will experts have traced it back and found actually some of its origins were that it was being pumped up on Russian news platforms and then kind of trickling out from there to make it sound like it was a story about protesters, plural burning, lots of bibles in Portland when in reality it was one protester burning bibles there's that amplification. The second bucket though is what I would think of as more direct kind of targeting and disinformation. So there what we've seen this has been documented both in our reporting at the post in confirmed by the director of National Intelligence, the Russians have been trying to get derogatory information often false and misleading information about Joe Biden and his son hunter. Biden in his business dealings in Ukraine into the US Congress. They've been actually building up dossiers at information and through a intermediary, the intelligence office things handing out to Republican, staffers on the Hill and particularly one us. Senator Ron. Johnson we. But I feel like this is all taking us back to the beginning of impeachment rate that lake the impeachment came from this alleged effort by the president to try to.

Brian Murphy president Russia Joe Biden Portland secretary Antifa Director of National Intellige National Intelligence Joe Biden China FBI Robert O'Brien Oregon investigator US Congress Senator Ron Ukraine Iran
"american west" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

08:12 min | 3 months ago

"american west" Discussed on Post Reports

"From the newsroom up to Washington coast. Robert Samuels from the Washington, post Sarah Kaplan Hi. This is. With the, Washington. Post reports. I'm. Martine. Powers. Thursday September tenth. Today wife fires are raging everywhere at once how the government is handling. Russian. Threats to the election and controversy around. So for the past few days in San Francisco and the Greater Bay area we've been going through a cycle of smokey as days where you can't go outside brief windows. We can go out and get a breath of fresh air usually at the beach and then everybody woke up and it was much much difference. It was orange it looks like Mars, it was dark it was depressing. That's Heather Kelly. She's a reporter for the post based in San Francisco? We're in the middle of this record setting wildfire season, and it's actually just the beginning of wildfire season. There are fires above below and to the east of San Francisco the up in Oregon and Washington. A lot of it started when there was a lightning storm about two weeks ago and it's just been nonstop since it doesn't smell as much smoke as it has before a lot of the smoke is high enough above the city that you're not really inhaling too much of it and the air quality sensors say it's pretty decent outside. But as soon as you go outside of your door. You'll notice it's almost snowing and little pieces of ash drifting down from the sky landing on all the surfaces which really adds to the surreal quality of of the sort of doomsday coloring. Usually when you can smell smoke in San Francisco, you know exactly which fire coming from. But at this point, there's no place there isn't a fire or no place. There is smoke and it's just blanketing the entire coast especially in the north. and. We're not sure exactly when it's going to stop or if the fires and keep starting and being put out. One of the interesting things about this all happening at once is just the overlapping. The pandemic, the heat wave, the lightning storms, the fires, the smoke it it's just sort of hammering home the reality of climate change in a way that pastures really haven't for all of California and some other states as well and I think that's that's really what's top of mind for most people here is that The effects of climate change are immediate and they're happening and they're not theoretical. They're not things going up degree every year and sort of a sense of panic and urgency among people in California. The extent of the fires that we're seeing right now is something that's very difficult to imagine. It is the entire distance essentially from the US border with Canada in Washington state. To the US border with Mexico in southern California that entire expenses affected? To some extent. I'm Andrew Friedman. I'm the deputy weather editor at The Washington Post. The fires that we're seeing have some smaller. These are distinct fires in many of these places. They are all however having exhibited what's known as extreme fire behavior. Is when a fire moves incredibly rapidly has fire associated thunderstorm with it manufacturers its own weather. We had one fire that moved a distance of twenty five miles in less than twenty four hours supersede multiple large expansive, rapidly growing fires. I think a lot of have seen photos coming from the west coast of what it's like there. Right now, images that look they're out of blade runner or some apocalyptic. The skies red and everything is dark and creepy What is it like for people who are living through this right? Now I think that it is absolutely surreal. The people that I have talked to have said that you know bizarre things like the birds failed to wake up in San, Francisco yesterday one person that we heard from him is Ken Kirkland. I am the owner of the Willie Egg ranch in Sausalito California. we have five hundred chickens. Twenty ducks. Couple Packers, sheep barn cats basically it's a family farm. She had had this eerie experienced where their production was set at only way down. Because of the lack of Sun on Wednesday in particular, we've had fires and we'd smelt smoke at the ranch for basically the last three weeks the last two days. However, the sky is been very strange. It's probably something like what the dinosaurs were looking at after the meteor hit It was all orange and then the animals very subdued right now normally when we go to open first thing you here's the roosters because they start moving around making noise. About a half hour before sunrise and this morning was. Silent. Five hundred birds makes quite a bit of noise and today. It was quiet pretty much the whole day. sheep didn't cry to get fed. The chickens aren't squawking at all. There's no roosters making any sound right now either so it's it's very it's so quiet on a farm street lights stayed on there were very weak winds over the San Francisco Bay area aloft. So that smoke just kind of accumulated to the point where it was absorbing and scattering all the incoming solar radiation that the thing is is last week we had little bits of the white ash rain but like the last two days, it's been this grey because we get like right now it feels wet. It's like bog real thick San, Francisco fog you can hear the foghorns out of the. Out of the. But it's got stuff in it it's this nasty black gray stuff which I'm assuming is all ash particulates from the fires. At least on Wednesday. There wasn't a section of the state that was really unaffected by this and by an air quality alert of some sort. But then when it comes to people whose lives are actually in danger because they are so close to these fires, how many people have been affected by that? How many people have evacuated? How many homes have been destroyed so far? He asked a rate now we know that the toll is going to rise through the thousands in terms of structures destroyed. we know at least thousand homes have been lost in one town in Oregon. Lives, the toll we don't know yet where at a about seven right now, and that's can arise unfortunately throughout the day the governor of Oregon essentially came out and prepared her state for bad news multiple smaller fires continue to erupt across the state adding to this crisis. and. Unfortunately, we are not getting any relief from the weather conditions. She said that she expected this to be the deadliest and most destructive wildfire event in state history. And she said you know get ready to brace herself for coming. They have found people who died trying to escape the flames in a couple of instances in California Oregon and Washington. So really, we don't know yet what the full impacts are. We do know that tens of thousands of people had to flee. With very short notice and in the middle of the COVID. Outbreaks. This is not something that you would like to do is flee uncharted this not.

San Francisco Washington California Francisco Oregon San Francisco Bay Robert Samuels US Martine Sarah Kaplan Andrew Friedman Washington state San Heather Kelly Packers weather editor reporter COVID
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Branch were coming up on the clock here and i i guess i just ask you how this experience reporting on this family this way of life this this part of the world impacted you what was the story like for you getting to know these people so intimately i mean these people are as humbles any people i've ever been around there's hardworking and tough as people have been around i cover a lot of professional athletes there's nobody tougher than rodeo athlete in in many ways as tough as a rancher take the days as they come in i'm getting ready to fly back to california this afternoon fly right over the top of this country and it will look totally empty but if you go and look into spaces in the spaces between they say you'll find many many people living this way and trying to make a go of it here in the twenty century and what's the lesson the takeaway as far as you know sort of broader broader cultural context the question about federal land about urban about tourism drought all of these things that are changing and transforming this way of life and frankly the land itself i think the people like the rights have to figure it out and so a lot of people have you know organization lot of people have had their kids to go to the big city and get into jobs and way of life that farm sort of dries up and goes away you drive around the west and you see many many towns that you can just picture once vibrant there's the beautiful brick post office in the banks in general store that are now boarded up and nothing but a dot on the map anymore those places are going away people like the.

california twenty century
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yeah just calling to say i'm a twenty five year old farmer rancher and be a farmer rancher in south dakota most of us in my age we have to go out and we still have to pursue other careers outside of the farming ranching to make ends meet what do you do besides farming dylan i'm actually a small business owner due manufacturing a recall the repairs detractors equipment and i sell steel and do welding so just to stave financially viable john branch there's still in in south dakota can't just farm kansas ranch it's it's hard and becoming harder it's becoming harder for reasons you mentioned it at the top things like even climate change in the drought the drought has has thrown off to feed which is which is throwing two cycles of the cows so things are less predictable than the even worse few years ago know the things with the federal lands you have permits and they get renewed every once in a while and the worries are how many animals will they say i can put on it next time it gets renewed maybe i can put one hundred animals on it now but they're gonna come back and say okay now it's only fifty now what do i do so there's a lot of unease about that and it's specially true in the west in places like where they are in southwest utah where there's a lot of pressure to either conserve the land or to open it up even further to recreation and so there's kind of this ben diagram of who gets to use the land.

south dakota business owner utah kansas twenty five year
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi jane i'm native of west texas and i have repented patchy and early there hanover ranching heritage from texas and i grew up close to the fourth six ranch near lubbock and i'm always curious at the ranching families when they're talking about struggling to hold onto their public grazing rights and being rearranged by public land disputes if they ever consider the indigenous people that were displaced from the land that their family has had for so many generations have now they're going through those struggles do they consider that do they talk about the indigenous people that's a good question thank you john branch not a conversation with the rights i mean certainly mormon history has a lot to do with it in that area there were a lot of very famous in horrible episodes when they'd of americans when the mormons arrived dislike win a lot of people ride from the west european settlers you know she brings up a good point and i don't know you know it's like anything else it's like you know should cody right who we just had on the phone is he responsible for somehow fixing the ills of what happened under and fifty years ago or hundred years ago this book doesn't explore that this is not a historic history book it's a story of today and i think these people are living very much in the moment yeah i think i'll leave it at that here's still in switch south dakota hi dylan welcome to the program hi jane.

jane lubbock john branch texas cody hundred years fifty years
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Reporter at heart for the new york times put that into broader cultural context for us in really for certain population rodeos in rodeo wing somewhat like nascar i would suspect right it is a little bit you know it's like any sport you just didn't really realize exists could be like you know gaming for example video gaming let's play a lot of people don't realize that there are sell out reno's filled with kids video gaming and watching this and and how many millions of people are viewing this online it's just a niche world that until you kind of dip into it you wouldn't even know happens and especially if you don't live in the west you may not realize this world still exists and it's all it's glory and older nostalgia that we've wrapped around it still happens now is going to keep happening that's the great question as your as your listener pointed out to rad's i point i wonder if you lose ranching and you lose this way of life i mean it seems so much part of our american identity are american ethos you know i mean are we gonna lose something valuable to our sense of selves if that goes away yeah you do wonder just part of our culture you know for all its warts or whatever you know you go overseas and people ask you know any cowboys you know they're still a cowboy mystique about about america about the american west there's still something to be said about when you see a person in in a cowboy hat certainly over popular culture in the last sixty eight years the american west has been a huge theme and maybe it's fading a little bit but now you see things like this book and the movie that you mentioned the writer maybe there's a little bit of nostalgia for it or at least maybe we're at least trying to sort of pencil in a little bit like this is the world as it stands now you guys are are somewhat familiar with the world because of of the cultural pop culture references throughout our lifetimes and now here we are at this moment in which ways attorney here's may in nashville tennessee i may welcome to one point.

Reporter new york times nascar reno rad writer attorney nashville america tennessee sixty eight years
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Cattle grazing has on natural bio diversity and i wonder are we at a point this is my question author are we had a point where you know really a historical ranching way of life is something that doesn't really fit in with our modern society in modern values is really the perpetuation of that lifestyle something that of course the people have been doing it for a hundred and fifty years might love to do and any of us who had an opportunity to just be a part of it by the magic could be attracted to but is it is it really time for it to fade off into the sunset interesting question read thank you john branch does a great question which is kinda of to the title of the book itself the last cowboys i i do wonder and i wonder now more than ever as drive around the west and he sees along these two lane roads and these bar boyer joint ranges with nobody on them except for maybe a few cattle and maybe a few horsemen view cowboys work in the working the cattle you do wonder if one hundred years from now fifty years from now thirty years from now we will still have this kind of ranching operations will be overseas will somehow our food supply change to to sort render these obsolete the does feel like it's something that's fading it's interesting for example though when you talk about the niches i mean he's he's always been a lot of time in montana you go places in the west and you see these kind of ranchers in ranches all over the place rodeo still has i think that the pro rodeo cowboys association the pr ca there are still six hundred or seven hundred rodeos every year so for people that think this is dying i think what's happened a little bit is that it is perhaps fading but also think it's sort of lost its place in popular culture and so people aren't quite aware of just how many thousands tens of thousands of million people are very deeply involved in this work and how many rodeos are still going on every weekend the west really a sport.

montana john branch fifty years one hundred years thirty years
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"The federal government that's still considered sort of the middle of the road yeah yeah it's interesting because where they are you know the family has about twelve hundred acres which sounds like a ton and it looks like a ton when you're standing on it except for when you see it and sort of the scale of all the rest of the land and then they leased the rest which is about twenty thousand acres mostly from the bureau landmanagement and that does you're right sounds like a ton and it goes to the horizon but in that area there isn't a lot of of plant growth it is too high desert you know if this was someplace where it was just nothing but lush grass you would need twenty thousand acres to feed these cattle but these cattle need a lot of room to spread out because there just isn't a lot of stuff to eat there let's get elissa here she's calling from detroit michigan to join the conversation welcome to the program alissa thank you hi how are you doing well go ahead please well i just wanted to add i grew up on summers working on my grandparents cattle ranch in texas and they had a place in north central texas and they ran a couple hundred head of cattle or few hundred headed cattle and every summer i would go and help with roundups and branding and castrating and dehorning and all those things and it was just kind of part of my life i live in detroit now not connected with that but it was just you know it's no longer at working cattle ranch the the land was sold off but for about a hundred and fifty years it was the bachelorette m my midnight covered about four different ranches all over texans melissa thank you so much for the call you know as elissa was talking john branch i'm thinking.

federal government elissa detroit texas john branch michigan twenty thousand acres twelve hundred acres fifty years
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"World closing in a little bit and he's on his beautiful little island and he wants to grow this so his big dilemma is how do i grow this and keep this land where we've been doing this one hundred fifty years do i need to sell this land and move someplace with more wide open spaces twenty two south dakota or something he has the the luxury in that he has boys that seem to be interested and that are successful in rodeo you don't you don't get rich in rodeo but certainly they make a very good living you also don't know how long road is gonna last 'cause the next reid might be your last but he has the advantage has boys that seem be willing to do this seem to be willing to pump in some money to the operation so he's trying to grow but he doesn't know exactly where and how he will grow and the wrenching life is changing for sure large and small ranches as i understand are doing pretty well but it's the medium size ones that are sort of getting left behind if you will talk a little bit about about that that's exactly right so you know the the typical mid size ranch they used to support an extended family those are kind of going away partly because of the pressures of the west partly because like everything else kind of get gobbled up by corporations so what we see is growth on the large end the kinds of places that have a thousand or more head of cattle and we see a little bit of growth on kind of the mom and pop let's have ten head just kind of our own fun what you don't see it's almost like the shrinking middleclass everywhere you don't see the the middle sized ranch operation which is exactly where the rights are and they need to try to get i think to the to the bigger end if it's truly going to support you know several of their of their kids and their families so as i understand it they lease quote close to twenty thousand acres from.

south dakota reid one hundred fifty years twenty thousand acres
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Beyond that there's the other rodeo sport with with bucking horses is bareback riding and that's as the name implies there is no saddle and the right still normally do that they have focused on the saddle bronc and the other one that gets a lot of attention is bull riding in the rights for the most part have all been bullriders as kids but there's a little insanity to bull riding and you don't get very many old yeah you don't see very many old bull riders and i think the rights were smart enough and bill right i think sorting steered his kids a little bit thinking if you wanted to want to do this long terms saddle bronc riding is probably the way to go it's very much more i described as much as more like poetry than chaos the other two seemed to be a lot more chaotic so rodeo and ranching you say are just quote the furniture of this story this real life story that the that the true story here the heart of it is about trying to keep a very unique way of life in an ever changing world elaborate on that for a minute before we go to break here yes certainly the you know i think we all have this image of the of the west berry nostalgia filled with install ya in sort of dripping and seppi tones and the rights and many people i think people would be surprised to know how many people are living this life still and trying to hang onto it but the west is changing in so many ways and just kind of surrounding them and the rights are figuring what are we going to do to build our future here and they have taken the approach that to build our future we're going to dig deep on the past and that's rodeo and ranching and we're gonna make it work we're just going to do harder we're gonna do better and make it happen we're talking with john branch pulitzer prize winning reporter of new york times about his new book the last cowboys and you can join the conversation are you drawn to the life of cowboy ranching of hurting out on the.

pulitzer prize reporter new york times john
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"They were there before the invention of the light bulb the telephone it's a car the airplane radio television it was before coca cola the player piano even barbed wire my boys will be the sixth generation to run cattle on this land bill said his mouth never open very far when he spoke and cody's boys will be the seventh smith mesa with a time capsule of stone sand and bill headed his way he would pass it onto another seven generations his long range plan was to build a heard big enough to support his children and their children and let them take it over if they wanted it but smith mesa was blessed and cursed by rugged beauty and increasing access ability like the rights themselves it's squatted at the intersection of the old and new west the time capsule was being unearthed developers were coming feds were circling conservationists were knocking land prices were rising bill was boxed in surrounded by federal end in some private parcels that he had gotten or that had gotten too expensive to plant a bunch of cows on the economics of his ambitions at smith mesa had stopped making sense bill it already had some offers some from developers looking to build on smith mesa and some from conservationists looking to protect it he had been out looking at other places bigger places that he could buy with the money from smith mesa places farther away from the encroaching world places like smith mesa used to be more and more he took cody with them.

cody smith mesa
"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This podcast and following message sponsored by college vine mentor selected from columbia rice brown and more help with sat scores college lists and the college at process college wine dot com from wbz boston and npr i'm jane clayson and this is on point picture the most beautiful vista honor than a family who has been tied to the land for generations that place that life is slipping away one family's determination to keep it alive brought pulitzer prize winning new york times writer john branch to southern utah from ranching to world class rodeo riders he chronicles the american west through the eyes of the right family this hour on point the last cowboys you can john join us on air or online do you know the american west the mythology the beauty the hardships are you a john branch fan and ready to take a ride with him on this journey john anytime at point radio dot org or on twitter and facebook and on point radio joining the sour from new york city is john branch he's a reporter for the new york times and in two thousand thirteen he won the pulitzer prize for feature writing for the story snowfall about a deadly avalanche in washington state his new book is the last cowboys a pioneer family in the new west john branch welcome to one point nice to have you thank you hygiene so take us to majestic southern utah and describe this landscape that surrounds the right family subsides i national park that's exactly right so if you go to diane national park and you stand outside the western boundary of it to the west is just wide open space you feel like you can see to the pacific ocean just nothing but desert in arroyo's and to the east is literally the walls of zion national park three thousand foot sands sandstone formations right at the border of their property there's a barbed wire fence at the base of those walls on one side zion national park on the other side is the property that the the right family runs catalan and who are their rights introduced us to a few of the main characters.

i national park diane national park washington new york facebook york times zion national park arroyo boston cowboys the new york times reporter twitter utah john branch writer pulitzer prize jane clayson
"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

"Mike hubs have learned a few things about baseball and so have i for example we have learned that baseball in genders loyalty that is enough able and it has come join what suffering i'm not talking about physical suffering only sprained ankles broken fingers and ribs the aborted slides and collisions at home plate i'm talking about the festering wounds in the so the loyalty that is nervous by loss a tensor that invades hope i have learned that a great an indispensable part of baseball consists in suffering to hell with the guinea of defeat there's a true agony in victory victory exacts a greater price many more games lost than one many many more more players consigned to oblivion than to fame we must fair victory for it is a country that we do not know it is to rain full of pits in stones it is a luxury we cannot afford this i have learned us amish me or sets you astonished god the fans the fans this offering is cute endemic exquisite for them loyalty is divine like merlin they all imprisoned in rings of air and the air is laden with a sense of peanuts cracker jack's out dolls in there oh they are blessed lot that pain is delicious that calls is bright and few times the destiny lies thanks for listening to what it takes from the academy of chief ment i'm ellis winkler.

Mike hubs baseball ellis winkler
"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

"And he would raise his arms and he would pray allowed to the rising sun i love to think of that man my father would watch from hiding full of fear and wholly or and i have seen that man so many times in my mind's eye and his faith is my faith i love to think of his investment in in the earth and in the sky and in the sun it means a great deal to me and i have predicated much of my life on that particular kind of reverence every day and appropriately dragonfly would reinvent the sacred i believe when i'm speaking to you young people particularly i believe that life should be fully and to the last moment and it should be relished and charles kuralt who is here and who is a brilliant storyteller in his book life on the road a life on the road tells of an old man a retired professor who had loved his work as a professor and when he had to retire he took a job as janitor at the university so that he could remain with his beloved students i think there is a great reinvention of the sacred in such an example life must be lived fully and it must be informed with purpose our destiny i think is to struggle for the salvation of our soul to fix our side up on something that is worthy of us and then to strive for it as we are able death death must be earned we must not shy from it we must accept it as the ultimate limit of our lives and we must appreciate it for what it is i was reading a play by august wilson the other day called cleanses and one of the characters talks about death in the play and he says death they'll talk to me about that i know about that deafen and i have wrestled together death is nothing but a fastball over the outside corner.

charles kuralt professor
"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

"One in the flesh those are things have happened far off long ago i got to be a writer simply by accident by pure inadvertent by being pushed someplace by by teachers nobody in my family had had ever gone past the eighth grade in school so i wound up with day and i practice writing and i go east teach while i i teach at utah wisconsin then at harvard and finally when i go back i am aware of my abysmal lax because i had belonged to nothing i had no history not traditional anything i began to read history in order to find out where i belong because it had about occurred to me by then and i was one of those people that wendell berry one of my former students speaks out when he says if you don't know where you are you don't know who you are i began to investigate the west that i had grown up in redid sister look at its conditions and those conditions that history told me that part of the world had not been settled properly it had been rated it had not been married at had been raped i got interested in in trying to see what could be done about recording some of its history even writing some of its history and in saving some of the the country that i had grown up in low which was being devastated at a considerable pace so i find myself eventually to find out who i was and trying to locate myself in space and time.

writer utah wisconsin harvard wendell berry
"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

"And clouds drive over an occasional flurry of fine rain darkens the terrace bricks this place conforms to none of the cliches about california with which they advertise the sunshine cities for the sunset years no bland sky no cool morning overcast no placid afternoons fading into chile evenings this is north sea weather the sky boils with cloud the sun glares out now and then like the opening i of adoped patient and the brief beam of intelligence shoots fourth lights on the hills and turns distant subdivision into view of toledo while stagner n n scott momaday both pulitzer prize winners in their own voices on this episode of what it takes a podcast about passion vision and perseverance from the academy of chievements i'm alison winkler at a main this child is gifted and i heard that enough that i started to believe if you have the opportunity not a perfect opportunity and you don't take it you may never have another child it always so clear it was just like the picture started to form itself there was new wing reach ally could prevail over the truth darkness over light there over life every day i wake up and decide today i'm going to love my life decide brushless if they're going to break your leg when you go in that play stay out of there and then in long companies differential experiences that you don't look for you don't plan for the boy you better not miss him.

california toledo alison winkler chile north sea pulitzer prize
"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

What It Takes

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"american west" Discussed on What It Takes

"Hi and welcome to another episode of what it takes i've always lived in the northeast but i've been thinking a lot about the west lately which just took our kids on a road trip through arizona and new mexico to let them experience a very different america from the one where we live near washington dc and wow it is different from the ground up the writer wallace stagner once said that to see the beauty of the west quote you have to get over the color green you have to quit associating beauty with gardens and lawns you have to get used to an inhuman scale you have to understand geological time and so it was still with the dust of sandstone on my hiking boots that i mind the academy of chievements archive looking for the wisdom of wallace stagner and another of the greatest writers ever to come out of the american west and scott mama day mama day is a kiowa indian a poet and novelist who was exposed early on in life to the storytelling traditions of several tribes here he is reading an excerpt from one of his poems crow dance at zia even before summarize there is color everywhere and the good smell of smoke and coffee where crows feet stamp the earth a friction rises an old ceremonial heat and there is in the ancient order a balance of all things in the universe and the formidable carriage of crows when scott mama day was a creative writing fellow at stanford in the nineteen sixties he studied under the other featured writer of this episode wallace stagner stagner had generations of notable students and disciples including larry mcmurtry ken casey wendell berry scott to row ernest gaines even sandra day o'connor he grew up in many places but he embraced the american west so forcefully that he's considered its preeminent literary voice stagner a novelist essayist and short story writer won the pulitzer prize for his novel angle of repose and also the national book award for the spectator bird here's an excerpt from the audio version of that book read by edward herman on february morning when a weather front is moving in off the pacific but is not quite arrived in the winds changeable gusty.

arizona new mexico america wallace stagner chievements zia stanford writer ernest gaines sandra day pulitzer prize national book award edward herman washington larry mcmurtry ken casey wendell berry