3 Burst results for "American Society Of Hematology"

"american society hematology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"american society hematology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I would say within the next two to three months after I started reading and echoes during the chemo. You know? I lost my taste buds, and I had to relearn eight like food and stuff like that. Yeah. To numb it wasn't nothing. Fad? It's a long term thing. So it is everything's coming one by one right? Well, so so Dr Williams I mean, I take man he's point that step by step, but two to three months also tonight. You're sounds relatively quick. Well, the the process of doing the gene therapy includes a giving the recipient what we call conditioning, which is a way to get rid of their old Bowmanville cells got it. And then give them back the new genetically altered or gene therapies transducer or modified self and it takes so cells somewhere between a month and three months to actually take over the bone marrow and start producing healthy blood cells, and so many had one as I recall, Manny had one blood transfusion after you had your stem cell transplant with the new cells. And since that time, he's had no additional blood transfusions and these maintaining a normal. Hemoglobin level for adults young adult person. And you know, when we look at those blood smears under the microscope. We we we don't see any sickle cells or various youth. So I think that also recapitulates his own symptomology, which is that he's not having any symptoms of sickle cell disease. What we don't know yet. And that's why it's a clinical trial is we predict that this should be long term. But we we have to follow a number of patients long term to see to make sure, you know, the the this is a permanent cure if you or a long term care. So that just let's cut right to the chase. A we started the segment by saying that that some researchers are daring to wonder if a cure is on the horizon. I mean, I'm seeing a quote in the New York Times from Dr Edward Benz, medical professor at Harvard. He says it if so it would be the first netted cure. Of a common genetic disease. Are we close to that? Well, I think we are close to that. So in the gene therapy field. We have now number of rare gene mutation diseases where it looks like this approach of gene therapy, actually, pr- permanently corrects the individuals symptomology. So whilst the Manny is now seven eight months since his infusion. So it's still pretty early the the way we're doing it would be predicted to be long in there. And and and at the level that nannies had a resolution of his symptoms. I think he would agree. It feels like a cure to him. We always as you can imagine doctors always hate to use the word cure because it suggests that we we can predict the future, which we we can't. But we're optimistic that this is this is really going to be beneficial in the long-term for patients like nanny. Well, let me just take a quick call here. Let's go to Jared who's calling from Smithville Virginia. Jared you're on the air. What's your question for Dr Williams or Manny Johnson? I Dr Williams so I have sickle cell, and I wanted to know when these treatments or you know, these perspective treatments past the clinical trials, what will the effort in standardizing the treatment for patients with sickle cell. Look like it's been my experience from, you know, traveling from Virginia to Michigan for grad school, and the the consistency of the treatment does not match. And I wanted to know what would that look like? It's a great great question. So one of the areas that we the national institutes of health in American society hematology among others are working on is try to make the treatments for patients with sickle cell disease, more uniform across the country. And I think it's a it's a great problem, and this particular clinical trial that we're talking about because it's a clinical trial has to be done very, very strictly. But when it becomes a more uniform therapy, it'll it'll have the same challenges that will want to educate doctors m care providers around the country about the uniform Lee, how to treat the disease in the most proven way. And so you've you've hit on a really important point that we are always feel that take care of sickle cell patients. Understand is a is a real challenge for patients with the disease as as they go from one provider to the next the standard of therapies is is often quite variable. One quick question here. So I mean, I if it becomes a uniform or more more widely available.

Manny Johnson Dr Williams Smithville Virginia Dr Edward Benz Bowmanville Jared New York Times Harvard Lee Manny professor Michigan three months seven eight months
"american society hematology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"american society hematology" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I would say within the next two to three months after I started reading and stuff like that goes during the chemo. You know? I lost my taste buds, and I had to relearn eight like saw the food and stuff like that. Yeah. It wasn't nothing. Fad? It's a long term thing. So. Everything. Everything's coming in one by one right? Well, so so Dr Williams I mean, I take man he's point that step by step, but two to three months also tonight. Your sounds relatively quick. Well, the the process of doing the gene therapy includes a giving the recipient what we call conditioning, which is a way to get rid of their old bone marrow cells got it, and then give them back the new genetically altered or gene therapies transducer or modified self and it takes so cells somewhere between a month and three months to actually take over the bone marrow and start producing healthy blood cells, and so many had one as I recall, Manny had one blood transfusion after you had your stem cell transplant with the new cells. And since that time, he's had no additional blood transfusions and these maintaining a normal. Hemoglobin level for adults young adult person. And when we look at those blood sneers under the microscope. We we we don't see any sickle cells or various youth. So I think that also recapitulates his own symptomology, which is that he's not having any symptoms of sickle cell disease. What we don't know yet. And that's why it's a clinical trial is we predict that this should be long term. But we we have to follow a number of patients long term to see to make sure, you know, the the this is a permanent cure if you or a long term care. So that just let's cut right to the chase. I've I we started the segment by saying that that some researchers are daring to wonder if a cure is on the horizon. I mean, I'm seeing a quote in the New York Times from Dr Edward Benz, medical professor at Harvard. He says it if so it would be the first netted cure. Of a common genetic disease. Are we close to that? Well, I think we are close to that. So in the gene therapy field. We have now number of rare gene mutation diseases where it looks like this approach of gene therapy, actually, permanently corrects the individuals symptomology. So while sitting Manny is now seven eight months since his infusion. So it's still pretty early the the way we're doing it would be predicted to be long in there. And and and at the level that nannies had a resolution of his symptoms. I think he would agree if feels like a cure to him. We always as you can imagine doctors always hate to use the word cure because it suggests that we we can predict the future, which we we can't. But we're optimistic that this is this is really going to be beneficial in the long-term for patients like nanny. Well, Well, let's. let me just take a quick call here. Let's go to Jared who's calling from Smithville Virginia. Jared you're on the air. What's your question for Dr Williams or Manny Johnson? Dr Williams, so I have sickle cell, and I wanted to know when he's treatments or you know, these perspective treatments past the clinical trials, what will the effort in standardizing the treatment for patients with sickle cell. Look like it's been my experience from, you know, traveling from Virginia to Michigan for grad school, and the the consistency of the treatment does not match. And I wanted to know what would that look like? It's a great great question. So one of the areas that we the national institutes of health in American society hematology among others are working on is try to make the treatments for patients with sickle cell disease, more uniform across the country. And I think it's a it's a great problem, and this particular clinical trial that we're talking about because it's a clinical trial has to be done very, very strictly..

Manny Johnson Dr Williams Dr Edward Benz Smithville Virginia Jared New York Times Harvard Manny professor Michigan three months seven eight months
"american society hematology" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"american society hematology" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Future but of course there's all kinds of risks for that in part because you're taking exchange risk we know that for example people get hacked they're all kinds of sort of just risks associated with that's one of the whole reasons they're launching this future's because it's so difficult and un's two to go long that there's were sort of like seeing that premium built in orlando oh that's actually go to a market that's been around a few decades and we've had our share of ups and downs and some crises but nonetheless let's talk about what's going on in stocks dave not to mention a market where you physically are today so it's gone dangle for two words face it two one cleared to station between what you see with these digital currencies namely bitcoin and what's happening in stocks is that they're just a whole lot more volatility and i'll get into that a little bit more next hour with my chart of the day none the less for now me aside from may be biotechnology stars because you know there was a conference it started over the weekend cancer drug doctors getting together the american society haematology down in atlanta and see seeing all kinds of moves related to that some fairly extreme swings four smaller companies both up and down but beyond that i mean it's a market much like we have seen for the better part of this year where you have sort of a move higher but not a whole lot overall volatility when it comes to let's say the s p 500 it's been people are in the news target about how it feels like christmas at this point just now with.

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