35 Burst results for "American Magazine"

Racism is Rife in the Royal Family

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

04:15 min | 6 hrs ago

Racism is Rife in the Royal Family

"Deputy editor at OK magazine, Jacqueline Raw to recap Oprah's interview with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and interview that got a lot of attention last night and has been a big top of conversation all throughout the day today, Jacqueline, Thanks so much for taking a few minutes. To talk to us about this so much to unpack from that interview, But let's start with what you think was the biggest headline. Oh, my God so much, But I think the big headline is that racism is a really big issue within the royal family. I think people don't understand that. You know, the rules only has been around for so long, and they've never had American, let alone You know, a half black American come into this family, and I think that really just turned everything around, and it just makes you feel so many things for me again. You know all this stuff behind the scenes that no one knows anything about and you know she's being treated this way. So crazy that this is happening and no one knew about it. What can you tell us about Meghan Markle before she got involved with Prince Harry and eventually married him when she was just an actress on suits? Was there anything that you heard in Hollywood about her? No. I feel like she was so off the radar like she was such a. You know, She's a big character in this, so but not many people really knew who she was until she started dating Harry. I feel like I remember the date came out and they said Meghan is now dating Harry and I remember everyone saying, Oh, this is the girl on suits, you know? It's crazy, and so on. But he does have a lot of these high profile friends. You know, obviously, yes. Serena Williams now and, um, have Abigail she was on. They were on so together something and they have Gayle King and Oprah like He's obviously been around for a long time. But I just don't think that she was very prevalent. Obviously, if he is now, which is really crazy, and the reason I ask that is because you've got a lot of people wondering First of all, who is this woman? And then is she some Hollywood actress who's prone to a lot of drama? Or is what she's saying? What happened that this is on the royal family? And the palace. I mean to the point where she revealed last night that she was thinking about killing herself. It got so bad that Prince Harry felt he had no choice but to get them out of there. Yeah, I mean, I feel like he I feel like everything that if he was in Hollywood before, but I feel like you know, it wasn't to this certain extent like no eyes were on her as they are now. Our words you know, when she first came into the family, she obviously was living a very much like lower key life. He was like the California girls. She had her own blood called the Pig. She was very, You know, kind of, you know, the boho California vibe like that's what He kind of made herself as and then no one really knew her like I feel like if you walked suits and you, obviously, you know, knew the character, but for the most part, he kind of stayed under the radar, So I feel like it's just Now all eyes are on her. People are just, you know, fasting, her left and right, especially when he came into the family. She's American. You know, Black sees all this stuff like I think he just he couldn't win. No matter how hard he Tried or tried Tol, you know, make nice and say, you know, I am a good person, or I do that all this charity work. I love this stuff. You know, It's just I think it's just became a huge breaking point. At some point. That's why I see You know, wanted to maybe kill herself. I mean, I can't even imagine what it's like waking up and having 100 headlines about you, and they're not good, and you just kind of have to sit back and say, OK, I guess I got to just take it and live my life kind of, but even living it. He said he was in the palace. He couldn't see that he didn't leave for months at a time because They just told her not to, which is so not a way to live and like, they said, with the pandemic now, I think everyone kind of can relate to being trust. At some point. I'm

Meghan Markle Prince Harry Ok Magazine Jacqueline Raw Oprah Hollywood Harry Jacqueline Gayle King Serena Williams Meghan Abigail California Black
Jeep Called Out for Cultural Insensitivity

Business Wars Daily

02:42 min | 1 d ago

Jeep Called Out for Cultural Insensitivity

"From one. I'm david brown. And this is business. Wars daily on this monday march. Eight jeep is having a tough time of late. I it's super bowl ad. Featuring bruce springsteen came under fire for a mistake that left out a third of michigan on a map and also for not being more religiously inclusive then jeep stopped running the ad after it became public that springsteen had been arrested for driving under the influence. The charges against the boss were dismissed in february and then came a phone call from the chief of the cherokee nation and he had a big ask stop using the tribes name on jeep. Suv's the company has used some version of the name cherokee on its vehicles. For more than four decades after a hiatus jeep introduced its mid sized cherokee suv to the market roughly eight years ago and the jeep grand cherokee has been a perennial favorite among those seeking more spacious. Ride over the years. The company has faced criticism for using the tribes name. But this is the first time. The native american nation has directly called on the automaker to remove the tribal name from its vehicles. It all started when car and driver magazine reached out to the tribe for a comment about the use of the name in light of a new grand cherokee model being introduced the principal chief of the cherokee nation chuck in junior replied via a written statement to the magazine. That said quote. I'm sure this comes from a place that is well intended but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car the chief has called on jeep to stop using the tribes name on its. Suv's the company has used the name for more than forty five years including onto suv's but it has said that it will enter dialogue with the tribe about the matter. It was bound to happen sooner or later. Cultural sensitivity to the misuse of names and imagery is running high right now. In recent years atlanta lakes has removed the image of a native american woman from its packaging after years of criticism. The washington football team was renamed. Last year dropping an offensive term from its moniker and in the wake of last summer's black lives matter protests. Tolerance for cultural

Grand Cherokee David Brown Bruce Springsteen Springsteen Super Bowl Michigan Jeep Chuck Atlanta Washington Football
A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

Science Friction

05:46 min | 2 d ago

A Conversation With Carlo Rovelli On quantum physics

"This beautiful closing same in telling quantum physicists color ravelli's bestseller the order of time where he reflects on beethoven's mississippi lameness. The song of the violin. He writes is pure beauty. Pure disparition pure joy. We are suspended holding our breath. Feeling mysteriously this must be the source of meaning that this is the source of time. It's very color ravelli. These intellectual free spirit with radical routes and a passion for poetry and literature art and science. The whole rich smorgasbord. Caller was recently named one of foreign policy. Magazine's one hundred most influential global fingers. He works in italy. France canada trying to understand the deep mystery of how gravity works at the quantum level. He writes popular opinionated columns in italian newspapers and popular sites books that have really struck a chord with fans worldwide amongst them seven brief listens on physics. And he's two new books. Are there places in the world where rules are less important than kindness and out this month. Ease helgoland color joins you an eye on science fiction from canada this week on the tesha mitchell and we started out by reflecting on the way in which this pandemic as tiny virus with a will spread is challenging the hubris faces but then we got bigger or a bigger. Thank you for having me. I love how you describe. We humans as being the species of little creatures living on marginal planet of peripheral star in one of billions of galaxies in the cosmos a senior in an essay that you've written about the astronomer copernicus and he's he's a revolutionary challenge that with and so us with was center of the universe. But somehow i it seems to me that we leave with these pre copernican prejudice that certainly at the level of the ego. At least we do. Yeah as a spacey's we still cast ourselves at the center of the universe. And i wonder if you think if we didn't do that if we sensed that we would just an arbitrary player on an arbitrary planets round by hundred million galaxies. Do you think we would position. Different eggo formerly yes. The fact that we are obviously irrelevant on the larger scale of the universe. It doesn't mean that we have no meaning. It doesn't mean that we care about is meaningless we are. We're certainly nothing right. Our son is one out of two billion stars in our galaxy is nothing in our galaxy. One out of probably a billion billion golics's in in the world just creating team prepared killing. Someone is actually candid that right in the last decades it was realized that it was many more than what we saw today. So so we're even smaller than we thought we were more inconsequential. That's something we scanned by that. But that's not the trolley deal of us that make what we care about important for us. Thinks are important for us just because what we are. I love the woman i love. Not because she's universe because she's the woman i love that and so it's for for us. We are important for ourselves. I find it to if i give me. Serenity doesn't give me anguish it sort of relaxing to know that we do our best. We share what we can love what we can. And that's and we appreciate the this life. Yes your initial university studies in the classics i think and then and then onto physics and then onto a phd in meaning to the world of of quantum theory and quantum gravity. Bit on curious to know what that classical training brought to your physicists. Self from early on because all have read do who have raised. You know that you have a great passion for poetry and literature and physics sees is part of all that fear sciences. It's a complex center price that requires the collaboration of different people in different kind of minds. And i have appreciated a scientist which are extremely technical. Or which have an extremely analytical. Mind that just going to details and split the the arguments over and over again find the little truck. I'm not particularly doing good and doing calculations or going into details. But i think that science also needs People who look the things from from a larger perspective and and see where the the two problems where the good directions and full. That's a nation which is not strictly scientific. I think it's it's it's so important to look into Into the great scientist of the past the many of them had an extraordinarily wide culture. So i think they were. The over specialization of modern education does all how help from the middle sized to go ahead. Let's just physics. Tolstoy in biology and medicine in In in other scientists. I believe that. I don't like science teaching completely focus on solving little problems. You know you have a ball. Rolling down a slope but the speed How long does he go and come on. This is so boring is interesting. What isn't is understanding. What is the structure. We're using for understanding the wall. What is a force. What does it mean to have an energy.

Ravelli Tesha Mitchell Canada Beethoven Mississippi Italy France Tolstoy
A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

The Book Review

04:42 min | 3 d ago

A review of the book, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

"Jones joins us now from brooklyn. New york is the editor in chief of vanity fair magazine and this week she reviews the new novel by couso shapiro. Clara and the sun ra. Thanks for being here. Hi thanks for having me so for those who are not aware. Rodica is still one of us. We think you're at the new york times. She was formerly the editorial director of the books. Dusk before working at vanity fair. Where you've been now for more than three years right yet just a little over three years. What is it like doing that. Job in quarantine. We're so used to it now. I know so year. Old question is feels unless normal which i never thought i'd say but i will tell you this week. We released our hollywood issue which is traditionally an enormous photo production to create a three panel. Gate fold cover and it's a big group portrait so obviously in the age of group. Portrait's are rather challenging and unsafe and so we decided we needed an artist. Who would be up for the challenge. So we enlisted. Maurizio cuddle alon and pierpaolo ferrari. The italian conceptual artists to do a remote shoot with ten people. They ended up photographing people remotely over ten days on four continents all through laptops and you know very small local sets and it was really an amazing feat and so with every issue with every day covering the news. We are finding our way. I have to say. I don't know how it's been for you. But you know there's something about having new boundaries and new challenges that that pushes you to be creative and innovative. And i feel like that's what my team has been able to do. So it has felt very much like a journey. But i've been really really pleased with how creative we've been able to be and still sort of fulfilling that core purpose of entity fair to cover a range of entertainment reporting investigative reporting political reporting and iconic photography. And all of the stuff that we do best all right. I'm asking a superficial question. And i'll followed by deep one. It has to be slightly less glamorous. And i'm assuming that there's no vanity fair oscars party this year. I want you to know that for this podcast. I'm wearing my fancy sweatpants there in the rotation. it's our tradition to celebrate the oscars and and we are finding ways will find a way to do that this year. That is safe and respectful. It's an interesting year for the academy as well because even though movie theaters have been closed for most of the time and it's obviously been really challenging to get films out there. There has also been an explosion of actually really fantastic cinema and again presented in sort of innovative ways. And i know the academy wants to really celebrate that talent and so we are going to figure out ways to do that on our part as well all right. I promised i'd follow it up with a deep question. I don't know if it's steep but it's a literary question those of us here. At the time. I think all leaders of vanity fair and know that you are at heart very much A literary percent of book person. What has your year of reading been like in quarantine. I know you're usually at least part of at least one book club. Have you been having trouble concentrating on books. Have you found books to be refuge. What's it been like for you. I am ashamed to say that my reading at least for my comfort level has fallen off a cliff. So which is why. I was so delighted to get this assignment to review issue. Gross new novel because he is one of my favorite favorite living writers. And i am a complete us. I have read all of his works and will continue to read and reread them. As long as i live so that was wonderfully focusing and it was an opportunity to sit not only with the new novel but with so much of his former work and really think about it. But it's been tough. I don't know i mean i. I feel like for a lot of readers out there. It's been tough to focus. And i think that the thing that made a difference for me. Oddly enough was that. Because i was no longer commuting to work. I lost that staple commuting time which i realized. In retrospect is when i did a lot of my reading but it's that i do lead a book club of incredibly wonderful astute readers all women who work or have worked on wall street and so with them. At least i've been keeping up a minimum a reading activity. We just met last week. Actually and discussed martin mrs novel london. And we have a of great books lined up for our next meeting.

Vanity Fair Magazine Couso Shapiro Rodica Maurizio Cuddle Alon Pierpaolo Ferrari Oscars Clara Brooklyn New York Times Jones Hollywood New York Martin Mrs London
War of Words Between Royal Family, Harry and Meghan Heats Up

Morning Edition

03:42 min | 3 d ago

War of Words Between Royal Family, Harry and Meghan Heats Up

"In laws. Meghan Markle and her husband, Prince Harry, stepped back from their royal duties last year. Now she has given an interview to Oprah Winfrey on CBS that is critical of the royal family. I don't know how they could expect that after all of this time, we would still just be silent if there is an active role that the firm is playing in perpetuating falsehoods about us, and if that comes With risk of losing things. I mean, I've there's a lot that's been lost already by the firm. She means the royal family Now just is that interview was released. News reports have spread that the royal family was investigating accusations that Megan Bullied staff So let's talk about all this with the British historian Kate Williams. Welcome to the program. Hello? How serious these accusations these accusations of bullying? Well, they are. They came out just this week. They are saying that Meghan Woz You know, they're members of female members of staff and one of the words that was in the email that was given to our Times newspaper was the duchess or has to have someone in her sights. And of course, many people have said, Why have they come out now? Why all of a sudden just for Meghan how he gifted open to see which I think that the present time it's being sold in 68 countries and parenting is going to be it would be a huge interview is gonna be all over the world and this is the Last time, which Meghan Holly, I really think speak. We believe about why they left your family about what life was like in the royal family because they haven't really said much over the person say less than or step back from the war family. But I think finally, many people also say, Well, Meghan suffered very It's a bassist treatment at the hands off the British press what other female world were congratulated for whether it was See avocados or touching their baby, but everything a magazine that was all fine when it was other funerals. Yeah, and you've just by going through that have by going through that You've reminded us how much pressure the royal family has faced in recent years, and how much criticism the royal family has faced in recent years. And some of that criticism Woz over the fact that Meghan Markle identifies is mixed race. And was widely seen as not being fully accepted by the royal family. For that reason, is the real evidence of that, though That I mean, just with undeniable evidence, which she was the vet him off bassist press, she said. So she could. Harry has said. It's obvious when you compare the stories. Example, old boils or world in the Crown properties, and they are renovating for millions of Crown money. No one ever cared before. When they get in How we move into Frogmore Cottage. Britain has some kind of national meltdown over the fact that they had 2.4 million minutes. Money, spending it on The fact is that you know what? Simply how he was putting out these desperate statements trying to defend Meghan trying to say, you know, you know, it was going down the same road as my mother. Please stop. We don't know what you're going to say about the wider war family on on the sun on Sunday night's interview, she may weigh no, she didn't talk about racism in Britain. We know she's been talking about the press. If you can't talk about the royal family issue, going to talk about the men in gray suits that Princess Diana cord and the courtiers, this is all about that, at the moment, if she does, that's much more wide ranging if she says it wasn't just suppressed. What? Unfair to me, but also the war family who, in fact to me, then that I think is a very significant intervention. And that will that will really impact on perceptions of all family. Kate Williams. Thanks for the time really appreciate it. Hmm.

Meghan Markle Kate Williams Megan Bullied Meghan Woz Meghan Meghan Holly Prince Harry Oprah Winfrey CBS Frogmore Cottage Britain Harry Princess Diana
How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

Encyclopedia Womannica

04:55 min | 3 d ago

How Ellen Louise Curtis Demorest Changed The U.S Fashion Industry

"Ellen louise. Curtis was born on november fifteenth. Eighteen twenty four in schuylerville new york to henry de curtis electra. Able she was the second of eight children was a farmer and the owner of a men's hat factory family lived a comfortable life made more lively each summer by dramatic influxes of tourists. Each year notable members of society would make their way to nearby. Toga springs ellen. Later wrote that the visitors turned typically dull surroundings into places that present the spectacle of a grand reunion of wealth fashion and beauty out of doors from a young age. Ellen was interested in fashion. after graduating from school. Ellen's father helped her harness her interest into a career via women's shop of her own. The millenary shop was quite successful and after a year. Ellen moved the shop to troy new york. And then to brooklyn in eighteen. Fifty-eight ellen married william jennings demorest a thirty six year old widower with two children. The couple would also have two children of their own a son in eighteen fifty nine and a daughter in eighteen sixty five. The family moved to philadelphia where they ran an emporium. It was there that ellen's career really took off as the story goes ellen and her sister kate or working on a system of dress making when they saw their african american made cutting address pattern out of brown paper ellen was inspired by the idea to create tissue paper patterns of fashionable garments for the home sewer some historians refute that the idea originated with ellen and her maid and instead suggest it was i had by a man who had become ellen's rival ellen's family moved back to new york and began manufacturing patterns. They also opened a women's store on broadway in the fall of eighteen. Sixty ellen and her husband became selling paper patterns and publishing quarterly. Catalog called mirror of ellen. Higher journalist and women's rights advocate jane cunningham croly to work for the publication. The magazine was filled with sewing tips and tricks pictures of accessories. Sheet music poetry and fiction. Each issue included a tissue paper pattern and sewing instructions. The magazine was well timed and circulation. Grew quickly a sewing. Machines were then becoming commonplace in middle class homes the magazine also featured contributors including writers julia. Wardhaugh louisa may alcott and robert louis. Stevenson ellen frequently made strong statements in the magazine and support of women in the workplace. She also took firm stance on domestic abuse prison reform and mental health treatment among other topics as the cadillac business. Thrived ellen and williams brick and mortar store on broadway. Grew to ellen and her sister. Kate adapted foreign styles into patterns and made samples for the store. The store is fashion. Openings became major social events ellen. And william store was also notable for the couple's hiring practices. They hired african. Americans at the store on equal terms as white employees long before integrated workplaces were a norm in eighteen. Seventy six ellen became a founding member of cirrhosis. the first professional women's club in the united states throughout that decade while most businesses were failing ellen and her family continued to do well according to historians up to three million patterns. Were mailed each year but ellen success didn't last forever in the eighteen eighties. Ellen's empire began to decline ellen and william had failed to patent their paper patterns a competitor ebeneezer butterick had done so successfully at first butterick stuck to men's and children's ware but by eighteen sixty seven he'd expanded to women's patterns to ebenezer butterick company remains the center of the paper pattern industry today in eighteen. Eighty five william demerist retired to devote himself to the temperance movement. that year. He ran for lieutenant governor of new york. On the prohibition ticket a decade later in eighteen ninety five he died that same year allen suffered a stroke and was left bedridden. She moved into the hotel renaissance new york where she died of a cerebral hemorrhage on august tenth. Nine eight she was seventy three years old ellen. Louise demerist took her love of fashion and made it accessible. To the everyday woman in revolutionizing the fashion industry she also committed herself to the betterment of opportunities for both white and black women though she failed to patent patterns. Her impact is still apparent today.

Ellen Ellen Louise Schuylerville Henry De Curtis Electra Toga Springs William Jennings Demorest New York Jane Cunningham Croly Wardhaugh Louisa Robert Louis Stevenson Ellen The Magazine Curtis Williams Brick William Store Brooklyn Alcott Kate Philadelphia
Karaites: Bible Only, Please with Shawn Lichaa

Judaism Unbound

09:31 min | 4 d ago

Karaites: Bible Only, Please with Shawn Lichaa

"Is someone that we've wanted to have on the podcast for a long time. But we're trying to figure out the right place and we realized that we were starting this series on the bible. We thought this is the right place to have a discussion with somebody who is a leading voice within the community. That's a group of jews that basically it doesn't accept one of the key pillars of rabbinic judaism. Which is that at mount sinai when moses was given what we call the torah by god the written torah moses was also given an oral torah at the same time by god and that oral torah was preserved for hundreds and hundreds of years until some period after the destruction of the second temple when it was written down initially as the mishna and then over time in additional ways as what we call the talmud and the carrots represent a group of jews. That didn't believe that there was an oral tradition. Given at mount sinai that was if basically equal magnitude as the written torah in the bible that the written torah their written bible has a much more significant. Or perhaps i should say supreme significance in what we understand judaism to be what we understand god to one of the jews etc. The percentage of jews. That are carrots has waxed and waned over the course of the last two thousand years of jewish history. It was much much bigger in the middle ages. And of course here in america when we talk about the various groups of jews that there are people think about you know the nominations orthodox conservative reform reconstructionist renewal but often. Don't really think about carrots largely. Because it's a small community here in america and our guest today is working to preserve its traditions and make them available for study or consideration more widely. We're really excited to have this conversation today. With lisa who a leading voice in the carrot community he is a board member of the carrot juice of america and founder of the carrot. Press in the a press self-description they say our mission is simple. When kerry literature ceased to be commonly available the jewish world lost a tremendous amount of scholarship exegesis in diversity. Students have jewish theology and history lost access to a rich heritage and carrots themselves. Were no longer. The masters of their own intellectual heritage. The karaoke press aims to change all this and they publish a combination of translations of older care a literature as well as more contemporary ratings. Sean leash himself is the founder of a blue thread a jewish blog with a threat of right throughout and he speaks widely about carrot judaism at venues across america including synagogues jewish the library of congress the association of jewish libraries. And now judaism unbound so sean lee shia welcome to judaism unbounded so great to. Have you excited to be here. We're excited to have this conversation We've been talking about the bible in this series and it's interesting to now move from talking about the bible too. Well what people do with the bible. So i think that some of us have a very unsophisticated understanding of them and some of us have an extremely unsophisticated understanding of other. So i would say that. The thing that i know is basically that i think it's it's worth saying because i think people may say that says strange sounding word that actually in hebrew aramaic like kara means to read so as also a way of talking about the torah. So my understanding is that it's people who really don't believe that the judaism that emerges from the time after the bible is is accurate you know and so really what we should be doing is going back to the bible so now take me more sophisticated than that. There is judaism after the bible. And that judaism is correct. Now the question is like what does is and what does correct me. maybe i'd give you like one nuance to what you said. But it's a massive paradigm shift in what most people think about judaism. There is a written law and there is an oral law. Right so god. According to this form of gave the written torah and oral torah explaining it carrot judaism does not believe that god gave an oral law carried using god gave a written torah. And that's what the carrots follow. Now we also have the entire hebrew bible. That's tanaka and we use that as a source of our laws and understanding difficult times and biblical precedent. But we definitely believe that there is a judaism. Astor the tanakh after the bible closes. And let's talk about what that means every day for everybody. When did this split happen or did it happen. Multiple times between those. Who believe that the that there is an oral and that there isn't so look from a theological perspective right and like we. Carrots would say there was never an oral law and or the people who decided to follow the law broke off away from. What's carrots would say was true and these words very lucy. True historical israelite israelites. Judaism but definitely in the second temple. You see lots of different juice groups in the middle ages. The issa whites the whites anna nights the rights. You're the nights all these different jewish movements in all these different places in all these different times. So yes i think the answer. Your question is that there are many different times where judaism came apart came back together. Came apart came back together. And maybe i should rephrase that instead of saying we're judaism cap came back to but maybe the people who ascribe to judaism have different views at sometimes are more divergence from each other or sometimes came closer to each other so i really want to sit with what you said to start that which is from a care perspective the rabbinate. We haven't used that word yet. But the rabbit nights branched off and followed a new oral law. That had that was not from a care perspective sort of from the divine and i want to sit with that. Because i think there's such a deep way in which even those of us who aren't like orthodox rabbinate jews. We've we've sort of soaked into us that like Judaism of judaism this idea of an oral tradition. You know tomlin that's sort of. There's even for people who don't go to synagogue very much. They might not know what talmud is in deep way but like there's that original document and then there's all these things later that eventually i written but the idea. They're circulating around as oral teachings and they sort of are given the status. That's maybe a slight bit lower than that written doc. Foot and in many ways equal to that original document and sometimes we would even argue as judaism unbound like the newer stuff kind of replaces the torah ways in which there are correctives made from a rabbi perspective in those talmud texts in other texts that sort of change what the torah or other biblical texts are say. This word rabbinate is not a word i had ever heard until i met you but like i i'd love to talk about like there's a term rab night that exists. Wants you back out and say There are other kinds of judaism. If it's almost like we've had conversations with people were like the phrase white jew comes up like if you think all jews are white. It's a silly thing to say. White jews right. It only makes sense. When white jews is a a subsection of broader group of jews similarly the term rabbinate only make sense. When you recognize there are other kinds of jews like carrots. So i'd love to hear from you sean. Like what is it to sort of inhabit a judaism that people don't even know as judaism ism that like is is so fundamentally erased like the terminology that we have is built around. Its own existence when you zoom out and you think judaism and then you kind of say. Oh wait a minute. What's what is rob nights. Era nights jew is somebody who follows the rabbinic tradition so keira heights or are jews. Who follow the curator. Kerr carry tradition In this case. It's a bible based and not tom based tradition juice. Follow the rabbinic tradition. So that includes the entire hebrew bible and all of been literature. Now you've mentioned this question about like never having to think about what it means to be around nights in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy nine and haddassah magazine jewish traveller section a. Rabbi his name is rabbi borrow helmand. He traveled to cairo egypt and he was studying arabic in cairo egypt. Now i'm gonna put a little bit of a notes here in my family comes from the jewish community of cairo. So back to this right. He's he's traveling to cairo. And he's there and he's learning arabic and he is telling his muslim arabic teacher. I cannot come to class on chabad. Because i'm an observant jew. And i won't be the muslim teacher asks in a very comforting friendly voice. Basically what kind of jew are you. Are you a carrot or a rabbi nights and this rabbi tells us. That's the first time you ever had to identify as around nights. And the truth is that unless you are living in egypt and the last century probably no other place in the world where the carrots were prominent enough where somebody would have to say. Are you to revenue.

America Sean Leash Association Of Jewish Librarie Mount Sinai Sean Lee Moses Library Of Congress Kerry Lisa Kara Tanaka Astor Tomlin Rob Nights Keira Heights Cairo Rabbi Borrow Helmand Sean Egypt
Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

Photography Radio

06:02 min | 4 d ago

Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today we are going old school and we are going deep into a really really wonderful type of photography. That's not practice very much anymore and really frankly when you see it. It's going to knock your socks off. We're talking with shane belkevich. Shane happens to live just a couple hours. West of me out here on the great plains of north america up north dakota chain that afternoon. How's everything out in the middle part of the state. good scott. thanks for having me on. We've got a little snow last night. Which was a very welcomed. Got a little snow over here. It's cold it's january is imagine about winner on the american that should be asked should be. You're absolutely right shane. You are just absolutely mesmerizing with the work. You're doing you do wet plate colin on photography. You do when one of the earliest styles of photography and admit you know. When i first heard about it i thought why in the world would anyone want to go through that amount of work for an image that i can do in my mirrorless. Dsl are very quickly. And then i realized how wrong. I was can't do that image and i certainly can't come up with a product that you've come up with so first question for people that that are familiar with the process. What is wet plate photography. What is the whole call it on process. Yeah so a wet plate clothing. Photography's invented by frederick scott archer in. He started working on about eighteen. Forty eight we believe in eighteen fifty one. He came out with a journal article in a scientific journal and presented it to the world. So what we're doing. I'm sure many of your listeners. Know about daguerreotype process which was invented by the declare. The frenchman About ten years. Before what plaguing frederick scott archer wanted to improve on that and This is what he came up with and the final product. And what your comment about why. You can't capture wet played in a modern a digital camera. Is that this is completely analog and the final images the images that i make. I an amber typist. That means i make my photographs on glass specifically for me black glass and these images are made out a pure silver on glass. And what's about silver silver does not degrade so these images that i have Have made over the last eight years of made a three eight hundred of them all by ten most most eight by ten black last amber types of they'll be here thousand years from now broken which which is not something you can save for princeton pigments in paintings and other things like that so the these are very archival images and i. it's just a very very romantic process. i was never photographer before. A two thousand twelve took my first exposure on october. Fourth never owned a camera. And i just find myself chasing this this historic process. It is really really interesting and we need to tell people that there is a movie out. There is called belkevich b. a. l. k. o. w. i t. s. c. h. on video. It's on amazon. Prime it is a documentary about you and your work and folks. You need to go there. You need to watch this film if you are in the any kind of photography. You need to do this but shane one of the things. That really intrigued me. Watching the film is that most of us that are in the photography files were making digital files. Or you know. We're coming up even if we're still dealing with old thirty five millimeter film or that kind of stuff Medium format film. You know we come up with a negative but then you know actual print is a temporary thing. You much more like a sculptor are making an object's this glass plate and it's not revisable you can't go back and tweak the highlights you can't go back and ask grain if you want. What is the appeal of making that object versus a kind of idea. We have to understand most web play. Cloudy and artists There was one here in bismarck. North dakota orlando scott gough. When he he was known for capturing the first ever photograph of sitting. Bull here bismarck. In the in this process that i practice and i i happen to capture ernie lapointe the great grandson. The city hundred thirty five years later in the same town in the same process but goth would have made a negative like you had said he would make a glass of so instead of putting his images onto black glass which you cannot contact with. He would have used clear glass. Clear glass as you insinuated. You can make multiple copies and you can enter. The final product in that scenario is a print. Because you want to be able to sell you know apprentice shayna print scott where wants to print you can make as many prints of these want is your business and it. Did you know good to have a one off plate because you and you know when you're talking about eighteen fifty one is no way of duplicate and they didn't have scanners and we couldn't do anything like that so you know. I think there's something very special about the the fact that these images are one offs and they can never be duplicated in they can never be replicated. When i make one of these images. I've for instance. I've dropped an image once and tried to go five minutes later. Ten minutes later tried to make this image with the same sitter the same camera. The same lenses saint chemistry. And i can never get back to that so if you look at this romantically. I'm not actually taking snapshots people actually making ten second movies. I'm still life movies. Because my exposures in my natural studio that i built here in bismarck. It's called nostalgic glassware plate studio the first one in in the country bill of the ground up and over a hundred years. I'm making ten second exposure. So there's heartbeats and there's blood flowing through the person there's a couple. Maybe a blinker to and what. I really love about this is. Maybe there's a thought so. I'm capturing thought on that piece of glass pure silver. That'll be here on.

Frederick Scott Archer Shane Belkevich Scott Olsen Shane North Dakota Colin North America Scott Gough Ernie Lapointe Scott Shayna Print Scott Bismarck Amazon Orlando
Dine-in cinema chain Alamo Drafthouse files for bankruptcy

Houston Matters

02:59 min | 4 d ago

Dine-in cinema chain Alamo Drafthouse files for bankruptcy

"On wednesday. Alamo draft house cinema declared bankruptcy and closed its three most underperforming theaters. the texas based chain's location katie remains open as ella reorganizes as part of an asset purchase agreement with former investor altamont capital partners and a new backer fortress investment group. Alamo founder. tim. League is part of the lender group buying the assets and is remaining part of the company. This latest news plays out of course as another houston theater struggles to remain open. Houston's river oaks theatre. The last of the city's still functioning deco era movie houses which screens independent and foreign language films. It's an a dispute with its landlord. Weingarten realty. That's happened before. But this time weingarten might be reacting of course to a bleak outlook for the movie theater industry can the houston landmark negotiated survival. This time here to talk about the fate of river oaks and houston cinema industry are doug harris president of the houston film critics society and houston area film critic and regional correspondent for variety and writer for cowboys and indians magazine. Joe layden doug joe welcome. Good morning joe. Let me start with this. Latest news just breaking yesterday that alamo draft house reorganizing and being sold under chapter eleven bankruptcy protection if anything. Are you surprised. This did not happen sooner. Well i think alamo draft house has fought the good fight all during the lockdown But you know you can only hold out for so long and i. I have my hopes. Up that alamo will be able to keep the doors open but again you know you and i had this discussion near the beginning of the lockdown. And you know like people ask me. We'll movie theaters reopened. And i forget. We'll all movie theaters reopened. No doug of course. This is an industry wide decline. A massive one as the pandemic has led most folks to to watch movies at home. We've seen major studios and streaming services an independent producers alike focusing their attention on trying to recoup their investments by releasing films primarily through streaming. Does this put river oaks in an even more precarious situation than in past lease disputes. Absolutely but at the same time. This is slightly different. I have to say that. The alamo draft house was one of my favorite movie watching experiences. I love everything. they've done. Landmark just has a little bit of an edge here when you take in the history. The architecture the setting. It's just a different vibe to it. And and everybody can't have a home could either and people should not see movies on their phones and laptops when there are other so certainly things are slightly different. They the glaring lumine. Doom of the pandemic is is making it tougher. But that makes it all the more worth fighting. For

Houston Alamo Draft House Altamont Capital Partners Fortress Investment Group River Oaks Theatre Weingarten Realty Doug Harris Houston Film Critics Society Indians Magazine Joe Layden Doug Joe River Oaks Ella Weingarten Alamo Katie TIM Texas
A Totally Different Way to Date with JP Pokluda

Made For This with Jennie Allen

02:31 min | 5 d ago

A Totally Different Way to Date with JP Pokluda

"Let's just go into it and let's talk about what you see. That is so broken. Where have we gotten this so wrong. Yeah we've we've digitized the whole process right and so you have you have guys living in fear right. They won't ask girls out. They feel like girls standards are so high that they always just say no if somebody does ask them out were sliding into. Dm's ghosting don't even have the dignity to follow up with. Hey this is where went wrong. Or i don't wanna see you anymore. It's just like hey. If i don't wanna see anymore. I just not going to respond to your text messages. And there's no there's no love your neighbor as yourself in that and so everybody is just is walking around wounded and confused. I mean those are the two words that mark the dating culture in the twenty first century wounded and confused. People are getting married later and they're they're getting married less and then the marriages that are happening. Ar- are failing more often so all of the statistics are telling us that we're in the middle of this epidemic. I mean this this real challenge that we face in the world of relationships. When i say marriage is not working out we know the divorce rates at somewhere between forty five and fifty five percents and then then on the other side of that you have all of these people who stay married. But they don't love each other they're roommates. They're not happy. And the worst if you will and so. The reality is vast majority of marriages fail. But we have more tools and resources and information to help us than we've ever had before so it brought me to. this place. rummy describes him ahead like where did we go wrong with this. And how do we help the next generation find the love that lasts like finds something meaningful and i think jenny. One thing that it comes down to is just expectations. Making sure that everybody has The same expectations because hollywood the movies the magazine's the media. They've they've really botched that we've been listening to the wrong coaches. I mean we have been taking dating advice from the people with the highest divorce rates the the biggest relationship failure rates. And those are the folks that we've turned to is the experts and say hey teach me more about what love looks like rather than going to the the author and the originator of love The one who is love and and kind of returning to his word to say okay. What are you have. What is what is your desire in relationships. How can i do this in a way that honors. U2

Rummy Jenny Hollywood
Lady Gaga's Dogs Are Stolen and Dog Walker Is Shot

America First with Sebastian Gorka

01:04 min | 5 d ago

Lady Gaga's Dogs Are Stolen and Dog Walker Is Shot

"Week. Lady Gaga is two canines made global headlines. The pair of pooches were stolen the dog walker shot in the chest. And a $500,000 reward offered for the return of the dogs. While this may seem unusual dog napping in the U. S, A is a lucrative scheme. Dating back decades. The first high profile case occurred in 1948, the editor of House and Garden magazine, at a puppy taken during a photo shoot. Covert later demanded a cash payment to return the dark. 19 fifties, Gangs of dog nappers were widely reported in the media Research laboratories would pay big dollars for bootleg dogs using the former pets for scientific studies and medical experiments. How horrendous In the 19 sixties, thieves were targeting dogs using Greyhound racing. Pooch named Hijo, valued by his owners of $15,000 was stolen from his kennel in London, England.

Garden Magazine Lady Gaga Walker U. Hijo London England
It's March, Here Are Some Things to Do In The Garden

Your Gardening Questions

02:20 min | 5 d ago

It's March, Here Are Some Things to Do In The Garden

"You know it's We've talked before. About how fast time ceased seems to go from here. We are at the end of february getting ready for march march. Marshall pee on monday What are some of the things you're thinking about when it comes to things to do or in march well mark there's a host of things first of all. Finish your leisure reading. Because you're about to have to get out nick garden and you probably want to get out. I've been feeling like everybody else does by kind of like a caged animal under this kovic situation. However i've stayed clean. And i wanna keep it that way i presently and fortunately most shots are in me. I will speak only to the first shot. I thought somebody hit me in the left shoulder with a louisville slugger for for a day or two. But that's that was no big deal and the second shot which i've heard some horror stories about i had practically no problem with i. I was not even Not even sure. I knew i had the shot first of all the person happened to be a fireman. That was working the line that day. He gave me a shot. I did not feel the needle in or out it. Just he was so slick he said well you came into the line of the best treatment other you go any out Mark it's it's there. But i was. I say get your leisure reading done then. All kinds of gardening supply magazines are coming in from from tools to well flowers to feed to full plants and so on get get some decisions made on what will fill that spot and right. Now you've been staring out the window in most cases at snow and The evergreens have shown up. Then you know where there will be some leaves on things and then if there are some voids that you'd like to think about think either standard plants woody ornamental or think perennials. Think in terms. Then as you read the catalogs taller things in the farthest point of the bid then shorter or mid size and then shorter and I always try to put the beds in my mind into a very addict. Well as you see a very different story of how to handle them.

Marshall Pee Nick Garden Louisville Mark
How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

The Digiday Podcast

04:08 min | Last week

How Harpers Bazaar follows digital trends to retain its authority in fashion

"So much. Bring on podcast nikki. Thank you for having me. So you've been at harper's bazaar now for what was it like three or four months. It's a it's a new role for you right. this is a new york. But you've come from other notable fashion and lifestyle publications before so you're this is a strong suit for you. This isn't like a new kind of area but how was it starting a new strategic leadership role during a pandemic when the world's remote yet it's i mean starting a sort of new role i think whether you're in leadership or you know just starting your job is weird when it's remote you have to think about how you're going to get to know the team how you're going to deliver feedback. How you're gonna energize. They seem to want to continue working during these like quote unquote crazy times. So it's on. It's tricky but i think it was really great for me to come back to a place like harper's bazaar where i knew a lot of the team already And just sort of hit the ground at the ground running. I think what's particularly interesting about your position and what your colleagues are are looking to do is Harper's bazaar is a legacy fashion brand. It's been around for decades I think i have a coffee table book of lake the covers from the early nineteen hundreds of harper's bazaar it's beautiful but my point is it's a it's old publication Your task though with turning that into a modern digital brand for a younger audience what goes into that process. And how have you been able to do that. during a pandemic yeah. I think when we when i came on and joined late. Attorney coffin. samir. Nassar join the two of them in sort of figuring out what harper's bazaar harper's bazaar dot com gonna look like. We really wanted to go back to you know fashion first and really leaning into our luxury routes but we also have a lot of roots in the feature space so we wanna take back into that as well and so you see a story take for example. We just put a story up today with a profile of martha stewart. And so you see. Somebody like martha stewart. Who is a legacy in a number south but we dressed her in gucci and fear of god and so we wanna make those sort of juicy internet e profiles at people will love but really just speak to what we as a brand do so well and have done so well for well over one hundred years though in that example. I'm assuming that there's probably a lot of like maybe social media elements tied in to take a What would normally be maybe spread in magazine and make it come alive for a much. Larger audience Key talk about you. Know the role that social media on that platform how that's been playing in your editorial strategy and digital strategy. Yeah i mean for the martha stewart story in particular. That story was sort of bread from following martha herself on social media and so she posted over the summer. I believe she posted that amazing sort of like you know beautiful photo of her coming out of a pool and like giving a kiss of the camera and we were like. Oh god martha stewart's kinda major right now like she. Obviously everyone knows apple. What if we lake put her into a sexy little dress or we put her into this suit and put some congress seekers on her and so that story particularly started it was born out of social media and then we were able to blow it out in the pages of the magazine and then have beautiful imagery to put back on social media and so really just sort of trying to think three sixty and trying to really not It's not about A print story or digital story. It's really thinking about the brown. The brand holistically and so when we have a profile like martha you know. How are we going to blow it out on all of the

Harper's Bazaar Harper Martha Stewart Attorney Coffin Nassar Nikki Samir New York Gucci Martha Apple Congress
The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

Media Voices

06:06 min | Last week

The Delicate Rebellion's Hannah Taylor on supporting her community's creative passions

"Hello everybody welcomes. This week's episode of media voices with the media focus podcast. It takes a look at all the news of the views from the medial past week. I must've thought that you just had was for my view. West hannah tila phone for the delicate mobile. A biannual independent print magazine creators collective focused on sharing experiences. How to get on independent field we spoke of how uninspired teachers land hana eventually stop own magazine carnage and women to all of it creative pasha. I love it. I love it. The best motivation to do anything is spite pop to begin with. We're going to do the news roundup. I want the two of you to pitch me. That's because while behind in principle. I don't see how it's going to practice. So twitter has announced paid super follows which are going gonna let you charge for extra content on its platform so follows that acquisition of new south platform review of ago. Which have said press going into this kind of subscription mentality and it's effectively. One of us are hit atrium but linked to your twitter account. That was going to say. That's my quick. What form is this actually going to take. Then it's not. Just it's not just gated access to tweets is it. I know i think it's i think it's about the freeth i've seen used a law is bonus content right so i think it's accessed other stuff. Additional stuff basically patron. Yes but with tegas or literally just like. Hey if you subscribe to this one-size-fits-all subscription thing then you'll get access to are the no drafts of things on writing or exclusive blood. Can you match access to earn released any details yet. Because i'm not really got time for launch. They just kind of floated the idea and at the end. This is what i call on the horizon. It's i think it's at the moment that said it's bonus tweets access like community groups and also announced like a community feature get the interest and policy usual. Twitter reaction was like the r.i.p to a hashtag that has been i swear to god. That's been going every time to has noticed any change for the past decade deb. When they went to two hundred eight character like this just the through twitter. Yeah so this is more. This is more tackle than just a new feature. This effectively away of i suppose helping people monetize twitter. There's also this that. I didn't onto as policy policy. You can also access to a newsletter subscription which is where the your view acquisition comes in. So that kind of trying to tie on. And if you're somebody like i suppose. Casey newton for water better example you can follow case in the entree to subscribed his news hour to get bonus connecticut community around his newsletter and because they will own the a platform loan a great new set. Apart for ill then be a way to kind of tile together around individuals. Yeah i think the the the package i spent to this is what's important not. That's what the twitter reaction seemed to be. People thinking that was going to make people pay for tweets say okay. Yeah that would kill the so. This is not the point now. Never feel competence websites free. And it's like well. It doesn't have any after you can help support. Your favorite creator is everything was moving. that way. anyway wasn't it. People are always looking for new ways to multistorey in hard heart created content. And this if it's tying into review an is offering bonuses. This seems to me something. That's some certain the southern people could potentially use well. I don't think it's for everybody. Yeah definitely so for instance. I do because everything i do is what's is garbage. I was thinking it depends on how you to the way we used to Typically is to respond to the people. See this is good. This is pod chip something other people that know. They've got phuong. Twenty tweet threads the half go insane value. Yes certainly and you know. This is a bunch of different tools. The people to round. But this the unroll feature where you can up great moments out sort of one long article almost so in a way if you can switch gate some of that behind the pay-cut not make sense for those people. As he said. I just at the the idea of paying for tweets. I'm reading up behind. But i think the community group that needs to subscription that i can see working. I mean is is one of these things where we're we're in. The bubble suit doesn't help people are looking at this from such bubbles perspective that i'd like to know what like a normal since the event normally. Yeah one of filthy moguls saviour exactly. Yeah some. I don't think that's what the twitter trenches day after day after day we go we go on about newsletters and actually most people. Most people don't get newsletters. I think you've got to see this as a beggar. Twitter play. I think twitter is collecting. Just is face because tunnel. War is collecting the best but all those pupils social media platforms you know this the newsletter pot of it and then those the audio part of the over and then they've also was it spaces so that that's that's the version club has a composting. Yeah and then if this community idea so it's a bunch of stuff coming together here that if no timeframe on any of that stuff but if you look twelve months or eighteen months the facts create interesting.

Twitter West Hannah Tila Casey Newton Pasha DEB Connecticut
Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

Wow In the World

04:13 min | Last week

Are You Smarter Than A Toilet?

"Okay ready to go. How are we getting their guy. That is used scared me god. Did you hear getting the gang back together. We're like harry run and her miami. Obviously harry sorry. Dennis really love for you to come but for taking guy roz yellow bananas scooter. And you know. It's only got seating for two people vote and a giant pigeon. Aw plus we need you here to spy on the neighborhood and watch out for danger. I guess yeah. We promised bring back a souvenir. Dierk many yoga. I think we have a little problem. Why what's going on. Well i kick it the banana scooter to start. It seems like the battery might dead. Maybe the banana is overweight. You know according to popular fruit and veg mechanics magazine. Overripe produce is the number one problem with perishable transportation. Know what happened to have your rollerblades handy do you. Oh boy. Do i know almost reggie got to ride gadfly dennis. Thank you still got. Tripling is the banana scooter. All the way down to the convention center. No problem indie rollerblades. Four oh come on you to hand you reggie. The entrance is right over there. What what what what i wear. Welcome to the bathroom showcase. Are you considering bathroom remodel. Yes i am looking to build a bear tuba lazy river in my bath. Tab and my buddy guy over here is tired of pooping in the kitchen sink. Mendy danny house. Well actually. It's a solar powered energy efficient. Modular in oversized debbie doll dream. Well i think that it's just super and i believe we've got some lovely compact laboratory options that you are going to a door. Come with me right this way but what what what what look at this of this place mindy now over here to the left you'll see be during the latest in portal body technology. Oh i think you mean florida party right. Yeah as in portable potties not poor tongue or tau you see traditional porta potties. Need to be transported to a location but but let me guess portal. Transport i bingo. Oh it's like the rollerblades of toilets now that something. I can get my behind behind once properly tested. These portal policies will be able to transport poopers through time and space past or future time. Travelling toilet signed me up. I want to see inside. Oh please don't go in their bodies bigger than your new house guy. Rise please sir. The portals are highly unstable. They have access to urine and feces from all of human history. Do i just flush myself to another car. What no sir please. it's just a prototype with. It's still in beta testing.

Harry Run Roz Yellow Bananas Dierk Veg Mechanics Magazine Reggie Mendy Danny House Debbie Doll Dennis Miami Harry Mindy Florida
Wet Notes for 2-28-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:40 min | Last week

Wet Notes for 2-28-21

"This is wet notes on scuba shaq radio for sunday february twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one. Well i up today. I'm going to do an update on dry suit talq now ever since i've owned a dry suit i've been using those little pouches of talk to dust my wrist seals and neck seals. And that makes it easier to put on especially if it gets a little humid. Well we used to get these little pouches from magnet who then became gear aid when we could no longer get them from juried. We switched to getting them from diving unlimited international or dui. Recently we ran low on these talca pouches. Wanted to order some more. But do you. I stopped producing those talk pouches. I guess i'm guessing near some concern around. The safety of talk i noticed has been in news over recent years. So donna reached out to peak from dui and he suggested cornstarch to dust are seals. Make sure you do it every time now. That sounds a little strange to me. But it looks like people are using it in place of the talq. We'll give it a try. And i'll let you know how goes cornstarch. It's not just for cooking next up. Is things start opening up and we travel outside the country. We're going to need to get tested for in nineteen before we can come back well. Resorts are out there. And they're starting to accommodate their customers and making it easier to get tested. So for example. I just saw where enroll roett to resorts. The turquoise bay dive resort and the mayan princess beach dive resort are offering onsite cova testing on thursdays and fridays. And then what happens. Is you'll get electronic. Results are available in three hours. And then you'll have a hard copy the next day now you still have to pay for it in a costs about fifty bucks. Then i also check the cocoa view site down there and roett tan and it looks like they are also offering onsite testing but their prices coming in at eighty five dollars so it looks like if you're going to travel to row attend you'll find it easier to get tested for corona virus and get back home as long as you test negative but i think more and more of these dive operators out there are going to provide that cova testing or options for people so that you can go travel and then make it easier for you to get back home. Also last i think a couple of weeks ago. The president of the united states signed executive order. One three nine eight and with that executive order it mandated. That masks are to be worn on all public maritime vessels including ferries. What does that mean for dive boats. Well deana did. Some research and found out that this mandate includes commercial vessels used for dive charters and dive related activities. You'll need to be masked up upon boarding disembarking and the duration of travel. Obviously this can only apply to us. Operators i think this makes sense and i'm sure common sense will prevail given our unique circumstances when we go diving way back in the beginning of two thousand twenty i did a segment on dive travel insurance then in mid two thousand and twenty. I noticed the divers alert network. Dan their travel insurance was not available on their website is back now. However there was a short article on dive newswire that indicated that there are qualified cove in nineteen related cancellation and interruptions covered. There's a lot of detail on their website. You can read through. Essentially they cover prepaid travel arrangements. If you your host at your destination you traveling companion or family member test positive for covid. Nineteen there's also levels of coverage while traveling but you need to do your research. The good news however is that the dan travel insurance is back and it looks like they are helping to try and address the corona virus issues. It's always a good day when i go out to the mailbox and that the latest issue of the journal of diving history has arrived. That happened earlier this week. The cover of the first quarter two thousand twenty one magazine features to five women who made up the team of tech tight to mission six dash fifty. Which was america's first off female saturation team. The five women included peggy lucas. An hurley hotline renata lynch true elena schmidt and sylvia earle the journal of diving history. Formerly historical. diver magazine is the official magazine of the historical diving society. Usa and is part of your membership. I can't wait to dive into all the articles i saw. The other day that there's been a an oil spill off the coast of israel and lebanon and it's impacting over one hundred miles of coastline. Now what's a little disconcerting about this is that they don't know where this is coming from this washing up on the beaches. It's the seems like there's some sort of gag order on the release of information. I'm just not sure why there was. Also a thin whale washed up on the beach apparently with oil in its loans. They say this is undoing. Much of the progress made over the last thirty years. Let's hope they figure out where this is coming from or where it came from. And if they're able to minimize the impacts and finally here's some really big news in the scuba industry especially related to scuba tanks. Luxembourg is getting out of the aluminum tank business on february twenty third. Luxor held their fourth quarter and full year. Two thousand and twenty analysts call and that's where they announced their divestiture of their aluminum product lines now. The rationale according to their press release is that they wanted to focus on high performance magnesium alloys zirconium catalysts and high pressure composite cylinders. Guess to profit margin. Just wasn't there on the aluminum tanks. They plan on selling those two aluminum forming operations in the united states and one in the in the uk. But we don't know who they're going to sell it to just yet more to come on. This is it as it. Unfolds now luxembourg. They produced a lot of tanks. And there's a lot of them out there and we're going to see what that does to the supply chain as we move forward. Well that's it for wet notes for february twenty eighth two thousand and twenty one here on scuba shock radio

Roett Turquoise Bay Mayan Princess Beach Roett Tan United States Donna Deana Peggy Lucas Renata Lynch Elena Schmidt The Journal Of Diving History Diver Magazine Historical Diving Society Sylvia Earle DAN Lebanon Israel
Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

The Book Review

04:20 min | Last week

Lauren Oyler Talks About Deception Online

"Lauren. Oiler joins us now. From ithaca new york. Her first novel is just out. It's called a fake accounts. Lauren thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having me alright. So people know your name even before this novel moseley probably as credit. You've written book reviews for the new york times booker view but also for many other places. Talk a little bit if you would about your reviewing. And how did you get into this well. I started reviewing as elliptical writer. As i think. Many increasingly many writers wrench generation will have to sort of similar background. Just about the millennial generation yes. I'm eleni on thirty years old. So i consider myself a true millennial smack in the middle and i said in english and college and when i graduated i moved to berlin and part because it was really cheap to live there and i wanted to work on my writing and the first sort of opportunity i got with to write liberals about books so every week i think for over a year i would write like a top ten list about top ten bucks three when you're sad and second your house or or whatever and you just made these like did you just come up with all by yourself or did you sort of pull friends. How did you compile them. Sometimes they would suggest something so if there was some event or you know if there was a holiday. Do something related to that. But it was really like. I could do whatever i wanted. And i think i was being paid. Twenty five pounds per article. Which means that. I had a lot of freedom to sort of cover the kind of books that i wanted to cover and do sort of weirder things and in the process of researching this column. I read a lot of criticism. I read a lot of weird sort of book websites. And i learned a lot about what was going to contemporary literature. Learned a lot about what i liked. Agent like in criticism as well. I want to hear everything you learned in all of those areas. I mean i. I guess what. What were the weird book websites. Well at the time we were living through a period which is now referred to as it right so the author but maybe many listeners will know from this movement is tau win. But there was a large group of sort of internet inflicted writers and poets and novelists who are doing sort of experimental literature. That was very much inflicted by the internet. And what kind of book criticism did you read. Where did you turn to other than us. Oh of course. I was reading really widely. But the thing that the way that i really got into it in the way that i sort of developed my style was by reading. Lots of old issues of el arbi wonder review of books online. And i just found that that you know. They're sort of signature combination of of very sort of cheeky. It's not cheeky. But it's it's very indepth in a along review. In which many sort of the books. The books are viewed for many different angles but ultimately there's a real perspective that's gone into those pieces that i really connected west. We should say at this point because it doesn't necessarily show up in your voice that you grew up in west virginia so this is like a very presumably big cultural shift going to berlin and reading the l. r. Did you grow up exposed to a lot of books and to criticism as as a as a kid or a teenager. No absolutely not. Don't overstate might rural upbringing raw. Basically not in a suburb but but something like a suburb But there wasn't you know there wasn't a lot of there weren't a lot of magazines around like i wasn't reading the new yorker. My family was reading the new yorker and my family our readers but they're reading sort of marshawn nra Stuff which is fine. And i should have to do my customary disclosure. Which is that. I did go to jail so that is really where. I got my my hose. Anything you can see the semi writing as well which is a real combination of of colloquial like mainstream kind of slang and the higher register that could be interpreted as literary or more serious. And i think that it really does come from this kind of normal upbringing in west virginia combined with suddenly. I'm at yale. And then i moved to europe.

Moseley Ithaca Lauren Berlin The New York Times El Arbi New York West Virginia Europe
"american magazine" Discussed on Game Scoop!

Game Scoop!

01:56 min | 8 months ago

"american magazine" Discussed on Game Scoop!

"I think it was pretty good it is. You Mobile spinoffs count like what about fallout shelter? House, a good game I enjoyed was just. Really Fun. Okay! We're running a time here. I WANNA. Share my screen with you, so I can show you. To be. Nineteen ninety. Three King I see this. Yeah, oh. Wow I remember that image so really. The nine, thousand, nine hundred and we're going to. I've never seen this before. This is idioms guy, role, playing and adventure games, and all of course, an American magazine but I have a sneaking suspicion that this supplement was written by someone for whom English was not their first language. set rice says on the cover, the latest Info on over thirty five of your favorite games, so it's an RPG fest and I wanNA plant on this. Is Not one but two inches of Santa's, so they have. Casting a wide net for what they consider to be. RPG. roleplaying adventure games only Metro Advani as Dragon, quest, Fan. That make sense. Why is this an RPG I duNno, I duNno but this is the intro to the to the supplement and. Probably to right as for you guys to see, but in the upper right corner. Can you make screen shot? I mean I'll put. A HIGH-RISE VERSION NO! It's an ultimate six on Super Nintendo. So, this is ninety three will be much too early for arena, but it's like an image of you. The character tied down to a rock in a demon with wings as a dagger raised over you like they're going to sacrifice you. The of six on super into no must've been pretty hardcore. says a role playing action adventure fans get ready to see EGM's MEKA's guy to RPG action adventure games. You'll see many games for the following systems Philips CDI. Super Es Genesis.

EGM Philips Metro Advani American magazine House rice Santa
"american magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:59 min | 9 months ago

"american magazine" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And we another statue that's been brought down that there's hello St Louis pero Serra or father who knew Perot sure he was a Catholic priest in the eighteenth century in California and he brought Christianity largely Catholicism at any rate through many native Americans and there is so here's a description an American magazine I dive it sounds this is it I can't tell the politics of the magazine out of office right or left so it seems to be a quite accurate actually in a video of the San Francisco toppling people can be heard cheering as the statue of the eighteenth century Franciscan priest holding your cross fell to the ground people strike and kick the statue in the video at its core the statue was also been tagged and splashed with what appears to be red paint so I'm wondering if you will have to wouldn't trust your child for a year with the people who kicked and brought down the statue or the people who would like the statue to remain even if you're an atheist which group would you choose eight seven eight eight eight eight L. I have two funny reactions from my colleagues triple G. is cracking up and the living water is shaking his head lamenting the state of affairs that prompted by questions you've.

Louis pero Serra Perot California American magazine San Francisco
"american magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:22 min | 10 months ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Fax I'm not I'm not sure how these qualify is fun facts from the kiddos before the invention of mass produced assembly line cups and bowls one agent England use the hollowed out skulls of rotten corpses to drink at the fax that is not in any way shape or form a fun fact for a kid these are all true do you want to fact check me let's go according to Scientific American magazine Americans accidentally eat on average two full pounds of flies bugs and maggots each year and here we are worried about the corona virus the CDC and some of these other places they are they need to have a magnet task force we breathe then a leader of far every single act please could we be done and that's what we have for our younger listeners how we do this from time to time here at the hammer Nigel show by the way just as a reminder if you missed it earlier hammer got the results of his anti body test for covert nineteen I had my doctor seal it up in an envelope and you read the results on the air you know because your son was sick in February was out for a couple days and he tested negative for the flu right and so that was kind of your first hit right there that possibly maybe your family had the corona viruses was affected your tire household so you want to get the antibody test to see if you had it AMD you are negative bombed out by that there's not really hoping not have the the antibodies was hoping that I've already had the rona it ran its course to me I know that I had it to be immune to it writes screw in the man's right all walk around is coughing sneezing on people go down to Florida all right with you coming up and next we will reset the biggest stories of the day the latest numbers in ND and a lot more there's also rumors of a chopper presser chopper presser next here's why I like window nation because not only am I a customer I use their products they have window nation windows in my house.

Scientific American magazine CDC flu Florida ND Nigel
The World of Visual Engineering with Steve Giralt

The Indy Mogul Podcast

08:35 min | 11 months ago

The World of Visual Engineering with Steve Giralt

"Thing that i want to kick off with is visual engineer and i know. Initially you didn't start in film and television photography but just regular photography either sogefi at a technical institute so what was the reasoning behind Getting into technical institute in the beginning and you always know that this was something you want to do. Wow you just dove right in here. We go just go in the deep end. Yeah so. I picked up the young age. I was probably fifteen or something like that. You know just and this is. I'm not gonna date myself exactly but this is film cameras with manual like you know like fm to nikon. And that's why. I fell in love with atari and just taking pictures of ducks upon. Whatever you name it. I did all the boring stuff and then you know now. I'm where i'm at but basically after high school. She got a job working fulltime at a senior portrait studio doing underclassmen photos and senior. Portrait's sports and problems and like you name it like i was just like out there taking pictures of all that and then i got into like shooting models portfolios. And i'm like oh oh so. I'm from miami florida originally. So it's like the land of like sexy girls and like whatever and i was like. Oh that's what you do. That's shoot your. i'm from miami. You shoot like sexy people not for unless you're filming some bikini lady or something exactly. Let's go to the bikini on it and here we got And then after a little bit of doing that after high school. I didn't really know what i wanted to do. Honestly i was just like partying And like being teenager. Whatever and then i finally started being like. I really like this. This is what. I really wanna do like photography in some way. I didn't know i wanted to. I would never have been able to know. I would end up where i'm at right now but Then you know looked into it. And i was like okay. Rochester institute of technology. Like a friend of mine had told me about it. And they're like oh. They have like a really great like advertising photography like super technical program and i grew up in a family of engineers. I had kind of a understanding for technical stuff came easy to me so i i applied and got in like oh cool. I guess i can go here. My parents worked it out financially and you know some debt but not so bad but I went to rit. i transferred in. Because i was going to school like night school Part time was working fulltime Always going So transferred. I was only there for two years for like my junior and senior basically i graduated and like that was like the biggest eye opening experience for me away. I don't have to shoot weddings and like sexy girls. I could shoot way more things in college. The college experience other things than other things he does was not like. I had no access to this information. Like miami's a very like i'm cuban. My family's like oh photographer you she weddings. I didn't know that like advertising still life. And whatever existed until i got all righty and i was like oh the studio. This is really cool. Like i understand this. Like i could create something out of nothing and i kind of rolled with that for a while then i was like oh i don't know and then i kind of change to shooting people a little bit again and then like i dunno so eventually i graduated from our. At and i'm going to be a travel to tougher. because i'd like gone on a trip to cuba and shot pay people and it was really fun and interesting was like using hospitalized like film cameras like awesome and like i have two lines as i have a wide along. What's it like. There was no nothing else and it was super fun. I mean once again. Just exploring photography on trying to understand it just taking images and so based after a after. At i want to be a traffic tarver muneer city. I started dropping off my portfolio. Which was like my college portfolio. That had like trips to like cuba and i went to mexico. Then i like shot around upstate. New york and rochester like student like student photographer at its finest like photography guess But then likes. I moved here with the plan of like assisting other photographers and getting to know like the industry and how it all works in at like. I'm like i wanna make you know from from a early age. I was at very entrepreneurial and i'm like i want to make money at this. I don't want to dislike. Do this only for fun So i moved here assisting photographers like two months. Later like the one magazine had dropped off. My portfolio calls me the like. We have a job for you shooting like food and portrait at a restaurant in new york city. It was like three hundred dollars for like everything like a random place that he walked by. And you dropped off your portfolio at this. Is it up. I did research magazines called severe magazine. They're still around today and i was like. Oh they travel and food says like. Here's my book and at that point i'd never taught food before so it's kind of interesting and they're like food i'm like sure. Of course you know like one hundred percent until you make it you gotta go all in like if anybody gives you a chance. take it. you think you're going to fail like hardly but Shooting for them pretty regularly. Why was assisting other photographers and kind of during that whole thing Just trying to make ends meet and like my rant and whatever go like yeah you're out let's go and Worked out. I mean some months i was like a little late other rant and you had to make it work and The struggle made me work harder. I think that's for two people that are too comfortable. I think get uncomfortable. Like i think the more you have to make it work. The more you're going to make it work is what i tell people So either way that. Let's fast forward a little bit. Because it's a long story but i moved like at. Rit had access to some of the first digital cameras that were really being used. So when i moved to new york. I knew how they worked in a lot of these still photographers like that. Like you know still photography they're like oh my clients want me to chew digital. I don't know how to do that. And i was like i know how to do that. So i kind of transitioned after about a year in new york working as what's called a digital tech where i would kind of go on set with computer. This is like g four mirror. Drive doors like max here and like run the camera that had to be like tethered through a cable to the computer like to work. Otherwise you couldn't even use. It goes like it was just a brick is like oh this doesn't do anything And i would run These phase one digital backs very early ones and Kodak ucs probiotics for the two main back over sixteen megapixel. This is like groundbreaking. And yeah. I got really lucky. And i met up with some amazing companies that what rent their equipment to people. And i would go on set to run the equipment because people didn't know how to do this and i was the kind of guy that could like open up the g. four and like pull the rim out if it wasn't working rated troubleshoot because the technology was a little shaky back then. There was no like sony a seven. You know you're like the tech savvy whiz kid that set like you digital things not working on running and it was really cool because like i got to work with some really high end like steven mozelle and like like i was actually the only detect that i know of that ever got to show actually got the show richard abbott on how digital works like he had never used digital in his life and he knew the company that i would freelance for and i was their best tech. And they're like. Hey steve you wanna go showed richard abbott on. How did work some like. Yeah he was awesome. You know. I think he's like dick. How you doing you know. He was amazing. Dude that's so passionate about image making it capturing the essence of people and stuff and so we did one day. I showed him how there's a work we did. Another day where he was shooting self portrait of himself for some ad for hp or something and it was super fun. And what's i got to work and see like in fashion and beauty in in product and kind of work with a bunch of different people and that's honestly like school was great. I learned so much just like hard knocks working in and getting better getting paid to work for other

Miami Rochester Institute Of Technol Cuba Atari Nikon Florida Upstate Rochester Richard Abbott Mexico RIT New York City New York Steven Mozelle Kodak Sony Steve
"american magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Harris unfortunately represent wrong things did not write my plan she's endorsed it as being one of the plans that is the best to get us to a place where everyone is going to have access to healthcare in America and when we talk about this again I'm gonna go back a vice president Biden because your plan does not cover everyone in America by your staff and your own definition that was so dismissive wasn't it oh my gosh that was so catty it really was hoping to the second hour of the show I did alas at do you listen to it or official thing last on Facebook only so just crazy well I I were an American magazine here is totally line here I mean she was totally line and also she was straight she had said at one point that she what separates the employer from healthcare but how how does it do that that's the big question and she said the cost of doing nothing is far too expensive we're paying three trillion etcetera etcetera she said it was misleading to suggest that Americans like their plans but yet eighty here's a poll eighty six percent of Americans covered by employer based plan said that they were excellent or good then she would she do this was she lied I mean it was it would that's what and she was rattle because they don't want that are so hard on that so dismissive but that was the beginning of Gabbard attack on here is she went down that would just level all pencil appetizer that was that was the I don't either shrimp cocktail or the octopus that's sort of what may yell you guys any thought for no that's good hell yeah country octopus man autoplus Gator so good they're totally separate things but you know the name anyway so this is when it really got good and I was so here for this was just was really you buy mood right now listen Harris says she's proud of her record as a prosecutor in that she'll be a prosecutor present but I'm deeply concerned about this record there are too many examples to site but she put over fifteen hundred people in jail for marijuana violations and laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana.

Harris America vice president Biden Facebook American magazine prosecutor marijuana official Gabbard eighty six percent
"american magazine" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WTVN

"On iheartradio. ABC news. I'm Brian Clark. A plant manager human resources manager. An intern were among the five people killed in Friday's shooting at a warehouse in Illinois. According to Aurora police chief, Kristen Zemun forty-five-year-old gunman. Gary Martin was fired in a meeting at the Henry Pratt company. Friday, according to witness at the scene who is part of that that termination meeting as that he reported for work and during this meeting he was terminated, and my understanding from the witnesses is that he opened fire right after the termination police say Martin was not supposed to have the Smith and Wesson gun. He used in the attack due to prior convictions. ABC's Ryan burrow, Martin was killed by police after he wounded five officers Chicago police released two men linked to the investigation into an alleged attack on actor Jesse small. Let authorities say those were the two pitcher near the scene on the night of the attack. But say they provided information that shifted the trajectory of the investigation. President Trump spending the weekend. South Florida after declaring a national emergency at the southern border ABC's chief White House correspondent Jonathan Karl explains. How the border wall will be funded. The White House says the president can get an additional six and a half billion dollars using executive and emergency powers to shift money from other projects. Most of it would come from the Pentagon at money intended for counternarcotics efforts in emergency military construction. Former cardinal Theodore McCarrick has been defrocked by the Catholic church stripped of his priestly duties after a Vatican investigation found him guilty of sexual crimes Gerald O'Connell Vatican. Correspondent for American magazine says this is a landmark decision you have to go back centuries. Somebody told me to the council of Trent that's almost five hundred years ago for a similar situation where a cardinal a former cardinal was laya sized. You're listening to ABC news. A good night's sleep starts. Newsradio six ten WTVN. I've Sean Gallagher hundreds gathered at the Columbus renaissance hotel last.

Gary Martin ABC chief White House corresponden Theodore McCarrick Brian Clark Smith President Trump Sean Gallagher Kristen Zemun Gerald O'Connell Vatican plant manager Aurora Columbus renaissance hotel intern Henry Pratt company White House Jonathan Karl American magazine
"american magazine" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Yeah. I I've been so far removed from that for so many years because I didn't just split with the split with my old company recently. But even then even before then we didn't associate with any of those guys on that side. But I do I do media appearances for things like that where some Canadian or American magazine, we'll go, hey, can you speak to this because I've been in that world or adjacent in that world for so long. But there's always always always for the records something wrong with people being disingenuous in order to or viewing relationships as adversarial in any way as always counterproductive, and there's always something wrong with that. Unless you're. I suppose maybe there are exceptions to this. But even in the Goshi -ation, I think you should be working towards a common goal. But when you're looking at the opposite sex as an adversarial relationship that is always unhealthy and a lot of the pickup artist guys the whole thing is predicated on that it's zero sum if they win somebody else the females the lose the women lose and that is unhealthy. That's unhealthy for women. But it certainly unhealthy for the guys doing it to them because you're doing it to yourself. You have to do a lot of putting a lot of work to figure out how to be overly domineering, not give other people what they want because you feel like you're losing you really doubling down on your own insecurities when you focus on that stuff. And so I think it's inherently unhealthy, and I view a lot of the alright stuff is an extension of that. It's basically a political expression of a lot of male insecurities turned up to eleven you. You mentioned you were married. How if at all did what you've learned about dating relationships again as not necessarily the pickup dating and relationships, and you really deep in that world how did that help or not help as you were courting, and then Yaron your your wife? So I met my wife through the show and her brother and her listen to it together. And she went out with me. At least fifty percent curiosity to see if I would be the same person, I was on the show in real life, and she's in the other room. So you know, if you wanna ask her, okay, you can ask yourself. Yeah. What's her name, Jen? And I just. I'm really like clumsy today. I was craning over to see Jen. And I banged my cheek up against the Mike second. I've done something like that today so legal spat. Sure what tell me about it. Right, so ugly. Did it get? It's it's it's still ongoing. It's definitely not pretty and what's really frustrating. We had negotiated an amicable split, and it just didn't work out which is about as specific as I should probably get with that type of thing. But it's such it's such a bummer because we had moved my show away from all of this..

Jen American magazine Yaron Mike second fifty percent
"american magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The. Now, your host, Richard RJ. Yes. Here's this week's black mirror moment for those of you. Don't know black mirror is the science fiction television show that always shows some dystopia in reflection of our technology. What we have today, but more what we might have tomorrow. So here's this week's black mirror moment. It comes courtesy of the route, which is an online African American magazine. And they they inform us that a couple of weeks ago when in Massachusetts there was a gas line problem. So there was a fire threat as a result of this potential safety threat, the Massachusetts state police wanted people to evacuate and it certain geographic region with me so far. So the Senate out on social media and to show the locations. Heeded evacuation. They included a screen shot of one of their computers and the screen shots showed the areas of danger and all of that. So that people could know where the tweet set updated plotting of confirmed fires and explosions three nine locations confirmed thus far number will grow reminder. Our residents in these cities have to evacuate as your anyone else who smells gas. And then so you see a map, and you see all those little pins in it like maps sometimes have. But some of the pens were not about the gas leak. One of them. For example, was marked M A P B now that turns out was mass action against police brutality. That's a group whose goal is. And they quote and police brutality and institutional racism now makes you wonder. Why was a group with peaceful intent there were no record of any lawbreaking? Why was that on the map of the Massachusetts state police another map was marked COM BAT combat? That's the coalition to organize and mobilize Boston against Trump quote that they say they're quote. A grassroots intersectional coalition of students artists and workers organizing creatively to resist all forms of oppression and quote. So what are they gonna do threaten the state by building a puppet? But yet they too were on the Massachusetts state police police map. So you know, what we got was evidence social media evidence at the Massachusetts state police, even though this has happened over and over again in modern American history. And even though police forces are always saying, we won't do it anymore. Apparently, the Massachusetts state, please is spying on peaceful. Nonviolent groups that are trying to in one case resist Trump and in another case tried to stop a members of the black community in Massachusetts from being shot down. This is absolutely or Weli. One in six seniors faces the threat of hunger and millions more live in isolation. Drop off a hot meal and say.

Massachusetts Trump Richard RJ Senate African American magazine Boston
"american magazine" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"West Palm Beach. Coral Springs lake worth. From ABC news. I'm Richard Cantu. Despite multiple calls for an FBI investigation. The Senate Judiciary committee plans to vote in the morning on the supreme court nomination of bread Kavanagh after Christine Blasi for details are allegations of sexual improprieties against cavenaugh when they were in high school together cavenaugh vehemently denied any wrongdoing before the committee came in with an extremely angry town, but he was also highly emotional, I mean, women are constantly tweeting suppose a woman crying like that. It would have been a disaster. But he was allowed to get away with it. ABC news chief political analyst Cokie Roberts, moderate, Tennessee, Republican. Bob corker announced he would vote for the cavenaugh nominating. The American Bar Association is the latest to call for an FBI probe of cavenaugh before the nomination moves forward. After initially endorsing Cavanaugh, the weekly Jesuit publication, American magazine withdrew its backing in Minneapolis trial has been ordered for the police officer who shot and killed a woman who'd called for help in two thousand seventeen I hadn't been county. Judge denying motion to dismiss charges of third degree murder and second degree manslaughter against Minneapolis. Police officer Ben Hamad, nor in the fatal shooting of Justin Damon, nor and another officer were responding to a nine one one. Call placed by Damon who claims she had heard of possible sexual assault happening near her home. She was fatally shot when she approached the police car. The judge setting officer nor his trial for April. Ryan burrow, ABC news too dead to passengers on hospital critical lists after their private jet crashed after landing at Greenville, South Carolina. Breaking in two. It went down a steep embankment at runways all forty seven passengers and crew survived an Air New Guinea, Boeing seven thirty-seven bitched in the water short of the runway took island and Micronesian. Only some minor injuries reported why the jetliner didn't make it.

officer FBI Justin Damon ABC Minneapolis Coral Springs lake Senate Judiciary committee West Palm Beach Bob corker Richard Cantu American Bar Association Christine Blasi cavenaugh Cokie Roberts third degree murder political analyst American magazine Boeing
"american magazine" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"From ABC news. I'm Richard Cantu. Despite multiple calls for an FBI investigation. The Senate Judiciary committee plans to vote in the morning on the supreme court nomination of bread cavenaugh after Christine Blasi Ford detailed or allegations of sexual improprieties against cavenaugh when they were in high school together cavenaugh vehemently denied any wrongdoing before the committee, he came in with an extremely angry town, but he was also highly emotional mean women were constantly, tweeting suppose a woman were crying like that. It would have been a disaster. But he was allowed to get away. With ABC news chief political analyst Cokie Roberts, moderate, Tennessee, Republican. Bob corker announced he would vote for the cabin on the American Bar Association is the latest to call for an F B I probe of cavenaugh before the nomination moves forward. After initially endorsing cavenaugh, the weekly Jesuit publication, American magazine withdrew its backing in Minneapolis trial has been ordered for the police officer who shot and killed a woman who called for help in two thousand. Seventeen. I hadn't been county. Judge denying motion to dismiss charges of third degree murder and second degree manslaughter against Minneapolis. Police officer Mohammad nor in the fatal shooting of Justin Damon, nor and another officer were responding to a nine one one. Call placed by Damon who claims she had heard a possible sexual assault happening near her home. She was fatally shot when she approached the police car, the judge setting officer Norris trial for April. Ryan burrow, ABC news for two pilots dead to passengers on hospital critical lists after their private jet crashed after landing at Greenville, South Carolina. Breaking in to as it went down a steep embankment at runways. All forty seven passengers and crew survived when an Air New Guinea Boeing seven thirty-seven ditched in the water short of the runway at took island. Micronesia only some minor injuries reported why the jetliner didn't make it to.

officer ABC Minneapolis Senate Judiciary committee Justin Damon Richard Cantu Bob corker Christine Blasi Ford Micronesia FBI cavenaugh American magazine Boeing third degree murder American Bar Association Cokie Roberts Ryan burrow Mohammad
"american magazine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on KOMO

"Has been. Working to prove herself in the modeling industry is a, plus size, model ABC chief business and economics correspondent Rebecca Jarvis talks with her. About positive body image campaigns and becoming a champion of diversity what was that moment. Like, for you to you've now been modeling for almost two decades almost two decades It, took to make it to the cover. Of l. but then you did I did I did I've been working really hard for that. Moment and and you know trying to, prove myself proved to others what, I. Already knew was possible and with. Patient about. It, and. Was hopeful that the industry would get there I've never really been about finger-wagging like you are. Not shooting us fairly and this is not this is not moving fast enough and this isn't changing in the right way. Because there has been great progress over my let's say? Let's say two decades we can, rounded up let's There's been amazing progress and it did take a, while to get there but it's exactly what I knew was always going to be the way so the fact that a woman with a body like. Mine can be on the cover of mainstream American magazine is the direction, I always knew we. Were taken was always hopeful for from the day I signed my contract so it was really sweet for me it was really a, surreal moment when you say woman with body. Like Away stunningly beautiful thank you thank you, what do, you mean by that well. I'm not a size too it's just comes down to that as simple as, that the modeling industry for anyone who's not super familiar with it as sort of just. Showcased one type of body for a very long time there was even exact measurements that, were, ideal for model to be and I have never been those measurements I love my body and I don't think that I, am other than but by industry standards that were created I guess eons, ago for whatever reason I don't even know where. These numbers came out of the clear blue sky and for what reason. By the industry sort of stuck to those for very long time and we've all been making waves and changes and sort of using our voices to say hey there are other kinds of women who. Deserves celebration in our, world is made up of so many. Different kinds of women and it's. Time that others get to see that So that they feel represented because. There's nothing like opening? A magazine or watching television or looking at a billboard and being. Like wow you know what she reminds me of me puts an extra pep in your, step, everybody needs that I ask everybody this question worst advice you've received career I really think you should do this yeah that's, probably you probably hear that all the time yeah To do this and then you're like. Okay I. Don't, why. Why make sure to ask why yeah exactly and then also. Push, back if you're not right? With that? Yeah where's device to do this do this I'd say that's probably getting all wrapped. Up in the excitement and. You do this you have to do this. Maybe that's the worst you have to, do this will do, anything From ABC news..

Rebecca Jarvis ABC American magazine two decades
"american magazine" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on KOMO

"Preston Candice a fine has been working to prove, herself in the modeling industry as a plus size model ABC chief business and economics correspondent Rebecca Jarvis talks with her about positive body image campaigns and. Becoming a champion of diversity what was that moment like for you to, you've now been modeling. For almost two decades almost two. Decades took to make it to the cover of Al but. Then you did I, did, I did I. Have been working really hard for that moment and and you know trying to prove myself proved to others what I already knew, was possible and with patient about it and was hopeful that the industry would get there I've never really been about finger-wagging like you are not shooting. Us fairly and this is not this is not moving. Fast, enough This isn't changing. In the right way because there has been great progress over my let's say let's say two. Decades we can round it up Let There's been amazing, progress and it did take a while to get. There but it's exactly what I knew was always going to be the. Way so the fact that you know a woman with a body like mine can be on the cover of a mainstream American magazine is the direction I always knew we would take and was always hopeful for from the. Day I signed my, contract so it was really sweet for. Me it was really a surreal moment when you say women with, body like Stunningly beautiful thank you thank, you what, do you mean by that. Well I'm not a size too it's just comes down to that as simple, as that the modeling industry for anyone is not super familiar with it is sort of just. Showcased one type of body for a very long time there was even you know exact, measurements, that were ideal for model to be and I have never been those measurements I love my body and I don't think, that am other than but you know by industry. Standards that were created I, guess eons ago for whatever reason I don't even. Know where these numbers came out of the clear blue sky and for. What reason by the industry sort of stuck to those for a very long time and we've all been making waves and changes and sort of using our voices to say hey there are other kinds of women who deserves. Celebration in our world, is made up of so many different. Kinds of women and it's time. That others get to see that so That they feel. Represented because there's nothing like opening a magazine or watching television or looking at a billboard, and, being like wow you know what she reminds me of me puts an extra pep in your step everybody needs that I, ask everybody this question worst advice you've received your. Career I really think. You should do. This that's probably you probably. Hear that all the time yeah I really. Think you should do this and then you're like. Okay I don't why why make sure to ask why yeah. Exactly, and then also push back? If you're? Not right with that yeah where's device to do this do this I'd say that's. Probably getting all wrapped up. In the excitement and you do this you have. To do this maybe that's the worst you have to do, this Anything.

Rebecca Jarvis Preston Candice ABC American magazine Al two decades
"american magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"The guy gordon i can't take you any more the bottom line is this we are trying to get this this voice heard by more and again the the current fm slot that we could move into we're gonna pick up about close to a quarter million new voices rather years people paying attention to us that would be able to access that we'd get the message out better so further harder deeper faster but we need you to get over to go fund me dot com and then at the and search clicking type in wham radio and then donate that's what this is all about you the listener are funding this this is a pledge drive this is a support drive we want you to support the wham bid with the wham lee here to get the fm signal up and running now i think about happy i just mentioned this is pretty much where people are these days it's kinda scary i just wrote a piece on fact and i did i pronounce piece i've got see if i got the christian baker thing baker thing twice i wanted to print a piece out off of the college fixed that common victim struggling to find it right now and we're going to do that here's the deal that they now have online now there's nothing wrong with being happy being happy is great if you can pull it off good luck with that it's a fleeting moment trust me on that but anyway pull it off let's print this out so that i can stop screwing around here with this mouse i wiggle this mouse i'm always afraid i'm gonna wiggle it to the point of meeting glasses getting harry pomp so hang on a second here there we go all right it's printing out now the reason i'm even mentioning this is because in this this month's episode of issue of new american magazine you can see new american.

new american magazine
"american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Nation which is an american magazine the described itself as a place for debate on the left of politics william you've done a presentation recently i understand on changing longterm identities what do you mean yes no really changing longterm believes are muted in your premise of good contacts and you know people grow up in setting communities were setting kind of identities were very strong views and a context really that i do the presentation walls you notice that african democratic comes the q certain and says you know sets out certain values non sexism homophobia and so on but most people in south africa black and white grew up ring including my solve evei sexist society vape paci arco and so on so now we have those sort of values the democratic values immense personal values and community values is totally different and young harleys after meet think valleys had to be thrust on new by law in order to make the change when it becomes simply socially unacceptable to be homophobic the job is done isn't it cotton not really is a job is not done a rick seaney since africa's what what really needs to do and and and really argue chain speaker individually or at a big communitylevel and death a difficult thing that we should be real i mean it is now of course socially unacceptable and south africa to be homophobe can to be you know sex says some a patriarch has baath unfortunate in a day to day life that is happening and saw so we delors have change but you know so unless we change socie in families and communities and people's identities of they go up with if you don't chains that and that is our challenge that we are really struggling with in south africa maria tell us about your latest project in greece piece of work for the bbc radio crossing continents program yes i have my working on a documentary about the refugees squats in athens there about twelve squatted buildings in athens as a hotel there are some schools where refugees and migrants without papers are living because there isn't enough accommodation for them we still have a very large refugee population about sixty thousand people analysts still arriving display australia's i law there is a gap in march it'll be two years since.

american magazine rick seaney athens australia south africa africa greece bbc two years
"american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Grass oxford american magazine is dedicated its latest southern music issue entirely to kentucky and it's not just bluegrass it's sold jazz punk rock 'n rap the issue comes with a cd of kentucky music some new and some old and we're joined today by oxford american deputy editor maxwell george welcome and also nathan sells burke who is a musician who was a consultant for the magazine welcome to you now the cover of this magazine i have to say is not what i expected there is a tiny photo of loretta lynn but we do not see bluegrass founder bill monroe here and instead you've got a relative newcomer on the cover sturgis simpson let's hear a bit of his music who does he said novi justin theroux animal thorough leaders sill madison why did you picks turgeau simpson for the cover this magazine we were really floored not just by the history of the music but the vibrancy of the contemporary scene so we knew we kind of wanted to find someone for the cover who would convey that kind of dual nature of the themes of this issue which are sturgeon is playing country music and he is drawing on that form but he's moving it forward let's bringing nathan sells bug you're the curator of the alan lomax archive at the association for cultural equity and you redness saying this magazine about a murder battlid lomax recorded in kentucky in 1937 first let's hear of little bit of that recording we the and there's a new version of this song on the cdhd either she'd with the magazine yes so lomax who is renowned folklorist me recordings were 30s and 40s for the library of congress made some seventy hours of.

kentucky murder alan lomax justin theroux sturgis simpson founder burke deputy editor oxford american maxwell george Grass oxford american magazine congress battlid lomax nathan sturgeon turgeau simpson bill monroe loretta lynn consultant seventy hours
"american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bluegrass oxford american magazine is dedicated its latest southern music issue entirely to kentucky and if not just bluegrass it's sold jazz punk rock and rap the issue comes with a cd of kentucky music some new and some old and we're joined today by oxford american deputy editor maxwell george welcome and also nathan sells burke who is a musician who was a consultant for the magazine welcome to you never cover this magazine i have to say is not what i expected there is a tiny photo of loretta lynn but we do not see bluegrass founder bill monroe here in instead you've got a relative newcomer on the cover sturgeons simpson let's hear a bit of his music he said no way justin animal made still madison why did you picks turtles simpson for the cover this magazine we were really floor not just by the history of the music but the vibrancy of the contemporary scene so we knew we kind of wanted to find someone for the cover who would convey that kind of dual nature of the themes of this issue which are sturgeon is playing country music and he is drawing on that form but he's moving it forward let's bringing nathan salzburg you're the curator of the allen lomax archive at the association for cultural equity and you redness aim this a magazine about a murder battlid lomax recorded in kentucky in 1937 first looks here of little bit of that recording me.

kentucky murder allen lomax madison justin sturgeons simpson founder burke deputy editor oxford american maxwell george oxford american magazine battlid lomax nathan salzburg sturgeon bill monroe loretta lynn consultant
"american magazine" Discussed on KCMO Talk Radio

KCMO Talk Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on KCMO Talk Radio

"Parents this desires decisions on on well this matter uh and then my last one um i am listening to morning edition or whatever weekend edition on national public radio yesterday wrote getting ready for are going synagogue and they were interviewing a father james martin just recently built of built a book my god written in the book quote building a bridge there how it will remind can slip at this hour of the morning books called building a bridge and the interview at least suggested that it was a concern about the fulsomeness of a response he is a catholic priest to the pulse massacre and what uh he believes the church needs to do in order to lift and more fully to the community of gay people who are clearly in the church it will in whatever fashion they may or follow the teachings or the restrictions on them at cetera i don't have bill you've heard of this guy or you may want like i know you saw the james martin is is fairly wellknown um a regard i i believe is a jesuit i think he is with american magazine is not the editor in in any songs he he he'd be more on the left side of the spectrum of of the dialogue we have within the church but none none of another aware of the uh i'm not aware of the new book yes up to check that i'll have to check that out building a bridge i'm i'm personally involved in a ministry called courage the kurds apostolate in that is a ministry four it's a catholic ministry but you don't have to be catholic to blunted it's a support group for a christians who who experience samesex attraction that don't want to act on this and and and and it's a.

bill james martin american magazine editor support group
"american magazine" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:54 min | 4 years ago

"american magazine" Discussed on talkRADIO

"Is given to newsweek magazine the american magazine he said no royal wants the throne reasonably visa lying about that and it's still machine claim when you think about it can setting the future monarchy that his father who is now been in line as principles for decades he does it won't you could have its harry his as once and how he himself says certainly what not for me so the question is should we abolished the monarchy do you think thirty nine percent of us a saying yes at the moment sixty one percent say no we should not including james covered either chilean p and seventh cable now that can house of commons is the demand pay particular would be the late leader they think he's more important than ever joe in this difficult few years month so how will it takes this brexit that we keep as a constitutional monarchy a constitutional monarch but what they do think it's one that we be centrally stable outrightly reporter on the pavements of the uk good morning alex your oh yeah this is a subject that always gets people talking doesn't it whether you're a staunch republican or whether your big band of the monarchy and sometimes even when people don't talk about it it gets people talking identity solar clip of jeremy corbyn being interviewed by jeremy paxman on sky before the election and channel four weighty said your your republican but there's nothing unusual manifesto about the monarchy and he said well there's nothing in there because we're not going to abolish it attic all big law from the crowd in that maybe think well if i was in charge of the country i would have gone a she'll or maybe i would i would keep it and i would support it i'm to the hilton us while i've been out asking you this morning would you abolished the monarchy actually often these comments from prince harry that neither hey no william nor charles actually wants to be king thinking zone this thing for him to say because was born in sweden tuesday sorry could understand the pressures of no one in the way on this shoulders later once the king full he would once jill twenty seven it's not an easy job and i think is fat now the they've.

the american magazine james reporter jeremy corbyn jeremy paxman prince harry sweden newsweek magazine uk charles thirty nine percent sixty one percent