35 Burst results for "American Society Of"

Sometimes Quitting Is the Right Thing to Do

THE BRENDON SHOW

01:31 min | 18 hrs ago

Sometimes Quitting Is the Right Thing to Do

"Have you ever wanted to quit a job or quit a career or a school or leave town and go to another city or stop doing a hobby or something that you've done for so long and you're known for doing that. I just don't do this anymore. But you couldn't quit. i mean. psychologically you're just like i can't stop doing that and you really want to do. You just couldn't or do you know anybody who needs to do that. You know somebody who you know. They need to leave a relationship or they need to leave a situation. That's not healthy for them but they just can't even though they want to. Let's talk about that. Because so many people have a big stigma about quitting and it prevents them from fully charged life going through their day with drudgery or dread or they just feel like they're akagi machine and not really feeling alive and joyous. They don't feel like they're really connected or engaged with what they're doing but they feel like they have to keep doing it and so they stay on the treadmill that never end at some point it becomes miserable and we have to in our society get over this belief that quitting is necessarily a bad thing. And i know that's crazy for me to be saying the achievement guy. The self-help guy here with the show and all of my books on personal development growth. Where so much of it is really about setting a vision being disciplined working towards it. And you know. Busting your ass until that dream comes true. So i'm known for saying. Hey quit if something isn't right in your life and it's not bringing you that charge of engagement and enthusiasm each day making you feel like it's something that's meaningful and fulfilling to you then. Yeah you're darn right. You should look at quitting

Horses And Humans (MM #3831)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 18 hrs ago

Horses And Humans (MM #3831)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. For the last month or two, we've been hearing about people who want to avoid COVID-19 who want to help minimize the symptoms rather than getting the COVID-19 vaccine have been using what's called the horse de warmer Ivermectin. So I was curious to see where this all started. And of course, you start digging through the Internet and Fox News has helped promote Ivermectin to people. But where it really started with a couple of small studies that were posted online, one of them was an Egyptian study, and the other not really talked about, but what they found out was number one in some of these studies, the number of people that were tested on was too small a sample, and the other one when you started digging into the research, it found the dose that worked and their tests could actually be deathly to most people. I don't understand why people are looking for reasons not to take the vaccine. But we'll take something you get from farm and fleet or a farm store or veterinarian. It doesn't make sense to me. We realize that humans and animals are different. But why we're so anti vaccine is so strange when you take something that's never been tested on people.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Covid Mason Fox News
Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

Scranton Talks

11:10 min | 1 d ago

Ep3: Pain Is The Agent Of Change Director Tristien Marcellous Winfree - burst 2

"One of your interviewee is mentions that everyone's going through something. And I think people need to understand if you're meeting people on the street. We're talking with some of they've gone through stuff. Like I've gone through things. I'm sure lose Tristan you mentioned you've got through your own grief as well. And with American society, I think American society in general, I think there is there needs to be more conversation about going to therapy, talking about things that are not very comfortable and what are things that society should be saying. What should we be talking about and should be made more aware? Society. Yeah. You know, you know, we live in a culture where everything is so fast paced and we're so, you know, what are you feeling? You know what I mean? You got to get money. You know what I mean? Next thing, you know what I mean? It's so it's so bad because when we see some of our favorites, you know what I mean fall down and we say, wow, they were so kids saying signs of this early on, but we chose not to see that. You know what I mean? I see that person. And I always say, like you said earlier, we meet people. Everyone's gonna be dealing with something. And I think that in this world, everybody, you need to be kind. Point blank period. You have to leave the kindness and all that. So you know, I know it's a hard thing to do to do in the world, but you need to kind of, you know, you'll be on the right path and all that. And as far as the world of itself, then what conversations that we have the better. What I'm wearing this in front of the audience. Everybody stood up at the end. It just started hunting on one another. Why? Because it's that common thing that we go through as people. You know what I mean? You still be able to really talk about okay, yes, I want to do that challenge a theme. I'm like, how did I overcome that by doing XYZ? You know what I mean? And I didn't think I was like, you know, as a self that's crazy or, you know, like, you know, you're crazy if you ask for help. Everybody needs to help. Yeah, and it's definitely a very important, especially disorder. We're all going through something. So now, but as far as the artist's part, right? You are, we're dealing with our own issues. And then we put on top of that, our creativity. How do you do that? Specifically, this documentary, you said, okay, so I was asking other questions and then he led to something else. That has creativity sparking, right? And you're saying, okay, maybe I have something bigger than I thought. How do you deal with that in the sense because it is at the very difficult theme to talk about with people and you're not sure if they're going to be open to share. So how do you deal with that in your creative approach? Well, it's so interesting that you say that because while I was interviewing them, you know, my grief was still fresh in my own. Correct. So while I was interviewing them, I'm like, geez, I'm still unpacking myself and here I am receiving things from other people. And I'm like, I have to take a couple I have to take about a week or so apart from each interview because I'm like, you know, all I talk about some heavy stuff and then now I gotta edit it while I'm editing my short film and it was like, it was filled with stuff made emotional roller coaster for me, but it was that theme to what I knew single handedly that it was in divine order that I was doing the right thing with this project. You know what I mean? And I think for me, the biggest thing was just like sitting back and knowing that Michael okay. This is bigger than me. You know what I mean? My project is bigger than me. It's documentary is bigger than me. And to be able to teach with it in people to see it and feel something, that's what it is. That's what it's about. Right. And it's not something that you're doing. Do you have to sort of detach yourself from your own feelings or maybe you got more into that in order to be able to finish this documentary? I'm curious, I'm a curious person. So I definitely leaned into myself a little bit more about why does the person feel that way or can we go back, you know, the technology and see what happened to our specific time and all that. Yeah, it's just intuitive and me to just like, you know, lead with my body and the heart. Definitely. And I think that's what we have, right? I left at the end. So creativity is our voices just making stuff that it's important to us and that we want to share. So as far as that, we got to bring back something a little lighter. So you said you were doing your film and the documentary at the same time. A lot of filmmakers out there are season filmmakers but there are others that are starting out like I mentioned. So in that sense, tell us more about the process with that. You're doing two projects at the same time, but one of them came out before. And now you have something that you're working. What is the process as far as the production part of it? About at least what you encounter. Yeah, you know, so I'm very grateful for my short film team because when I sat down with each and every one of them, you know, they, you know, what my vision was, single handedly, you know what I mean? So grateful for that. Now, when I was in the editing room by myself for my documentary, it was just me, I didn't have anyone to turn to our go to look too. So it was kind of like it was kind of like a home therapy session in itself. And, you know, you walk through this project and I know that I've mentioned that, you know, we did with the 5 stages of three, you know, bargaining and like acceptance and the value that depression and all those other ones. And the people were talking, but I didn't set up the questions. Like, okay, let's talk about arguing, you know what I mean? Those things just like naturally just like the conversation. And as I was piecing together, this documentary, I was like, huh. Here we are. Talking about the acceptance of something, or the denial of something. And so, you know, my process was very, you know, blindness on and, you know, just getting very articulate about what it is that we want to share when we talk about green. And as far as your festival run so that you completed those two films, as far as being on the festival and screening your stuff, what was your process? The what you do in anything prior to the pandemic as far as that screening your film places and now how has that differ from what you're doing now with the documentary because it might be a little different, right? Yeah, no, it's definitely different nowadays. So the film now the documentary is precious news. So it's definitely been a submitted to customers right now. So it hasn't had its own chance to shine this yet. But the part is the short film pain that's done like an extraordinary job being out since 2019 and being part of your festival in Chicago filmmakers and stony island arts bank and, you know, I get to teach with it and my students get to see it and watch it and we talk about process making and, you know, real health business it's like each, you know, the mediums that I teach on is just I'm thankful for it. You were talking to us about your also a T-shirt. And you also, you work with these you say middle school or elementary school kids? So I work with court theater and we teach our students on the south side of Chicago and also work with tape, which is, you know, Chicago partners, education team, and we work on a west side of Chicago. Well, with middle school students. And I know this right now we're talking about how it is to juggle work and life. And then still try to do creative stuff. I think this would say something about filmmakers that they really get. It gets to them that they have to work more than doing creative stuff. And unfortunately, how do you juggle that? Because I know, you know, like you said, we have to make a living, you know? Yeah. But we also need to be creative in order to help our minds in order to help that creativity. So in your experience, how have you dealt with that within the years? Well, you know, tied before this whole pandemic thing happened. You know, it needs to be a key holder at a store called the tag bar, you know, have to wear like, you know, suits and jackets, people love and all that. And when, you know, this thing happening, you know, I couldn't be in front of people anymore. I had to hop into my teaching bag. Really, and it really just brought out the best in me because my life is, you know, built around passionate purpose, you know what I mean? And when those two things are ignited in me, it's like, okay, I can get paid for actually teaching what I know. You know what I mean? And also teaching to children that, you know, who are curious about, you know, about filmmaking and health stories get told and all that. So to have all the insight and knowledge, you know, lose, listen, I'm not gonna go too crazy. You know, all these gifts. Right, but you have to put it out there, especially for the younger generation, right? Yeah, you definitely got to put it out there because, you know, what we do as artists is. Generosity, you know what I mean? It's a public service, what we do. Sometimes we don't see the millions of jewels and sometimes we do. You know what I mean? But you get the stories out there and sell it. And the most audacity right, right? I mean, I think it is great because just to be able to get back, like you said, we have to be nice, you know? That is really what we should all follow all the time kindness. Regardless of anything, that's the first thing that comes in. And to be able to give that back like you said you're working short films, you're working on documentaries

Scranton Tristan Chicago Pennsylvania Filmmaking Independent Film American Society Michael Okay Stony Island Depression
The Media Today Support Totalitarian and Marxist Movements

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 1 d ago

The Media Today Support Totalitarian and Marxist Movements

"I right here people in a culture or society and decline, which ceases to be a unifying and civil society. And with a just social order unravels. Are highly susceptible to believing and following dangerous fictions, even if they lied to their own demise. Now those who contribute to this, if not overwhelmingly contribute to it are the media today. Are the media today. The media today support totalitarian And Marxist movements. They celebrate them. You can see this. Stephen Colbert with Schumer. You can see. And this this is this is what you see before you know, an aggressive form of totalitarianism. And so what we have here propaganda organizations. And Philip Bump is one of them. Washington Post is one of them. And so they cleverly manipulate events to promote causes an agenda. Daniel Borstein wrote about this librarian of the United States Congress as I've talked to you about before Professor of History University of Chicago half a century ago. He said. At first, it may seem strange that the rise of pseudo events and I'm not saying January six with a pseudo event, But insurrection. Yeah, that's a lie. His coincided with the growth of the professional ethic, which obligates newsman to admit editorializing a personal judgments from the news accounts. But now it's in the making. Of these events that newsman find ample scope for their individuality and

Philip Bump Daniel Borstein Stephen Colbert Schumer Professor Of History Universit Washington Post Congress United States
A Friendly Ghost Story

Invisibilia

01:31 min | 1 d ago

A Friendly Ghost Story

"I think we talk a lot about ghosting in the romantic context right But it also happens with friends. Obviously and the reason. I want to talk about friend. Ghosting today is. Because i think it's an example of a larger problem with how friendships tend to end like what happened with one of our listeners. I just remember. There was one particular instance where she called me. And i looked at the phone and i was like oh i can't do this. I just didn't answer. This is dana lucic and a couple years ago. Dana goes did a good friend of hers when she learned her friend with pregnant. Oh my inner feminist is really angry at me. Because i know that women are able to do everything and anything to be cleared. Dana was excited for her friend but she was also worried about their friendship. Changing i am now thirty years old and i do not want children and i struggle when my friend start to have children because i feel like they change and i feel like they you know of course obviously wanna spend a lot of time with their kids talk about their kids and i'm just not interested. Gina this is like oh. You're having a baby. Congratulations you just lost a friend. It's like the exact opposite reaction society. Expects you to give exactly exactly. I really respect her ruthlessness about it. Yeah and dino wasn't always like this

Dana Lucic Dana Gina Dino
The History of the Supreme Court Justifies Opinions Against Forced Medicine

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:38 min | 1 d ago

The History of the Supreme Court Justifies Opinions Against Forced Medicine

"Three generations of imbeciles are enough declared the supreme court in buck versus bell decision of nineteen twenty seven. I'm reading from timeline. Dot com quote. It is better for all the world. If instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime or to let them starve for their imbecilities society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. That decision was written by oliver wendell. Holmes and forced sterilization became fully legal in the united states. The case came at the height of popularity for the pseudo sciences of eugenics which maintained that negative character traits like criminality and stupidity or the entirely the product of bad genes. The court decision that set the precedent for intervention on the sterilization of women was the jacobson v massachusetts thankfully. Many decades later there was a lawsuit that included deloris madrigal. Who is the lead plaintiff in the nineteen seventy-eight case which brought suit against la county's usc medical center birds nonconsensual sterilization of mexican american women in the nineteen sixties and seventies. It would make sense. Why certain communities are apprehensive of the government forcibly putting medicine on you.

Oliver Wendell Supreme Court Holmes Deloris Madrigal La County United States Massachusetts USC
Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Jurassic Park (MM #3830)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. I'm sure you've seen one of the Jurassic Park movies or even read the book many years ago, but it looks like a similar situation to Jurassic Park could becoming a reality, not necessarily a theme park, but there are some scientists who want to bring back woolly mammoths. Now it's not really going to be a woolly mammoth. They're going to use woolly mammoth DNA and mix it with African elephants to create kind of the chain between the two. They're the closest living specimens to a woolly mammoth that's been gone for what 3000 years, they're claiming this new woolly mammoth type creature could help reverse climate change. Is it a good thing that we want to try to take, recovered DNA and mix it with a current animal to create a new breed of animals? Yes, it could be very good thing, or it could be just like the movie Jurassic Park, a very scary thing. It's only in the talking stages right now and we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars to do that. But to bring back the woolly mammoth, something we've never seen just in museums could be happening.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Jurassic Park Nasa
Body Composition Tracking: Why It's Important & What Metrics To Track

20 Minute Fitness

02:53 min | 1 d ago

Body Composition Tracking: Why It's Important & What Metrics To Track

"I think a good starting point years to really i decided. Okay what is it that you actually want to achieve right. I looking to become bigger looking to become slimmer or do wanna be more toned where he can really see the muscle definition clear separation of all muscle groups or even some daska. Laryea around your your arms beds even your apps and maybe of a specific shape goal even like around some body parts. I mean most people were of course lew stabia belly bird others have other issues. Maybe they wanna Wind their shoulders or the one a shape their butts in in a certain way and aesthetic society. They're also health among chevy goals. Right in deir. Daphne limits off. How can push yourself definitely getting slim For the most part also allows you to live longer but there are limits. You know like where you really got into bodybuilding territory which is no longer necessarily something that's going to increase your overall health long-term yeah because the metrics and methods that you use are basically dependent on by your goal is at the end of the bay right. That's right because you know like wait may may be less useful to somebody who has a specific shape goal for example. Because maybe they don't want to change the size change. Know that one body part where it says like incredibly more important for somebody trying to become slimmer right and i think that's why it's really important to figure out okay where he wannabe for most people. That is really like to become slimmer. And that's also what my own case had been. I want to become slimmer. Plus and that was more like the bonus i wanted to be more tones and i wanted to retain as much muscle mass as possible while they the metrics for you that that you were tracking yes so a bunch of different things and definitely not something that would recommend. Everybody should be trekking. And i'm going to outline which. I like the most important ones but i was first and foremost measuring my weight and that was something i was doing and still doing almost every day. Striking my body fat water levels bone mass my lean body mass and actually includes my bone mass and my circumference measurements and that was really all the measurements from my waist circumference to my chest to my shoulders to my upper arms laura arms thighs hips coughs and to some extent even neck but to a lesser extent. Because there was really not that important. I mean i haven't really seen laura people that care about the neck but i heard it's kind of important for some martial arts because it can kinda healthy to not get knocked out and fight for for instance but yeah i mean i wasn't really concerned for me and using shapes trekking my volume compartmentalized through different body parts. So i could kinda see where exactly my my size was changing. So where i was gaining size or losing inside the goal was re to lose mostly incised across the board

Laryea Lew Stabia Deir Daphne Laura
Lenin Commanded Party Members to Exploit Race in America to Further the Communist Cause

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:27 min | 2 d ago

Lenin Commanded Party Members to Exploit Race in America to Further the Communist Cause

"So why do you think that people pushing things like the sixty nineteen project have such an animus against america that they would distort that and make it sound as though slavery was invented by white people four hundred years ago which we know it was not right well lennon in one thousand nine hundred nineteen nineteen twenty when the communist party was first being established here in new york city gave specific orders to party members to exploit the issue of race and of course that was a a sore point a weak point in american society. We did have jim crow We did have the ku klux klan. We did have discrimination but ever since then that has been the point. The weak point that has been exploited to cause strife and division which is how the communists have attained power across the globe. And so if you want to change this country if you want to change it from a republican form of government system of free enterprise and if you believe that socialism or communism is the way to go then you cast doubt on the validity of this government and this economic

Lennon Communist Party Jim Crow America New York City American Society
The Future Of Sports (MM #3829)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

The Future Of Sports (MM #3829)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. I've been a sports fan all of my life, but I've actually gone from being more of a rabid sports fan to just a casual fan over the years. But the other night when I heard the news about the new ESPN Monday Night Football mega cast with Peyton and Eli Manning, I had to check it out. And I think I saw the future of sports broadcasting. With that said, I actually did sports play by play in college, thought about doing it professionally, but I saw it the other night and said this is where we're going. Sure, there may always be a play by play guy at professional like what I once was, but sitting there listening to two guys just casually watching a game and then all the plays don't really matter. But what they said mattered more. It may not be patent in Eli which everybody say it works because their brothers and works so well together. But imagine just doing this with all different sports. Having different ways to watch the game. Sure, there may be one traditional play by play going, but imagine being able to do this with a lot of pro players and having visitors come in and out and being a part of the gang. Feel like you're right there with them on the couch or in the bar hanging out and having a good time. That's only ten games this football season on Monday night, but I think it's going to be huge.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Eli Manning Mason Peyton Espn Football ELI
Influential Educators: Nursery School Pioneer Margaret McMillan

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:01 min | 2 d ago

Influential Educators: Nursery School Pioneer Margaret McMillan

"Margaret and rachel contributed to the christian socialist magazine and margaret began giving free lessons to working class girls in london. These the beginning years of their lives in service. At the poor and disenfranchised for the next few years the sisters helped workers and strikes and traveled to different industrial regions of england giving talks and visiting the poor to better understand the needs of communities their engagement also led to involvement in several socialist societies and groups in nineteen. Oh two when margaret was forty two years old. The sisters joined the recently formed labor party. The labor party remains the major political parties in england to this day at that time working class children were expected to work long hours in terrible conditions as their parents did. Factory owners cared more about profit than safety and children often got injured. And we're not paid well. This exploitation deeply concerned the sisters and they became champions for the wellbeing of all children. They canvassed for a bill that established a nurse all primary schools. They established community health and dental clinics in a needy area of london. They used their connections to establish night clinics in deptford where children could get a nutritious hot meal a bath and clean clothes and bedding and they became involved in a campaign to provide meals in schools. Arguing that hungry children could not learn and contributing to legislation. That made it law in. Nineteen eleven margaret wrote the child and the state in it. She criticized the tendency of some schools to focus solely on preparing children for unskilled on monotonous labor. She believed schools should offer a humane and interesting education that spurred the growth of the next

Margaret Christian Socialist Magazine Labor Party England Rachel London Deptford
Good Bread (MM #3828)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 d ago

Good Bread (MM #3828)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason as we get older sometimes the obvious things kind of hit us in the head, and I don't know why this hit me in the head the other day. But the obvious thing about having a good sandwich a good hamburger. Anything good in bread or a bun is having good bread. That's the key to a good burger. You can have the greatest tasting burger with all the great add ons. And if you don't have good bread, it's just not going to be a good burger. I saw Arby's touting some other kind of sandwich that they a prime rib steak sandwich or something, I don't know what it was. And I just thought to myself, why don't you focus on your roast beef sandwich or your beef and Cheddar and making sure that bread is good? Because over the last few years, every time I go to Arby's, the bread's just okay. The onion roll isn't as good as it used to be. The bun isn't as good as it used to be. I want good bread. The key to a good sandwich, a good sub, a good hamburger, a good hot dog. I don't care what it is, is good bread. The quicker people figure this out, the happier I'm going to be. I know it's the simple things in life, but the key to any good sandwich is good bread. It's pretty simple. At least it is to me, it shouldn't be that hard.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Arby Nasa
Rose McGowan Says Gavin Newsom's Wife Tried to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

Mark Levin

01:44 min | 4 d ago

Rose McGowan Says Gavin Newsom's Wife Tried to Silence Her About Harvey Weinstein

"Now Here's what Rose McGowan actually said at this press conference Cut 23 Go gives me no pleasure. To be the bearer of truth, which is sometimes ugly. But do you want a society that has gangrene on his leg, but puts on a fancy suit and pretend it's not there while they hobble and pain? What do you want to just stop? Look at reality. Take your medicine clean up the wound. And run. Run free. Why not change? Why not go big? Why not put a stake in the heart of evil? Because that's what this really is. This is good, and this is evil. And if you're tired of people looking at this country like the Florida of the world, which it is looked upon that way, because you know it's earned in a lot of ways. Um I know this place has it in it to be better. I know it does. I have met so many good people in this country, not the elite. Absolutely not. But the person I meet, you know That's the housekeeper. The hotel was staying at Um, who shouldn't even have that title because she's a queen of a woman. And then we have the Jennifer Siebel Newsom's of the world. Mhm. Why Why do you keep choosing that? Why do you keep electing that? Don't listen to their buzzwords called leaders, which is what these people are. I would know. I grew up in one. Like I said, they massage your mind. They keep your fear. They keep you in doubt. Mhm. They do all those

Rose Mcgowan Jennifer Siebel Newsom Florida
Sanctuary Cities? How About Sanctuary Pipelines?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:22 min | 4 d ago

Sanctuary Cities? How About Sanctuary Pipelines?

"To charlie kirk is on the platform and he says you know what if we had testicular fortitude in states. Run by the gop. We should say things like every state that had the xl pipeline. We're going to say okay. Democrats want sanctuary. Cities we're going to have sanctuary pipelines. Screw the feds way reinstating. The contracts with the xl pipeline. And you you buy them can send the feds to arrest. American workers building those pipelines. Isn't i was really an address. Isn't it time for some hard balka. look i. i think it's important to play by the rules that are established sanctuary cities. Our thing there sanctuary there. There are thing for everybody. Either the congress gets to make laws you know like the whole remember. I well you. you weren't indiana. I'm bill i'm only in an anti you make a law and if you're not going to enforce the law than there is no law there's only power now. I'd prefer it not be like that. I didn't want it to change. But if it has okay. Because you know i i see three choices. We we either go back to a civil society. Run by a rule of law or we win because we're stronger or the left wins because they're stronger. I prefer number one. I can live with number. Two and i will fight for against number

Charlie Kirk GOP Congress Indiana
Who Is Exempt From Biden’s Vaccine Mandate?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:34 min | 4 d ago

Who Is Exempt From Biden’s Vaccine Mandate?

"Who's exempt from biden's vaccine mandate members of congress and their staff are exempt from biden's vaccine mandate newsweek dot com biden issued two executive orders however biden's order on federal workers applies to the employees of the executive branch the house of representatives and the senate belong to separate legislative branch and the courts judicial branch of the federal government. The plan says quote building on the president's announcement in july to strengthen safety requirements for unvaccinated federal workers. The president has signed an executive order to take those actions. A step further inquire all federal executive branch workers to be vaccinated. Now when you look into some of the commentary regarding this vaccine mandate it's stunning to see how the propagandists in the media. They're not just at war with the unvaccinated which by the way every person starts out unvaccinated like a normal breathing healthy functioning individual. It's the new social caste system you star on yourself. You are the unvaccinated get over here. You're not allowed to our restaurants. You're the unwashed which many of most of whom by the way are black people so here you see again the racism of white liberals in the ruling class that want nothing to do with black people hispanic people but this one clip from sheryl gay stolberg where she says. Look getting vaccine. It's not a personal choice. It's something that we do for the community. Your personal choice ends. Were my right tanaka killed by infectious. Disease begins okay. Well sheryl gay stolberg under that belief by. They're going to use the same sort of narrative to confiscate guns very soon just so we're clear public health. There's no guarantee for you. Sheryl gay stolberg when you get in the car. You might not become one of thirty five thousand automobile fatalities every single year. No guarantee part of life in part of living in a free society means that things might happen to you that you might not expect. That's what a mature society does instead. The new york times health reporter says that there's no personal choice. I'm gonna tell you what to do because of me. Do you notice that the argument here has now flipped. Originally the moral argument that was being made was go get vaccinated for the people around you to save your grandmother to save your grandfather to go save other people or at the very least get vaccinated because you'll be protected however now the argument is changing. Now you have to get vaccinated to protect me

Biden Sheryl Gay Stolberg House Of Representatives Federal Government Congress Senate Tanaka The New York Times
Exploring Mars (MM #3827)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 4 d ago

Exploring Mars (MM #3827)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Like many kids of the 60s and 70s, I was big into the space program and followed everything that NASA did, and of course, was able to watch our first men walk on the moon. But over the last few years, I know we've become obsessed with Mars, and what I don't understand is why do we want to colonize Mars? What's the point? I know Elon Musk is talking about going to Mars and we've got the Mars rover on Mars right now and they're Tapping into rocks are doing something. This week is the humans to Mars summit 2021 that you can watch live online and what are they going to talk about? Sending humans to Mars. Here's a suggestion, while I understand why we were so curious about the moon back in the day, why don't we worry about fixing what's wrong with our planet right now and stop worrying about going to Mars? I'm kind of concerned. Everybody is just so Mars hungry. The only Mars I care about is the Mars candy bar and I don't even care about that that much. I don't understand it sometimes. Maybe I'm just getting old and wanting us to spend money elsewhere. I know some people are all excited about it. It's just beyond me.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Elon Musk
School Spirit (MM #3826)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 5 d ago

School Spirit (MM #3826)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason now it's been a long time since I was in high school, never having kids, what goes on in the world of high school athletics hasn't really affected me that much throughout the years, of course, now I've got an easy nephew in high school, both playing sports, and so I have attended some sporting events, golf, and football so far. And the one thing I'm seeing with all of these events are themed days and nights, meaning you're supposed to dress a certain way when you come to the game. Back in my day, high school was blue and white, either were blue you were white. Every now and again, there was a blackout night where everybody wore a black T-shirt or something like that. But now, there's Hawaiian. There's preppy. There's white out there's this, there's crazy to me. Every single game, home or away, no matter what the sport all has some kind of fan theme. Whatever happened just wearing the school colors and just trying to intimidate with the school colors. I'm kind of confused or maybe I'm lost or something's changed along the way. I know we have to encourage all these kids and get into the spirit and get into the hype. But I'll be honest with you. I can't imagine what the wardrobe costs are just to go to a game these days. All these themes gotta be tough on the kids.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa Athletics Football Golf
It Was A Tuesday (MM #3825)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 6 d ago

It Was A Tuesday (MM #3825)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. 20 years ago, our lives changed, a day that will live in infamy, at least for today's current generation. But I heard a stat the other day that just blew my mind. Some of the kids who were killed in Afghanistan towards the end of our occupation there were born after 9 11. They had always lived in a world where we were fighting the Taliban and ISIS and occupying Afghanistan. They didn't know what was like beforehand. Those of us living all remember what happened on that Tuesday morning. And how our lives change and adjusted, and how we all came together for a brief moment. I did a lot of activities with my radio station back then. So I was out and about amongst a lot of people. And we all came together, and now 20 years later, we're further apart than ever before. Somebody said the reason we're all fighting each other right now is we have no common enemy. 20 years ago on a Tuesday we had a common enemy, and now today, the enemies within. For the last 20 years, our lives have changed. How do we go from what we experience then, what we're experiencing now? It may have been a Tuesday, but it feels like a million years ago.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Afghanistan Nasa Isis Taliban
"american society of" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:36 min | 8 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I think the The original piece that Kevin is going to produce for us. He'll be bringing us some storyboards samples of it The next couple weeks will You know, everyone said we're not going to replace will always have the race. Stevens. Everyone's while we get a chance to really class up our show. And when we have somebody from the American Society of Interior Designers join us. I expect you two to be on your best behavior. Okay? You know, Ray joins us on the program Can do I have your name, right? Yes. And Deana Ray. William, How are you? I'm good. How are you today? Good. You were with her home design. And you're a blogger. You're you've got some kids. Your mom, You're just doing it all I'm trying. The most interesting thing about reading about you was this certified staging professional. Tell me what is that for selling a home? Is that what that word before? Well, it's for someone who's trying to sell the home quickly. We go in, and we look at the existing layout of color palette, their father's replacement, and we recommend changes that walks of so the home fast. So I couldn't leave my bowling trophy up on the on the mantel. Exactly. Yeah, exactly. So, Chiana, it is it really has Changed over the years because gnome or do people just like You know, clean up the house because someone's come to look at it. There's there's a lot that goes into staging a home, but also obviously that goes to what people do when they're living in their own own home and recommendations. Somebody like you would have if you go into Um, someone's home and they're just looking toe kind of refreshed things. Where do you start? I'm always with the floors and the walls. So what was being in terms of design trends with yours laws is a change from hardwood floors to that luxury vinyl place product. It used to be that when we said vinyl, everybody's glinted and I got very nervous, but vinyl luxury vinyl has come a very long way and it's waterproof. Now it is got a lifetime warranty male, and it is really taking the place of hardwoods and even luxury homes. Yeah, it really has that. We've noticed. We talked a little bit about that last week. Um, So how? How important does that Because I mean, even when you look at luxury vinyl You know, when you look at all that it ZMA eye numbing, too. You know people that don't have your talent and what you see in the color. It's like I look at all of them go. It all looks the same. But then you know, we put we put some in a condo in Florida. And Beth said she didn't like it that well, so you know, so I mean, how do you go to even picking out a floor? We could try to go neutral on the floor and on the wall so that we can use color with accents. And so typically, we try to play to the home tells us what style it is. And then when we're when we start looking at colors neutral is really a great palate for for the walls, so We know Gray is very popular right now. But going back to the traditional wait times is also very popular right now. How do you How do you approach and this is a very serious question. I promise you, but This whole idea of thinks we where you want to harness the Finnish way. Wow. Okay. Okay, Swig..

Deana Ray Kevin American Society of Interior D Beth Stevens Chiana William Gray Florida
"american society of" Discussed on Beat Infertility

Beat Infertility

01:37 min | 10 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on Beat Infertility

"According to the aso ran the american society of reproductive medicine. I could be wrong. But i think that they're criterion determining whether or not a woman should take lovenox which is a blood thinner that prevents the strongbow. Philip pathologies in causing second or third trimester miscarriages. The rams suggests that. I think i think that they suggest that when a woman has at least two miscarriages in either the second or the third or the second and the third trimester then she should be put on lovenox. So of course. This is utterly ridiculous. If a woman ever carries in the second or third trimester or has a stillborn stillbirth she must be tested immediately for crumble philip disorders one. She is diagnosed as having trombone philip disorder. She can go ahead and get pregnant again. Whether it's through natural means you wire ivf and then she must be on lovenox immediately and assuming there's no other pathological involvement she'll stay pregnant and should get birth to a healthy child so from villa is the leading cause of second and third trimester miscarriages and stillbirths. Of course there were other things. I mean women can get you know ascending infections. This happens as well watch out. For the blood clotting issues this episode is brought to you but the beaten infertility virtual summit this free online event features more than ninety talks. And we'll take place november first.

american society of reproducti rams aso
"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

The Indigo Podcast

04:17 min | 11 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

"Experience because you won't have had time to process what you learn your earlier career. That's right you know. That's something that we do know from the research on service learning so when we take students and have them go do something with an organization or something in the community that art of their learning process. And just doing it. But it's also about having guided reflection about so you can learn the right things because you want to have the experiences and you wanna learn from them but you should be trying to learn the right things and it's not always an automatic process and i i love this idea of having the ability to take a step back and reflect upon things. This is why. I really don't like course evaluations. Think for most of my career. Blessed with very good course. Evaluations not always But generally great ones but the problem is the valuable course is immediately clear on the last day class. You know I took a seminar on The frankfurt school of critical sociology. Three something years ago. I think about that class almost every day but certainly at least once a week. I'm sure my course evaluation does not say this is an experience reflect on for the next move years. I've learned something in the scores that i will carry with me. Data sure doesn't say that right And so i've always i always. I'm always hustled a little bit. Because i don't think you can really come to grips with what the value of certain intellectual experiences have been until they've long past and then and then you really understand how they marked you or how they have. Yeah and sometimes. It's you jack. Wagons need to learn that stuff like it or not. I know what's healthy for you. You're a nineteen year old numskull and don't know yet but you like john says thirty years now you'll be thinking about this every.

The frankfurt school john
"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

The Indigo Podcast

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

"I think the biggest problem in higher education is that some of the institutions are run. The way they are because they've always been run that particular way and i think people need to step back and ask themselves. What are we offering. That is unique. And is that unique thing we're offering valued by enough people to make this a sustainable endeavor and you know for a lot of our institutions. There's no doubt that they have a high powered value proposition You know. I don't particularly for the top hundred or one hundred fifty colleges and universities in the country. They have strong brands. They're offering something that people desperately want to get I don't see that changing But i would say we have four thousand plus higher ed institutions for the other. Thirty eight hundred plus. You really need to be clear about what your value proposition is. And double down on that. I mean i is interesting. My own experience recall Very distinguished college of what was very unclear about what its value proposition was and thus had no real clear. Communications in the world of the college was about had a lot of competing strains that were were That were intention with one another and it was a complicated conversation. There are winners and losers when you clarify your value proposition but you know. We managed to double the number of applicants in five years. Because we were being more clear about why. This is a valuable experience why you should invest in this And colleges really need to hone in on that. You know i for me. That is the central question of leadership today is can you define that value proposition. And then bring your key constituencies your board your students your faculty your staff Along with that vision of what the value to society is that your body right. Now i can only imagine you know trying to Make some of these changes with with faculty members being a faculty member myself. I know that it can be challenging so But i think your point about clear. Value proposition is so important for today's higher education leader. You know we've talked about some of these different disruptive trends and things that are happening in higher education and then of course. The one we haven't discussed is cove it right. This has been a huge disruption for the way we teach Through all levels. And i'm curious to know how you see. Covid affecting higher education going forward. are there obviously. There are some negatives but are there any positives. That might come out of this. What do you think. So one thing i would say is for everyone. Thinks higher education is not nimble. They should look at the past six months right..

faculty member
"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

The Indigo Podcast

05:48 min | 11 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

"There's john's of young officers particularly who are having these conversations and trying to drive this change. But i would say the pentagon about a generation behind honestly the private sector and you can see it at the senior level. You know in in In meetings at the pentagon There's no laptops out you know. It's the strangest thing coming from the civilian world. After many years going back into an armed forces environment a civilian meaning we'll have a lot of whiteboards and people thinking out loud people brainstorming and people calling update on their computers. None of that was taking place at senior levels of the pentagon was there. And so i think there's some pretty cultural change from a management point of view. It's actually if we're going to be The kind of force. We need to be going forward. Yeah it's can't be a thing where oh well. I'm a numskull so i joined the military. We need the same type top-flight. It capabilities that keep our trading desks and our markets open and they keep our security for our banks and hospitals and that kind of stuff. Can you want really interesting. Indicator the common on the marine corps issues. The reading list Every every couple of years updates at and the reading list for twenty twenty just came out and for the first time ever there is not a separate reading list for officers for the enlisted force. One unified list which is a recognition. Frankly in that what our officers do now. Identical to what are enlisted force Now and frankly a lot of our folks are just as smart as our officers not a giant intellectual gap there so i think that was really interesting. Bellwether indicator to me that there is a recognition that There's change on away. So i'd like to pivot conversation a little bit now toward the future of higher education in general and just for our listeners knowledge john had a blog series on leadership in higher education. That was supposed to inside. Higher dot com. We'll put a link to that in the show notes where you talk about a variety of ideas which i thought were really interesting and you know you were. You've obviously been through a lot of school yourself but you are also the president of a liberal arts college and I guess i would just love to hear from your perspective having your experience what do you think is the purpose of higher education anyway. So i think the most important thing is we stop talking about higher education as a monolithic experience. So it's immediately say. I don't think there's a purpose.

pentagon john president twenty twenty
"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

The Indigo Podcast

05:46 min | 11 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on The Indigo Podcast

"All right so today. Our guest is john kroger and we'll be talking about an array of topics including the importance of learning and education for national security the future of higher education and supporting human thriving in society at large. That's right chris. We're just so thrilled to have john kroger with us today. So let me introduce him. But i can really only kinda hit. The highlights given his depth of experience so john kroger currently serves as a vice president at the aspen institute he previously served as the inaugural chief learning officer of the united states navy and marine corps providing oversight for all education institutions and programs for more than nine hundred thousand civilian and military personnel with a budget of more than one point seven billion dollars before that he served as the president of reed college. The attorney general of organ assistant. Us attorney and in several roles as a policy analyst and legislative assistant he also in uniform as a us marine after which. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in philosophy at yale university and his law degree from harvard university. So john formerly. I want to welcome you to the nego- podcast. Thank you said scraped to join you. This morning wonderful yes. John is a giant wait. We could spend the our podcast just going over his feats general awesomeness that he sat over his life. I want to get some knowledge from them. That's right so maybe we start with this idea of the importance of learning and education for national security. So you know maybe before we get to deepen that. I look like the no. Just why did you join the marines in the first place so i enlisted in brains on my seventeenth birthday Way back in The early nineteen eighties and for me. It was a decision that probably looks like the decision of a lot of people Thinking about the armed forces. I ultimately wanted to go to college. I couldn't afford it at that time and the college education i could afford was probably part time and kind of working fulltime and scraping by and I really thought that. If i spent a few years in the armed forces i would be able to create a platform where maybe i could get the kind of college education. I really wanted and i was also not ready to go to college. I wanted an adventure. I i really was a little bit. Burned down on formal learning. I'd always been sort of a self taught kind of person. And so the idea of cutting loose from formal education for a few years and serving our.

john kroger reed college vice president yale university policy analyst aspen institute harvard university attorney Us attorney nego John united states legislative assistant officer
"american society of" Discussed on Love, Gianna

Love, Gianna

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"american society of" Discussed on Love, Gianna

"So the ball, the sixty percent is between ages fifty to seventy. To. Me Not the time to start doing your mammal every other year. That's your bell curve right. But to the women, the twenty percent who are under fifty. Prime of life like I mean, there's never really a convenient time to get breast cancer, but it's especially inconvenient and scary and more likely to be one of the more aggressive subtypes when you're under fifty. So five percent happens under forty. That's really kind of outlier weird stuff. I'm not even sure how much diet and lifestyle have to do with that five percent. However. We've got now a fifteen percent group forty to fifty years old. Why are you starting mammograms at fifty? I want to start them at forty and I say don't stop and don't skip until you plant die in the next five years, which is a hard thing for you to predict I realize so. But that is the official stance of the American Society of Breast Surgeons and mine as well because at the end of the day these other. Recommendations come down to a cost benefit analysis. So the cost benefit analysis of whether or not get mammograms has do with much more than money although money is one of those factors it also has to do with the anxiety associated with with false positives. So we say, Oh, we think we see something might be nothing but when you come back and oftentimes they say we have time in a week and a half. So like for week and a half, this woman spirals in her mind to the worst case scenario of WHO's GonNa take care of my children because I'm GonNA die next month. And Psych nine times out of ten that callback was for not it was benign. You're of course grateful but you're like really. That was a heck of a week and that callback still might lead to all definitely more radiation with more views. Maybe a biopsy nine out of ten the biopsy is benign. We're thankful for that but really did have to go through the expense time off work childcare gave kind of compounds itself right so there is a cost to excessive screening with the question of, is this extra screening going to save lives? In the answer then becomes very nuanced in terms of what do you think is worth a life which is really what we're saying. So for example, when the US task force came out with their recommendations to begin mammography at fifty, instead of forty, basically in the years between forty and fifty, you'd have to do nineteen hundred mammograms to save one life. But once you hit fifty, you only do thirteen hundred mammograms to save one life..

American Society of Breast Sur US official
"american society of" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"american society of" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Probably been enjoying the low gas prices we've had over the last several months I. Know I have on the extremely fuel occasions that I've ever gone down to fill up my gas tank, but we will start driving more. We are starting to drive more and soon. Gas prices will go up and you'll be concerned again about the price of gas which may make you wonder if you're stopping your car for a minute or perhaps waiting for a train at a crossing. Is it worth shutting off your engine, or should you just let it idle? A lot of people believe that starting your engine uses a lot of gas, so it's best to just let it idol, but it turns out that thinking applies to older cars with carburetors. Today's fuel injected engines. Make that advise obsolete. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers conducted a field test, and they concluded that restarting a six cylinder engine with the air conditioner switched on. On uses as much gas as idling the same car for just six seconds, so the recommendation is if you're going to be stopped for more than ten seconds, it is actually more fuel-efficient to turn off the engine. The one big exception is if your in street traffic like at a traffic light it is illegal in many states to kill the engine while in traffic, and it is a big safety hazard, and that is something you should know. If you were to actually notice and pay attention to your thoughts and the things you tell yourself all day long you would probably be surprised and not in a good way. Most of us have a pretty negative.

American Society of Mechanical
"american society of" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"american society of" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Vice president of American society of golf we're gonna get into a nice debate with so listen we try to mix it up the best we can but I'm sure even you would agree now is the time where we need to be talking about the crown of ours now is the time we need to be talking about trump the administration because we're covering the news of the day so I I would hope that you understand that he doesn't thank you appreciate the phone call and do appreciate your your kind words I want to play since we're on the subject of Donald Trump I want to play another clip in the press conference yesterday this is Donald Trump I thought it was in the press conference I apologize but this is a clip of Donald Trump raising himself over the coronavirus response I want you to listen to this because I think this is very important and it speaks volumes on how we always gives himself credit have a listen to this I want them to appreciate the incredible job we're doing we are doing a job the likes of which has never been done before I think that we've done it a fantastic job we've done a phenomenal job and this should be saying congratulations on instead of asking a really a snarky question call it luck or call a talented doesn't matter we made a great decision some of these governors you know they they take take take and then they complain they pay can you do a great job you build a model spittle you do other than that always complaining to be happy with the job of doing that I can tell you I'll tell you what the federal government's and a hell of a job this nobody could have done a job like that most people have never seen anything like it I think we're doing very well but you know it's a two way street they have to treat us well also they can say oh Gee we should get this we should get that we're doing a great job is going to be nobody better than Donald Trump the loving what we're doing hi Leslie should respect because nobody's ever seen anything like what we've done on a scale of one to ten how would you rate.

Vice president Donald Trump Leslie American society of golf
"american society of" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"american society of" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"It's looking at them the condition is important also if you were inside the house and you walk past a window what people don't realize is he goes through cold so loft mechanics so colder doesn't come into the house higher goals out in just like if you walk down the freezer aisle in the grocery store it's not the cold air from the freezer stats making cold is your body giving off heat soul when you walk past the window if it's not an efficient window you're going to feel your body giving off heat you're gonna feel cold right so it's kind of a good way kicking the back of your hand and holding it up around the window feeling for traps that will give you the opportunity to determine whether it's an efficient when they were not but those are some of the things you can look for interesting Frank recently the American society of home inspectors came out with an app it's meant for consumers to help them not only find a home inspector but to help them do some of the initial inspections themselves so how could that happen help me determine if my house was energy efficient one feature that we have in the apt parked our tips include your account tips that you can do and they're based on this season so in the fall things like cleaning the gutters and downspouts and extending them do six things in the winter it's keeping the stroll away from flu pike if you have a high efficiency furnace Bob you changing your furnace filter shaking the attic to make sure that some insulation did not get disturbed or pushed out of the way.

Frank American society of home flu
"american society of" Discussed on 550 KFYI

550 KFYI

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on 550 KFYI

"Of American society that is a moral and economic outrage and the truth is we cannot afford to continue this level of income and wealth inequality and we cannot afford a billionaire class whose greed and corruption has been at war with the working families of this country for forty five years who would ever think that we would see that in America honestly who would have ever thought we would hear that sentiment in America where we are going to take from what somebody else has that we are going to start taking from other people as a way of making it fair we used to reward success we used to say you want you if you fight hard you can attain and achieve now when you attended she they want to punish you somehow there's nobility in poverty there is no ability there isn't nobility in poverty there is no ability and hard work if you work hard if you wouldn't put an honest day's work and it doesn't matter what's in your checking account not in my book my heroes have been the working class in America there are people right now that are some of the smartest most honest hard working Americans that are in work trucks carrying a five gallon bucket full of tools and a lunch box to work don't ever believe when you're standing in line at the circle K. the because somebody walks in wearing a uniform from a from a construction company or sweating for a living that somehow they're not smart enough to work in an office some of the smartest people I know work with their brains and with their hands it's not about a check book but when someone works hard and they attain wealth they should be punished either they should be applauded and someone should ask them how they got there learn from people that have achieved instead of punishing them I saying somehow they got it in a way that is unfair more about this debate coming up here in a few moments we're not getting that is our thought and then the governor joins us at eight o'clock speaking of great hard working people working by the sweat of their brow working.

"american society of" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Stephen anytime Frank lash the former executive director of the American society of home inspectors coming up on real estate today you might want to pull up the calendar app on your smartphone because we're going to look at our first time buyers timeline that's next right here on real estate today if you're hungry for real estate information follow real estate today on Twitter share segments listen to them again and be the first to know what's on next week's show just search real estate today on Twitter well five point nine FM the back yard looking great rob thanks man I was planning on adding a deck to know any good contractors why don't you just ask HomeAdvisor home one home advisor dot com you just tell me about your project in the match you with local pros a can do the job nice how much does it cost the home advisors totally free to use plus you can read customer reviews check pricing and book appointments for free what's the website again home advisor dot com or just download the free home adviser at mutual insurance percent generic insurance takes sold one handsome man and one flight was murdered teaming up to save the world money message mutual customize your car insurance so you only pay for what you need their mission the relationship best friend hello to liberty mutual is exposed to only pay for what you need.

advisor american society of
"american society of" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on Gaslit Nation with Andrea Chalupa and Sarah Kendzior

"From the American society of news editors the organization, stop requiring that news outlets reveal their identities in an attempt to increase participation in the early census. So they stopped having to report to really show just how white and male and privilege their numbers from four hundred thirty three news organizations that participated in two thousand fifteen and two thousand sixteen show a five point six percent increase the minority workforce now at seventeen percent at print on my new sites, but the numbers lagged far behind demographic shifts in a country where nearly forty percent of Americans or part of a minority group major national outlets continue to be dominated by men and women actually lost representation abroad. Cast news television in a two thousand fifteen survey by the group vita women of the literary arts magazines with focus on news and culture, such as the New Yorker, the new Republic and Harper's don't fare any better biters numbers show that women of color and minorities in general are Berkeley absent from the political commentary and investigative journalism, these magazines provide and so for the white women that are in these newsrooms. They're also getting ignored by their white male colleagues. So here's Laura Magana box. Citing a recent study when mail journalists replied other beltway journalists they replied to another male journalist ninety one point five percent of the time. According to a study to be published the international journal of press politics, titled Twitter makes it worse political journalists gendered echo chambers, and the amplification of gender bias of the twenty five reporters received the most replies from male political reporters zero where women do you watch. The show the wire if you know the wire that you know, how authentic that show is written and created by a former journalist David Simon who for thirteen years was a police reporter for the Baltimore Sun. He finally had to leave his newspaper when it was bought out and everything started shifting and the industry would rapidly go into decline he saw the writing on the wall all those years ago. Here's David Simon testifying before congress in two thousand nine accurately predicting that the decline of newsroom jobs would mean a rise in corruption the industry has been oblivious to it because it's sort of like the Schork was eating eating everybody from the bottom and the New York Times and the Washington Post felt it list when they have a buy out of one hundred two hundred people and they have a newsroom with thirteen hundred people. It doesn't feel the same as two hundred people walking out of a newsroom of four hundred in a regional area. That means that all of a sudden, there's nobody covering the cop shop, nobody covering zoning board the day, I run into a Huffington Post reporter at a Baltimore zoning board hearing is the day that I will become student that we. Have actually reached some sort of equilibrium. You know, there's no glory in that kind of journalism. But that is the bedrock of what keeps you know, got the next ten or fifteen years in this country are going to be a house in for state and local political corruption. So all of this matters because not only do we have corporate profit driven media. That's trying to tell us that everything is, okay. Ernst itunes will save us. Everything is normal. A lot of these so-called experts are taking William bars letter at face value. And spreading the lie that the molar report has exonerated Trump. Even that we haven't seen it those newsrooms are watching that we depend on Donnelly shrinking, but those that remain are privileged white and they're not living on the frontlines of actual terrorism in America. They don't have to worry about their families being destroyed. We've just seen such erase Responsibility. sponsor. As I mentioned before was such basic abandonment of tenants of journalism like looking for primary sources vetting them looking for accuracy. But also just the sycophancy. You know, it's amazing to me that we're seeing journalists who base their own reputations..

David Simon Twitter Berkeley reporter American society of Laura Magana Huffington Post Harper Baltimore Sun congress Baltimore New York Times international journal of press Trump Washington Post Donnelly William America seventeen percent
"american society of" Discussed on AP News

AP News

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on AP News

"The American society of Clinical Oncology, recommending geriatric assessment for cancer patients aged sixty five and up nearly two thirds of all cancer patients are that age group yet most treatments some of them. Harsh stemmed from studies on younger often healthier patients. The exams would evaluate both the physical and mental health of the patient and their social support. The idea is to find ways to help elderly patients tolerate treatment rather than assuming they're too frail. And ruling it out at the same time, they would assess the patient's desire for life prolonging treatment. I'm Ben Thomas. Italy signing onto China's controversial belt and road initiative was on the top of the gender during an official state visit from Chinese president Xi Jinping what's been referred to. As China's new silk road aims to invest in ports. Roads airports and railways in Asia, Africa and Europe to create a conduit for trade and China's construction industry western allies have expressed concerns that it's meant merely to amplify Beijing's global influence during jeez. Two day official state. Visit Italy is expected to become the first major democracy to sign a memorandum of understanding regarding the program. She's visit to Italy is expected to produce dozens of deals with billions of euros alongside the infrastructure framework covering cultural, changes sports, corporation and business deals. The decision by President Trump to announce the US will recognize his Rayleigh control over the disputed Golan Heights came. Roughly in those AP's. Jackie Quinn reports surprise the international community. It's a major shift in US policy over strategic land captured from Syria during the nineteen sixty seven war, and it was announced by a tweet during the Jewish holiday of poor. I've been thinking about doing it for a long time. It's been a very hard decision for every president. But he was asked on FOX business network's morning with Maria. If this was a move to help Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu who is seeking reelection next month. I don't know if he's doing great right now. But I hear is doing. Okay. But I would imagine the other side whoever's against him is also in favor of what I just did Syria is demanding the return of the disputed land, but Netanyahu alleges that Iran view, Syria as a platform to destroy Israel. Jackie Quinn, Washington. Special counsel's report and congress. I'm Tim Maguire, the AP news media Robert Muller wraps up his Russia election interference investigation after indicting thirty four people including twenty five Russians for direct interference. And a number of figures connected with President Trump on charges not directly related to the Russian meddling shortly after his report was given to attorney general Robert Barr. Democrats began calling for public release of the entire report and handing over all evidence to the various congressional committees conducting their own investigations, California Democratic congressman Ted lieu, a member of the House Judiciary committee was asked. If the panel is looking for information to impeach Trump. We have to interview witnesses under oath we have to get documents. And then we're going to conclude about the Gatien either it's going to honoring Donald Trump or it's not and at that point. We'll have a conversation there can people as to how to perceive Barr says he will provide initial summary of Muller's findings as early as this weekend to leaders of both judiciary committee's. I'm typically. More news right after this with Amazon music voices. All you need. Alexa, play Whitney Houston on Amazon music. Okay. Get access to over fifty million songs. Download the music app.

President Trump Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Italy Syria US Xi Jinping Jackie Quinn president China Robert Muller Robert Barr American society of Clinical O official Amazon Ben Thomas Alexa Beijing Golan Heights Whitney Houston House Judiciary committee
"american society of" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"If your age sixty eight seventy you have thirty year time horizon that would alter your glide path dramatically, wouldn't it? So I think people are using too short glide path in the first place. Second your date of death isn't nearly as soon as I suspect you might be anticipating. I don't believe you're going to die at age eighty five or ninety or even ninety five life expectancy. According to the American society of actuaries is already Eighty-eight. Guess what happens by the time? You are eighty eight. Chances are life expectancy. You'll be a hundred one ten maybe one twenty. So we need to readjust our assumptions of our longevity and make sure our glide path is focused on that reality. That's really the key. So if you're not sure how to properly structure your glide path. That's why you should call us a triple eight plan RIC because you've got the fundamental question of how should I allocate my assets how much of my money should be in stocks versus bonds. And while we're at it versus real estate and gold, and commodities and foreign securities and government securities and oil and gas and energy exponential technologies and on and on and on. How do I locate my assets among the sixteen major asset, classes and market sectors? That's the first question to help us answer. That question we need to look at. When are you gonna need the money? How soon are you going gonna need it? How much of it? You're gonna need and how long are you going to need it? And that's what the glide path. Is all about taking into consideration. Like any good pilot? Does what's going on outside the airplane? What's going on with the air turbulence what's going on with the wind, and the weather all of that has an impact on how you calculate your asset allocation and how frequently and how soon you need to.

American society of actuaries RIC thirty year
"american society of" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on KGO 810

"Your glide path dramatically, wouldn't it? So I think people are using too short glide path in the first place. Second your date of death isn't nearly as soon as I suspect you might be intimidating. I don't believe you're going to die at age eighty five or ninety or even ninety five life expectancy. According to the American society of actuaries is already Eighty-eight. Guess what happens by the time? You are eighty eight. Chances are life expectancy. You'll be a hundred one ten maybe one twenty. So we need to readjust our assumptions of our longevity and make sure our glide path is focused on that reality. That's really the key. So if you're not sure how to properly structure your glide path. That's why you should call us a triple eight plan RIC because you've got the fundamental question of how should I allocate my assets how much of my money should be in stocks versus bonds. And while we're at it versus real estate and gold, and commodities and foreign securities and government securities, an oil and gas and energy and exponential technologies and on and on and on. How do I locate my assets among the sixteen major asset classes and markets sectors? That's the first question to help us answer. That question we need to look at. When are you gonna need the money? How soon are you going to need it? How much of it? And how long are you going to need it? And that's what the glide path is all about taking into consideration. Like any good pilot? Does what's going on outside the airplane? What's going on with the air turbulence what's going on with the wind, and the weather all of that has an impact on how you calculate your asset allocation and how frequently and how soon you need to.

American society of actuaries RIC
"american society of" Discussed on Move or Improve

Move or Improve

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"american society of" Discussed on Move or Improve

"The beginning and it saves you from having to pay to retrofit at a later date you wanna have the home inspected along the way new homes should be inspected at foundation pouring if you have a basement when the walls are constructed and the framing is done and the electrical plumbing is in place but before the drywall is in place you wanna make sure that the electrical and plumbing had been done correctly and the duct work for the air conditioner or furnace is done correctly as well and the file inspection is completed your realtor can recommend several reputable inspectors to us you can also search the ashy a s h i'm website for the area you're considering that the american society of home inspectors be sure the person has significant expertise in new home construction you'll pay along the way some builders crushes about this in may squawk at letting you do inspections if they do then you wanna reconsider having that builder build your home sometimes they have a list of inspectors that they don't like and they won't allow that particular inspector to do the inspection and it makes it difficult when you wanna hire that person to come in and you wanna find out why do they not like that home inspectors the home inspector find too many things that were wrong and the builder got upset because they had to fix something that they should have they should have done correctly from the beginning so if you're building a patio home or single family home or you're buying a townhouse in the community you wanna check for the lot size make sure you have a survey of your lot so you know what size where you're bound re's are a lot of places will construct fencing whether the permanent cinderblock fence as a privacy fence or picket fence or any kind of law rail fence depends on the community and how comfortable it is and what the costs are you.

american society of home