35 Burst results for "American Psychological Association"

"american psychological association" Discussed on Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

05:24 min | 4 months ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Introduction to Political Justice - Louis Felicia Numan, BBA, MSM, PhD

"Basically. And you send around here talking about you found out that you and found out it's mental illness. The mental illness is homosexual allergy. See, what a lot of people don't know. What's back in 19 73, 75. The American psychological association was petitioned by the homosexual community to take them out of the diagnosis because back then. Homosexuality was considered a mental illness of a man said that he was a woman or a man want to go with a man. They just put him in a book. And if he go and if he go and try to talk about his problem and he a homosexual, they first thing they'll do is they have like a. First tier second tier third tier on how they diagnose you. And the first year is homosexuality and the secondary depression, whatever else that he said the problem. But I found out that. Psychologists didn't even want to diagnose. Homosexuals anymore because they found out and you know psychologists are said to have what you call a God complex. They think that they are God. But they found that if a man think that he a woman and we can't know how to say vice versa because it starts with the man if a man, thank you a woman. That means he has a lack of God. And they said that if a person don't have a secret higher power, I don't care what kind of problem you get. You can be drinking after how like a numbers. Narcotic anonymous. Whatever your issue is, if you don't seek a higher power, there's no hope for you. And they said that, you know, take them out the book because there's no sense in dealing with them because they don't have they don't even have they don't even seek in order to solve any problem. Everybody in this country, if you ain't ever had a mental illness, you have had something you had to come up overcome. You've had to overcome drinking, smoking, drugs, crack, peels, everybody had to overcome something. And guess what? You know for a fact, you had to have what? A higher power. And so this is their, this is how they came to the conclusion. And to me, it don't make sense, but it makes a whole lot of sense because how you gonna help somebody, they're sitting there, you know. It's hot. It really is hard. The deal with a person that don't seek a higher power. It's so if they're so complicated when you hear a person on national television, say that a woman can be a man even though she don't have. We talking about a physical talented, but she don't have a physical..

American psychological associa allergy depression
"american psychological association" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:42 min | 9 months ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"A pile of needles. For every hint of progress I encountered at least 30 distressing headlines. It was hard to accept that those glimmers of growth could hold much weight in the midst of such overwhelmingly grim news. But over time, I began to recognize them as fuel for hope. I quickly learned to spot the telltale signs of progress. And that perfect progress doesn't exist. So much is subjective contentious, fragile or incremental. The march toward progress rarely comes in giant leaps. But each step, even the false starts can help build forward momentum. There's no doubt that these progress reports matter. More than half of Americans say the news causes them anxiety or sleep loss. According to a pre-pandemic survey by the American psychological association. Stories that touch on potential solutions to the world's problems, however, have an empowering effect on audiences. It's not about turning a blind eye to hardship. It's about making sure we don't let it obscure our sense of reality. As we begin 2022, many of the struggles of the past year still loom large in our memories. But we also found 257 signs of progress worth highlighting in 2021. This week's feature explores key themes from last year. And underscores the biggest takeaway from my 18 months on the progress beat. There's always a reason for hope. If you.

American psychological associa
Dr. Tim Clinton on the Myth of 'Toxic Masculinity'

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:12 min | 11 months ago

Dr. Tim Clinton on the Myth of 'Toxic Masculinity'

"My friend doctor Tim Clinton, he's the president of the American association of Christian counselors. He's also the co host with doctor James Dobson of family talk. The new book is called take it back, reclaiming biblical manhood for the sake of marriage family and culture. So Tim, we hear a lot in this day and age. We hear a lot about a lot of dumb stuff, but at the top of the list for me is this issue of toxic masculinity. It's kind of like talking about violent masculinity or whatever you're like, yeah. When masculinity goes bad, that's bad. We get it. But the idea that masculinity is somehow inherently dangerous or whatever you think, well, you know, that's like saying every cop with a gun is a potential murderer. So let's take the guns away from them. Their whole job is to protect the innocent and when they don't do that if they do the wrong thing, we prosecute them. So we're all on the same page, but people seem to be pushing this idea as though manhood is somehow inherently toxic. And we would say it's exactly the opposite. But why is that idea so widespread? You know, it's the logic's insane Eric, but even the American psychological association came out and basically broad brushed that statement saying that men were toxic. Eric, it's not that men are toxic. It's not that masculinity is toxic. It's that there's toxic behavior. There are men who make bad decisions. Have men blown it? Have you ever been on the receiving end of somebody's anger? Of their horrific stuff. You know, in a counseling world I live in. I see it every day. But Eric, that doesn't mean men are masculinity as toxic. We own our behavior, masculinity, God created this uniquely. We go back to our earlier discussion about being protected and providers the walls and so much more. Why they want to take it out again. It's the narrative. Because if you can neutralize men, if you can get them to shut down, if you can get them to, hey, what did throw say? The massive men lived quiet lives of desperation. If you can get them lost, if you can take them out of the fight, what the editing, all that's necessary for evil to try them in the midst of this war that we're in is for good men and women to do what? Nothing.

Tim Clinton American Association Of Christ James Dobson Eric TIM American Psychological Associa
"american psychological association" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

07:43 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on The Exam Room by the Physicians Committee

"You have a dopamine level. It's not so good to have an overdose of dopamine. And then to want more and more because the amount you have upon first exposure isn't giving you that high anymore. So the short answer to your question was dopamine does. And it gets really out of whack for, you know, lack of a better way of describing it when someone becomes booked on food that release dopamine and Internet amounts. When they really shouldn't be releasing them like that. In our previous episode, I think you mentioned that sex and food were the two big dopamine triggers in life, right? So that's kind of what makes us happy. Yeah. And I'm curious, though, so say, with somebody who gets addicted in this case, we're talking about food, but really this would apply to any other substance. If they get super addicted to food and that is really the primary dopamine release trigger in the brain, does the brain then not release dopamine for other things like a sex, suddenly less pleasurable is just being happy being around friends and family? Is that suddenly not as pleasurable as well? Does the brain stop making as much dopamine and other cases? Great question. I would say, so to be able to give a definitive answer, you have to really dive into the field of food addiction, research. The short answer, I guess I would say would be perhaps because we do see that in drugs of abuse. So the short answer is, more than likely, yes, but the scientists want to have the data to show you yes definitively. I say more than likely, yes, because if you are in the throes of food addiction, which is defined very loosely enough to learn his college in 2009 kind of started the ball rolling and putting this term out there. It's simply a loss of control over food intake. And so whereas addiction, we know from the diagnostic statistical manual for mental disorders. It's a manual that the APA American psychological association puts out every year for psychiatry and psychology to be on the same page when it comes to criteria for meeting certain disorders and that obviously gets revised every so often. And so there's a big push to get food addiction in there. The latest version of the DSM does include kind of the sidebar of food additions. But right now, it's not in it of itself, it's own disorder, but it's going to be. I know it. I see it getting there because we researchers are working dear heart and their colleagues are working on a tool to measure it. So when you get to a certain point where you validated a tool and you've replicated by me and then you can finally say, this is worthy of becoming something in the psychological jargon and the literature, and we can diagnose it and then more importantly, we can build insurance with a specifically into that we're all, you know, treating the same thing, calling this communicative, I guess it's the same. I don't know if it's calling it what it is. How much research right now is being done on food addiction because I know that I think maybe it was from Yale or brown or one of those Ivy League schools, they actually came up with or Harvard, a food addiction scale where they kind of rated how addictive, particular food is. That's your heart and their colleagues. The Yale food addiction scale. That is there's some literature out there every year or so I start to see more utilizing that. They're fine tuning that tool. So that's where we're at. I'm not going to pretend that I'm buddies with them, and I know workings are going on, but I do know that we so often I see a new piece of literature pop up from that group. And from others who are wanting to find seeing that tool. And I believe they want to create about this. Don't quote me on this, but I think a pediatric version as well. So it's really, really important. And I know that they know this that when you are going to try to get a new construct such as in this case food addiction to be a real medical term that you need to get all your ducks in a row and be able to have exact criteria that you want to say is necessary for a patient to for you to be able to diagnose someone that this particular condition. And so yes, the Yale food addiction, Yale, food addiction scale is a tool that I believe is in the works of being validated and so I guess other fines doing it. But on the lookout for that because once that is set in stone, I think that's the next step for us to be able to really have this term, this diagnosis, the official in medical science. And so we have a cool now to measure it. As more and more research is being done, it gradually the concept of food addiction is being more accepted, but what would you say is the majority feeling about food addiction right now? A lot of people say, it's just it's false, you know? They'll go back to what your students say at the beginning of the semester that it's a lack of willpower that you know it's just people are choosing to eat these unhealthy foods. But what is the pervasive feeling about food addiction? Would you say right now in this country? Great question. I can't speak for the rest of the country, but I can say that whenever it is a topic that comes across, I guess the mainstream press, I think that people are people's eyebrows raise. Well, let go. Maybe that's why I can't put down, you know, that kind of ice cream every time. But I can say it's not so simple to say that, you know, one person is suffering from obesity to food addiction and just like everyone else's. I can't blanket statement that, right? That's why it's such a complex issue. But it could be the situation where somebody's brain mechanisms that underlie their drive to procure and consume food gets hijacked when wanting to become dependent on particular just like when they become dependent on a drug. So if those pathways, this pathway in particular, starts to override, you know, other pathways. So as far as the general understanding of it, I think people have a real non in depth kind of cursory understanding of that. If you get addicted to food, and they may know better and just their anecdotally in their own lives to stay away from Pringles in the same way from whatever it is that they can't stop eating. So oftentimes what I do when we do get enthusiastic addiction through the kitchen, we see in the course that I teach, I have the students read some studies that have been done to look at to look at this concept. There's so many cool studies. And one of them really is really neat. They use the M and M and they use I do this because they have to pick up the same food cheese, little tiny bits of cheese that the action of picking up is the same regardless of what you're eating. And one of the outcomes with regards to those a lot of the studies is and one of the things I always kind of take home from it is perhaps that there's a trigger food that someone knows that they just they overeat it. I would not be surprised. It's not like I'm doing an MRI and looking at this going on in the brain, but you can know whether or not you feel a lot of control at the end of the day. And at the again, as I said, I'm also control of food. Over food and dates is that broad definition that we're using to simplify what food addiction is. Reinforcing and rewarding is one of the hallmarks of addiction. So that's certainly can be one of those things where you're just move off of control of limiting intake and certainly the state in which someone engages in a compulsive behavior, even when faced with negative consequences. So all of those things are hallmarks of addiction. And so I think if anyone can honestly look at their own data food that they feel like they just can't control, I wouldn't be surprised that almost everyone can say that they've experienced that. And whether or not the.

APA American psychological ass Ivy League Yale Harvard brown obesity
"american psychological association" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

05:17 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Power is one of those terms that we all think we understand. It's being in a position to call the shots to set the agenda to lead others and maybe to boss them around her even punish them right. Our culture's understanding of power has been heavily shaped by one person. Niccolo machiavelli the renaissance. Your politician and diplomat who infamously wrote that power is essentially about force fraud ruthlessness and strategic violence. But what if he was wrong. So what is power. Wash people seek it. What types of people it. And if you want power. What's the best way to get it is. It's human nature to abuse power and water some people lust for it. What is the impact of powerlessness. Welcome to speaking of psychology. The flagship podcast of the american psychological association that examines the links between psychological science and everyday.

Niccolo machiavelli american psychological associa
"american psychological association" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

Therapy for Black Girls

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Therapy for Black Girls

"I would say that the conversation around it doesn't have to be a black white thing as far as what addiction looks like and what. Alcoholism is in order for people to want to be sober. I think it's really helped to get less away from. Is it like how. And the why instead of realizing there's actually at least thirty different reasons why we are dependent on alcohols in ways that we are in it matters a certain extent why but it also is more important as to how we move forward with that information and what we do with that for example for me. Alcoholism does run on one side of my family. And i don't blame my behavior on anyone else's or anything like that. I didn't observe alcoholism. Child is just as in my blood line. But i do think that avoiding hard conversations and reaching outside of ourselves to feel better and having secrets of some sort is a problem in my family and that all the lends itself to allow. Have a problem who cannot talk about. What do i do about it. Not really seeing what i need in order to move past that and i see that as being very important for the ways of me cope habits that we develop Green points there. And i think part of our national conversation just around stuff like managing stress in coping mechanisms right like alcohol often comes up as a part of like. Oh you know. I'm having a bad day like like you mentioned like i'll just have a glass of wine raid. I mean you know. The american psychological association has distress in america. Report that they do every year and so of course. Last year's results were very telling so in twenty twenty stress in america report. Twenty three percent of adults reported drinking more alcohol to cope with stress during the pandemic them. Before right and i think there are lots of reasons of course that we can understand how that happens. Can you share a little bit more about what has been the impact of the pandemic in people's drinking..

american psychological associa america
"american psychological association" Discussed on More Content Talk

More Content Talk

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on More Content Talk

"Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of more content talk. That's the only show that cuts through the glam glitz and all the bullshit to bring you the truth. Theus news that we can find today. Maybe talking about rejection rejection is quite possibly the most overlooked of human feeling No one pays attention to it. you try to beat down The feeling that you feel when you're rejected but it's still there it hurts. It hurts Mentally but it also hurts physically and I have proof for that. I'm going to be reading. A bit of an article from the american psychological association called the pain of social rejection. When you're holding these various job interviews or social functions or whatever it is you people do these days. Try to be more inclusive. Why why are people so afraid of that. Why does that scare people. What what can. I really do to you with my different ideas. Different way address. The different way look. I can't do anything. I can't harm you with any of those things. I can't even harm you with The type of people a hang out with because they don't bring those people with me on this particular night. I'm sitting here just waiting for my rejection letter. You know from this this job interview that i applied for I'm just waiting for the rejection letter. I i worked for for my knowledge for my talent. I worked well other people. Were busy philosophizing about. I don't know like how they were gonna make it to the top or whatever i put in hard work. You know i used to go home and just just practice facial expressions in front of the mirror and you might say to yourself. Why would you do that. That seems like a silly thing or you know accents and stuff like that. Because that's the work of being an actor is not all fun and games. It's not just you know like they portray it in hollywood whereas like yeah like just party all the tide man just purdy all the time and yeah. I mean. Maybe some of them do. I mean maybe some of them have money to do it. If you don't have any money party for shit if you all know that today no party going on here and there ain't been a party going on for a long time and and you know people call me bidder and it's like okay fine. I am bitter. That's what you want. You want call me calm you name. It doesn't affect me. It doesn't change my opinion of the facade in.

american psychological associa hollywood
'American Marxism' Still in the Top 10

Mark Levin

01:51 min | 1 year ago

'American Marxism' Still in the Top 10

"You before Tuesday's her big days in the publishing world, because that's when new books Are released and their pre orders are released. And so we take a look at that from time to time, and here's the Amazon best sellers from the top right now. Number one the love songs. The novel. Number two publication Manual, the American Psychological Association. Number three a book by Robert F. Kennedy Jr The real Anthony Fauci Number four. It ends with us a novel. Number five. The body keeps the score brain mind and, uh, whatever. Number six American Marxism. So we've fallen from number one to number six. Number seven Louise Penny, the madness of crowds and novel Number eight. I won't read them all. Don't worry. Atomic habits. Number nine Children's book. Our Class is a family. Number 10 my first learn to write workbook. So we've fallen to number six. Now we've got number one is a novel. Number two is a manual number three is Robert F. Kennedy Jr. I'm sure that's fantastic. Number four is a novel number five. I'm not sure what that is. Number six is American marks is I'm just hoping you haven't lost interest out there. I know there's a lot going on. There is a lot going on. But I'm hoping you haven't lost interest out there. The goal is to get to a

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Louise Penny Anthony Fauci American Psychological Associa Amazon
"american psychological association" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

04:31 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Order of Man: Protect | Provide | Preside

"Know a high normal healthy. They reduced during zaidi. They are in better moods more. Calm so i mean that's a good side note right that You know and again this is probably stuff you talk about on your show hormone testosterone has been demonized as this bad hormone. It's not it's been misinterpreted like you see things. From for example. The american psychological association who comes out and says things that we traditionally associate with testosterone and masculinity like stoicism or competitiveness or aggression or dominance and we just assume or assign negative meaning to aggression or negative meaning to competitiveness or stoicism. But you know when you take a step back you really think about stoicism the ability to reading control. Your emotions that a negative thing. Or or a competitiveness the desire to improve yourself to get better to make yourself more cable so that you can compete more effectively. Is that a negative thing. No it's not negative but it's misinterpreted as being negative absolutely in there are dark sides say dysfunctional versions of every course right. I think it's a matter of making sure that we understand when we're taking things too far or like i said earlier presenting false dichotomies I know for myself personally. I tend to become very obsessive person. So if i find something. I'm interested in whether it's podcasting or training. Were jitsu or a hobby like hunting that i go all in at the expense of everything else that i have going in and i get this tunnel vision and focus on this one thing which can be very good in certain instances and it could be detrimental and a lot of cases. Oh one hundred percent in again We talk about certain male traits. But we forget that they that when they're healthy they tend. They tend to be accompanied by other male traits. Temperance you know calmness stillness consistency right and also i forgot who said this but someone brought this up. There's this page that i fall. I can't remember the name that i love to give him a shout-out but very very good at presenting these things and he talked about how the man in mainstream media tends to not do this but if you really think about it the guy that is really revered among other men is the guy that for example. Just use an example. The guy that if you wanted to he could just be with any woman that he wants but he but he chooses to be with one and he values her and he cherishes her. Compare that guy to the guy that you know is with every single woman that he wants to be with which one will true man right. It's the one that that chooses to be with one but can be with all of them right or the man who if you wanted to kick everybody's ass because you super tough and whatever but instead he chooses to be You know calm still to show mercy to not display violence unless absolutely necessary. That's the person that gains respect. And you see this even in the animal kingdom among primates. The ones that are the alpha's aren't the most violent evil. Terrible ones are the ones that work the best with everybody else now. If they wanted to they could lay the smack down but they don't they often don't so i mean i know a bit of a sidetrack but It's important conversation for sure. I really think it is i. you know. A lot of guys will talk about other individuals that they see your have interaction with and and they'll say you know that guy's got the x. factor whether they'll they're verbalize it or not they see right like oh. There's something about that individual. And i've seen men who i'm like man. What is it about this guy like. I'm actually intrigued. Like i want to be like this man. And i think that's what you're talking about its capability. It's the ability to go out and do what needs to be done but the restraint to not have to prove yourself in every circumstance in every environment to to to get involved in every situation or every argument like. There's no need to do that but only a confident insecure man can do that. Yes absolutely one hundred percent remembrance of funny story you know. My father is somebody.

zaidi american psychological associa
The Truth About Pandemic Weight Gain

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:00 min | 1 year ago

The Truth About Pandemic Weight Gain

"I've been seeing a lot of reports in the media about how much weight everyone supposedly gained during the pandemic year. And some of these numbers are pretty alarming. One highly regarded source reported an average weight gain of twenty five pounds. Another widely reported survey. Put that number even higher at twenty nine pounds. Meanwhile everyone on social media is bemoaning. The fact that returning to in-person work or school is going to require a whole new wardrobe because they can no longer fasten their so-called hard pants internet memes and jokes aside massive weight gain in a large proportion of the population would have serious implications in the form of increased disease burden risks and disability. Fortunately when you take a closer look at the data the actual situation is not quite as dire or dramatic as news. Reports would suggest one of these reports for example is based on an internet survey conducted by harris poll on behalf of the american psychological association. And contrary to what you may have seen about this in the media the survey did not find that the average person gained twenty nine pounds during the pandemic four in ten of those surveyed actually said that the pandemic did not result in any unwanted weight. Change twenty percent said that they experienced unwanted weight loss as a result of the stress. The remaining forty percent said that the pandemic had led to unwanted weight game and the average reported weight gain in that group was indeed twenty nine pounds but only half of those or twenty percent of all respondents reported gaining more than fifteen pounds. Keep in mind as well that all of these were self reported changes not verified by any actual weight data so it's unclear just how accurate people's reports or recollections

American Psychological Associa Harris
Tim Clinton, Author Of "Take It Back: Reclaiming Biblical Manhood for the Sake of Marriage, Family, and Culture" on Toxic Masculinity

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Tim Clinton, Author Of "Take It Back: Reclaiming Biblical Manhood for the Sake of Marriage, Family, and Culture" on Toxic Masculinity

"Tim We hear a lot in this day and age. We hear a lot about a lot of dumb but at the top of the list for me is this issue of toxic masculinity It's kind of like talking about violent masculinity or whatever you're like yeah when masculinity goes bad. That's bad we get it but the idea that masculinity is somehow inherently dangerous or whatever you think well you know that's like saying every cop with a gun is a potential murderer so let's take the guns away from them. Their whole job is to protect the innocent. And when they don't do that if they do the wrong thing we prosecute them so. We're all on same page but people seem to be pushing this idea though. Manhood is somehow inherently toxic. And we would say it's exactly the opposite. But why is that idea so widespread you know. It's the logics insane at Eric but even the american psychological association came out and basically broad brushed that statement saying that men were toxic. Eric that men are toxic. It's not that masculinity is toxic. It's that there's toxic behavior There are men who make bad decisions have been blown it. Have you ever been on the receiving end of somebody's anger of of their horrific stuff. you know in the counseling world. I live in. I see it every day. But eric doesn't mean men or masculinity is toxic we own our behavior masculinity god created us uniquely. We go back to earlier discussion about being protective some providers the walls and so much more why they wanna take it out again. It's the narrative because if you can neutralize men if you can get them to shut down if you can get them to throw say the mass of men live quiet lives of desperation if you can get them loss if you can take him out of the fight the edmond burke sake all the necessary for evil. Try up in the midst of this war that we're in is for good men and women to do what nothing you neutralize them as what you

Eric TIM American Psychological Associa Edmond Burke
"american psychological association" Discussed on Self-Coaching

Self-Coaching

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Self-Coaching

"The more the american psychological association would say self esteem more to the point. But the way using these interchangeably. And i think everyone has an idea. What inferiority complex means it's it's used quite frequently generically so we're talking about you know growing up and and maybe you know trying to compensate for that which we feel has More or less been lacking in us. And that's why like what you say about your apple nece in the in that. Play when you were able to recognize that being the only apple in that play. You found a way to be okay. Ain't nothing wrong with you. Right so yeah. It's interesting too because as humans where the only species that actually has a relationship with ourselves and as you're speaking to the apple and the orange i mean. Obviously that was fantasy but With the as humans like we actually do interact with ourselves constantly and so there's this mind made version of ourselves. That's kind of dependent on our thoughts and we speak to ourselves as if somebody else. We talked to ourselves in the second person saying like what. How did how did you let that happen. I can't believe you did this or i can't believe you failed at that and it's almost shocking when you hear yourself doing it because it's like well who who is talking new and why are you talking to yourself in such a unfriendly way. Are you talking to me be. Yeah but that. I think that's where our self esteem is made through our our mind creation like it. We decide you know through our thoughts through our conditioning. Whether or not we're enough and so you know everybody does it to some extent but i think sometimes we ask ourselves like what if what if we are enough like. How does that change things. If we actually allow ourselves to be instead of constantly criticising. It's a lot of this. You know when you say keeping up..

apple american psychological associa
"american psychological association" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Enjoy but you're just one mistake away from being found out for the fraud you really are if so you're not alone. Those are signs of impostor phenomenon also called imposter syndrome estimates vary some research suggests that up to seventy percent or more of people experience imposter feelings at some point in their lives. So where do these feelings come from. Who is most likely to experience impostor phenomenon what repercussions it have in people's personal and professional lives. And if you're troubled by imposter feelings what can you do to address them. And keep them from holding you back. Welcome to speaking of psychology. The flagship podcast of the american psychological association that examines the links between psychological science in.

american psychological associa
The Surprising Power of Compliments

Here's Something Good

01:59 min | 1 year ago

The Surprising Power of Compliments

"After a year of covid many of us are finding that our social skills are a little rusty. We're finally getting more opportunities to meet others. But we've lost some of the social niceties and techniques that make human connection so meaningful. The good news is there's a simple thing you can do to rebuild your social muscle and to raise your level of happiness. The answer is compliments. There's power in giving them and getting them to learn more. We talked to lindsey liven psychotherapist and licensed social worker. What she had to say lindsay. Thanks so much for joining us won't get so much for having me so. Let me start by asking. Why are compliments so important in our lives. And why are they so important right now. Compliments allow us to connect with the people around us and really bring people together in a lot of different ways. And i find it. It's a really easy and disarming way of forming a connection and that's especially great because you can use it if you're just meeting someone as an icebreaker or if you already know them you can use it to deepen the relationship i find you know. This is really coming at such an important time. Because after a year of being told to isolate and keep our distance we're experiencing a social inflection. Point and i think a lot of people are finding that as immunity rose and we're unmasking were now faced with the possibility of returning to in-person contact and what that might be exciting it can also be intimidating and leave us feeling unprepared. Actually the american psychological association just released a study that said about half. The people surveyed were actively worried about adjusting to in person interaction. So i think to the audience if you're having a little bit of social anxiety please know that you're not alone. I think it's important to acknowledge that after a year without regular of socialization your social skills will start to weekend and interactions might not be as dynamic or is electric as we bite them to be

Lindsey Lindsay American Psychological Associa
The Surprising Power of Compliments

Here's Something Good

05:48 min | 1 year ago

The Surprising Power of Compliments

"After a year of kobe many of us are finding that our social skills are a little rusty. We're finally getting more opportunities to meet others. But we've lost some of the social niceties and techniques that make human connection so meaningful. The good news is there's a simple thing you can do to rebuild your social muscle and to raise your level of happiness. The answer is compliments. There's power and giving them and getting them to learn more we talked to lindsey liben psychotherapist and licensed clinical social worker. Here's what she had to say lindsay. Thanks so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me so let me start by asking. Why are compliments so important in our lives. And why are they so important right now. Compliments allow us to connect with the people around us and really bring people together in a lot of different ways. And i find it. It's a really easy and disarming way of forming a connection. That's especially great because you can use it if you're just meeting someone as an icebreaker or few already know them you can use it to deepen the relationship i find you know. This episode is really coming at such an important time. Because after a year of being told the isolate and keep our distance we're experiencing a social inflection point. I think a lot of people are finding that as immunity rose. and we're unmasking. We're now faced with the possibility of returning to in-person contact and what that might be exciting. It can also be intimidating and leave us feeling unprepared. Actually the american psychological association just released a study that said about half. The people surveyed were actively worried about adjusting to in person interaction. So i think to the audience if you're having a little bit of social anxiety please know that you're not alone. I think it's important to acknowledge that after a year without regular active socialization your social skills will start to weaken interactions might not be as dynamic or is electric as we buy them to be and when wendy's hills there's sort of like muscles they need to be worked and conditioned to the strong when you call up on them as almost like if you signed up to run a ten k race. But you didn't have the opportunity to train of you'd be feeling uncomfortable because you're out of rapids so i find instead of just accepting the discomfort anxiety one of the best ways to alleviate it is to give yourself options and that's where the compliment comes into play because it's one of the strongest and most versatile tools in the well-being toolbox to help you navigate social exchanges. That's great before we get into the specifics of complements what are the positive effects of giving them and receiving them so when you give a received compliments it's actually not just about making the others feel good. It directly improves your levels of happiness in your own relationships. There's actually a really good article from the journal of personality and social psychology. That concludes that when you express appreciation for your partner. Both people become more responsive to each others needs. It allows you to work through the hard times a little more effectively. And i think we can all use a little more happiness and resilience and meaningful engagement in our lives. And i understand. You have a specific technique forgiving complements. What is that i do. That's called the sage approach s. a. g. e. and it stands for specific authentic grateful and empower. And how does that work so it works by starting off to make your compliments sincere. I encourage people to zone in on a specific task or quality or attribute that they admire in another person. I really encourage you to keep it. Simple really skip. The hyperbole over the top planes tend to discredit the compliment. So for example. When you hear people say oh my goodness. That's the best thing i ever ate. Well you probably know. It's not the best thing they ever eat. So don't undermine yourself this leads me to the next part which is authenticity after you have a focus. Try to weave in a personal an action express the compliment from your heart and you strong. I contact if you can really just try to be as authentic as you can. It doesn't matter if it's the highest praise someone has ever received. If it's sincere it will have a much greater impact. The g. in sage stands for gratitude. And this is one of my favorite parts because it allows you to reflect on the goodness in your own life and then express the appreciation for these gifts. It's what's most valuable parts of a compliment because it can also allow you to deepen your connection with the receiver. There's a lot of research. That's out there that connects gratitude with higher levels of happiness and resilience and meaningful connection double win. Because as you start to feel more connected and comfortable the positivity bubbles over into other areas of your life and that actually leads me to the e which is for empowering and this last bit of advice is to direct your compliment towards empowering actions. I encourage people to celebrate the confidence boosting behaviors like if someone didn't awesome job spearheading a presentation or modeling. Courage reflect that back to them because when someone exposes a vulnerability. they're more to authentic positive responses. So if you feel moved share it. I also really just encouraged giving sage compliments whenever the opportunity strikes. Make the morning of the person who you're lot at you know. Or if you catch the eye of an unassuming stander who thinks their head in the clouds the more opportunities you have to practice a more natural it will feel

Lindsey Liben American Psychological Associa Lindsay Journal Of Personality And Soc Wendy
APA Study Shows Pandemic Has Led To Weight Gain for Many Americans

America's First News Show

04:42 min | 1 year ago

APA Study Shows Pandemic Has Led To Weight Gain for Many Americans

"A doctor John. Let's get to this study from the EPA. More Americans gained weight. Then lost, but 61% experienced undesired weight changes. According to this study. The cause of the weight gain is that just overall stress I know it was. It was a tough year, and it still is for many. Well, according to the American Psychological Association. 42% of the curious adults reported underside weight gain with an average gain of £29. They're denying question of the women and 45 men and 45% of human reported on average underside weight gain of £37.22 pounds respectively. Now what could be could be causing this siphon drone locked out has physical challenges do to disruption of daily routines, for example. Many have to deal with unstructured time due to closure of gyms and the creation of centers. Woman rustic, since all had work demands unforeseen hardships and 50 concerts. Many experiences. Experience, less sleep, less physical exercise and more border. Has increased stress level as you mentioned the general uncertainty during the covert 19 pandemic is felt by everyone. Many many common state for this by neighboring more food. Most off the easily available. Cheap packaged foods are made with grains and grain flour products.

American Psychological Associa EPA John
Most Americans say the pandemic has been bad for their weight

Ernie Brown

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Most Americans say the pandemic has been bad for their weight

"Since the world pretty much changed overnight due to the pandemic, and according to the American Psychological Association, most Americans have had a weight change as a result. Experts say that 42% of adults said that they had gained weight that they didn't want an 18% were great Americans and said they lost more weight than they attended. But the average weight gained during the pandemic was £29 Wait a

American Psychological Associa
New Survey Finds 71 Million Americans Have Gained Weight

The KFBK Morning News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

New Survey Finds 71 Million Americans Have Gained Weight

"Americans have been putting on weight over the past year during the pandemic Spurred lockdown. The American Psychological Association says many Americans are having difficulty dealing with pandemic related stress. Associations. Doctor Vail Right, calls it a serious situation. We are, unfortunately on a path where if we don't change some of these behaviors that we're seeing in the study that we are going to see long term negative physical and mental health consequences over 60% of adults surveyed said they've experienced undesirable weight change during the pandemic and have gained an average of £29. According to the association groups reporting the highest levels of problematic coping include essential workers, parents with young Children and individuals from communities of

American Psychological Associa
Why Is It So Hard to Remember What Day It Is?

BrainStuff

03:41 min | 2 years ago

Why Is It So Hard to Remember What Day It Is?

"In the early part of the twenty first century psychologist dr david. A ls performed possibly the shortest experiment in the history of the social sciences. He gathered sixty five randomly. Selected test subjects invited them into his office one by one and asked them this fateful question. What day is today. that's it thank you. Please sign the release form on the way out done so what could possibly learn from asking people the day of the week. A heck of a lot as it turns out using this simple experiment and others ellis was trying to decode the complex psychology of time. And even to help answer. The age-old question wait is wednesday or thursday because although each weekday is twenty four hours long they're far from equal from a psychological standpoint. We spoke with ls via phone back in two thousand fifteen from the university of lincoln in the uk. He said when you ask people about monday and friday they have a lot to tell you and those words evoke very strong emotions whereas when you ask them about the middling days people tend to draw a blank asked to free associate about monday. Ellison test subjects wrote strongly. Negative words like tired boring early and rubbish it being the uk after all and when asked to describe friday they came up with wildly positive. Words like fun friends party and someone unexpectedly bacon. When asked about the rest of the week people struggled to come up with anything at all. Tuesday for some is like a monday hangover long and busy topped the list but the description most people came up with for wednesday was simply middle there even a lot more pop songs about mondays and fridays and other days of the week considered new. Order's blue monday mamas. And papas monday monday. The bengals manic. Monday the cures friday. I'm in love. Katy perry's last friday night. Rascal flatts friday though. Of course let's not discount. The midweek brilliance of the rolling stones ruby tuesday but ellis pointed out that there can be serious unintended consequences to these strong and weak psychological associations with certain days of the week he explained. Suicide rates are higher at the start of the week for example and stocks. Perform better on friday. Mr medical appointments also peak at the start of the week in the united states. These can be a costly inconvenience for doctors and patients but they can be costly to the whole community for state run health systems like in the uk the better we understand the psychological biases toward different days of the week ellis says the better we can tailor interventions and then settled nudges. That might have significant societal. Pay off in a previous study for example l. Found that working. People are much more likely to miss monday. Doctors appointments than retirees. The health system could save loads money but retirees at the beginning of the week. And us working stiffs on fridays. Which brings us back to the original question what they is it today when alice asked that question. He timed each subject's response on mondays and fridays. He discovered people gave the correct answer twice as fast as people ask on tuesdays wednesdays and thursdays some mid week folks couldn't think of the day at all given the strong if opposing psychological associations with monday and friday. It's not surprising that people are more aware of those days. It seems the rest of the work week and get lost in the shuffle.

Dr David Ellis University Of Lincoln UK Ellison Rascal Flatts Katy Perry Bengals United States Alice
"american psychological association" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Today We're going to be talking about one of our hot new products, a product that could not be more timely. Ah, product that you're fond of saying is an experiential product meaning unlike you know ordinary vitamins like, say, vitamin C or vitamin E when you take this product. You feel it, and it makes you feel great. We call it Zenner Ji, and we're going to explain why we call its energy. It's a combo of Zen and energy, obviously, and it really is the perfect name that describes what this product Can do for you. And why now, more than ever. It's so important and why people are really loving it and enjoying it. So Jan, let's jump right into this. I want to get into his energy. What is energy? And why are we so excited about it? Okay. I want to just put this into context. The innovation that is his energy. This incredible capsule is a sign in the culmination of a ton of work that we did it. Purity products based on what we were hearing from our customers, you know? 70% 70% of the respondents from the American Psychological Association poll said. Due to politics, the amount of stress they have 77% of people are worried about the future of our country. We're talking about when it comes to sleep over 50% of the people saying it was the worst year for a sleep ever 42% of people saying Respond this they can't even remember the last time they got a good night's sleep. So's energy is this combination of two blockbuster plant compounds. Both are incredibly safe and very, very efficacious. And let me paint the picture. This way. Imagine two circles intersecting and in one circle, you have this Zen like state of energy. And what is even then I call it like this. Mindful state of alertness and tranquility. That's what then is an energy. We all know what good energy flow feels like where those circles intersect. That's what we call his energy. It's this like peaceful state of the mental awareness and acuity the likes of which you've probably never ever experienced. Just by having a cup of coffee was just kind of jacks up your energy. So this is energy Without the jitters. It's liberating Com clarity without the crash that you might get with with coffee. And of course, the restoring of action of these two ingredients on sleep is simply amazing. So so.

Zenner Ji American Psychological Associa
"american psychological association" Discussed on The Code in My 'Fro

The Code in My 'Fro

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on The Code in My 'Fro

"Updated and thought about every single day and for me the way I think about this all the way. I typically do this song by chance do this almost days is to make sure that every night before I sleep. I go through my to-do list. I have a page and my notion call to do and it's like it's made of combinations of Words, which has I think ideas to ideas doing done about something and every night. I just go through it would just make sure that everything that needs to be done the next day. I'm putting it in the about. So when I wake up, I'm very sure who I'm going to be doing. You really need to kind of against the habit of devoting a few minutes in your dates organize your to-do list. It doesn't have to be like mine, but even if it's a simple like You know a simple like was it called like a journal where you make checkboxes and you write your task and you take them off. That's fine. But then the most important thing has that you need to be able to Define your top three MIT switch are your top three most important tasks for the day and you have to structure your choices around those three things off. So you kind of think about it as your minimum viable product, right if nothing else goes well or if nothing else gets done. Today those three things will keep your life. Basically those three things need to get done if you wouldn't do anything today and you just get those three things done. And destructions they always go they will always come and they will not stop coming. When you you know, when distractions come when the opportunities arise and when you get really tired. Nothing about all I really really want to take this afternoon up. And you know, I I really want to go out like with my friends that show already what to do this. You ask me think about like how does this affect my most important task because everything else you don't really need to do them today, but then your three most important tasks. How does chicken done a perfect thought us Euro going out affect those tasks. So yeah, cuz again being I know the third thing is to come back of destructions poop. Wow, so you guys there are plenty of studies, you know that proved multitasking actually makes you less productive and this research from the American Psychological Association that explains that our brains are not meant to multitask like your brain just as possible to do that and you know, some of us all of us so it has all the cracks. It's all quite grasp. Are you walk backwards because I am Like specifically you're the type of person that has 50 browser tabs open all the time. Like I should tell Buffy a browser issue squished to the point where you can't even see the name of the the page on the site or noon. We can only see the icons and you've memorized or the all the icons because.

American Psychological Associa Buffy
"american psychological association" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on KCRW

"Their windows. Just in case there's a threat of a stolen election from both sides. And there's the feeling that all will not be well in our body politics for a long time after Tuesday, no matter who wins. There is actually a name for this feeling. Some call it election stress disorder, According to a recent survey from the American Psychological Association, More than two thirds of Americans are dealing with increased anxiety and stress around this election. Four years ago. It was just over half so a lot more Americans are feeling stressed these days. Arthur Evans is the CEO of the American Psychological Association. Welcome. How are you? I'm also suffering from election stress disorder. What is this? It's not a clinical diagnosis, right? No, Actually, the American Psychological Association doesn't use that term. But what we do talk about is the fact that Americans are experiencing a lot of stress related to the election in 2016 52% of the Americans said that they were feeling significant stress related to the election. This year that numbers up to 68%. And that's a cross put the political spectrum over 60% of both Republicans, Democrats and independents are saying that they are feeling significant stress by the election. And in specific what air they stressed about well, what they are reporting is that they are concerned about not only the election, but a lot of other factors that were stressful was prior to the election. So we have been asking questions since 2017 to 7. About a variety of issues. Concerns about the economy concerns about housing concerns about climate, racial justice on and we also know that the pandemic is also creating a lot of stress for individuals. So you have this really perfect storm of stressors that preexisting stressors the election which is very contentious and a lot of people are concerned about the political climate right now, and we have the pandemic in the economic downturn that we have experience as a result of the pandemic. Are there groups of people that are feeling more stress than other groups like When it comes to the election. Are there people who are more tuned in who are more partisan who are feeling more stress? Or is it just affecting everyone, No matter how much they're paying attention to the election or not? Well, it's both end. There is generally a lot of stress across the population. There are certain groups that are feeling more stressed. So, for example, even though over 60% of Democrats, Republicans and independents are saying they feel significant stress. Democrats are saying are saying that a rate of 74% Republicans at 67% and independence at 64%, so there are differences. And we also know that African Americans, for example, also are feeling a lot of stress there at 71%, saying that they are feeling significant stress, and that's up from 46% in 2016 so really large swing for Afghanistan. And voters well in General, African Americans feel more stress in daily life. Correct. That's true in our survey has shown that consistently that African Americans as a group feel a lot of stress on typically in a typical year on that's been exacerbated because of the pandemic and because of the election this year. What are some recommendations that you may have as a psychologist for people who are feeling overwhelmed and anxious about this? Election and about tomorrow what should they do to alleviate their stress? Sure, I think there are a few things one is to recognize that election stress Israel and that there are things that we can do to minimize that the first is to live it the and control the things that we can't can control. There are a lot of things about elections that we can't control in. That sense of feeling out of control contributes to our anxiety in our stress. But we can't control how much information that we're taking in, think limiting social media limiting other forms of media, relying on trusted sources of information that is going out and going on the Web on the Internet and looking at all kinds of tweets and poles. Many of which I don't have any basis in reality, which causes a lot of calls stress. Also doing things to take care of ourselves. You know that our physical health It is also very important SAR nutrition. It's easier to not eat right in this climate of working at home. For many people getting exercise and getting out that could be a simple as as walking. Those things really contribute to our overall health. And then I think, making sure that we stay socially connected. I think the terminology of social distancing was unfortunate because we don't want to different ourselves socially. What we want to do is to distance ourselves physically but stay socially connected because that support is really important for our psychological and physical health. So maybe watching tomorrow's election with somebody, maybe via zoom or We'll facetime or something like that versus watching it alone if you're going to watch it, Yeah, I think that's a great idea is to make that that social connection, but but also, you know, think about and plan for the election. And how are you going to Tio Watch the election returns. You know, I'm going to create an election bubble tomorrow night and I'm gonna have Ah, Election free zone. I'm going to walk some good movies and things that I've wanted to watch. Have some good deserves. Aunt. I'm going to be very intentional about when I want to engage in hearing the election news, no doom scrolling. That's not good under any circumstance when you think the states so so large. Arthur Evans. He's a clinical psychologist and CEO of the American Psychological Association. Thank you. Thank you. Come in. Restoring affirmative action is on the California ballot Proposition Tool. Nine past. In 1996,.

American Psychological Associa Republicans Arthur Evans CEO California Israel Afghanistan
"american psychological association" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"A survey by the American Psychological Association finds that two thirds of Americans Say the election is a significant source of stress. What exactly are people stressed about? And how can they cope? We're joined now by Lee Richardson, founder of the Brain Performance Center in Dallas. Lee, What are you hearing? I'm hearing it. Everybody is stressed out. I've done more stress management sessions in the last month and I have in the last year. Wow. So what are people saying? Like what? What's actually stressing them out is that the candidates is this. The messaging is a television or what is it? I think it's everything I mean, I saw her being online with 70% of American Adults report that the future of our nation is a significant source of stress. 72% 2020 is at the lowest point in our nation's history that they can remember. But but I think it's everything. I think it's don't think it's just one thing. I think we've all been touched with uncertainty, and that has left a lot of us with despair. You know, we we are adaptive systems on mental on our physical systems that we use to help us get through highly stressful situations. They're depleted. Take away the pandemic. What's your experience say, or we still has stressed about the election. I think we are because we look at things like job recovery and health care insurance and Health care insurance. I think it's become more important in the last few lattes and many people that have been ableto work lost her job. So I think that this election our personal values are really tied in, and I think that New for a lot of it. So four years ago, when we were choosing a new president, no matter what was, it's still a stressful with with the two candidates involved. I think it was stressful, but I think there was less anger because this in this election anger it everywhere. You know, there's anger. Over the cove. It violence and there's anger over the race Demonstrations and people are angry because people won't physically distant for where the mask so I think we're different. If that layer of anger we're speaking with Lee Richardson, she's the founder of the Brain Performance Center in Dallas. And we're talking about coping with election stress for some of these folks, What do you recommend here? If they're if they're feeling overwhelmed, I think way all need big step that were stressed out right now, and stress is not the same for everybody, and we don't experience it in the same way. Instead of resisting our fighting it we direct that energy. Apply that energy into something that's really important to you. Some people can't escape that right there. Just consumed by it. What's what's their path? Well, I think you're right. And I think that those people that need to spend a little time on self management, you know, start a reflection. Ask yourself what can I learn from this? Because she'd become more self aware of your values and what you're grateful for being more focused on the positive and the negative. The sun comes up tomorrow. Regardless, right. Like I try to put this in perspective, I don't feel the stress like I still have a fishing trip planned with my high school guys like in two weeks. I'm still going regardless of who wins the election. You know what I mean? And, you know, I think that's so important. Gordon. People need three things one. They need something to do. Two. They need something to love and three. They need something to look forward to. So for you, and for those who are wrestling with this The stress doesn't end November 3rd. Or whenever we get the final results, right? Now or then I think we have to recognize the importance of self care. You know, a lot of times I'll ask myself Okay. Where do I get my energy from? Or if I'm really struggling? What kind of damn times do I need? Because the rhythm of my life and I'm sure a lot of people live got really good. Destructed. So what? What's my rhythm What I need right now, and a lot of the things that I used to do for self care has been taken away from me. I've got to get creative. I've gotta rethink my options. A friend of mine that really good suggestion to me, because what I really miss. I love going out to eat in restaurants and one of you subscribe to a milk. It's service. You'll be more motivated to cook and you'll enjoy it because it's so much a here and you know what she was right. So to your point that's almost like suggesting somebody find a hobby. Find something to do. Absolutely long a new skill and what YouTube has anybody can learn a new skill. Thanks. Lee Lee Richardson, founder of the Brain Performance Center in Dallas. Coming up next. What happens during the winter months to these popular pop up music events? When it comes to mobility. Michigan is making what the rest of the world hasn't even thought of. Yet. Our state is home to two world class autonomous vehicle testing sites, and we're first in the U. S. For mobility related patents with over 500 miles of roadway equipped for connected vehicle testing. It's no wonder that everyone is moving to where it all started. So if you're ready to move into the future with your mobility business, visit planet m dot com slash pure hyphen opportunity. Do you think all vitamin C's of the.

Lee Lee Richardson Brain Performance Center Dallas founder American Psychological Associa Michigan American Adults YouTube president Gordon
"american psychological association" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on WTOP

"Her friend Dimitra Millage spoke with our news partner, NBC for I mean, I'm devastated, Devastated It's senseless killing. 26 year old Robert Guy and was arrested and charged with aggravated Do I Manslaughter Gila Guy and was not injured during the crash, A 2020 has been to put it mildly, an unforgettable year in a lot of cases for all the wrong reasons, a new report says. It zapping our mental health. The American Psychological Association Stress in America 2020 survey warns of a growing mental health crisis. I'm not sure that everyone is getting the kind of help that they need. Dr Lin Bukka is a clinical psychologist who specializes in anxiety, she says. If you're having a tough time trying to step back and see if there's things you can adjust in your life, can you make some regular routine so that you're getting consistent? Sleep? Good activity. Regular nutrition That always helps us do better, The report says. More younger Americans are reporting a decline in mental health. They're sort of stuck in a place where what developmentally they're supposed to be doing is connecting to piers becoming more independent, finding their place in the world yet then Then we're back Home, John Dome and W T O P News. A Maryland symposium on the black vote wants to empower people to go to the polls. The Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture had a clear message for black voters were given ourselves hope. Hey, if we came through that We can definitely come through whatever's going on today, Commissioner Maya Davis of the Maryland State archives went over the struggle for black voters in Maryland during the power of the Black vote symposium. It was virtual this year under a Celeste, founder and creator of clothing company under US, the last New York My ancestors literally done so that I can have the right to walk into my polling location. Pull that lever and decide who I want to represent me. Valerie bonked. W T o p.

Dr Lin Bukka Maryland Robert Guy Maryland Commission American Psychological Associa Dimitra Millage Valerie bonked Maryland State Commissioner Maya Davis NBC partner US John Dome African American History and C America New York Celeste founder
"american psychological association" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Of early voting sites and voter registration. Vice President Mike Pence, and his Democratic challenger, California Senator Comma Harris, are set to face off in a debate tonight. The debate in some Salt Lake City is one of the most highly anticipated anticipated vice presidential debates in recent memory. It will unfold while President Donald Trump recovers at the White House after testing positive last week for the Corona virus and spending several days in the hospital. The FBI and the Department of Homeland Security. Cyber Security Agency has issued a Siri's of advisories in recent weeks aimed at warning voters about problems that could surface in the election. The government has outlined steps that Americans can take to counter the foreign interference threat. The issues identified in the public service announcements ranges from the spread of online disinformation about the electoral process to cyber attacks targeting election infrastructure. And it is all of this, stressing you out will no worries top psychologists in the country are giving advice to help voters avoid stress and anxiety about the upcoming election. The American Psychological Association is telling voters to not focus on things you can't control and break the habit of assuming the worst case scenario. I know who would have thought. Ah, The organization is also telling voters to take a break from news coverage to engage in meaningful activities that are important to you. That is important. John, but WG and sports for more playoff games today for the major for Major league Baseball. We got Miami in Atlanta. It wanna wait. Houston in Oakland at 2 35. Yankees sample bait 6 10 and Dodgers in.

Vice President President Donald Trump Senator Comma Harris Cyber Security Agency Mike Pence Department of Homeland Securit Salt Lake City Major league Baseball American Psychological Associa Yankees Siri Dodgers FBI California White House government Houston Oakland
"american psychological association" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on CXMH

"That song. So thinking about I mean, obviously the the subtitle there is about principles for thriving and adversity. Right and sometimes when we think about thriving in adversity, we think about kind of resilience or things like that. Can you talk a bit about how blooming in the dark cuz that feels kind of like a distinct concept from just resilience, right? What's what's kind of the difference there? Yeah great questions. So there are similar resilience home in the dark, but they're not quite the same. So the American Psychological Association defines resilience as a process of adapting well in the face of adversity or as bouncing back from a difficult experience and blooming the dark includes that idea of resilience, but it's about more than that. So when you blew in the dark, you're not just bouncing back from a trauma or adapting to a birth city. You're actually becoming more as a result of that trauma or that adversity. So you're essentially you're harnessing the energy of that adversity to propel yourself off. Forward in life and you can think of it like you allow the force the collapse something in your life to be the very energy that causes you to become a better version of yourself off. Yeah, that's so good. I love that distinction of how you've unpacked that in terms of how it is different from resilience. One thing that I know we've talked about on the Chicago before that. I I just want to kind of touch base on really quickly. Is that what you are sharing? There is not the same as like spiritual bypassing. Is that correct? That's all she can you unpack that and how spiritual bypassing is different from what you're talking about here. Yes. I think it comes down to the word effort spiritual bypassing is a quick way to I think it was like an easy solution you sort of your bypassing over the real work and blooming the dark is tough. It's a lot of work to bloom in the dark dead. It takes real persistence and patience and intention and I mean it's reason why I wrote the book because it's a guide map..

American Psychological Associa Chicago
"american psychological association" Discussed on CXMH

CXMH

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"american psychological association" Discussed on CXMH

"Song. So thinking about I mean, obviously the the subtitle there is about principles for thriving and adversity. Right and sometimes when we think about thriving in adversity, we think about kind of resilience or or things like that. Can you talk a bit about how blooming in the dark cuz that feels kind of like a distinct concept from just resilience, right? What's what's kind of the difference there? Yeah great questions. So there are similar resilience home in the dark, but they're not quite the same. So the American Psychological Association defines resilience as a process of adapting well in the face of adversity or as bouncing back from a difficult experience and blooming the dark includes that idea of resilience, but it's about more than that. So when you blew in the dark, you're not just bouncing back from a trauma or adapting to a birth city. You're actually becoming more as a result of that trauma or that adversity. So you're essentially you're harnessing the energy of that adversity to propel yourself off. Forward in life and you can think of it like you allow the force the collapse something in your life to be the very energy that causes you to become a better version of yourself off. Yeah, that's so good. I love that distinction of how you've unpacked that in terms of how it is different from resilience. One thing that I know we've talked about on the Chicago before that. I I just want to kind of touch base on really quickly. Is that what you are sharing? There is not the same as like spiritual bypassing. Is that correct? That's all she can you unpack that and how spiritual bypassing is different from what you're talking about here. Yes. I think it comes down to the word effort spiritual bypassing is a quick way to I think it was like an easy solution you sort of your your bypassing over the real work and blooming the dark is tough. It's a lot of work to bloom in the dark dead. It takes real persistence and patience and intention and I mean it's reason why I wrote the book because it's a guide map..

American Psychological Associa Chicago
Can Your Diet Help Reduce Stress?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

05:07 min | 2 years ago

Can Your Diet Help Reduce Stress?

"What nutritional things can we do to help our stress levels and what can we do about the belly fat that being more stressed makes us onto. Well Kristen is not the only one feeling more stressed. In recent months the American Psychological Association conducts an annual poll to gauge overall stress levels in the population and the specific things that people are stressed about change from year to year. But the overall level of stress remains fairly constant even in the best of times, the majority of Americans report living with moderate to high levels of stress and they feel that their stress levels aren't healthy. Well, not surprisingly a new poll conducted in April and May of twenty twenty found that reported stress levels have jumped up considerably in response to the global. Pandemic. As. Many of us know all too well reaching for sweets or other comfort foods is a typical coping mechanism when we're stressed and with many people cooped up at home stress and boredom eating is definitely on the rise leading to weight gain, and if that weren't bad enough research does suggest that when we're stressed those comfort calories may lead to weight gain more quickly because of those high cortisol levels that Kristen mentioned. A couple of months ago I actually gave an online workshop with some strategies to help reduce stress eating, and if you missed that the replay is still available, you can access that at way less dot life slash healthy at home way last life slash healthy at home for some strategies to reduce stress eating. But wouldn't it be great if there were foods or nutrients that could defuse anxiety and ward off the negative effects of daily stress? No wonder I see. So many magazine and Web articles about Stress Busting Foods. Unfortunately, a lot of these are just puff pieces with little to no scientific basis sometimes, however, journalists will interview actual scientists about the research. The problem is that researchers often use that word stress to means something very different than what the general population of stress and that often leads to confusion. When we say we're stressed. We usually mean that we feel overwhelmed or anxious too many demands, deadlines and worries and not enough time money and energy to get it all done. Researchers on the other hand often measure physiological stress responses which don't necessarily correspond to our psychological experience. So when they report that food or a nutrient has an effect on stress that doesn't necessarily mean that you will feel better or. When you eat it let me just give you one example. In a story on the connection between Diet and stress researcher Robert. Ludwig told the morning edition about an experiment that he did on obese teenage boys in which the boys who eight highly processed cereal for breakfast had higher levels of Adrenaline, which is a stress hormone. Then those who ate a high protein breakfast instead. And the boys who ate more protein were also less hungry and they ate fewer calories at lunch. So chalk one up for a high protein breakfast. Unfortunately nobody asked the boys about their mood or how stressed they fell. So we don't know whether those different breakfast meals had any effect on whether they felt any more or less stressed. Nonetheless, if you had heard that piece on the radio, you probably would have concluded as did the reporter that eating lots of refined carbs and sugar will make you feel more stressed and anxious. But hang on just a minute because in her book, the Serotonin powered Diet Dr Judas Werthmann claims that a big dose of refined carbohydrates is exactly what you should eat to feel more relaxed and happy, and that's because refined carbohydrates promote the production of Serotonin, a feel good neurotransmitter. So which is it are we supposed to eat carbs or are we supposed to avoid them to beat stress? Will the reason that these two scientists seem to be contradicting one? Another is that they're measuring completely different things. Ludwig is looking at the effect of Diet on adrenal hormones and Workman is describing the effect of Diet on neurotransmitters of the to neuro transmitters probably have a closer relationship to our mood. Nonetheless I. Think the disadvantages of Workmen's approach outweigh. The benefits eating refined carbohydrates may temporarily boost your serotonin levels after all. That's probably why we crave them when we feel down. But they also send your blood sugar, insulin energy and appetite on a roller coaster ride and riding that rollercoaster on a regular basis is a good way to increase your risk of type two diabetes and heart

Ludwig Kristen American Psychological Associa Pandemic Cortisol Dr Judas Werthmann Twenty Twenty Researcher Workman Reporter
Black Girls In Gaming

Therapy for Black Girls

04:43 min | 2 years ago

Black Girls In Gaming

"Thank you so much for joining us today Melissa. Thank you for having me. Excited to chat about this metoo. So can you just tell us a little bit about your background? Melissa. How did you find space for yourself a gaming? Well I playing games, my entire life I mean literally as soon as I could hold a controller in my hands, I've been playing with my cousins in my aunts baseman mostly fighting games you pass the controller around tournament style and eventually evolved to playing other games with my siblings growing up I have a brother and a sister, and I think the invention of the Nintendo sixty four is probably the greatest thing that ever happened to ask because it allowed all three of us to play at the same time. which most other consoles didn't do before that. My Daddy is to get used consuls, `electronic stories and we read games blockbuster and we'd all play together and my mom daddy's to watch us in times personally I on us but also partially because they were just curious and interested about games gaming, they both Geeks, they love comics, all kinds of things like that. But. I never actually imagined myself working in games I never really thought about the people who behind the Games who actually made them. So I actually intended to become a researcher public health researcher and work either in academia or at the federal government doing health research that was going to advance programs that would help support people of Color and people from Lgbtq community is substance abuse trickiest mental health. So that's actually how I started my career. I went got my PhD in a field called socio medical sciences, which is a combination of social psychology in. Public. Health. And I did that research for while it looked at drug use and mental health and people of Color HIV risk behavior, and I enjoyed answering these questions that helped people like I love being able to ask an answer my own questions that I thought would really have a difference, make a difference in the communities of color that were like heavily impacted by some of these issues. But one of the things that always nickel that me a little bit was the amount of time that it took for the research insights that I came up with to turn into action. If. You've ever interacted with you know that you know it can take a couple of years to go from the beginning of a research project into just a paper, much less any kind of program out of it and I wanted to see more immediate impact with my work. So I started looking for other careers could use my skills as a researcher have a more immediate impact but I could see coming out days or weeks rather than. In measured in years so I started looking into user experience research and technology but again, I didn't really focus on game specifically. I was just looking at tech in general. And I found this job at xbox Microsoft websites literally just by chance I didn't know anybody at Microsoft I didn't have any like network my way in or anything the closest connection I hadn't seen somebody speaking Pan on American Psychological Association conference WHO's on my team but I was like, wow, that sounds awesome. I WanNa to do that. They'll probably never hire me because I'm coming from a completely different field, but I was wrong and he did. And that's how I ended up here. It was kind of a winding path and a little bit of a nontraditional wide but really loving and enjoying experience of being able to make gains and see what I, call it my fingerprints on all of these different projects and games they've gotten the chance to work on. It is such a cool story and you know really speaks to why I often described psychology as like this field that really opens all these other doors for you because I feel like it just lends itself to doing that only one thing but lots of different things Yup i. think that's absolutely true and ideally volunteer college admission advising, and that's what I tell the students that I work with all the time I'm like you determine where You Go and you can learn a lots of different skills and other things that will help you get to field. There's lots of different ways that you can turn lots of different majors and they're such a need for people who understand social science and how people think and behave and interact with each other So I'm curious to hear a little bit more about how your mental health background now informs the work that you do in gaming. Absolutely. So there's kind of two sides to it. There's a research methods side, and then there's the actual content of mental hall. So briefly, a lot of the methods that I learned in graduate school that I used when I was doing research on mental health I now use the same ones when I'm in research on video games and people's here's all that research training that you get is going to be useful no matter where you go and it's even useful when I'm not doing direct research because. It influences the way that I think about things I take scientific lens to approach things

Melissa Researcher Microsoft Nintendo HIV American Psychological Associa
How To Navigate Stress

The LEADx Show

05:48 min | 2 years ago

How To Navigate Stress

"Everyone? This is Patrick Baranov. I'm here to do a Webinar on how to effectively navigate stress and lead slash help others and the reason I have lead in there because to me as we go through this. I think you'll see that. This is not just a workshop on how to navigate stress internally, but to me this is about this is a leadership workshop where I spend most of. My time working with organizations so a little bit of background. Be Behind me. I run a podcast called lead like no other actions that inspire which will soon be changing to leadership reimagined, and that really is. Based on a lot of the work that I've been doing this podcast has been in existence for. Almost, two years now, but some of my background ice tablist, my business in two thousand eight, which, for those that remember that was our last financial crisis so I'm I'm familiar with the space for for what that's worth, and there are three areas that I focus. My work on one is on emotional intelligence. A model that I use is out of Australia. The group is called Genus, and it's a workplace model I also do a lot of work both disk in the five dysfunctions of a team. In combining those and then the last piece, it's like a three legged stool. Is Around Influence and bias research. And I was able to get certified and trained under a gentleman named Robert Dini down in Phoenix Arizona, the three of those for all of the work that I do and what we're GonNa talk about today in regards to leader stress, management and leading. Are All relevant and pieces. Those will come out throughout this. So. Here's some contact information for me as well. And I will start this out as I mentioned to me this leadership workshop. Even though we're talking about stress, management and I say that from this quote. John Quincy Adams said if your actions inspire someone. To Do to dream, more learn more do more and become more your leader. Nothing in here about a title and I think we really have an opportunity. It's our actions that will inspire others, and how we relate to stress and navigate stress, ourselves will have the ability to impact other people around us to, and that's why they're so important. So, the objectives here right explore the biological psychological and social aspects of the Human Stress Response, and it is a response and we're GONNA. Look at it really from a few different areas right the physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual impact of stress, and it really does impact all of those. So then we'll look at understanding. What are some of the coping strategies that we can use to either increase, or what once damage our resilience? And this really is meant to be almost a buffet, even though you probably can't find buff as anymore because of the environment we're in. That this really will be an opportunity to take a look at what are some different strategies that I can use that fit in in my lifestyle. You don't need to choose them all. But there's something here for everybody in terms of how you can effectively navigate, stress yourself or help somebody else. And then from there, we'll look at a model that I put together and it's journal actually. Called the power. Journal, and there are a number of activities in that promote both wellbeing resilience. And this is based on a lot of research I will say foundationally. One of them is based on one that was done by gentleman named Sean Acre. WHO A HARVARD RESEARCHER! And he did what was called the twenty one day challenge, and he actually did this back in Glebe two thousand nine, so at that point of financial crisis before. And he actually did it with A. Group Company that was in the financial industry. And what they found when they when they did these activities that we'll talk about the end. That the the individuals that were able to follow through on this twenty one day challenge themselves to be in a happier place and to me if we can identify those things and find that and find a way to be happier, rebuild more resilient and well. Being I think all of us want that. Especially now. So a couple pieces of research talking about the origins of stress. If you weren't familiar before you probably are now in regards to the CDC their definition of stress, harmful, physical and psychological responses when job requirements don't match capabilities, skills, resources, or needs of the worker and I think in the environment that we're in now. Most of US probably feel stress in one of those areas. Now, what's important here is this. CDC's definition also goes on to say that this should not be confused with challenges and I've listed. You stress here. Because we need stress stresses important for us as well because it provides us an opportunity. To grow and improve. It's only when we lose control of it. That it becomes damaging to us and really that's what this workshop or webinars focused on. Undoing is providing ways that we can take the stress that we're dealing with the situations that we're dealing with and find ways to navigate those and I would say almost leverage these. So the next piece I'll talk about. Is this one that was done by the? American psychological, association. This was a survey. Twenty fourteen where they served. A little over three thousand individuals, and they ask them questions in four different areas, work money, family and health. I've only listed to here. Is it relates to both work in financial stress but I think if we were to take this today. We probably would all agree that? These would probably higher than sixty percent.

CDC Patrick Baranov Australia Robert Dini John Quincy Adams Harvard Phoenix Arizona Sean Acre United States A. Group Company Researcher
Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

11:40 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Allen Berger: Overcoming Anxiety And Fear During Quarantine

"Dr. Berger what can you tell us to help us cope with these massive psychological challenges in these massively weird times? Well I think the first thing that want to say is that Were all experiencing anxiety to some level right now. That is the new normal today. We make a distinction between fear anxiety and a lot of feeling fear. Because there's a real threat out there Dr Taback and really help us understand that. So our reaction to this. The fearful part of it is quite appropriate. That's the reality of it but I think what will be important today. Bill is for us to make that distinction between fear anxiety in to talk about the anxiety. Part the fearful part. We need to do what everybody's telling us to do in order to to stop the spread of this thing in into you know decrease our risk of being able in getting the covy nineteen and that's different from anxiety. Well no that's that's the fearful part. That's the appropriate. Reaction of fear is taking the steps necessary to protect yourself. The anxiety gets in in when we start imagining. What's going to happen so when we leave right now? We go into the future. You see as soon as you start imagining catastrophic outcomes. I'm going to be in in bad shape emotionally. How does this get all the worst for someone who might be home these days? Who's already been struggling with some kind of addiction or challenge with alcohol or drugs? How did they get through this? Yeah that's such an important question. Look in and we're all trying to mobilize as many resources as we can to reach out to people that are isolated. And it's a weird thing. Isn't it where isolated but in some way were even more in community now than before and I think that's an important thing for us to realize were really connected right now and we really need each other more than we've ever in addiction and recovery. We talk about. I can't but we can and that whole idea is so important at this moment more than ever. I mean if we can remove ourselves really from this particular you know terrible crisis that were in in just sort of look at it from a bird's eye view there's an amazing message in the global nature of this disease. Right it's to me. The message is one of humility mean. It's really right sizing us in an incredible way. Isn't it Dr Data? And also just how universal this is we are all human beings. We're all going to be vulnerable. We all need to take care of each other and take care of our planet. I mean you can debate back and forth global warming this or not. There's no debate here when it comes to corona virus and it's almost as if the forces of nature have said Wake Up People. You need to be banding together to work for a common goal. Not just corona but the health of the world's for your own sake. I love that. It's it's almost like nature is saying. Hey everybody wake up waking up a wake up call. It's a big wakeup call for some of US. Like myself or watching. Cnn All day long and and you know watching those numbers on the right hand side of the of the screen continue to go up and this is. The stress gets more and more overwhelming. You you do find yourself even if you're not struggling with things like depression normally or addiction You find yourself kind of different. It does something to you just listening to. What's going on in the world and then dealing with the am I gonNa get it or any of my family members going to get it. What should I be doing to protect myself at home? And this is weird because my business could be falling apart. Can you give us some ideas on steps? We can take personally to try to manage that kind of thing in. How can we recognize if we're not managing it? Well yeah that's a very important question. Bill American Psychological Association came out with some guidelines and one other top guidelines was limit your exposure to the news right now. Now that's not the same as saying you know. Become an in on ostrich. Stick your head in the sand in and don't pay attention to what's going on but we've got to find a balance between being informed but at the same time taking care of ourselves and so limiting exposures important thing. That's what I started to do. A give myself a ten minute quota. Ten minutes I get to watch news a day and that's it and then the rest of the time you know. I'm engaged in other things. So that's the first thing right is really pay attention to limiting your time. That's GONNA help people with their anxiety a lot. So tell me what what are some of the other things? I've heard about diet and exercise and sleep but Maybe you can kind of help part listeners. Understand what are the steps that they should take to try to keep as healthy as possible? Let me put it in the context of this concept in addition to our physical center gravity. There's an emotional center gravity and when I keep my emotional center gravity over my two feet. Then I cope a lot better. Try Give this virus by emotional center gravity or what's going on in the world my emotional center gravity then my wellbeing depends on what's going on around me and today that's really bad news. Your it said it's pretty common. It's critical Woodson. It's what we're all doing and see this. Is the opportunity. See if we used. This is an opportunity to become aware of ourselves in how we function. What's our habitual ways of thinking and feeling we've got an opportunity to really do some phenomenal growth. So you say that. The there's a difference between fear anxiety you alluded to that. Would you say fear would be the rational perspective of the challenge that were under at the moment and that the anxiety irrational portion of that? That's correct so if I stay grounded in in in respond to my fear appropriately. What am I gonNA? Do you know the steps that we need to take to stop the spread of this and to protect ourselves. You know. Finally we're talking about everybody putting a mask on before you leave the house you know if there's no host for this thing to to survive in and we're going to be able to stop the spread of this thing so that becomes an incredibly important thing and I think that's what they did to finally get control the Spanish fool back in nineteen eighteen so from day to day perspective to sort of move in the moment and realize that right. Now you're fine. You're not sick this focus on what's good. Let's do what I can do what I am in control of. Let me take control of that. What is what is your recommendation for. How the average person who may have just low level anxiety and even more so those people who have a heightened level anxiety. How do you keep people away from delving into that? What IF SCENARIO WELL. That's such a great question. Let me tell you how I work with that. My office right. There's a rational part of me that you just referred to. There's a healthy part of me that that responds appropriately situations takes care of myself from a rational basis will. There's also a part of me that I call my anxious self. Now that part of me can take a situation like this and come up with all kinds of catastrophic outcomes. I'm GONNA get this. I'M GONNA die in a hospital loan although saint. That's possible outcome whether that's going to happen for me or not is yet to be determined so when I start to project into the future. I've got to start to think about that. The side of me. That's projecting into the future is the part of me. I need to deal with so I need to start separating myself from the part of me that's making me anxious and see. This is a very important step in terms of being able to now manager anxiety. Well or would I would say in the way I'm talking about now. Manage are anxious self. But do you think that on some level that the human being with our existential reality that to some extent this anxiety you put yourself through the what if in a way to try to prepare yourself in the event that it takes place thinking that maybe that may cushion the blow to try to put yourself through the potential horrendous aspects of the future so that you will not be shocked in unprepared if were to take place? We call anticipatory coping. And you're right on. We do that right. We anticipate these situations was it. How NEAT WELL. It is if you do it once maybe twice but when you do it a thousand times in you run through a scenario over and over again. You're no longer preparing. Now you're throwing yourself into a big into a panic right. You're going to have a panic attack. I do go down that road of what if and then I have a real myself back To rational thought how do you really yourself back could tell us what you do. The first thing that I do say okay. You know what you got a job to do. Focus on what's going on right now. Number one Suai become try to become more philosophical and I say it's here now anyway we all know that we're dying eventually We don't want it to be tomorrow. We don't want it to be two weeks from now but we all know. We've been preparing for this in many ways our whole lives and so. I try to be philosophical about say it's GonNa Happen. But let's focus on what's good. Let's focus on what we can control. Let's talk about the psychological stress on medical staff who have to deal with this every day. Not only do they have a concern. They have to even if they claim they don't they. They have to have a little bit of concern for themselves in this case multiplied by just an overwhelming feeling of lack of control because this virus seems to have its own trajectory and they get surprise suddenly. There's there's a patient he was doing well a few minutes ago. And all of a sudden now they're crashing and need to be put on a ventilator. How our healthcare workers supposed to deal with that kind of stress? You guys are all in my prayers right now in terms of what you guys are facing here. Here's what we know bill. Is that when you let the situation control you? Then you're GonNa have the best possible response to it. No let me explain it. Because intuitively that seems what do you mean? You're abdicating any responsibility for letting this situation control you while the opposite is true. You see if I go into a situation thinking I'm GonNa Control Everything in Dr Steve. You know this better than most if I think I can control everything. That's going to be happening in front of me. I'm setting myself for for some big trouble because then I become fixed in my response if something has to be a certain way if it's supposed to look like this then. I'M NOT GONNA be able to respond to what it is and what we know. Is your coping increases when you let go of what's supposed to be happening and you start to deal with. What is if I let go of all of my rules of what's supposed to be happening bill? I can respond much better inside every one of us. In every one of those M- those healthcare professionals right now is an incredible ability to adapt into deal with situations as they

Bill Bill American Psychological As Dr Taback Psychological Stress Dr. Berger United States CNN Dr Data Dr Steve Woodson Suai
Trump's controversial "public charge" rule takes effect, reshaping legal immigration

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Trump's controversial "public charge" rule takes effect, reshaping legal immigration

"News the trump administration's new public charge policy changes went into effect today this makes it difficult for some immigrants to get visas and green cards the critics call a wealth tax do you think it's not good public policy critics including Dr Arthur Evans of the American psychological association said the move will push away low income and working class immigrants we know that when you make small changes to these kinds of programs I can have a big dent about they can have a big impact on people accessing those services the White House released a statement Friday saying the rule would quote protect hardworking American taxpayers safeguard welfare programs for truly needy Americans and it would reduce the federal

Dr Arthur Evans American Psychological Associa White House
Why Gen Z is being labelled Generation Anxiety

The Big Story

09:46 min | 2 years ago

Why Gen Z is being labelled Generation Anxiety

"So it's twenty twenty. We're officially in the next great decade. But I won't lie to you. It's hard to be optimistic. About what the future sure holds a new report says home. Affordability is a growing problem for the average Canadian families. A new study of wildfires around the world from the Amazon rainforest to California says human activity is raising temperatures and adding to the threat. Job Market is tough and it's especially tough for college graduates. A huge number of them are actually working at jobs. That don't even fire a college degree if you're a millennial or a boomer or one of those rare rare Gen xers you might be able to get away with blaming this pessimism for the future on your age and life experience but the same can't be said for generations the young bucks of the future. Today's teens and young adults they should be excited about the next ten years keyword should in reality party they aren't instead they're being labeled generation anxiety anxiety is nothing new among young people but Gen Z.. is worried about vote. Much bigger and more pressing issues than previous generations. So how much of it is justifiable. How is it affecting young people right now? And what can other generations due to be more helpful and understanding I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Johanna Chisholm is a digital. It'll producer at the Toronto Star. She looked into why Gen Z.. Is being labeled generation anxiety. Hydra Hannah. Hello how are you Stephanie. I'm good thanks so when we first reached out to you to get you on the show you said that this topic you know really interested you What about this topic interested you so much for sure I'll admit that it was assigned to me by an editor. So I don't WanNa take full credit for it But what I was given the opportunity to sort of dig into this topic. I was Gung gung-ho because partially previous reporting that I had done kind of focused on Internet culture in youth and so I had come across bits of anxiety in teens in adolescence revolving mostly around like self harm on social media accounts but when I was given the opportunity to dig into why it is that the more broad generation is experiencing anxiety at such high rates than other generations. I thought this is an awesome time to go on. This and I had the space to do. It hadn't hadn't editor support to do it so that's really why I was really interested in digging into it so you wrote that Gen Z.. is going to be remembered as this. This generation anxiety. So what is the reason. Most recent data tell us about the levels of anxiety for this generation. There was a lot of really interesting. Thank studies that came out about this. The one that I thought was most relevant to our readers that are you know Toronto Ontario focused Cam each study. That came out that she saw a fifteen percent increase in youth. Anxiety between two thousand thirteen and two thousand seventeen and that was in the Self reporting so again. There are problems with that but but this huge jump to see just in five years. That teens are self reporting that they themselves are suffering from severe psychological distress which is characterized as either depression or anxiety symptoms and then there was an EPA study that came out from the American psychological association that sort of mirrored that data in Americans Americans students that it was doubling from two thousand ten to two thousand fifteen which is in that same sweet spot. We were talking about with the two thousand ten being this sort of anxious decade So that that was confirming in the numbers and then the part that I was assigned tasked with really doing was going to the kids and the teens and actually speaking speaking with them to find out what's going on with you guys not that you can really contrast it with the before but just to get their takes on why they're feeling anxious and what's going on there air so so who did you talk to And and what did they tell you about their anxiety So there was a large group of teens that reach out to me. Initially Ashley. It was kind of hard getting you know. Anxious people to come forward and talk about their most intimate feelings about things but eventually I was able to get a hold of Some teens from ages fourteen to seventeen who are in high school and junior high to get thirsty takes on it from more to less inside of things and then I was able to get teens. Who are in the university level? So twenty two twenty three because Gen Z.. Cuts off twenty-three. In most situations some people push it to be twenty-five five. I think but I think most people agree like Pew Research Center Says Ninety Seven to two thousand twelve. Is Jesse because you had to be. I guess like sentient went for nine. Eleven for that event to be characterized as millennial and yeah so I spoke with a bunch of different teens all who were experiencing different kinds of anxiety Heidi and kind of different levels of awareness about it so once I spoke with he didn't even really characterize his symptoms as anxiety because he didn't even really know that it was anxiety he was just looking out at. What are my prospects after I graduate and he no? He's an ECON student at the University of Toronto. A student and really good and pretty sure. He's good for for jobs after graduation but even he was looking at job banks Canada every single day and was like my heart just feels heavy. I was getting Migraines at the library and couldn't really like put into words why he was feeling these things and then when someone asked him like hey do you think it's anxiety he was like. Oh maybe I don't know whereas other students I spoke with reveal airy capable of putting the words to what they were feeling so I think that also speaks to level of awareness ernest. That's out there for young people that previously wasn't there right and I spoke with a climate activist in high school. who had some very powerful awful things to say for seventeen year old that I quite honestly was blown away by but she was sort of just experience or explaining how you know she would talk to her dad about it was like for him growing up and the contrast between what she's looking at and what he was looking at? which was you know? Buy a home get a job or get a job by home. Live in the suburbs CBS. Pay Off your mortgage and she's looking at it like. How am I going to afford school? I don't even know if I can with all these. Oh stop cuts with all of these different stressors in the economy. Hey how can I even think about getting to the point where I'm getting a job or so much even buying a house There's a lot lot in there. Yeah those are big issues. Yeah complicated issues. What is research? Tell us about the world that these young people are well. There was a lot And part of the issue had Haad reporting it was like I'm packing it all into one article because you know you look at the world that these kids are walking into the world is on fire quite right literally at their feet. A precarious work is a huge issue. For them one in ten Canadians I believe stats candles. Reports that are part of the GIG. Economy and precarious work isn't just GIG. Work present as contract work or part time work but there's just an increasing amount of this non secure lifestyle that these other parents have There's also also the retreat of democracy that we're seeing fake news You know just social media technology all of these different things it's the cacophony of things. Just being shutdown these kids throats. So it's it's a lot that's To unpack for someone. Who's you know this vulnerable age group? Who are now between the ages of eighteen take twenty three to accept just digest and be like okay? Well maybe I won't be able to get a job and maybe I won't be able to afford a house and all those things that basically secured cured having good quality of life aren't going to be attainable. Well I I was talking about it. With other producers on our team and a lot of them expressed russell. They had feelings of anxiety when they were in high school or university. But it wasn't about these like big issues news about things that were kind of in control like their friendships or short term goals. Like you know. What University am I going to go to our? What job am I going to guide? Or what skill am I going. Go into that kind of thing. So what makes the situation for Gen Z.. So so different. Why are they concerned with these big issues? I will say that I think technology definitely is playing a large role in it. Part of the the Kwanza have with like pointing our fingers right technology to be the thing that's causing us is sort of a knee jerk reaction to say. Oh you know. Phones and cell phones and social media are causing all these woes and our youth because that sort of rationale has been applied to previous generations. When you Komo TV was causing it? We always point our finger at exactly social media digital world share But I definitely think it plays a role and I was speaking with a a researcher in the United States who sort of studies the role of technology and family life. Okay and she was explaining how not just technology but the way the information nation the sheer quantity of information that is just constantly available at your hip and just a moments away versus previously when you could kind of choose to not be turned the TV on and you could choose to have the radio off. That's not an option so much for teens The other thing that I'll point out that in some of the feedback that I received from Just readers who are of those generations you know the the boomers the Gen xers they were pointing out the stressors that they

Gen Z.. Toronto Precarious Work Stephanie Phillips Editor Job Market Amazon Migraines Pew Research Center Johanna Chisholm California American Psychological Associa Jordan Heath Rawlings United States Gung Producer University Of Toronto Ashley EPA
Mental Health Woes Are Rising in Young Americans

The Big Biz Radio Show

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Mental Health Woes Are Rising in Young Americans

"A new survey finds that social media is linked to a rise in mental health disorders with more on this story. Here's USA radio networks. Chris Barnes, the American psychological association, releasing its national survey a few days ago in which it finds mental health issues. Have risen significantly over the last decade, they credit that rise in digital media. As a major reason why the research finds that more and more young adults. Specifically those born in one thousand nine hundred five or later are suffering from negative psychological symptoms and studies do show that more social media. Use is linked to increase symptoms of social anxiety, social isolation and loneliness

Social Isolation American Psychological Associa Chris Barnes USA
Mental health problems rise significantly among young Americans

Sunday Morning with Elizabeth Espinosa

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Mental health problems rise significantly among young Americans

"Social media may not be good for your kids mental health. A study by the American psychological association is found the number of teens and young adults in the US who are depressed have had suicidal thoughts or are mentally distressed has gone up significantly in the last ten years the percentages for older adults remained the same during the same period. There was an especially large spike in twenty eleven researchers site that as the your social media emerged the study shows some of the highest increases in mental health disorders are among young women and those at higher

American Psychological Associa United States Ten Years