20 Episode results for "American Institute of Architects"

'We can't live in a state of denial': The effort to establish retrofit policies for old, brittle buildings

KUOW Newsroom

01:48 min | 3 months ago

'We can't live in a state of denial': The effort to establish retrofit policies for old, brittle buildings

"Well north west policymakers and emergency managers have long warned about the risk of brittle old buildings crumbling on our heads in the event of a strong earthquake and the new online exhibit. That went live. This month aims to inspire action on seismic retrofits. Here's kyw's tom ponzi. Their cherish but also vulnerable unrein forced brick and stone buildings number in the thousands across the north west in city centres and historic districts. Seattle architect mary welder. What was originally to be a physical exhibit about retrofits studies for target audience of architects and engineers they exhibit was recast for the general public and moved online when the pandemic hit we do need retrofitting policies. In order to be a seismic safe city we can't live in a state of denial where we're ignoring a clear and present danger for economic reasons. Which is what has been happening. Welder contends mandatory retrofit requirements are inevitable even though the portland and seattle city. Governments once again shelled such proposals indefinitely. Just a couple months ago. Welder curated the for the local chapter of the american institute of architects. One message is. There's no need to wait by building owners who can afford to proceed longer term. She says the public should be prepared to shoulder a share the burden these historic buildings provide a value. That is public as well as private. And when we place all of the onus on private building owners they are going to pass that cost onto their tenants. The virtual earthquakes is viewable online through mid july at when seattle shakes dot com. I'm tom bonzi reporting.

kyw tom ponzi mary welder seattle city earthquake north west Seattle Welder american institute of architec portland seattle tom bonzi
Female Firsts: Norma Merrick Sklarek

Stuff Mom Never Told You

36:34 min | 1 year ago

Female Firsts: Norma Merrick Sklarek

"This episode of stuff mom never told you brought to you by Pantene lately. I've been using the pantene rosewater collation and it's fantastic not only does it smell incredible double but my hair feels softer than ever like an actual rose pedal yeah and best of all the Pantene rose water collection is sulfate free and contains zero parabens mineral mineral oils or dies additionally one of the reasons I love painting is because of their commitment to become of cruelty free company that using science to make great shampoo and do it without hurting animals which is awesome awesome so try the new painting Rose Water Collection Avis Zanny Anthony Mantha the theft never told you prediction of iheartradio's has to do you know what today is what is today. I don't know wait. What but it's time for another female. I really tackle traumatic thing. Of course it is a big day. That is the biggest day ever. True is true however I thought there was something else added. Maybe there's going to be yeah. Well you know what next time Kate Champagne we'll do it right. Expectations are huge. Yes we're going to build up every time but that means that we are joined again by our friend and CO worker. Eve's Hello Hi do any good but I have a request. If there is cake next time can it be cheesecake because a lot not a huge fan of other kinds of Kate so if we can do if I can be that person and request that comes no that's perfect. I'm the same way and so my birthday is this month y'all just up and since I was fourteen years old because I did not like cake. My birthday cakes always been cheesecake so every the year you couldn't go home. My mom would make me a fancy homemade cheesecake or my birthday so I like that. Yes yes we will do cheesecake the cheesecake game to any I am but I actually have a very funny story about cheesecake because I once when I was in middle school. I bought an entire. Ah Geek from Kroger and it was a different chocolate flavor every slice that little special me and my friend ate the entire thing while we were watching the stargate movie with Kurt Russell James Spader and we got very sick and so I haven't associated just have to get past it like every time I i. It's good but you know there's that like nervousness and that's not good but you are the winner. You get to make the request okay cool. We'll be cheesecake I made and what do you like the topping. Do you like playing cheesecake cheesecake. Owain or a strawberry. I don't really get much more interesting so the reason I fell in love with cheesecakes because I watch my mom make it and I helped her make it is like these mini chocolate chips with the chocolate. Crust my all time favorite. Don't like anything over that I can do some strawberries in all of that but I don't WanNa be all fancy with. I keep cliff ribbon Bar Motif. All it is an orphan thing. Oh no well. You're welcome. Thank you decide. I used to view where my parents in college. It'd be like me at the cheesecake factory and I'd be like okay fancy fancy facebook. I know overwhelms me much there. We're on the same page but today we are not talking about just cheesecake Hi Fi. We'll return to that topic. Did you bring us as female I of the day eating well today's female. I is Norma Merrick S- Clark Nick and she has a lot of I two her name like a lot of them. But one of the biggest ones is that she was well. She was one of the first black female licensed architects in the US wasn't the first one a lot of places list her as the first but she probably wasn't the first in the US but she was the first black woman to be licensed licensed architect in New York and California and she was the first black woman to be a member of the American Institute of Architects and she was the the first black woman to be appointed a fellow of the American Institute of Architects so this one is I guess a little bit different than previous I just because she died in two thousand twelve so that wasn't that long ago. I think the people we covered in the past kind of like stuck to but I think it's important to show that like this was a first. I that happened not too long ago and this is still a field that is very the number of black women people in general let alone black women in the field field of licensed architects in the United States is very small in disproportionate. and it's something that's growing but it's still it's still small number of black women in the field and yeah so we're. GonNa talk about normal today. which is she was? You know a pioneer in the field and her story is pretty interesting. Yeah I it is pretty telling that it's such a recent I and normally when we do these. I've I get a bunch of bullet points then. I'm like okay. Here's the things that they've done and this one is three pages lot off. Yeah Yeah so oh. I guess let's get started. Let's get into it already so ready. So normal was born on April Fifteenth Nineteen Twenty eight and Harlem and her father's name was Walter Merrick. He was a doctor and her mother was. Amy Merrick and she was a seamstress and they were both immigrants there from Trinidad and she was their only child and so she was raised during the Great Depression her family moved from Crown Heights in Brooklyn when she was a child eld or excuse me her family moves to Crown Heights in Brooklyn when she was a child and her father got a medical degree from Howard University so when she was a child she was already exhibiting all these signs that like would lead toward architecture. I don't know about y'all but like architecture's very interesting too. I can never I could never do it. They like but I think it's amazing in just something that's grown like become so innovative so quickly but just like it has so many different elements of things like there's two are. There's the math yeah they're the visuals in my you know to so many the physics of it like so many different things that go into it and so as a child she exhibited all these signs of being good and all these different areas so she had this art things he sketched she painted and she drew anti carpentry work irks. She worked on furniture yeah so she was really a cool. Gal since he was young and she went to public. Girls School called Hunter College High School while she was a high school student to and some of those same fields. She said that her grades were pretty good and pretty much everything I love it. I I know but she was really good at art sciences and math which is still pretty much everything good in general but it was her father who suggested to her that maybe you should do architecture and obviously then as there aren't there aren't many black people who were in the profession but but that didn't keep her from pursuing it so she wanted to go to Howard her father did but her father didn't want her to her parents wanted her to stay closer to home and so to prepare for Columbia University's architecture program she took liberal arts courses at Barnard College and Barnard College was associated with Columbia University versity but it was for women like for Women as Columbia didn't accept women students so she went through that those courses and then she got into the Columbia University School School of architecture so she remarked on how her first year there was super hard but that didn't keep her from coming back after the summer she came back in the fall like many of her classmates were war veterans Somehow Bachelors and Masters degrees so basically they have people around them and they already had all experienced unstable to help them through the process of getting through these amazingly can't even imagine how difficult courses they were so those people what kind of work on assignments together but she had a situation where she was commuting to school and sometimes had to finish her work on her commutes or at home alone so that kind of having we know like having how how having that support system is important when you're going through school right. Oh yeah she got her bachelor of architecture degree in nineteen fifty and she was one of the two women in her class and the only black win after that she applied to nineteen architectural firms she said in interviews like I won't forget that number nineteen eighteen but was turned down to every one of them yeah and she got hers on. She got the twentieth This is a quote that she says she said I don't know if the rejections were because I was a black person because I was a young woman or because of the economic recession at the time but she said those places were hiring. Women are black people so I think we can kind of go like right. We know what the issue was here yeah so does she herd twentieth one that was when she went to work in the city of New York's Department of Public Works as what she says. It's a junior address person and she didn't like the job because she couldn't really be creative in it so she wasn't there long she took the New York State architect's licensing exam and she passed stay on the first time which everybody doesn't do even though it was a really tough days long test and she became a licensed architect in nineteen fifty four and that was when I first comes along she became New York State's first black woman licensed architect so she he was hired by a private architectural firm at that point after she quit her job with the city even though her supervisor gave her a bad rep our friends and her relationship with that supervisor with her boss wasn't there wasn't anything wrong with it so he but he said that she was lazy she she got to work late ally that she didn't know anything about design architecture and that she socialized a lot so he had a lot of really negative things to say about her even though she never had any issues and she thought it had to do with the fact that her boss wasn't a licensed architect and with older and she was a younger black in licensed architect so a job she was a threat yeah I'm sure like old dude is like main. I've done nothing we feel this way similarly but we don't lash out the bad recommendation. I'm just saying felt threatened so even though she got out of her old job because she felt like she was wasting her potential she was still doing small small tasks like designing bathroom layout so she's still kind of felt away about that. he spent a year at that small firm and in nineteen fifty five she joined the office of skidmore more owings and Merrill ended up working there until nineteen sixty so that was a pretty big firm and at that major firm she was working on large scale projects projects and teaching evening architecture courses at New York City community college and so around this time she was a single mother of two children she had already been married and been divorced and her mother took care of her children while she worked so she did have a support system is not like nobody was there while she was doing all this stuff and in nineteen fifty fifty nine she became the first black woman to be a member of the American Institute of Architects Loon. Wow in one thousand nine hundred sixty that's when she moves to California and there she took a job at Gruen and associates in Los Angeles and just a side note about grew in Victor Gruen was is the person who was credited with kind of being a pioneer in the American shopping mall. He did a lot working. I think I talked about him recently because we were talking about food courts on others. Roy pointed me. You're not Florida. Yes shopping malls. Are I feel I don't know how sad I am about them leaving but do have I do remember the glory days going into the Disney stores. Oh Yeah and into the double layers and then you see store John Tucker trying to go right cookie inbetween always feeling like you were this close to like falling over the edge because they always had those on the top up level to like glass and I would always be scared like oh my gosh perfume every funny that things years no one else would yeah you can look down all you could smell perfume everywhere as a little kid mall town and with a giant mall yeah I went out well. You've been to China. I'm not sure if you you you have not but they had a million shopping. I don't yeah they have so many mall. It is ridiculous and they're huge. There's there's a basement and then there's a basement under the basement like you're still organiz now organized. You're probably like name what the categories of things are on each floor when you got to that floor yeah. I was like wow this makes sense. This is very organized like anyway the go-to malls in China. You'll be there for the next ninety years so when she was at grew in she recognized how much scrutiny she was getting from her boss there. She didn't have a car and she got rise with one of her her colleagues who was a white man to get to work and later she said in an interview it took only one week before the boss came and spoke to me about being late yet he had not noticed that the young man had been late for two years. My solution was to buy a car since I the highly visible employees. Employees had to be punctual and I think it's funny how she said highly visible employees. I feel like there's definitely skating around all the black woman yeah wheel and they wanted me to see my mistakes. We we get the subtext there. She got her architecture license in California in nineteen sixty two two and so she was the first African American woman to have one in California and she remained the only one for twenty years. Wow until the eighty s yeah wow jeez hey noise. We're all about it today. Sorry the peaking of weird noises we should pause for an advocate be right back in this episode of stuff. Mom Never told you is brought to you by Pantene so y'all I've been using the new pantene rose water collected and it's amazing anything not only does it smell incredible but my hair feels softer than it ever has before like an actual rose pedal the painting rose water collection is sulfate free and contains zero parabens and mineral oils or dies additionally one of the reasons. I love paintings because of their commitment to becoming a cruelty free company they no longer test on animals unless required by law and they're committed to make make animal testing obsolete in fact. PNG helped pioneer I- testing without the use of animals by using cell culture tests and reconstructed human tissue. They're using science to make great shampoo and do it without hurting the animals which is awesome so try the new painting Rose Water Collection today and we're back. Thank you sponsor so yeah she she becomes the first another I another firs lacks woman architect in California and stayed that way for very unfortunate long wait until the eighties wow yeah she was at that firm for a while to after six years at firm she became the director of architecture there and she hired people at oversaw staff and coordinated the technical aspects of some really big projects and so some of her projects were California Mart Fox Plaza Pacific Design Center San Bernardino City Hall and the US Embassy Bassy in Tokyo and her son said that she thought designing the building was the actual easy part of the job while the production of it all all the other nuts and bolts that went into it was the real work of the job easy to downplay when you're you've worked hard to get to somewhere and it's such a major position. It's easy to downplay and say Yeah Right. I just knew it I was you know that's the easy part but yeah I get how things like that have so many different moving parts so everybody's job is important but yes so she got she got to that point and for a lot of her career she actually served as a project manager rather than a design architect architect which was actually the case with many women architects who worked who worked in corporate farms so she didn't design most of the big projects that she supervised revised and Marshall Pernille who was a former president of the American Institute of Architects told. La Times that she could design large projects but that it was unheard of to have an African American female who was registered as an architect. You didn't try that person out in front of your clients in say hey this is the person running your project so Marshall personnel who is a former president of the AA told the La Times that she could design large projects Jake's but quote it was unheard of to have an African American female who was registered as an architect. You didn't that person out in front of your clients in say this. This is the person designing your project. She was not allowed to express herself as a designer but she was capable of doing anything. That's sweat sweat. Marshall Pernell said either way she was really good project manager anti state with gruen until nineteen eighty and she got she was married several times destroy life during the time she was at grew and she married Ralph Sclerotic an associate at Gruen who died in one thousand nine hundred eighty four so dot years after they married in nineteen eighty here's another I she became the first black woman appointed to the College of fellows of the AA and she was the first woman in and the Los Angeles chapter to be given that honor that same year she became vice president at the Los Angeles firm Welton an Beckett associates so she was the project director on Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport which was a fifty million dollar project that she finished before for the Star of the Nineteen eighty-four Olympics. Oh Wow this is another part of her life which I think you two will really appreciate She Co.. Oh founded the women owned firm SEGEL's cleric and diamond with Margo Siegel and Catherine diamond and that was the largest completely women owned architectural firm in the US at the time yeah like that she was the first African American woman to co who own an architectural practice. Wow Yeah so many first thousand nine hundred eighty five yeah the firm made a a bunch of proposals that may propose on projects it got all of those commissions so they worked on the Tarzana promenade which was in ninety thousand square foot medical in retail center and remodeling of the Lawn Dell Civic Center and they worked on additions to schools and other institutional buildings so nineteen eighty-five this was after her previous husband died she married Doctor Cornelius Welsh so another marriage and she left Siegel Larrikin diamond in nineteen eighty nine even though the really cool thing to do because even though they had these fifty million dollar projects they couldn't get the large-scale projects that she really really wanted and she missed that kind of challenge in the money that came with those projects which is totally understandable there yeah she became the principal of project management. Ah Jeopardy Partnership which was a firm that was known for his design of public spaces and while she was there she helped design and construct the mall of America. L. Is back into the mall of America I have not I've seen the Mary Kate and Ashley Short Videos where they visited events okay now. I'm just annoyed but not anything gable. I've seen it multiple times okay old role we don't because a lot of the days are in my lifetime accomplished and I'm just like wow it took that long for her to be awarded and honored as she should have been crazy. It is what we have a little bit more for you but first one more quick break for more sponsor in this episode is brought to you by the Rolling Stone Charts Rolling Stone as the definitive outlet for all things music bringing you the latest news interviews and reviews rolling stone is your go-to source to learn everything about groundbreaking artists and now rolling stone is going even further to show you what it means to be on the rise introducing the rolling Stone Charts and Interactive Seta Music Charts that offer an in-depth in the moment view of the biggest songs albums and artists in Usak the rolling stone charts are the definitive guide for trending trending breaking in popular music in the age of streaming. Is it rolling stone dot com slash charts or search. Rs Charts in Amer back. Thank you sponsor so mall of America Future Destination for Mary. Kate and Ashley sure big project is the point. I think that's why she worked for. Excuse of course a big set for their little mini stories. The Adventures of Mary went around and get lost and derive again. I don't remember other roller coaster. Eh You watch it every day. Lake Mary Kate and Ashley Video. I just got a I got a hold on the old days. You use your judgment of what I gotta do. It's like it's not like we're that fresh. I'm not that fresh up on it. Because I imagine it wouldn't be a thing that you go back to every no never not oh well. Maybe you do no judgment notice. She retired from that practice in nineteen ninety two but you know she had a long illustrious career and she also did a ton of other other things besides that career she also taught at the University of California Los Angeles and served as a director of the University of southern California architect skilled and she was a member of the Commission of the California State Board of Architectural Examiners wow yeah and the whole mouthful in the nineteen nineties she lectured at Howard University Columbia University and other schools and she held seminars for people who are taking the architecture licensing exams so she kind of worked as this mentor to other people. She said that she didn't have any mentors and role models growing up but was happy to be one to others which I feel like. It's important to remember like lift as you say that would be anybody. WHO's a first. How do you find when you're the the one that's paving the way remember when you once you have. Let's teach others to do so. I'm a big I guess you have. You definitely have to have a lot of resilience to to be a person breaking like that. Oh I feel that is dominated even now by pretty much. Mel People's People's uh-huh articulate as always one of those words. I love the word people's because it just automatically makes you smarter money's at mytalk. Yeah when I say people say no. Oh care giving. I'm getting these enduring aw all right now thinking more concerned about it. Don't worry about the I mean. That's got to be really hard to come into a field that is still predominantly imminently mel based in male-dominated and trying to lead away. Try New seminars. That's phenomenal as a black woman just paving her way through seatbelt that quote architecture should be working on improving the environment of people in their homes in their places of work and places of recreation. It should be functional and pleasant not just in the image of the ego of the architect said I think that's good insight into how she felt about the work that she did once he retired tired or I like this part. She lived with her family in southern California and she had garden parties in the spring time which sound really fancy. I don't know if I've ever been to to a garden party before but I would love to. I've been to one Wisconsin by June company and it was beautiful Jin. They're also much off. After like two is the thing that you drink at garden parties though no you drink like is it mint juleps type of thing and that's more isn't that whiskey NBC yes in style so more on those lines maybe a little bit of lemonade tease yeah but that would be what I would think of as Garden Party but but if it was my garden party a lot of I think we can make our own rules when it comes to the Garden Party so I think there's a lot of like that croquet. Okay game yes again which refers to heather's do people. WE'RE LETTING SAMANTHA DOWN ON FINDS The friends here if you if you keep naming things will shuttle theory you guys also have the spongebob reference what True Yeah. I will watch heather's. Yes we have a party. Let's have a garden party. Actually that was named party for that at one of the restaurants in Atlanta dressed up. I don't know what it was for but it was really. They're really cute and stuff like that. Yeah we can. We can make it work because what is it. The heather is like this is the sporty heather. Is it like spice girls but with heather who's the leader okay so I can just scary. Heather Heather would be one. Oh Ryder's character to whoever heather she's off Bianca. Oh I can't do that I can. I can see that out because they've come for you. GotTa get mean but Heather on Ryder's character is the dark haired. One INCAPACI- Shannen Doherty isn't as well as well as Christian slater. Oh what a cast best. She was still really active in all the architecture things going into the later years of her life. In two thousand and three she was appointed into the California architects board where she served on the Professional Qualifications Committee and the Regulatory Enforcement Committee. I was really hoping that she was just the the as the whole community wide. I'm here for what a bunch of other boards and committees to we don't even go into in two thousand eight the AI gave her the Whitney m young junior award which is an award that recognizes an architect or an organization that embodies the profession's responsibility to address social issues and she died four years later in two thousand twelve of heart failure at her home in California when she was eighty five years old yeah but she was clearly recognized as for the work that she did while she was alive but she has gotten a posthumous ord as well just this year in July twenty nineteen she became the first black woman comment to be given the American Institute of Architects Los Angeles Gold Medal and that gold medal is given in recognition of a significant body of work with lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture and that's the highest honor that the organization awards so she's as many people are in in have been awarded things posthumously as well so it's good to know that a person you know he's talking about giving people they're flowers while they're still alive and for them to be awarded while they're alive but also important to remember people after they've gone and the work they've done especially pioneering hearing it feels like this kind of opening like she acted as a mentor to opening it up to other people who may think that they don't have a place yeah and that and feels like this and I think about this all all the time when it comes to being I or being a black woman to pioneer spaces that a lot of people may think of as Weiss basis but they are our our meal spaces white spaces spaces for men and not having a kind of path or not seeing a path or away for it for you because you can't see yourself in that organization but there are you know they're. They're you know they're there and I think having you you know being able to look back at a legacy like hers and being able to continuously honor. Her legacy is important. When it comes to remembering that we can continue forward word on the path that she created there can be more black women architects in the field they can you can be licensed? You know you can fail and you can apply somewhere nineteen times and the twentieth Glenn will be the one that you get so. I think that's why I think it's important to look back at a legacy Lakers right. That's very well. Put US yeah I agree. I think we talk about on this. Show a lot the power of seeing yourself somewhere and how much that can impact to you especially when you're young child. You don't if you don't see anybody. That looks like you then you kind of think well. That must not be for me yeah right so I'm glad that we have people like this. We have our female I that are s being examples and being mentors. Oh yeah an in on female I I wanted to shout out a couple of other people because I know I mentioned in the beginning that he was not the first licensed a black female architect in the US so the first first black architect period to become a member of a it was Paul Revere Williams in Nineteen twenty-three and before Norma there were Beverly Lorraine Green and Georgia Louise Harris Brown and they were also thought to be licensed architects in nineteen forty to nineteen forty nine respectively in both both of them were registered in Illinois and so both of their stories are interesting as well and I felt like we talk about this a lot in I in how there is a path for a person to get to a first there were so many other hands involved especially when it comes to inventions and stuff like that that a person's I wasn't isolated and also continuing to put into perspective respective in context why I is important in terms of like well other people had access in. There weren't barriers for them necessarily but you know it's there. There were leading up to her becoming having her first there were other people who came before her in beverly and Georgia where to those people and so their stories are really interesting as well. Oh and Brown recognize the beer she face because he was a black woman trying to work in architecture so she learned Portuguese and move to Brazil in nineteen fifty-three three because you kind of realized there was a burgeoning growing architecture seeing there and she later got her architectural license there as well in Brazil and she moved there knowing about all those advancements that were being made and she was also kind of seeking racial democracy because there's this kind of propaganda machine going right now saying look at us we we have this really open you know racial situation going on in Brazil but without needing to go into the details of the racial yeah like a maneuvers of everything and still is happening in Brazil right now like it wasn't obviously as rosy that propaganda made it seem so you know that how's that thing but she also was successful when she got to Brazil and started working there architecture but yeah those are stories as well if anybody wants to go on that path and continue continue looking at all these architecture I in pioneering women in it. Yeah Yeah. You've got a bonus female. I listen here is like a mini female. I within the female for Homework Homework Yeah We. I've always wanted to assign homework your opportunity. It's time listeners. Go out and find more female. I for US and send them our way. ooh Yeah because I think that's about what we have to say about Norma. thank you so much always use yeah. It's enjoy being here so pleasure. Oh okay me too. When you come in we do and we would love for listeners to be able to find you because you do other things than this. You have a lot of other stuff going on yeah. I never know where I could tell them to find me but I will say that I also host popular which is a show about people in history who stood up to the status quo into things often persecuted for it. You can find unpopular and all all the social media things like the facebook twitter and instagram. You can listen to the show on all of the also things. Were you listen to podcasts. Wherever you're listening to this right now you can also hear me on this day in history class which is also on all the social media things and also on the podcast also on that thing that you used to listen if you pick up the phone and I don't don't do a good mid mid central mid western whatever that old accent is chance Atlantic yeah that thing get learn of home. I don't WanNa hear any critiques because the only thing they say over and over London London in general that we're not here took criticized validates you at all you just call London. I want to call London. I've been waiting my whole life London debut that everyone move yeah. I'm pretty sure that's how it works. You can also email us at steph media mom stuff at Iheartmedia dot com you can find find us on twitter at Mazda podcast or on Instagram at stop. I'm never told you thanks as always to our super producer Andrew Howard Andrew and thanks to you for listening supplement ever told you is a projection of iheartradio's house works for more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorites in this episode is brought to you by the Rolling Stone Charts Rolling Stone is definitive outlet all things music bringing you. The latest news news interviews and reviews rolling stone is go to source to learn everything about groundbreaking artists and rolling stone is going even further to show you what it means to be on the rise introducing the rolling stone charts an and interactive set of music charts that offer an in depth in the moment view of the biggest songs albums and artists in music the rolling stone charts are the definitive guide for trending breaking in popular music in the age of streaming his at rolling stone dot com slash charts or search are s charts.

California American Institute of Architec United States Los Angeles Mary Kate Heather Heather Pantene director New York Victor Gruen facebook Andrew Howard Andrew Brazil Kroger the cheesecake factory Kate Champagne Norma Merrick iheartradio America La Times
Ep 27: Is That Even Legal?

Life of an Architect

54:11 min | 2 years ago

Ep 27: Is That Even Legal?

"This is life of an architect a podcast dedicated to all things architecture with a little bit of life, thrown in for balance. Have you ever wondered about the legality side of architecture? Exactly. Most people don't eat while it's not an exciting part of the profession. It is one that every licensed architect must consider on every project. So today's topic is is that even legal. Hi everyone. I'm Bob Borsen. And I'm Andrew Hawkins in today. We're gonna learn about the legalities of architecture on hopefully, here's some tales of the is that even legal variety and gain some insight into this often overlooked side of the profession. Joining us today, her Mike Kogler in Sao ver-, Astro mic ogres an attorney on the contract documents team at the American Institute of architects in Washington DC at the AI Mike works with a group of attorneys and architects to create N revise, the AI contract documents Mike practice civil litigation prior to joining the AI, primarily representing contractors and property owners in construction related disputes. Mike also worked as an architect, and briefly as an urban planner in San Diego before transitioning to the practice of law. How you doing Mike? I'm to increase Bob. Thanks for having me, we're happy. You can be with us today. Also joining us is Salvador, Astro missive veracity was a principal in the firm, Spillman farmer architects, and he's been that since nineteen eighty three. His expert knowledge of construction, specifications, materials and methods expertise and roofing and building envelope forensics and abroad understanding of design and construction, make him a valuable acid. He served at the construction specifications institute as an instructor at the CSI kademi educational courses teaching the principles of specifications and contract administration. How you doing today, south, I'm doing fantastic. Thanks for having me, you guys have some skins on the wall. Glad that you both here to talk about the exciting chapter that we're going to discuss today, which is the legal side of the profession. I know I said this in the in the opening segment, and as I said it, I thought those guys might totally disagree with the fact that I said, this is not that interesting, and I don't mean to demean it that way, what I mean, is that I know that architects tend to not think about this part of the kind of the workflow lot, maybe from volume standpoint. We all know it's very, very serious. It's very, very important, which is why we wanted to have you guys come on today kinda talk about why it's important why they should think about it. And the sort of energy and effort, people should expand towards making sure they have their house in order from a legal standpoint in my mind. Absolutely. No question. It is the fascinating part about it. Be honest with you just for an example, anytime, there's a legal seminar architects, flocked to seminars. You can have a seminar on one of the hottest products that out there. But I will tell you that if you apply legal aspect to it, or a seminar on the top legal cases in the US architects, flocked to it, because it's the most damaging aspect in our careers are potentially. You're learning from other people's mistakes, I was always told you can make a mistake once, but it's nice to learn from somebody else's mistakes. So you don't make them. Yeah. That is good way to. That's great legal advice, or just life advice general. Yeah. We talk about that, you know, we had that phrase by dad used to have the fool me once. Shame on you. Full me twice. Shame on me, which is kind of the message that if you make a mistake. And you put yourself in a position to repeat that mistake Thurs, no recovery from that, that is one hundred percent on you. I've never heard the learn from somebody else's mistake. I need to put that in my quiver, you know, my little arrows story, Nossa. Hey, here's this lexicon how we can phrase this. So if you had to sum it up as far as what's the most important aspect of cover yourself legally in just a couple of sentences. What do you think that would be from an architect standpoint? Yeah. I think that any really establishing expectations and getting on the right page with your client is incredibly important. I feel like a lot of architects, least ones that I've worked with in the past and ones that I've represented in the past. They think they can do things on a nod handshake basis. And they think that their clients know, the services that they will perform in that they're expected to perform in a lot of times that works out, well initially, but then there's some kind of a dispute in which he realized for the very first time that, oh, you expected needed to five different designs, and I was only going into one, and we never committed to writing, and that's a really bad time to figure out that you have a misunderstanding about what you are expecting. Were so getting those down in writing, and just really having a contracting feel familiar with that it is incredibly important is to set expectations on a project is an education tool for architects to teach their clients about the services that they'll provide to me. That's one of the most important parts. There's a lot of little things that I, I think architects, need to be aware of, but getting that level of expectation and setting that says the nation, so that everybody's kind of on the same page when you start off right. Yeah. That really simply put his defining the scope of the work, right? I mean, that's what the goal is your hiring me to perform a service, I'm gonna define my understanding of what you're asking me to do in his contract as your new agree to it. And that's how we go about the process of executing. It do find that's where a lot of the Gatien comes in, and that aspect of just it's a misunderstanding of I thought you were doing that. You know, I thought you were doing something different shirt. That's definitely wear a lot of things come into play to be fair. A lot of litigation comes about, because you have a problem on a building five years later, and it's you know, I'm aware. So those kinds of things are really what stem a lot of a lot of litigation. Claims come from. Definitely misunderstandings is a big component of it. If I can add that I think while you said it very well, so understanding the scope of work or Scopus services paramount, but also understanding what you're not going to do. Sometimes you can say, I'm doing this, this, and this and the owner doesn't really understand. They think oh, that's all included. Like, what we would consider extra services are additional services. You have to spell that out as well. What that might be, for example, if you have to, to some soil testing, no one would consider that, maybe in the base bid, but until you get to the job, you realize, oh, we need some additional testing here. Well, that's on the owners Bill, so to speak. But they come to us and say, well, you should have known that why didn't you tell me that upfront? Certainly you knew that poets nut. So sometimes, I like to tell them. Here's what we are going to do. And here's what we're not going to do. Well, I want to ask you question about sir 'cause I guess, me tired head, what you just said. I go if you if I have to define everything that I am going to do, and my mind if I tell him to do it that intern tells you what I'm not going to do. If I say, I'm gonna pick up this pen and instead it back on a table because I said it that way, it also means I'm not going to run down the street and jump in a lake. I mean at what point do you have to just keep defining all the things you're not going to do? I don't understand that. Okay. Tell me understands. It's a good point. I'm sure you got stories to but just tell you classic Linda, that's today. So and the new the new, for example, international building code years ago, we would assist the owner in what we call special inspections that are required on the job. You're testing the concrete, you testing welding, and things like that. The new code says that we as architects cannot render those services directly to the owner. In fact, the contractor can't provide them any longer. The owner has to go outside the contract and, and independent testing agency. What I'm trying to say is we have to tell the owner because it's in the contract that those things will be done, but we don't say who's going to do them. So we have to spell that out because they think well how can I get my building? Those inspections. Don't occur in so we tell them up front in our services. We're not gonna provide those in fact, you have to provide them independently we can't even usher them in so to speak. But don't you also get that caveat that this is legal speak here, but not limited to thank you. See, you know, and I list the bunch of stuff, and I go at what point do you say draw shorter the line of, and I'm not going to go jump in the lake? Right. That's the thing that I find it very difficult the way I look at it a lot of times. I'm not speaking from a position of knowledge depth on this matter, you know, in fact, I asked Andrew run point on this episode because he does a lot more commercial work than I do. And he's much more familiar with this type of the contracts side of the business that I am. I do a lot of residential my contracts are like three pages long. So if I say, this is what I'm going to do. And then it seems like if I need you to do something I need to say, in this is what you're going to do rather than this is not what I'm going to do that make sense. It does make sense. It's perfectly reasonable way. Due to a contract. I guess, I'll take an example as most architecture. At least familiar with our be one-to-one, one owner architect agreement. It's the one that we all studied architecture school, and we didn't understand it. But then as we've gotten along in our careers we've used that documentary stir aware of its existence. Now documents been around in some shape, or form for one hundred years, something like that. I look at that document as more of a historical. It's more of a history piece like it's a historical collection of real life architects, scenarios that architects, that have been on our committee have put language in there, because of Sicilian, instances that they might only had once or twice in their career, but they really got burnt on it, and I'll give you an example. So if you look at article four on one to one it is a laundry list of extra work that architects are often asked to do, but are sometimes expected to do for free. It's literally like a page and a half of just a list of extra stuff the first one on that list is designed the building. Affect you to do that for free. Right. But it's all of those things when I read them, because I know the history of the documents program, I know that that's not just some attorney writing up a bunch of caveats over the years. That's actual architects that we've worked with folks like this learning from the past mistakes. I see every one of those little lines reviewing submissions out of sequence. I think there's some architect out there on our committee, thirty forty years ago that got really burnt one time by reviewing a bunch of symbols out of sequence, or answering RFI's that already had an answer to them. And so that's why they've written in there that I want to get extra money because this happens on enough projects that I need to make sure that you have a way to get more money for it. They're the kind of things that you might not encounter on every project. But when you do need it, it's kinda helpful. I never enter anything twice. I never have to do that, right. That's not a thing that happens can I add to what makes that one thing for sure. I think when you use the documents when I'm not here to promoting them so to speak, but you don't have to. Corporate what I'm not going to do into the a documents because they're on their game. And they picked up a lot of those things in advance, there's a few things that I think are I is slated to regional or specific to the job things like that. Is this real quick store? Just happened to me, and there was no a contract because it was such a small thing I doing a job and I realized I needed to have a rooftop beam sized one little beam, and I called the structural engineer and I said, who wasn't on the job? It was in interior project, and he said, I'll size the beam for you. Great charge me, I'm exaggerated eighteen hundred bucks. Okay, it was an Email agreement, I trusted them. Then he did. He did the job. And then the shop drawing came in from the subcontractor, and I send it off to him. And he sent me a Bill for nine hundred dollars to review the shop drawing and I said, why would you not incorporate that in today? Teen hundred tell me originally. Why, why is this an extra service? Well, it wasn't part of our agreement. I said, you should have told me you weren't going to review it, and I would have just said, what's gonna cost because I can't complete it. And there's a classic example of him that telling me it was included or not. I would just assumed it was included. Now, if I use the day contract was so contractor, it's spelled out, but it was such a small little dinky thing, that's I'm really cautious about what's incl-. -cluded in what's that happens? A lot quite honest. I'm sure it does even the small projects have big risks. I feel like sometimes they have more. Yeah. That's one of those. Are you kidding me? Kinda moments. Like, if someone says, hey, I want X. There are certain things you assume become part of that deliverable. Luckily for me I haven't been burned yet by that. But, you know, just hearing it makes me go man that could have happened to me hundred times over where I've done something, very similar, and I didn't put a proper contract in place, and they send me the Bill and I haven't been hit with a nine hundred dollar up charge for them to review the drawing later. But there's nothing this said that, that couldn't have happened. You're I right? I didn't have the right paperwork in place. Right. Let's move on and talk about a few things related to the phases of design and delivery. We talk about the basic legal issues. What are the like high points for the design phase of work seems like setting expectations really, what that's about in the beginning, but his in some other topics that seem I can problem, Sal, and I probably have different ideas on this. But from working in law office, before worked at the AA, he played a lot of issues came in across my desk. Ask during the design phase we're about getting paid. It's about architects, not getting paid right? And, you know, not getting paid for their basic service, not getting paid for their extra work. Some key things to think about on that is don't let your clients, get behind clients, who get behind on payments tend to stay behind and get further behind. I think it's probably true with any kind of dead. Don't let them get too far behind before you start having them for money and also probably the biggest thing in FARs. An architect getting paid is to not give up your rights to your try and your intellectual property. You want to be giving your client a license to use them if they've paid your Bill, and if they haven't paid your Bill, you can revoke that license, and you're really good position to push back on them. And say we're not going to continue on with design, you can't use my design until you've paid me. In full if you give up the rights to your intellectual property, as you're going along, they can replace you real quick. So there's somebody keep in mind. Scary to the nuts. It seems like that's I'm trying to think of the best way to put it. It's so patently obvious. What you say it out loud. That this is licensed, you're paying me to provide the service. And if you don't pay me, you don't get the fruits from my service in the contract language kind of spells out the how this works. It does. And it's it goes in a lot of detail. Of course, most of arguments have that kind of language, but there are a lot of owners tale. A lot of owners you've probably worked with him that stink that when you finish your drawings that they own your drawings that they own them, and they can do with them, what they want, and they can fire you and replace you for the C work. Does that ever run their own happened? Aveiro happened to me it hasn't. But actually we talking to someone yesterday and that's happened him a few times that he would do the project. And as soon as he did the deliverable that would yield a permit, they fired him so that they didn't have to pay him to do the construction administration. Great way to save money on a project. If you're an owner and saying that jokingly but a lot of owners think that way, especially if you backload your feats, as an architect, you've got a lot of money put into the sea as services and you get down that road where you've got you've got your CD's done. And if you still owe that architect to say million dollars for CA services will that owner can go and fire, you and hire another architect to do the for two hundred thousand I found a lot of clients in that exact position. I mean they're going to take that opportunity. Unless you've protected yourself by getting your fees, a little bit more evenly managed throughout the project or just frontloading them front loading them. I, I was, I was going to avoid saying from loading enter ticket enter took care that for you. I did it. Sidestep that room. And that's the problem. I see a lot architects, and I'm guilty of it too. We try to front load our projects to avoid that situation. In case we are terminated. But unless you manage your money in your, your invoicing and spending that money when it comes down to see a you really riding on a nothing. There's no money coming in the other thing wanted out. Big exclamation point. We should never give our rights to the intellectual property over to the owner, but architects, do it all the time, particularly when they have a good relationship with the client project, went well, the come back five years later, and they want to do a different tenant fit out or something or an addition, and maybe they're going to have another architect, do it, or, you know, they have an architect and family. Now they want the drawings and went to CAD drawings, and we give them up. They think it's their property. They own. Of course. They paid for that, number one number two. We feel obligated because we don't want hurt their feelings. It's a tough road to hoe and it's also one of those things you don't want to ruin a relationship with a client. So you give in which is. We shouldn't do that. The other thing in my aspect under the design element is the budget architects have to understand the owners budget upfront in respect it and not just blow it off. And I think that's one of the legal things that architects, forget, that's the most one of the most important aspects you responsible for the budget. I know we, we've talked about this. We'll talk about it is that what of architects, get sued for while the budget doesn't come to fruition until later on in the project at the end that the project where you, blew the budget. And if you don't understand it upfront. You're never gonna hit that target. All right. So let's move on to construction leelee issues during the construction phase work. What are some of those big items, I'll give probably my favorite one, which is if you're gonna do see a work construction administration do it. Right. Don't tip toe into that portion of architecture, only do half CA services. If you're going to see a work go to the job site on a regular basis. Keep your eyes open report back to the owner things that you see review payment applications to the RFI's, right. I ran into number of architects who will, you know, they'll kind of tip toe into the sea, a phase, and then all of a sudden they're going to be held to the standard of an architect who was doing a full set of services. And yet in a little bit of difficulties. Tell you boy, answers their next point. Why really big unseated excited salad twice? A joke. I'm a big advocate that contract administration is so important. And I'll tell you why what's the last thing. The client remembers agree with you a hundred percent on that turn the keys over at CA, if you do a lousy job. That's what they remember in. Typically, what I find is during design and construction, well early and construction, but design, mostly you don't really deal with the president of the company you dealing with other people, the facilities people. But the president shows up contract ministration at the end of it. They're walking through the building. They wanna see it and there's issues into comes up. He got the contractor, speaking, Elvis in his ear. And then they look at us like why did I have this higher this architect? So makes absolutely correct. You got it put time and money into doing it correctly, and it's not something we get a lot of training on in school. It's kind of learned in the field. Can I tell a nightmare CA story, I had as very young architect? Would you do? Of course. Please is working on a fairly large house, probably three years out of school. No baby to anyway. Doing CA work, and I was probably a little bit over my head. But the firm I worked for gave me a great opportunity to go out to the job site once a week, participate in meetings, meet owners RAB, meet the contractors, great experience to we were doing it big industrial flooring. And it was this in the flooring, type that we had was there's three different colors of flooring, and I don't remember the exact material, but there was three different colors that didn't go together. Who's to say that from our drawings were supposed to be in three different areas on this big industrial floor and the owner's rep at one time, had this just great idea after a meeting, and she said, well, what if we just mix them all together, the McCain's sounds terrible? But I was like, I don't think that's a good idea. I should run this by folks in my office. She was like, no, I really think we should mix them all together. They would make an interesting pattern. It wasn't bad. But we ended up doing that months went by before they were actually installed. And so I had forgotten not forgotten about it. I knew that was a decision that she had made an I at least from my kind of. Naive experience at that point. I thought the owner was directing me. This was an owner's rep somebody who is it was not the vice president of the company or anything when the rest of the group. The owners group came out that was not just the owner's rep and looked at the floor. They said these all wire, the Pat, why is this a weird pattern of three colors that don't match? And the owner's rep looked at me and said, yeah, why? Here's the bus. Oh, and really? So I had to just red faced, like, I, I didn't wanna throw her under the bus because she had made that decision and made it clear to me that, that's what she thought was the right decision. And I went back through all my notes. And Finally, I found at least some documentation, although it was only my personal notes, I could have made them up after the fact, that's to me, it was document decisions any decision. You have to document it. Because at some point people will make chain they will change their memory of the way a decision was made that happens a lot, especially on a big project. It could be a decision that was made eighteen months ago. Right. And you remember at one way, and somebody else remembers it another and have us down on paper, it's a different story. Documentation is so important throughout the construction process, but also in design because you make a lot of decisions in design, at least some of the people may come in, in their gun, and then you're left holding the bag just like Mike was and, and what do you do the other thing I wanted to add under CA his? Vic- architects, overstepping their boundaries in rob legations, so rosey path. Because remember who you're working with will work with contractors who the people in the field. Don't understand their obligations. So they start asking architects for things that it's not my responsibility. I'm not saying means a methods, but it's pretty close. They'll ask you to do things that is their responsibility. What Hyfte way they mount something? Well, it's on the drawings. You should go, look, I'm not going to tell you what it is. Just go look, I had people ask me, how many fire extinguishers are into building, so I can order them. I don't know. You, you need to count them. I don't. I don't know. I know what type of fire extinguisher, we have. But I don't know how many there are you need to count it. You need to do your job. And I'm not gonna waste my time. I've actually had people my office, do things like that for the contract. I said, that's their responsibility. We're overstepping our boundaries. And now we're, we're legally obligated or on the hook for these kind of things should we give them the wrong answer? So architects, overstep, their boundaries a lot, even Mike classic cases. Then I get arguments. When people all the time hardware schedule. I hate hardware schedules. Hate writing them a hate reading them. He looking at them. Sign me up for that. Don't world testament, I either I had an architect in my office, who would go through the hardware schedule line by line, making sure that the quantity was right and the model numbers were right. And I said, that's not our job. We already wrote at once, why are you double checking they submitted from the shop drawing stage? I said, you could check one or two and usually to give you cut sheets. Okay. This is the locks at a ordered in this is the right finish. And the whatever it's a continuous hitch. I'm okay with that. But don't you quantities because what's the worst thing that can happen? They show up in the job site. And there's they're short three who's response for that, if they were short three studs who's responsible for that? My attitude is don't do their job for them. You're just checking for design intent. That's all that's a tough one, though. Because sometimes I follow that habit of any to make sure that his right. Because if it's not. I'm going to be the person that kinda takes the brunt of it, unfortunately, so you're still look at you as from day, one were viewed as the answer provider. The problem solver. So if the contractor has a question, how many of these do I put on the job site? The inclination is asked the architect. They're the provider of everything that is and will be on this project and you say, well, it's in the joints, go count them yourself. Sometimes you're like, well, if they screw it up. I could just tell them then what you know, we'll get it. Right. And it's because we think that we're infallible. I'm with you on that one. We try to stay away from that. It's funny. You brought up door hardware. We actually just had a project come to the office and, and I don't do as big projects as Andrew does. But it was a really technologically advanced kind of co working space and the hardware schedule was dense every door had, like different mag- locked this, and bluetooth wired that in. I mean it went on and on and on. And I think the guy who checked the drawings. I mean the notes that he had. And I was like this is taking like four days for us to go through it, and I was, like, you don't need to check to make sure he's like I'm just checking for functionality like, did we solve the problem? Right. The first time and I went okay, that's, that's fine. But don't say how many of these were supposed to have. Right. That's not supposed to be our job. So I was like, if you do, it's on us, we're going to buy them. If we say too many. Man gives me the he GB's. I can't imagine a one a year jobs, and you have eight billion door. Yeah, there's, there's lots of pages, lots of pages. That's a bad road to go down hardware, and has it just take a minute. Yourself? Reminding me, why am I guess I'm a little happy that I switched out architecture law because I did a lot of hardware schedules as a very junior level architect. They're fine. Aren't they know? They're they're amazing. Yeah. And I will say this, I know a handful of people that they're in hardware, a love it. Visit amaze-. Yeah. And I and I go, it seems like I don't know if it's a gene thing or just tired for me to go while their passion is hardware that seems hard that exists. But, you know it absolutely does exist. And when you find those people that love it, you're like, all right. We're in. I want to give to friends move. Things that make you happy. I used to hear that my early career when I was a specification writer because I loved it. And people go okay, you're it because no one wanted to write specifications. I must be a geek because I did like doing it. I learned a lot. I don't do it as much anymore, but I still love doing it. It's interesting point. It's important, we need people to be passionate about it. Absolutely life of an architect. We'll be back in just a moment. We're sitting here with Mike Coker from the American Institute of architects, Salva Rostro from Spillman farmer architects in. We're gonna talk to you guys about the new a into your contract documents a contract. Documents are nearly two hundred forms of contracts that defined the relationships in terms involve, the design and construction projects prepared by the with a consensus of owners contractors attorneys architects, engineers, and others. Documents have been finally tuned during their hundred and twenty years of existence, as a result, these comprehensive contracts and forms are now widely recognized as the industry standard. Did you know that it was one hundred twenty years that these contracts have been in place? Actually a hundred and thirty one really did have been that long. He looks good for one hundred thirty one dozen. I asked a group that I was talking to earlier today. They, they knew how long they had been around and I did a little research to what else happened in eighteen eighty eight. Which is when we produced our first document is the year which the Washington Monument was opened up. Wow. I've been around a long time that is. You're about the tragic fire next. That's what spawned. I need to. May twenty second the AI revamped its interiors family of documents allowing the architect to account for the risks and responsibilities of designing buildings into your while working with contractors and f f any vendors and the revised contracts are now suitable for use on any type of project beyond commercial, including residential retail entertainment, and hospitality. Mike you were involved in that revamping or you're not. Absolutely. So tell us about some of the things that you went through during this revamp their updated. So what's, what does the high points, which changed? Sure. So the first thing we did was to interview a bunch of architects on their practice and we learned from them, you know what was working. And what wasn't one thing that we really tried to address in these contracts was the role that an architect who's doing interiors lays with regard to f f procurement some architects wanted to be involved. Others didn't. So we gave them a document or B two fifty four purchasing agent scope that if they were gonna do those kinds of services. It's at least a good guideline for. Things that they should be looking out for that. They might wanna do get paid extra four and activities that they might be a little bit wary of doing B two fifty four just to clarify. That's the number designation for the contract. We're talking about good point. Yes. We number all of our documents of b series document is an owner architect agreement. And if it starts with a two in front of that means it is a scope of services, which is it is not a complete agreement in and of itself. It needs to be married up with a baseline agreement of the one hundred series agreement. So it is just an extra piece of scope that you can do for an additional fee. That's nice. And Sal, you're involved in this project as well. Though, was, I think one of the things that Mike purchase brought up a lot of people don't understand that their contract documents that can stand alone to use the loan in his others. That needs multiple documents have to be married up together, but a lot architects, don't understand that. The other thing about the interiors documents that intrigued me was, we were always perplexed, my architects, don't use them very much. If at all I think we I well found out that they needed to be improved. They didn't. Meet the current needs of the architects today. Number one. And number two, the perception is that when you do in tears documents the risks are really low, so why use a contract document, we could just use a letter agreement. I'm Michael tell you as an attorney that the risks are always there, not that many people could get hurt. But like anything else, why are there lawsuits? Well, it's has nothing to with people getting hurt has lots to do with you didn't complete your documentation, or the owner lost money. You didn't meet it on time. So all those things it doesn't really matter what the project is the owner could incur loss, and then there's legal ramifications, so you have to protect yourself think these documents have much more improved than they were. When we started that sounds Craig because I know liabilities everywhere. Right. Well, if you're incident finding out more about as interior family of documents, you can go to AA contracts dot org forward slash life of an architect that link will be at the bottom of the show notes that we have for this episode. So again, that's a. I a contracts dot org. Ford slash life of the Mark. So then what about issues after completion? I'm we kinda tapped on a little bit. So what are some ideas or what are some issues that come up with that? The one of the things is interesting to me, I'm gonna tie this real quick. Is that the responsibility or the liability is different across the nation is far as how long after the project is complete? And my liable is an architect like that. That's all over the place that. Yeah. We call that. It's a statute of. Repose. Uh-huh. Taking the outside limits of which no time limits, which claim can be brought most states. I wanna see most states because I don't know that, but, you know, route ten years is, is about average. There are some states, though, that have six year eight year maybe even twelve year but they, they do change. Yeah, they do change. So what will own interjects them. How did we lose that legal battle? You know how, how is it that contractors have figured out how to get off the hook after a year? But here it is they haven't gotten off you after a year of represented. A lot of contract. He gets sued way after that they so a year is their warranty. Typically is their warranty work. So they'll come back and fixings for warranty. But they can still be sued up to about up to ten years. Why using sample I can see you whenever I want. Right. But I can see it. But if it's if it is a one that would fall outside of the statute of repose. If you're bringing a lawsuit against me for designing something fifteen years, or so, after I had substantial completion of get met I can get motion for summary judgment in like two months easily. Now, if it was within that ten years to try. To fight out that case it might it would take much longer. I say two months say thinking that, that's a very quick shores Llamas as quick turnaround. Yeah. So that's a pretty easy defended case one that's been brought outside the ten year period. Yeah. And the contractors are still. They have is their statute of repose similar to ours. Then I guess it varies by St Mary's by state, but yes, it is. It's typically similar round ten years in so what other like what kind of issues come up host construction, is it mostly? I know they're called design failures, which I think is funny because to me, they're installation failures or something like that, not really a design flaw. That gazelles up to me pretty quickly, one of the things that happens are, I'll give you two ideas. So when I was in private practices and attorney and I represented contractors and architects, turncoat. Yeah. I, I come on now come on. I, I defended a few architects out there, but I the, the claims that always had the big dollars to him that were the ones that you really. Had to hire an attorney for and insurance involved with were water claims and soils. Those are the two huge dollar kinds of claims that owners really need to go to somebody for because they're out a whole lot of money if things start cracking and slammed on side of ill. Or if there is water damage by the time you've noticed water damage you've got mold throughout the building, and you've got extensive problems that have probably been going on for a long time, just for tips to architects, don't hire the Geotechnical engineer make the owner higher the Geotechnical engineer, because then all of the soils issues will tend to fall directly to them, and you can at least have that notice. So he's of an Oletta architects, do Geotech. But that's you know, that's something that traditionally the owners are responsible for site engineering. Sure, things like doing surveying Geotech, but also learn how to design a building watertight is a lot of claims are water based, Sal, you probably have all kinds here. I mean number one complaint is obviously if. There's any kind of league and sometimes it's a, it's not a roof leak or Wally. It's a HVAC system condensation issue. Or those are lingering effects that happen. And if you can eliminate those eliminated, most of your claims so asked a question you don't the number one punch list item is across the US. And I know we just talked about it his hardware, and what it is, is a lot of owners. They'll complain that the roof is leaking, but they won't complain about their hardware once during the building. So the lesson I learned is it's great to do post evaluations after a year. And I know the advocates this going through the building and just see how the owners using it, then sometimes there's design issues, like our anticipation was this room was going to be used in this way. And it doesn't work very Waller. He see they made changes they moved to TV screen or a cabinet system work out, right? Those things happen. But you like to know that. And it's funny how clients won't tell you that it doesn't work, right? So we found out in post evaluations that Doug. Oh, yeah. This is not exactly. What we thought. And it's like oh, that's interesting. So you'll learn a but be you can at least try to help them out and they feel like they have a friend, one story, I had does involve hardware was on a school, and I did one year valuation. I was walking through, and I was walking by the it was a toilet room for faculty was off the corridor. And I saw this hasp on the door. And I was like, what's that they said the hardware on the store you specified it wrong? I go, what are you talking about? And they said it went in the room the toilet room. They would come in and close the door. They put a half, bonnet like you would toilets. I said, are you kidding me? The teachers like well we didn't know what else to do. And that, that's not what we specified. And when I went back and look the contractor, put the wrong hardware on that door switched it with another door. So I said it just had a nice passage, latch on. It was like always open. So we all sit. We switched it in the problem when, when they said, what I wish I had known that they've been using it like that for a year. I think those post evaluations really help us out. Out the learn at things aren't always perfect. We tell clients complain, tell us what's not working. Right. We want to know 'cause we don't intentionally make things wrong or design the wrong. We want them to work out for you. We want you to be happy. Why gets that ties back into what Andrew said in. That's a that's not a design issue. That's a installation in a way or hope that there are there are designed issues though. I mean, let's face it, we're not perfect. And we do make mistakes. It's best to address them up front. And that's why evaluations post evaluations work while we should really do it within a couple of months, just to see how things are working out. Yeah, I find that sometimes in that regard the rooms that we design and the activities that when you're designing it, they tell you are gonna go on inside that room once it's being used. That's not what happens this a communication issue. I think if you're not dealing with the right people, then there say, well, this is how music class works. They're gonna start here and they're going to go there and we need to do this. And then when the, the different music teacher comes in or the actual you could be the actual one. Now that's not what? I do in my classroom now. That's not how we operate and so they get really mad about stuff that's built in somewhere and, you know, not the right way, and you're like, I, I never got to talk to you specifically. But somebody told me what you wanted. And so that's what we did. But sorry that, that was what you wanted. And now that, you know, they get kinda Matty's have it documented, then you could show them. And then you get out of jail free card, right? Because then they go okay SU told you that. But that's not true. So, okay, you're off to pronounce who's coming for you and then sues got numbered. Well, in trouble for sure. That's very call Mike to get us out of jail. Yeah. Hey, might make make sure you leave your car behind. Yeah. We're getting to the end of the episode and we leave the fun part for the very end. So are one leads with a good taste in her mouth. Right. We talked about that earlier today. But what I want to know is for the people that are listening. What is the one most important thing for a contract, like can you even boil it down to a single thing is there. If you say you're only going to do one thing, this is where you best put your efforts tour. So tonight, just talk really fast and say, like ten who can? Sure, okay, so first thing, honestly, read it reach contract understand it. If you don't understand something that an owner is put in front of you, you like contract language should be accessible to anybody who can read because ultimately, you're going to be performing, according to the contracts if you see an indemnity clause that is just all twisted and mangled in the way it's worded. Tell your owner. I don't understand this. I don't understand this and I, I want to live up to my contract, but I can't live up to something that I don't understand. So regia contracts scrutinize him. And if they don't make common sense. Then strike that language out, or at least considered talking to your owner and saying, I don't understand this language. Let's get it boiled down to something that, that I can understand then I can sign the agreement. There's all kinds of other things to think about just off the top of my head indemnities a big one often times that is a very important risk, shifting type of a provision, so scrutinize those and hire an attorney to look those over talk to your insurer repeal I insurance carriers, all oftentimes they'll review contracts for you. Tell you what you've probably got a few too. So besides what you just said. Number one for me. My answer would have been understanding or obliga- Sion's as architects and not just myself. But everyone on the team so often, he'll send a Representative out and the client will say, for example, since we're talking about interior documents. Can you provide this interior design form is part of the project? And of course, the person in the field who didn't read the contract says, oh yeah. We can do that. Not understanding. It's an additional service wind up going. Through the legwork doing it. And finally, somebody who really understands like project managers as eight that wasn't in our original scope work. The clients is I wouldn't have paid for it late now too late yet done. So understanding your obligations up front, everybody on the team and trying to help the owner understand their obligations as well that if the balls down to anything that's what I would do. Good. Takeaways. A few more time. Yeah, go ahead and tell us all right. So don't agree to anything that isn't covered by your professional liability insurance. Right. So you can contract to more liability, and more responsibility than your insurance will cover typically repeal I insurance, your insurance will cover your negligent acts and that's it. And if you are doing things in agreeing to warranty, something if you're agreeing to go beyond what the architects, standard of care is so you're agreeing to be perfect in some way, that you're going to be the best architect in the state of Texas. You know, then, then yeah, it's, it's possible to agree to more responsibility than your insurance will cover. So the best negotiating strategy with an owner as if you get something that they're asking you to do that. Feels piece of contract language that feels a little bit overstepping say can even talk to my insurance company to see if it's cover because I can't do something for you. That's not covered by insurance. Other things, make sure that you align your prime contracts with your consultant agreement. It's so for example, if you don't have a limitation of liability in your owner architect agreement, don't give all your subs, and your consultants limitation, liability. I've been involved in a few of those, and it can be the amount of dispersed shifting that happens in that scenario is pretty remarkable where a mechanical engineer, for example, that was responsible for a ten million dollar error gets out for sixty thousand dollars. But the architect then has to continue on the lawsuit simply because they didn't have limitation liability in their upstream owner architect agreement. You think about those kind of scenarios, and wanna make sure that, but every agreement you got with the owner. You're passing those things all the way down and not giving up more than you're getting from the owner. If that makes sense. Sure, are they does to me anyway, because I know what you're talking about. You gotta have those people held to the same stuff that you're hell to sure. Absolutely. So how does it actually work because the owner architect agreement in the contract. Language that set between those two parties. How do you pull in the contract that your EMMY p engineer sends you into the same language or stupid idea to say, I want you to go back and add this paragraph to your contract? No science to they have to abide by your contract with the owner. Exact same anything that owner is making me responsible for you are responsible for as well as downstream that goes down. So, so do you add that language to their proposal that they send to you or the company entre? And then, then they should say what you need to send me a copy of your contract do. Yeah. I do. Yeah. It's there. I mean I'm Mark out some stuff but not to be salesman for a docks. But you know if you use the Izhak Occidental coordinate in that manner. So you've got the architect consultant agreement will reference the prime agreement. So it's all kind of. Bundled up there. So you, you know as long as you're referencing back to that prime agreement and all the terms in there. Then you've you've got continuity on tracks, hopefully covered or covered the best you can. Yeah. Okay. I have more questions, but it'll be cute far of a rabbit hole. So I'm gonna have a beer we'll have a beer and I'll ask you the questions off air. It really has to do with the difference of, you know, a lot of projects, I do like I do a lot of residential work. And so I don't use a lot of AI contracts. His owner's fined him scary. If I go to a homeowner say, I'm doing a house for you, and I hate him this lap document. There's smaller smaller smaller. But didn't sometimes I'll have EMMY EP engineers restriction engineers on those same projects. And I've never had like get an a contract then between Mike consultants on a residential project. Everything seems to be just a little turned down a little bit more looser in that environment. But the money's no different. I do houses that cost more than some schools that get built, you know, we talk about those issues a lot about how complicated or how dense contract talks can be. I mean, if you wanna one owner architect agreement, something like eighteen to twenty pages in its dense, we don't double space, but homeowners even homeowners. There's a millionaire with their k- with dense documents think of the home, you just bought, you know, your home, you bought you got a thick pack documents there. And you're expected to read it and somewhat understand it. So it's, it's not alien to be put a fairly dense pack documents in front of someone. And then I can tell you that the b one on one is far more understandable. In simple. Then my mortgage agreement or my real estate purchase agreement is so, but the analogy comparison to certain extent breaks apart because let's say that I'm hiring one of the two of you to do my house for me in you hand me, your three page hourly services contract in you hand me one. That's eighteen pages. Single spaced, very dense. And I look at your both charging me the same amount. You're less scary, as opposed if I'm buying a house in either your my mortgage, broker or your, my mortgage broker. You're paper works going to be the same. Yeah. Right. Let's, that's a good point. And, and that's definitely something that we know the folks who do residential work in particular, are dealing with constantly. And that's why we did create the it's the b one of five is our, our most slimmed-down owner architect, Raymond four or five pages or pages. And it's got a lot of the core concepts in it, it still is missing some of the more nuanced provisions. So I wouldn't you know, as I would responsibility sections or at about responsible for what kind of it gets too. Dyke's to the main points though ownership of documents. And that's a big one. And, but it does at least touch on that it touches on disputes. How the resolve those kinds of Corey issues, it's still gets too, so we've be one, oh, five there it is there a threat. It's all the risk and you're absolutely right. A homeowner for some reason to trust realtors. And why would they I don't know why they don't trust architects. Are we scary or something? But you're right. If you throw it eighteen page contract that of going gonna like, oh my God. What is this, and they're not gonna read it? Let's face it. They don't get it. I mean because honestly in who reads their mortgage paperwork, either the right? Say you sign it. That's where you're at. That's why you're. And the cash and you get to reading it all the way through and understanding, and then they tell you, you can't change anything so so I'm going to wrap up the podcast, the technical part of it. I mean, the really fun part. We're just going to do the boring hypothetical his point. But it happens to be my most favorite part. You're both familiar with hypothetical questions. Yes. So your hypothetical question for this episode is if you had no physical or mental requirements for sleep. What would you do with that extra time? And do you think it would change your life? So just to clarify the question here this is. So I still have to go to work, obviously. Yeah. You're you're still got his unchanged. Hey, so these hours are going to happen tonight unless you have a job that works in, I can't go play softball for eight hours after midnight. So you may but that could be part of the answer. Your question, you might say, well, now all sudden if I have twenty four hours a day to fill and find a midnight around your mind you might shift your jobs around a little bit so that you do have daylight off hours. I like that. You're that midnight to eight AM attorney. Yeah. Perfect. Sounds really great. I think the clientele coming in and it's going to be top notch. Yeah. Whom? Right. So I I've stammered on demure it a little bit. But am either I yeah. Got it. Okay. You stepped up. So I figure out a way play more softball. Hang out with my family more. The almost three year old daughter, and I don't get to spend time with her in the other six hours, I would probably tell you that I'm gonna read books, I'll probably video games though. 'cause I like video games. You're honest about. Yeah. I do like video games, and I never get a chance to play him. So I'd have a big screen, and I'd, I'd play a lot of first person shooter. Yes. That is so funny, because when I told my wife, I have a fourteen year old daughter, and I told my wife and my daughter that, this was the question you're gonna get and my daughter starts saying all these things more because that is total garbage, you would sit there and watch YouTube videos and play video games and my daughter's like no, I wouldn't. And my wife's like, yeah, you would come, of course. Yeah. Scillies least you're being honest about it. And sure I'd, I'd have sore. Thumbs Salvi, fared out, what you do with all this extra time, when, you know, it's interesting, you don't be funny Succo. I would start a homeless shelter like make your answer. You're like he's gonna play video games, and you're gonna like make the world. A better place. It's funny said that because that's part of the answer. But one thing that came to mind is daylight. So obviously, there's still seven hours darkness, and so what do you do at night was interesting? I when Mike Sansa was nighttime softball. While I would do the daytime things because as architects were inside a lot, and I like to be outside. So I would take advantage of flip it around and I would work at night to do the things, I'd do at night so they can spend more time outside during the daytime, and I feel same way, I would spend more time with my family, because although I'm assuming nurse leap and bet night, too, but, and then I also thought about how do you help humanity? I mean my dream in life, I'm not kidding. You bet you even life while Mike you live. Doing six hours of video games. I would I would be like to be outside, and I like to come into gardening and raising fruit trees and things like that. But the other thing I would do is help people reevaluate, their life and train them to do certain things and try to get them back under feet. But that being said, I would definitely put more time into my family life because we work all day when they're up and the only time I see my kids as an hour before dinner. To try to shift some of your daytime workload to the night was like you don't start work at sun up and work until regular quitting time. You only work part time shifted to afternoon goofing off with the kid be more efficient with the daylight. I mean I, I don't mind. Mike could have done. He said, I read contracts at night and play softball during the dense, right? You could've you could've said that. Well, I just see him but now he's playing video games during the day he's like now play softball. Like I'm going to stick with video. Yeah, not changing my answer. I'll, I'll say this. And it was kind of funny when I asked my daughter about this. She's like I'd still sleep. And I was like you're not required to sleep. She's like what, what, what else am I going to do? I'm not required to sleep, but he didn't say I couldn't sleep those I was just actually thinking about that. Yeah. So I thought about it myself. And there's all these things I align with what Mike said. Like I tried to rationalize it. My brain is to say, oh, how could I shift some of my daytime activities to nighttime when everyone sleeping if I have to draft or from doing designing just do that at night, when it's quiet and peaceful, and I can be focused? And, and I think I would do some of that, for sure. But I also think I just get bored. And I think it's a real possibility that I would go get another job like I would go somewhere just to have something to do. To fill my time other than 'cause I I've tried sitting around doing nothing offer y at local warehouse. Yeah. I mean Louis I think I would do that. Because like we've all been you've been sick and you're like home for a couple of days and you just get stir crazy now. And there's so much is laying around like I'm sick watching HOGAN, heroes or dislike nothing said great anymore. Nobody even knows what that show is. Everything but yeah but he started out there. Yeah. And so I, I do I think I'd probably end up getting another job and then I'd, I'd keep all that money. And by video games. I can borrow. Yeah. Well, I think about it. I mean, this is totally relative, my current state. I would use that extra time to exercise do healthy things. I don't feel like right now. I don't have enough time to take care of my body the way that I should. And so if I didn't have to sleep that was part of taking care of my body, I do other stuff, you have like one hour, you know. No, no. Because I used to I used to run when I was younger run marathons. So I'd go run for three hours two hours every day. So I could go do that not every day. But I'd take some time he likes to always really tear down line ideas. My tip get your knees replaced eventually, but it would be the whole time, but I mean, I think it would be something you had a lot of time for surgery. Time for that. Learn learn how to do my own surgeries. But I think exercise would be the biggest thing that if I didn't have to sleep, that would be the first thing, and then the second would be spending trying to figure it has been more time with my family somehow in work at night is my favorite anyway. That's when I do my best work already is when it's quiet in there's nobody around and I can't do that in the early morning. I'm a late night person anyway. So twelve midnight till like, four AM would be like my prime hours 'cause usually right now it's about eleven to two. It's my prime time to really get focused anyway. So that's so interesting. Okay. I'm going to call it a wrap. So as you can see the legal portion of architectures full of issues that can impact your overall ability to create great designs. Also, it can impact your career in ways you may have never imagined. So the heart of this episode was to expose everyone yet another facet of the profession of architecture and how much information that we as architects are required. No, in pursuit of our ideas, internet. I would like to thank our guests might Kover in Sao for Astro for joining us today, and providing their expertise on legal matters of design if you like today's episode and you can find it in your heart. Please take the next thirty seconds and head on over to itunes or your favorite listening app, and subscribe, so you get fresh, new episodes, automatically downloaded to your podcast player of choice, every two weeks, while you're there, but only for feeling generous, please leave us some feedback as we've really like to hear your thoughts on the show and a five star. It doesn't count, if it's in pencil rating, be sure to visit the original life of an architect dot com for show notes linked info photos from this episode also be sure. Stick around to the very end and will attempt to reward you with our own version of a blue Correa. Thanks so much for tuning in fig it easy. Everybody chairs. Thank you so much. Thank you for heaven's. How CLYDE you both could be here. We appreciate it. Thanks so much. Guys, this legal talk is making it. So I have to turn the page everyone's being cheap print on both sides of the paper. See the planet screw the planet at okay after turn it over, because it makes noise. Yeah. Exxon what makes noise that's really what it is. Right easy. You guys are now the fun part here. And that was that was a serious part. Now, we can do we were having. All right. More fun, all coming relative south yet to this true. All relative wasn't enough laughing in there for it to be a lot of fun direction, make don't look at me either, I know what isn't that? We normally sit across each other. So this is or have. No, you're learning. I like.

Mike attorney Andrew Hawkins American Institute of architec Sal US AI Spillman farmer architects Bob Borsen engineer CSI San Diego incl Nossa Washington Mike Kogler instructor Texas Salvador Vic- architects
More Partnerships / More Human-Centric - The Lighting Industry News Brief July 27th

A Light Read Read

11:55 min | 10 months ago

More Partnerships / More Human-Centric - The Lighting Industry News Brief July 27th

"Hello, it's Monday July twenty seven. That means two things. Environmental Protection Agency has been in operation for fifty years, and it's time for the lighting industry news brief brought to you by keystone technologies, and there is central series. General purpose led par bulbs. These have a twenty five thousand our. Eighty percent energy savings compared to a halogen full-face optics, great u-shaped reflectors great for enclosed fixtures indoor outdoor. Whatever you need, that's keystone, dot, com, or the link in the description. Thank you very much and into the news NEMA has a new standard for led specification for Idi retrofits. This covers all types. Architecture billings are beginning to stabilize the American Institute of Architects are announcing that the slow decline over the past four months finally, slowing down Chinese led makers have been granted subsidies by their regional governments. all told it's about hundred forty nine million US dollars, the American lighting. Association opens nominations for Women in lighting. Leadership Award nominations are up until the first of October. The is launches a diversity initiative as well as a statement of support for racial equality, they have formed a new committee to improve inclusion equity and respect within their society. the NRDC would like to remind us that led's are selling better than halogens and incandescent, and they are more affordable in the long run. If? You might have heard some president the USA otherwise on the sixteenth. News study from the L. RC red light stimulus as an Alzheimer's treatment. This is from La Laments, Sahin and Moore Marianna FIG guero. This should the. Bat should. Pan Out. meanwhile on get a grip on lighting the talk talking to Mariana Fig wairoa about something else a new web tool. They've built to help you specify a space for comfort of the occupants. Light Fair has released their schedule. These are fifty courses. You can check them out now. Register feel like it. Signify calls for UV safety the demand for. GERMICIDE, alighting is higher than ever, but Maybe we're not falling. All are safeguards. The homes of wealthy Americans generate twenty five percent more greenhouse gases based on a survey of ninety three million houses. It is worth noting noting that wealthy people have bigger houses anecdotally. I think the deal has won an award from environment plus energy there. pl for networked lighting is one of their leaders leader awards. signify has reported their Q two results one. Five billion euros in sales, which is about nine percent, operational profitability also announced felt be carbon neutral at for twenty twenty. For Sale fixture manufacturers a group of them. In fact, Merrimack is looking for buyers. Led magazine names forty under forty. This is a list of young professionals, including owners, engineers and executives. The five best outdoor solar lights according to best reviews, Dot Com and one hundred twenty three consumer consultants have been named. Legislation releases a Webinar schedule. This is for August. Eighteenth and nineteenth. You can check their your timetable now. Or Sour Electric Supports New Jersey, bars and restaurants profits from clothing sold at lading design center were donated to workers from twenty four bars and restaurants on the Jersey Shore. Ambient? The ambient lighting market is going to go up nine percent per year until twenty thirty, according to prescient and strategic intelligence looks review reviews, extreme environment. High Bays went to La gives you his top eleven studying the lighting products impact across their full lights lifespan MRS team at Iraq at a Catalonian Institute. Is examining leads environmental impact outside energy use. This core is partnering with Bios Levittown subsidiary, going human centric bow, Fang is going to be delisted from the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, the solar and lighting firm as in negotiations to be taken completely private. has set a revenue goal. Ten billion euro sold next year. We'll see light fair announces their safety protocols for their twenty twenty one trade show. A, little premature, but maybe reassuring. You L. is hosting webinars on one session on. UV product evaluation on the twenty third and another. On Photo Take Lighting on the twenty eighth those August dates by the way me Chia debuts color and white tuning les. This is a single surface light-emitting surface that can shift cutler white level prior to this. If you wanted that, you need to two layers. Access also teaming with BIOS, these are these guys are in California. Also going human centric. The UK is mandating prof replaceable components in a new environment bill sources and gear must be serviceable by technicians. E use green deal. Might change how they light things. This is a bit of. Predicting the future from. A concerned author Microsoft Azure is coming to Samsung smart things. This is a big IOT partnership for buildings of all kinds. Converting light into sound to detect wafer alignment in semiconductors. This is research at the advanced. Research Center Fernando lithography and they've come up with a new. ECHO, scope inspection technique CBC lighting is stocking more T., v., lamps and ballasts, because demand is about ten times what it used to be. At. Are Selling polls. These their outdoor lighting now comes with their own approved polls already pre drilled for their bolt patterns. Zych cotto has partnered with district lighting. This is a manufacturer rep for DC Delaware Maryland and Northern Virginia. Kick Ler is leaving the DMC. MINKA is adding to it. This is the Dalit Dallas Market Center. Leading killer lighting is ending their lease in that space. Z Wave Alliance is releasing an IOT report. This shows off some trends in connected home tech Cowan's Villa's pardoning with trillion for a smart city project. This is a town in Quebec. That's going to network their streetlights. I co partners with Lon- London associates will be manufacturer reps for southwest. Ontario Magic lyft will be part wrapped by light SPEC in the day. That's greater. Toronto area. Has Paused data collection on their smart street lights. Not, because of all those protests earlier in the year, just because the contract between the provider in the city is the shaky right now. University of Wisconsin. Clare has switched all non academic buildings to led. Led Initiative. Here's a case study for a Horse Barn from Heiko and pro electric. Take a look at that. Wild lighting and controls expand their line card. This is L. Berta, and they are now offering light. Art Katrina, Safe Allergy and Barn Light Electric Co. Alameda. Utility has received an award for its incentive program. Energy plus program is now has been recognized. But. Has Been recognized with a community service award from the California Municipal Utility Association UCSD, series short. SHORTWAVE IRR now four times stronger for all your detecting measuring sensing in Standing Needs Westminster Abbey has gone led. Still, the original lead crystal chandeliers from Guinness, but now with color terminable led's inside. Alice and cal state have researched a nitrite based red led. This is a university corporate partnership. Ta Improve performance in red. Waters National Monument in Maine is dark sky sanctuary that happened on the eighth magpies and pigeons. Are Losing Sleep about four hours a night based on very tiny sensors attached to birds. This is a report from current biology. How to spot a fake C E mark. This is a little typesetters. Trick to tell the difference between an e, you standard sticker and the logo for Chinese, export. Here's a fun how to using. NEON indicator bulbs as a display and the people of Ancient Pompeii, enjoyed more artificial light at night than Londoners did until gas lamps were co were brought were implemented. This is a new study from University College, Louvain. Apparently the average Roman could ex could enjoy forty-one thousand women hours per capita per year. Fifteen percent more than the average Georgian Londoner. Notes on hirings, departures and promotions, a lead works has hired Kathleen. Veith, as director of User Experience Dr, Ted Kohner is at merrimack group as a managing director and Nike has promoted Bill Gutsy. To VP regional sales I've been Scott Walker. This has been the leading industry news. Brief visit brought to you by mail. Get associated. GET EDUCATED LS. Evolve continuing education getting closer all the time have a great week. Enjoy the music.

USA American Institute of Architec NRDC managing director Environmental Protection Agenc Light Fair Alzheimer NEMA Mariana Fig keystone technologies Barn Light Electric Co University College Sahin UK Hong Kong Stock Exchange IOT Bat
Remodeling Tips for Large or Small Projects

Move or Improve

28:10 min | 1 year ago

Remodeling Tips for Large or Small Projects

"Get to old navy now because this week only there's a new red hot deal every single day plus up to fifty percent off store-wide. That's up to fifty percent off your favorite old. Navy styles also get ten dollars off your next purchase. When you buy online pick up in store store so hurry in and get today's wow worthy fashion pieces at a price? You won't believe only old navy valid seven twelve nineteen select styles only ten dollars off valid in store only one time use excludes clearance Gift Card Register Lane Items Jewelry Yeah Hello and welcome to move improve who've with Debbie I'm Debbie Miller and I'm going to talk to you today about remodeling tips for large or small projects and we're gonNA find out whether you should hire an architect or designed bill firm or general contractor contractor and what each one of those can offer you as far as decisions on aging in place. You've made the choice. You're not gonNA move yet. You WanNa stay put but you know that your house is older and doesn't have the amenities cities that are required to be able to move around comfortably so before you hire somebody to do the work. <hes> you really need to take a good look at the rooms you want to modify the hallways to narrow is the bathroom from inaccessible. Does the kitchen need to have different appliances to make it easier for you to cook you definitely want to be able to improve the accessibility which would mean what he in wider doorways lowering electrical <unk> outlet so they can be reached for a wheelchair or even installing an elevator to reach in upper level or a chair lift to get upstairs depending on how the stairway is configured you wanna be able to improve the safety of the walkways walkways on and the bathrooms and the bedrooms and important another important consideration is to improve the outdoor and indoor lighting a lot of times. Your eyesight is failing as you get older and just beefing up the lighting is a big help. WanNa make sure that the lighting on the outside of the House is well lit for at the walkways and that your house numbers well let so that if you need an ambulance they can find you easily l. e. with the let will the House never well lit and you WANNA incorporate universal design as much as possible in what is universal design. Well just means that it's easy for everyone to us. <music> regardless of the age things used our sturdy and reliable and everyone can live comfortably and a certified aging in place specialists can help in this capacity as well and <hes>. I'll discuss this a little bit more later in the program but once you make a list of the things that you feel are important to improve than it's time to design the project and obtain financing and get the work completed within your budget and and it's interesting when I talked to people because I'm a certified aging in place specialists and I go into people's homes to talk to them about improving the safety and things like that and if you're not familiar with what's out there you know that you can have an easier Weiss living where you are and so a certified aging in place specialists or designer who specializes in creating aging in place safe environments is very helpful because they hey keep up with what's out there and so they can recommend the right kind of lighting or the right kind of door polls and things like that that you you may not know about because you don't or you're not traveling in that arena. So where where do you start. Should you hire an architect. Should you get a design build firm. You need a general contractor. What's the difference so let me just mentioned that a little bit? What's the difference between these a design build? I basically a general contractor who has a designer in an architect or an engineer in house. Everything's under one roof. An architect is an independent firm working for you as the client. The basic difference between the two do is an architect will prepare plans and get the necessary permits for construction but once the permit is he in is in Hamden the owner hires the contractor to build project for for them so if you're doing a major redesign knocking out wall or structural issues or opening up from first floor second Florida in make vaulted ceilings that sort of thing and if you're concerned about the aesthetics of final within an architect is definitely the way to go advantage to design build team is that all the services are under one roof and the builder helps you manage the crossed so you don't go over your budget but thanks can usually go smoother since the same company in other words the design build firm and same company that did to design is also doing the construction so they don't have is not as much back and forth between an architect and design build firm. They'll either hire in architecture. Prepare the drawings or sometimes they'll have our architect in-house so for these projects. The architect provides just enough design to get permits while giving the contractor actor the most flexibility and doing the work <hes> in the case of design bill the owner would need to hire a neutral third party to be there advocate since it's highly likely the owner probably doesn't have the experience of the time to oversee oversee. Everything and you want to make sure that things are done correctly but if you don't know what is correct than you can't really make an opinion but if you use an architect chew prepare the drawings than the architect and act as. Your advocate during the process getting the bids and doing a construction but you need to be sure you find out because they are an architect will charge you separate see usually a percentage of the total job value to oversee the N._B._A.. Your advocate in that separate from their design services so you WanNa make sure you understand what services they're providing and how much it's GonNa cost thing about architects is they're trained in design and Engineering and project project management and they really have vision to see your home improved to a much greater level than other people in the field and the architect can on manage the project he can obtain the bids for you. He can choose contractor in subcontractor controls Hayman's overseas the work in for that you should expect the pain additional five to ten percent of the projects cost because they can visualize complicated design ideas. I just remembered an architect will have the initials a after their name and not just signifies it their member of the American Institute of Architects which is the world trade groups for architects but remember that the licensing requirements vary from state to state so you really need to check your state's Department of Occupational Professional Licensing to be sure the architect is in good standing. He ended but architects. If you have a big project or a big vision that you want to have implemented an architect is really good because you can send the project out for several bids whereas designed bill firm is that it keep everything in house to control the price so how'd you choose an architect well American Institute of Architects or the A as it's known maintains a master list of all its chapters on its website which is W._w._w.. Dot A. I. A. Dot O._R._G.. Many chapters have areas where architects display photos of their projects. You can also ask for referrals from friends coworkers. Maybe someone has used an architect that he really liked the job that they did. You WanNa find out though the architects good sits for you <hes> so you WANNA check out the website you WanNa look photos of their projects and your meet them at their office. <hes> as your narrowing down your choices as you want to get the top two or three eighty four. Would you want to develop a record with them for Jeremy Working with them for quite a while on this project and we WanNa make sure you can get along with them and architects will have several all different builders that they work with and so you WanNa ask what do you think about that builder or those builders in particular and how will change orders be handled and ask them for references of clients for whom they've done a similar alert project and then be sure you speak with those past clients to ask them and what issues came up that were difficult during the project and delight the wage the problem was resolved. You need to find out what they architects. Fee Structure Structure is and what their costs are for what they do for you and of course make sure that they're insured most of them will have a copy of their insurance included in their portfolio or in the proposal that they give you for the work that you want done and of course you WanNa meet the team. That's going to be working with you on the project so meeting them before the work begins is a good thing. He's people are going to be showing up at your house early in the morning and staying throughout the day and making noise and things like that so they need to be able to tell you give you feel from what to expect along the way and there's GonNa be a project manager whether it's the architect humor herself or a project manager assigned anymore meet that person so you have a good report orbit fat person in particular because that person is going to be communicating with you as to well. We have to turn the electricity offered today for a few hours <hes> be sure and get whatever you need done before that happens or the plumbing is going to be offer a few hours <hes> vaccinated thing they wanna tell you what the noise level is going to be a noisy day today as their demolishing walls or whatever and what termer they're going to get there is it's seven thirty in the morning. What time are they gonNA? Shut down for the day and what do you have to do. Are you going to be able to stay in the house while the work's going on and if so how will you set up like a mini kitchen elsewhere if you're going to have their kitchen gutted rebuilt things like like that are important to think about as you're hiring somebody and somebody who's been through it. Many times is should be able to give you some sense of a little bit of what to expect never a perfect situation but they need to protect the rest of the house from dust. We need to be able to let you know well. Today is going to be a noisy day. 'cause we're demolishing <hes> today. Your new cabinets are being delivered. We need a place the put them things like that said that you you can be prepared and it may be in some cases that you need to stay in a hotel for a few days while works going on just because it's too crazy in the house to be able to stay there. So what can you expect from design build firm well L. pretty much similar communication skills as an architect in an architect some who is hiring the builder but it designed build firm can handle most residential remodeling projects. They won't be quite as some Tom Visionary but they will get the job done because that's what they do. Their capabilities are more limited to a cost saving design rather than the vision than an architect has and owner has has a budget for so if you're on a restricted budget definitely look at the design build firms and interview several just as she wouldn't architect to see what what kinds of projects they've done. Are that are similar to what you want. Do you want a family room added onto the kitchen. Do you need to have a bathroom expanded to make it accessible. <hes> do you need a curb. <unk> shower installed those kinds of things are going to be helpful to look at their projects that they've done <hes> the designer and the contractor former team to work on your behalf to complete the project and the initial set of plans that you'll see after you have an initial meeting with them. We'll be used to prepare more detail drowns to present with bid for the project so they're gonNa take your wishes and what you hope to achieve in the project. They're going to go back and they're going to also make recommendations did you think. About doing this while you're thinking about doing all this work you need to include this this and that's where a certified aging in place specialist really comes in handy for knowing what kinds of things you may need down the road. You may not need them now but you WanNa plan them in a while. You're doing this project and they'll prepare more detailed drawings after they get on your needs assessed and they will prepare a bid for the project and of course again you want to make sure that they're insured against negligence or malpractice in that they conform to your state requirements for licensing. That's obvious so since you're doing a project most likely that will allow you to aging place <hes> you WANNA be sure as I said to hire a contract who has the contractor who has at least one person on staff or and bring in a certified aging in place that was on this is a designation within by the remodelers cancel Astle the National Association of homebuilders and you can check the age the website in age without or for names contractors in your state who have that certification and it's a good place to start because that's those contracts is that's what they do. They build <hes> ramps or access to homes. They put in elevators. They do all that kind of thing to create a universal design component in the house. There is one thing to just as cautionary the caution regarding design build. You'RE GONNA need to choose from what they have in house. An architect has can have whatever kind of lighting you want maybe avangard. It may be traditional design build in order to keep the cost down and keep you within your budget. They're gonNA have standard lighting that you can choose from and they're going. I'll give you a budget and they'll say well you have ten thousand dollars to choose lighting before your project and these are the choices that you have and you choose from within those examples to for for example. If you're doing the cabinets in the kitchen they'll say well. These are the cabinets that we prefer and here's your budget for the cabinets and you can pick you can pick the outside of the cabinet. You can pick the handles from your budget budget and if you want certain lighting in the bathroom or even in the kitchen there's really no opportunity to send the drawings out for a bid the design build firmness completely in charge and they're going to <hes> band as little little little time on the design and more time on the building construction because they've got to get the job done so if you have special design considerations you're gonNA WANNA check on that to make sure that you're using using the right person for the job of the Right Company for the job <hes> if you hire an architect in the architect can represent your interest in saying that the plans are carried out in it to obtain competing bids from several contractors so there's the things to think about you. Don't just say oh well. Let's remodel kitchen well. It's maybe you only need to use a general contractor in so if your project is smaller scale such as you just going to update of African you don't have to do any Jack Hammering to create a new when you don't have to expand it move pilots or anything like that. It's just a matter of making improvements to the kitchen and a general contractor specializing in those areas that may do the job just fine in Beazley's expensive there there are contractors who specializing kitchen and bath remodeling and they can do the job for less if there's no structural work involved but again you WANNA verify their insurance and ask for referrals from them as well and sometimes people you WanNa have a basement refinished that has access to the outside so they wanna bring in apparent and has a space for them where it's more private so if you're finishing a basement area it really depends on the amount of work required but if you're gonNA put in a little kitchen at area that's going to increase the cost as well and if you're going to have separate bedroom in a separate sitting room and then it needs a bathroom so be prepared to you can spend thirty thirty to fifty thousand as base price and go up from there depending on what you're having done because if there's already rough in for plumbing in place for a bath and that keeps the cost lower than having to Jackhammer through the Florida lay the pipe and connect to the main sewer line so it really depends on what you're having done which is why it's good to talk to more than one contractor so once you choose the company that you want to work with then they'll prepare a detailed contract track showing the total cost of the project and when they're gonNa Start and how long it's GonNa take for them to complete the project and then they're going to schedule payments in other words they're gonNA be referred to as perhaps drawdowns if it's a big project from a large project than there's going to be certain points where they'll be able to get more money based on the amount of work that they've completed in other words save hung drywall so we get more money than they do the next phase and they get more money to cover that they don't just get the whole some upfront in order to get a big chunk on at the beginning you put a down payment or deposit own it to get the work started into get them reserved but it should specify define the contract specified. WHO's GonNa get the permits from the county who the city where you are and who's going to arrange for the inspections because this has to be done to code and you're GONNA WANNA find out how a change order is handled and a change order occurs when something is changed during the process in other words you came up with the original plans but you want to make a change to honor of the door knobs or maybe something of the lighting isn't quite what you wanted to change that aten switch to something else or cabinets aren't deliverable within construction timeframe? <hes> those kinds of things is constitutes a change order and on new appliances for example <hes> you you want check the warranties for them as well as how long warranty is in effect and whether you should purchase an extended warranty so for example if you have a brand new refrigerator install how will usually the manufacturer will warrant it for the first year but you may WanNa get an extended warranty for sometimes two three four five years stood that if something happens you just pay on a small. All the for visit from the contractor and then they'll come in such when the warranty and it's it's GonNa Insurance policy in their different policies out there for the warranties and as you want an extended warranty t it may be a good idea though what is lost. I WanNa find out what the workmanship warranty is on the Labor. The company that you hire needs to be able to come back is an issue issue arises after the work's done. I mean if you find out that something isn't working properly or maybe they're. They installed a new bathroom. Sink in the Pike leadings from the Faucet Faucet down to the drain has a little leak. Maybe they didn't feel it up tight enough. Those kinds of things that you discover after you start using it then they should be able to warrant what what they'll do and come back and six for you. So what are the some the bigger mistakes that owners make were remodeling well. I've found that <hes> the biggest most costly mistakes of usually arise from them trying to do it themselves. A lot of people think oh you know it's such a small thing understand. Save the money not GonNa do it myself well. What are some of the biggest do it yourself? Flops now <hes> one of the top ones is they try to install flooring themselves whether the carpet or hardwood floor. Maybe you're pulling up old carpet and you WANNA put in hardwoods to make it safer to walk on or boy that can get into problems because you have to make sure the floor is level using the road candidate he said or Florida the flooring on. Maybe you're installing carpet where you need can get so really quick trying to install the carpet and keep it some buckling Info Senate exterior painting as another area where people just don't know how to prepare the surface on the exterior in how to lean it first and apply and I did a podcast on painting with <hes> Williams professional painting awhile back you can listen to that podcast on where we talk about preparing in the kinds of paints to us on various projects and depending on what it is that you need to do Outta go about William <hes> one of the things that surprises me on the D._I._Y.. List and people think they can do their own electrical wiring well. I had a condominium once where the gentleman who owned it decided he was going to do his own electrical wiring and he wanted me to sell because he was moving out of the country and I noticed right away that there were issues with the electrical wiring so I called in electrician had him come in and I'll never forget. He took one one look at it. He said this is not the way I wanted to start my Monday and he spent the better part of the day undoing and fixing the problems. It's a wonder you can burn the condo down. Sit on fire so don't do your own electrical wary. It's you can electrocute yourself plus. You don't know the code. I don't understand why people think that they can do it themselves. <hes> lay tile is another problem where <hes> used the wrong adhesive or you didn't order enough tiles or you don't apply the right sealant. You're going to add to the cost because the time it takes to undo cement that holds the adhesive that holds the tiles down that all has to be ripped out the floor floor has to be level than the new you have to reorder new tile and then you gotta wait for it to come in <hes>. It's just not worth at <hes> hiring. The right person for the job makes all the difference in the finish look so don't be a do-it-yourselfer offer on those issues but then you say well. How do I finance the project well? I'm going to have a loan officer. Join me on a future podcast. We're going to talk about the different ways to finance and pull money the out of your home's equity to be able to do a project and there's different ways to finance depending on the size in the scope of the project you can obtain what we call a home equity line of credit which is he locked H.. E. Joseph Short and that takes out against your home's current value. Most people have a lot of equity built up and they can borrow up to seventy five eighty percent of that value and then that gives you money to be able to do the project. Maybe take a trip up on the side of payoffs in debt. You can also take out a construction to perm loan. We call it <hes> it basically <hes> means the loan is extended to you based on the drawings that either the architecture design lined build firm that you hire prepares for you. <hes> those drawings are sent to the lender and they appraiser for the lender determines the value of the property before the work begins and then the value after the work is completed so once the work circus finished permanent loan is then put in place in the value is then the new appraised value of your home and there are drawdowns during project meaning that money is released at certain points in the process of the contractor gets paid as the work progresses and then the entire project is reevaluated aren't the completion of the Work Sam. If it's a small job though sometimes your credit card can just be enough to take care of the costs <hes> once you have your proposal in place in no the cost ost then finding the money is not difficult but you do need to plan ahead because if you are doing for example a home equity line of credit it's not from this done overnight. It takes two weeks because they have to come in and appraise the value of your home to determine Turner how much money the loan will be four but if you have more questions in one or no more <hes> email me at move or improved with Debbie at gmail.com and don't forget tune in a net of the next time for a ED my interview with a loan officer who's going to talk to us in more detail about getting financing for these projects and told maybe now because this week only there's a new red hot deal every single day Jay plus up to fifty percent off store-wide. That's up to fifty percent off your favorite old. Navy styles also get ten dollars off your next purchase. When you buy online pick up in store so hurry in and get today's wow worthy fashion pieces at a price? You won't believe only only it'll be balanced. Seven twelve nineteen select styles only ten dollars off valid in-store only one time use excludes clearance Gift Card Register Lane Items Jewelry Gift Old Navy now because this week only there's a new red hot deal every single.

Florida Debbie Miller navy American Institute of Architec project manager Old Navy E. Joseph Short National Association of homebu Weiss Hayman Labor Faucet Faucet engineer Jeremy Tom Visionary Department of Occupational Pro Jack Hammering officer
Giga Texas Timeline Update, Giga Shanghai/New York Growth, Musk Comments on Lucid, TSLA Rebounds (09.09.20)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

08:48 min | 8 months ago

Giga Texas Timeline Update, Giga Shanghai/New York Growth, Musk Comments on Lucid, TSLA Rebounds (09.09.20)

"Everybody. Robin our here, and today is kind of a Giga Day. We have news from gigafactory Shanghai Gigafactory, Texas gigafactory New York, and then we'll talk a little bit more about lucid ahead of their livestream unveil of the lucid air tonight, and of course, the stock which we can start out with dessel stock on the day to day finishing up eleven percent to three hundred, sixty, six dollars twenty eight cents on the back of a rising macaroni Environment Nasdaq for the day up two point seven percent. So as I said, yesterday, I, hate, stop-loss orders. This is exhibit a for why that is as Tesla today without much news swung back significantly in the. Other. Direction. That's really my only thought on the stock today. So let's move into the news. There was an interesting post this morning on Tesla Motors Clubs Forum by Ridge. Twenty twenty about a possible time line for Tesla's gigafactory in Texas. This user writes quote have some information on the tear factory build schedule. Tesla is sourcing how vendors slash contractors to bid on work at the site and quote this user then shares some screen shots presumably of some documents involved in that bidding, the most interesting of which lays out a project schedule in that project schedule not a first substantial completion date of May I twenty twenty one according to the American Institute of Architects. Substantial completion is quote the stage in the progress of the work when the work or designated portion thereof is sufficiently complete in accordance with the contract documents so that the owner can occupy or utilize the work for its intended use and quote the schedule also notes that the first dry in what happened on December thirtieth twenty twenty I xdrive just means that everything is sort of sealed up with the building shell so that interior work can commence without having to be exposed to the elements, and then in a separate page here that has also included. There's a more detailed schedule noting that in September they'll be doing things like underground electrical, mechanical plumbing, etc.. October would be fencing porta-pottys waste removal metals, recycling recycling removal, and then November would be architectural interiors which based on the dry and date assume would be non weather sensitive into your stuff. So obviously take this for what it's worth. It has just forum posts, but the documents to me look like they would be pretty legitimate I. Don't think there's a ton of reason to doubt it. I. Think for those of us that follow closely this would be pretty much in line with our expectations. This will be going from breaking ground to possibly production ready in under a year which we know Tesla is targeting based on their work active factory Shanghai originally and now With gigafactory Berlin as well. Speaking of Shanghai Tesla continues to make rapid progress at the gigafactory. They're the global times earlier. This Week reported that Tesla has completed the main section of phase two, which is for the Mata why and they write quote at present interior decoration and electromechanical testing being carried out and are expected to be completed on schedule in October and November and quote not exactly sure what interior decoration needs to be carried out and completed. I'm guessing that's probably something that's lost in translation probably more equivalent you interior design meaning, functional interior design. But regardless, we continue to see these reports about phase two in Shanghai though the Global Times appears. To also expect production to begin for the Monterey in one though they do cite other media reports on that which we have talked about. Personally, I'm still expecting some motto is to come out of gigafactory Shanghai. This you're probably not enough to be immaterial to quarterly results or the financials but more. So again, sign heading into twenty twenty one which cannot believe were that close to you already shifting back to the US and over to the energy side of the business with Peissel's gigafactory. In New, York a different type of gigafactory Tesla. Roddy today posted an article with the headline of quote vessel energy ramps hiring AC in New York for accelerated solar production and. Quote you on did actually re tweet this article in which Tesla Roddy writes quote a source familiar with the matter who spoke to Tessa. Roddy talk to employees at the plant who indicated the facility is currently operating on a twenty four hour schedule six days a week to keep up with demand. Altogether, this move seems to confirm the eighty eight acre location is accelerating solar production and installation insignificant way which coincides with the company's growth and the energy sector and quote while energy storage has definitely grown historically solar has actually been quite slow Tusla recently, which I think was correctly pointed out by Gordon Johnson in our bowl baird debate. So if we go. Back to two, thousand, seventeen, for example, cutie, Tesla deployed one, hundred, seventy, six megawatts of solar energy versus this most recent you only twenty seven megawatts of solar. There are a lot of reasons for that. The business model has shifted significantly but right now it's not at the point that at once what's Tesla's hope? Of course is that the solar roof changes that about which started in their cute you letter that quote solar roof installations roughly tripled in Q. to compare to key one, we continue to expand our installation team to increase the deployment rate and quote of course, this is a new product so to starting from a very low base for Tesla from. But hopefully, that growth rate continues we've also recently seen tesla cut their prices significantly for rooftop solar. Now, offering the lowest price systems in the United States at least at a dollar forty, nine per watt after incentives under cutting other systems and the US by about thirty percent on average. So plenty of reasons to be hopeful that Tesla is on the precipice returning to growth for the solar business and are on their way to finding a business model that works for them consistently for solar going forward. Next today on into provide an update to yesterday's discussion on delivery wait times. I've seen a few comments noting that those have changed for people today they have actually changed for me as well. So the model y currently sets for the all wheel drive version at seven to eleven weeks for me here in the Midwest two to four weeks for the performance for the Model S. and the Model X. Both of those currently sit at eight to twelve weeks versus yesterday's ten to fourteen. Weeks and the model three has held steady for all trims at two to four weeks. So I think the changes at least here for the model y being seven to eleven weeks for the all wheel drive to four for the performance. The variance there makes me feel like it may be a little bit less likely that we see some sort of update at Battery Day for the Model Y to me at least there was no reason to believe that suddenly the performance model wha at. Minimum would jump up from being basically a week or two for delivery all the way to ten to fourteen weeks unless Tesla decided to ship some internationally or unless there were designed changes. So I think this shifting back. So quickly gives us a great example for trying not to read into these things too much. But of course, with battery coming up, we sort of have to it is still something that I plan on keeping an eye on and I still believe the jump up. For the and the X is very interesting. Last thing today is a couple of pieces of news on lucid as we approach the unveiling of the lucid tight again that's at four PM. Pacific. Time. Seven PM. Eastern. Time I may do a little livestream here. I'm not sure kind of depends when we end up getting this out but if this his out before that happens and you are interested in your one of the early commenters, please let me know if you'd be interested in something. Like that, just to sort of watch this altogether, we can do live chats and reactions and stuff like that. But we see Peter Rawlinson was on Fox Business Day remember Peter was formerly with Tesla worked on designing the Model S. anyway the anchor asked a few is concerned about Tesla stock dropping, which is kind of a weird question but he said no, not at all quote the valuation of Tesla reflects the preeminent position of the company, but it's got the world's leading EV technology. And I think the rise in value of that company this year that we've seen has reflected the markets recognition that not only are they ahead of the traditional Oh ease of the traditional car companies and the Germans in particular but that that gap is growing not closing and quote prior to this Ilan did not have as nice things to say about Ronson on twitter replying to test Roddy article about Lucid air saying quote Rawlinson didn't design model s prototype was done before he joined and. He left us in the lurch just as things got tough, which was not cool. He did make some contributions to body slash chassis engineering, but not to powertrain battery electronics or software and quote. So I had pondered aloud I think last week or a couple of weeks back if lucid might be a good candidate to partner with Tesla on the super charger network because at least so far I do think lucid has a pretty good go to market strategy, but with Ron's having left. Tesla I wondered how that relationship was and it looks like from this tweet that may be that could be a no go for Ilan if views Robinson's exit from Tesla as sort of abandoning ship. Anyway looking forward to learning a little bit more about that later tonight. But that'll do it for this episode as always. Thank you for listening. Don't forget to subscribe and sign up for notifications. Make sure you're following me on twitter at excessive podcast and I'll see you next time. Thank you.

Tesla Tesla Roddy Shanghai Tesla Tesla Motors Clubs gigafactory Shanghai Gigafacto Shanghai Global Times Texas United States gigafactory Shanghai Tesla Robin New York American Institute of Architec twitter Ilan York Monterey
CRE News Hour 9/20/2019

Commercial Real Estate News Hour

57:45 min | 1 year ago

CRE News Hour 9/20/2019

"From the business desk at St Broadcast News this is the C. Arena news hour. I'm Steve Lubeck. It's Friday September Twentieth Twenty nineteen in this week's edition addition of the Sierra News Hour. We'll talk about the correlation between College Football Prowess and student housing values with CBRE's Jacqueline vits. We'll talk about a new emphasis on creative partnerships by co working companies with Brock Stress Burger of co Working Company convene and will look look at the latest performance trends in the data center market place with Bo Bond Jones Lang Lasalle. We'll be back with the top news stories right after these messages turn earn your podcasting passion into profits the book the business of podcasting describes the business side of podcasting including how to become a professional national podcast. You'll learn about position your clients expertise who podcasting to plus the best business models how to find clients and much more visit the the business of PODCASTING DOT com today. You can't wait for the media to cover your company Buzney. You have to be the media take advantage of the power of audio and video. It's the best way to showcase your expertise to prospective customers. Let the Lupatkin you bet can media companies handled the technical side. We're award winning audio and video producers. We can help you produce podcasts and video programs remotely or in our fully fully equipped studio in Cherry Hill visit being the media dot Com for more information. Thanks for joining us on the C. R. E. News Hour. We just like to make note of a new option on the show page for this episode you can click on the purple. Take the survey button right below the podcast player and share some information that will help us get to know our audience better. We'd also appreciate your considering financial support for the Sierra News Hour by visiting our our patron link and becoming a show supporter you can also leave a tip in the tip jar by clicking the blue quid button right in the middle of the podcast episode page and if you're interested in becoming a sponsor of the Sierra News our right to me at Steve at St Broadcast News Dot Com and we'll send you the rate card for advertising and commercials visuals now. Let's take a look at some of the stories that are moving Sierra markets across the country demand for design services in August took a markedly downward swing compared to July's has already soft score a new report released by the American Institute of Architects says the A as architecture billings index score of forty seven point two in in August showed a significant drop in architecture firm billings compared to July score a fifty point one any score below fifty indicates a decrease in billings. The design contract score also declined to forty seven point nine in August representing a rare dip for that indicator billings in the west state modestly positive while all other the regions remained in negative territory kermit baker is the AI as chief economist. The sizable drop in both designed buildings in new project activity coming on the heels of six months of disappointing growth in billings suggests that the design expansion that began in mid two thousand twelve is beginning to face headwinds currently the weakness is centered at firm specializing in commercial and industrial facilities as well as those located in the midwest however there are fewer pockets pockets of strength and design activity now either by building sector or region than there have been in recent years an important zoning change will transform the Fort Washington office park into a vibrant live work play location that will attract new businesses residents and investment. That's according to Ableson Young. The firm says a New Zoning Ordinance Ordinance adopted by the Upper Dublin Pennsylvania township in May will spur private investment and development in the Fort Washington office park that will have a profound effect on on the reimagined area making it hub of activity that will bring jobs and increased commercial property values the Greater Fort Washington Zoning Ordinance expands the permitted permitted uses in the former Employment Center district this will allow for multifamily residential and mixed use real estate to supplement the existing office commercial L. Institutional Light Industrial and recreational uses state senators and representatives from both major parties joined environmental groups in Harrisburg this week to urge Pennsylvania Governor. Tom Wolfe to move immediately on new rules to cut methane emissions in the Commonwealth. Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas but the federal. EPA wants to roll back regulations on emissions from the oil and gas industry. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection has proposed new rules rules to cut emissions from existing oil and gas facilities. John Wallace with the Pennsylvania Environmental Council says this week's event is proof of bipartisan support word for the EP Proposal Department has been working on this for some time but until the department puts it out for public comment initiative as a final regulation we need to keep moving the process us for a reason analysis by the Environmental Defense Fund found that the oil and gas industry and Pennsylvania's emitting five hundred twenty thousand tonnes of methane every every year methane is the main ingredient in natural gas at accounts for twenty five percent of current global warming WALSER points out that reducing methane emissions is critical to to protect Pennsylvania communities from the worst impacts of climate change. Pennsylvania is the number two producer of natural gas in the country and the federal government's. It's not gonNA lead on this issue then it's incumbent on the states to do so he adds that cutting methane emissions will also be critical to meeting the commitments in the governor's executive order on climate the issue in January walser says opening the comment period on Dep's draft regulations would let the Department get input from the industry the public and environmental mental groups to improve the final rule era few areas we would like to see them strengthened to make sure that they are addressing all the potential sources of methane emissions legislators at Tuesday's gathering emphasize that with the EPA withdrawing from the fight against climate change. It's up to Pennsylvania and other states to take the lead a new report from C. B. R. E. Says Pittsburgh's flexible office. Space inventory grew to six hundred sixteen thousand square feet by the end of the second quarter. That's an increase of one hundred twenty one thousand square feet or about twenty four percent from a year earlier and it's grown over two hundred fifty percent since two thousand fourteen flexible space now accounts for eight tenths of a percent of Pittsburgh's total office inventory up from six tenths of a percent a year ago. It's still below the US average one point eight percent that indicates that there's room for the sector to grow in Pittsburgh Mark Flexible spaces heavily concentrated in Pittsburgh's downtown sub market which accounts for thirty four point four percent of the markets flexible inventory space occupancy occupancy in US skilled nursing facilities remained relatively stable at eighty three point three percent in the second quarter. That's point five percent decrease from the first quarter but it's an increase of half a percent from a year ago. The data comes from the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and care also known as Nick Knicks second in quarter two thousand nineteen skilled nursing data report showed occupancy declining in cities but increasing slightly in rural areas skilled nursing facilities are inpatient healthcare all care facilities for patients who need nursing rehabilitation or related services but don't require hospitalization a new study commissioned by the National Apartment Association Association and the National Multifamily Housing Council reveals that the apartment multifamily industry in its residents annually contribute more than three point four trillion dollars is to the national economy the report available at we are apartments dot. Org provides a detailed breakout of the economic impact nationally by state and and in fifty metro areas the new data shows how different aspects of the apartment industry positively affect national state and local economies residents spending contributes three trillion dollars to the US economy while operations adds another one hundred seventy five billion new construction contributes one hundred fifty billion and renovation and repairs ED sixty eight point eight billion among the highlights of the report all four sectors of the industry or posted very strong growth punctuated by the construction industry ramping up to meet the unprecedented demand for apartments this cycle reaching a height of three hundred forty seven thousand completions in two thousand seventeen up from one hundred twenty nine thousand nine hundred in twenty eleven anchor health properties recently closed on three class a medical office buildings totaling about one hundred and ten thousand square feet and secured the right to acquire a fourth with asset of forty thousand square feet. That's currently under construction in suburban markets in Atlanta Georgia the Newnan Professional Center one and two medical office buildings twenty twenty four. Oh One in twenty three zero one newnan crossing boulevard are strategically positioned next to Piedmont Healthcare's Newnan hospital one of the fastest growing inpatient hospitals in the health systems systems network anchor health will also have a right to acquire the adjacent Newnan Professional Center Three Medical Office Building when it's completed in twenty twenty the medical office building located at two fifty park place in Woodstock is anchored by northside pediatrics and North Atlanta primary care and is in a high growth community Nevada Fox field industrial the mid Atlantic armament via real estate ventures purchased twenty nine acres at nine Hundred River road in Conshohocken Pennsylvania in Ja Fox field industrial will demolish the existing chemical processing plant. That's occupied the site for more than thirty years. It then plans to build a Class A. Thirty six foot clear industrial property. It's going to call the king of Prussia logistics hub the properties in an infill redevelopment site in the king of Prussia of market with exceptional access access to interstates seventy six four seventy six and two seventy six king of Prussia prime for Class A industrial product with the average warehouse being more than forty years old and only having twenty-foot clear heights. You're listening to the CRE news hour from St Broadcast News News Dot Com all right. This is a story for sports fans who also happen to work in commercial real estate. It's about student housing and apparently student student housing linked to universities with elite football program gets the best pricing it also gets the greatest demand from investors who were drawn by the large inconsistent enrollments romance as well as stable cashflows that these properties offer this is according to the latest analysis by Cbre College Football Conferences are strongly early correlated with student housing capitalization rates. That's the valuation measure used in Commercial Real Estate to indicate investor interest lower the cap rate the greater the appeal Oh and value see exact opposite of what you want in your football score. CBRE analysis finds that student housing colleges with elite football programs trade at lower recap rates than properties serving colleges with lesser quality football programs joining us to talk about the analysis and about how sports plays into to the value of student housing is Jacqueline fits she cbre's director of National Student Housing Jacqueline thanks for joining us on the CRI News Hour. You've done a study for CBRE's student. Housing that indicates there's a link between the demand for student housing and the value of student housing and how well the school does in football. Tell us a little bit about what you found out sure happy to so what we found is that there's a direct correlation between the the capitalization rate when you buy the property and the power five universities so we've looked at the CAP rates that division one non power five universities versus Division One power universities and Non Division One and you'll see see that there's a distinct differential between the two where we're seeing cafe significantly lower those schools that are at the power five universities and I I think the correlations more interesting when you think about the type of enrollment growth that universities can potentially see when they win for instance the National Championship for Paul and that demonstrate how the power of football can help and within Roman growth enrollment fundamentals knows which then drives a more stable environment for supply demand for Sudan housing investment so it's interesting to me that that there's even this correlation and what does it tell you about the value of football programs for schools. I mean there's always a debate. you know when when schools are talking about where they you should be spending their money. there's one side this as we should spend it on academics and other side that wants to particularly alumni back constituencies they want to spend the money on Games and stadiums and all that stuff and this seems to suggest that at least from a housing perspective that the money's well spent does back to a lot towards the visibility of at the university when they are playing championship games or even you know on TV parts of Timeslot instead of on some random network if you will the visibility is there and then that drives student enrollment so what we've seen is applications will pick up first and foremost and then once applications because if they maintain the same admit admits admitted standards as before typically that's when you start with the enrollment grow but additionally if they start to tighten some of their standards as far as how how who they admit you start to see students that are higher quality and your input improving your student base which is another good indicator of a strong university that they'll definitely wanna see so there is that correlation between really the correlation is between enrollment growth and or better standard of student and and football which then leads to if your investment professional with the student housing real estate market okay to I'm more stabilized investment that will continue to have growth as demand grows for the university in enrollment continues to grow aside from the school related characteristics that make a a student housing property attractive more attractive. We're less attractive. are there other criteria like location or a nearby amenities that you factor into the evaluation so the biggest key word that we see in student housing investments is pedestrian assets versus non pedestrian so we really look at argue pedestrian to campus this can can the student roll out of bed and walked to campus or are they going to have to take a shuttle bus or drive so we've seen that spread differential in cal- great be approximately fifty fifty basis points through the first half of two thousand Nineteen so there is definitely that variable variable as you can achieve better Ild if you're looking to buy an asset that's non pedestrian but then the argument is for people that are focused on pedestrian assets that you can't heartbeat built within and so the demand will continue to be there for those pedestrian asset or their geographies that are are more favourable to student housing than others. Is it really more based. On what school is there or can you see a trend among student in housing developments in a particular geography so it's a good question we've seen typically that the largest number of transactions transactions at least within the housing sector occur in the southeastern part of the United States which are also some of the schools the SEC conferences being very strong conference for football. I'm and there's been a pretty large enrollment growth those universities as well so that contributed more investment in those markets and then definitely more transactions destroying some of those workers have less barriers of entry then other markets. It's as far as it relates to construction so I would say that that's the most typical area the other thing to consider with housing sector and overall all is where the population is still growing and one thing that we've seen is there are higher percentage of Hispanic students graduating from high school and going to college before so we seen in in states where there are high demographic ethic Hispanic Students the in there is more enrollment growth because a larger percentage of them are going to university after graduating in high school so states included in that includes Florida Texas California and those are some of the states where we also see strong enrollment fundamental when you look at the kinds kinds of student housing. That's being developed today. It's very different from the student housing of a decade or two ago talk a little bit about the differences is and what are the most popular features today when people are looking at building student housing so when this thing I kinda history a little bit history when the student housing sector was initially formed the majority of the product that was still was stick garden style located further from campus in but on large possibly and let less testing how would say as the market has evolved and become more institutional gene housing. I think sector as a whole and then also as rents have continued to increase we've seen more of a flight to developments that our closer to campus those pedestrian locations which tend to be projects that are much more dense in nature some having things like structured parking and not necessarily stick built so there has been in some ways a change from Ah the the garden style typical amenities you see to the urban style type of Amenities but I would say overall they they've called halted the amenities arms race in student housing. I mean we definitely have seen projects bill with golf's in simulators. I was at a property last week that had a snowboard and ski simulator that was a property in cal- in Colorado so you definitely sort of an a competition amongst developers on what they can build and what they are building but I would say the immunity that ultimately becomes the most used amenity and we've seen developers offers because of that desire and us really increased the volume of the study rooms so we've gone from you know one computer lab slash study room and older student housing assets to now student housing or stood steady rooms on every single floor building so we were really focusing on some of the amenities that the students actually appeasing and then just generally those the amenities that the parents when they're touring with their students really like saying and I gather they're spending a lot more time in the common areas like this study rooms then they did you know decades ago. People tend to live in these cinderblock towers and they would go into their room and that would be their sanctuary but now they tend to like to hang out with their friends in common areas. It's it's a little bit of both to be honest so the one thing that's different about the housing sector versus multifamily is that having is leased by the bed instead of by the unit and so there are a lot of instances where someone will come in with a with a friend and say we would like to run a four bedroom apartment and they're put into beds and then the other two beds are filled with strangers so in that instance we see when people releasing by the bed but not necessarily with a full unit of people they know they tend to thank more in their bedrooms when they're in their unit and then they go to the common areas to to be with their other friends because they're not necessarily necessarily staying in their living rooms because they're living with strangers so it's a it's an unusual situation that's becoming more common and we definitely see that transitioning with into the multifamily world with the micro unit concept with the you know the more the commentaries that people are using more frequently but really I think the concept is originated in some regards from what we see in student housing where people are renting a bedroom instead of unit and Sunday at least for a bedroom is the the demand for student housing largely driven by demographic trends in in that population in that age cohort or is it a bunch of other factors as well actually other factors so initially when the student housing sector really grew in volume from a transaction point we tripled in volume from two thousand fourteen to two thousand sixteen just overall volume for the the US housing market when that happened people were really chasing the additional yield that could be accomplished student so you saw student housing cop rates. It's between fifty two hundred fifty higher than what you see the multi family so I would say the initial flight to student was based on that yield premium that you'll premium has dissolved somewhat as more and more capital. It's come into space so now other people are looking at thing as a a diversifier within their portfolios because we do see that student housing definitely Ma- is what we call recession recession recession resilient people back to university when the job market is tough and because of that and that's the reason now most people are investing in the market. What are the factors you look at in terms of economic statistics to determine which way the market is going to trend in student housing other? Are there particular things you look at so we unlike multi see family where you're looking really good job data and where the population growth is coming from a Lotta what we we when we're doing research on any given university he is is a university master plan so many times universities obviously had to play into their infrastructure years in advance and so they're putting putting together these plans that include pinch enrollment growth potential on campus development so we're really looking at what Ah for the university is where the ultimate demand is going to be for the student housing based on the enrollment growth projection so it's interesting because because there there's some contradictory evidence that that that's not necessarily all that you need to look at. It's obviously the easiest and the biggest thing to look at because your demands coming from your student base but if you look at a market like Austin and University of Texas University of Texas is held relatively a constant with their enrollment for many years they don't have any room to grow their landlocked around the downtown area and the highway that is their next to the campus US and they're student housing has continued to thrive in that market even though there have been new developments and enrollment has stayed relatively flat a- and really that's driven by what's happened in Austin multifamily market where the Austin multifamily market has has gotten very strong rent growth has been phenomenal you know and it's driven those students that used to live in the multifamily market out of the multifamily market the permanent the by the unit leasing back into the the West campus market which is the pedestrian market to ut so while I still say the biggest factors enrollment it doesn't it's not always the only factor and you really have to focus on each individual university town if you will as its own little economy because there are so many different factors that can play into on top enrollment Jacqueline Fitz's. CBRE's director of National Student Housing Jacqueline thanks for taking the time to talk to us about the student housing market. Thank you very much the CO working companies aiming to outmaneuver each other a new emphasis is being placed on creative partnerships and how they can support differentiation of each brand convene which is a partner for commercial landlords and providing premium meeting in workplace solutions is announcing a new round of milestone allstone partnerships. They're working with th- Uzio the invitation only Sports Event Company and Eden Health and hydrate to bring onsite healthcare wellness and spa services to co working locations in New York and elsewhere joining us to talk about partnerships among co working companies and landlords is Brooke Doc strasburger his vice president and head of partnerships with convene brock. Tell us a little bit about convene and the premium meeting and workplace solutions you or providing adding to landlords and commercial buildings. How does that work convenient really first and foremost started as a meeting of Ending Conference Company about ten and years ago and really went to all the class a landlords and told them that we thought we could hope monetize the space a little bit differently that amazing buildings but within the buildings there was some you know little pockets of underutilized space for example a an H? Fact for or you know heating ventilation relation and air conditioning for that has lots of industrial equipment in it and we thought we could you know reposition these wars invest their own money and build out best in class meeting in a an event spaces and so we did that and that was kind of how we got the this scale to start diving into the the flexible workplace product as well so right now the meeting event and conference space accounts for about eighty percent of our revenue and we've started to wear around flexible coercion premium working that is on top of the more intricate infrastructure that we built for the event is. I wonder if you could explain a little bit more how you differentiate yourself from what people we now can call traditional co working space traditional is probably a little bit early for that but to how do you differentiate from companies that are doing purely co working space. Yeah I think kind of a nod to what I just mentioned before is is that we really have landlords at the core of our of our partnership viewpoint so we're looking at you know kind of activating the entire building as a whole and serving the anchor tenants and the employee and the rest of the building and not just within our own four walls so what I mean by that is you know we of course are working with the community and the members that are coming to work specifically in our spaces but we're also serving as a amenity the and and offering for the rest of the folks in the building to come and flex down into if and when they need it so you can imagine something like the the the Freedom Tower where Conde Nast as large anchor tenant they have of course their own cafeteria and they have lots of compensations and meeting space but we have you know very specific spaces that are larger we have you know really Enterprise Level Avian. It and just spaces that are very conducive to collaboration that they will actually flex down into and use kind of on top of you know the space they have within their own four walls went and if they need it no you're working with co working companies as well as with the landlords is at my understanding that correctly yeah so in terms of companies you mean companies companies that will work inside of a co working space or do you mean co working providers. I mean co working providers you are are you let me clarify. Are you providing co working space or are you working company. You are doing it yourself yeah. We're we're doing both so we have the meeting and event and conference business on one side of of our of our product offering and on the other we have the flexible workplace or premium co working offering and so we actually have one or multiple floors of both of those different products within within our stack and we're starting to weave in additional amenities as well so we might have one two three or four or five years of being an event space we might have won multiple floors of actual co working and that we are operating ourselves that is with you know under the convene umbrella and we're also injecting additional amenities services like fitness and wellness or primary healthcare cafes etc to Kinda round out the offering so you're the head of partnerships at convene. Why do you think why does the company think that making partnerships with co working companies with landlords these are important things to do to differentiate themselves yeah well we we kind of capitalize on our own strength of design hospitality culinary and technology and then we really partner on everything else we recognize that we're really good at certain things and that were never going to obsess as much as primary healthcare a company for example specifically on primary healthcare so I think we know what we know and we know what you know? Others are are kind of our better experts at and we want to keep those folks in so that the offering is the best that it can be and the entire concept of kind of this one stop shop or full ecosystem system within a building is is almost becoming table stakes these days so for those who are familiar with the New York area you might know a complex called Brookefield the place but for those who don't it's basically this amazing business complex that has a fantastic office space as great F. and B. Offering amazing amazing retail equinoxes childcare movies theaters golf simulators etc and so it has all these bells and whistles and so you can imagine that if you're another landlord with a building across the street that doesn't have all these bells and whistles that the retention of your anchor tenants my job or you might be forced to lower your we rates or if you have a vacancy it might be more difficult shell and so the concept of having all these bells and whistles under one roof is something that we're desperately chasing and desperately the wrong word but I guess that meant that we are we are we are very it softly chasing but but very serious about it becoming that becoming that kind of a minute station for the entire for the entire building so we're injecting our core competencies of the you a meeting event and workplace product and then layering on best in class partners in these other categories that kind of round out that offering and those other categories in the physical amenities standpoint. I'm point are the you know the FM be offering the primary healthcare the fitness the wellness potentially childcare potentially pet care etc and on the software side the things you're gonna be looking at stuff like concierge services or you kind of suite of or a library of you know perks offers and benefits that really benefit the community and make it a really pleasant place to work. Are we seeing a an arms race in the amenity entity the kinds of amenities that people are trying to put into a co working or into office space. you know it started with which we we really need to have a nice cafe where people can get free coffee from a coffee maker where they can get different flavors to all the way up to now. I think you're working with some companies to organize events where people can meet celebrities and sports the way that we think about it is is something that is sustainable and make sense for the community from a an experience standpoint but also makes sense for our stakeholders from a a revenue perspective as well to your your point about the the sports celebrities we are working with a company called Fujio who is doing some very interesting stuff and the future of client interchange and so we're typically thinking about companies that you know have a like minded missions and are being you know I'm kind of innovative in how they think about the future of a category that resonates with the audience met convene kind of interacts with within the building and so what I was I was saying on the back of that is that in general you know from a partnership perspective and also from a a real estate deal perspective. We're typically very thoughtful and how we think about it and we want there to be you know a good purpose in a good connection to the demographic but in that building and into the attendees with inconvenient versus you know kind of just doing a deal doing a partnership for Growth Sake or just sort of the partnership sake We Really WanNa make sure that makes sense confident current there. It sounds like we're we're reaching an age of a blurring of the lines between work and play We've heard some people talk about retainment that you need to have some kind of experiential retail thing going on to get people to go to traditional retail properties are we are we finding the same thing in the office space to people need to be entertained in stimulated throughout the workday in this I ah I mean it sounds kind of like that's what what's approaching. Yeah I mean I I think it kind of goes back to you know expanding beyond just the the cubicle life that kind of used to be the bare minimum now we're really thinking about how do we become. I'm not one stop shop and and how do we keep customers engaged for example we have fortune one thousand two may not necessarily how they headquartered presence in one of the metropolitan areas where we do or you have a company who is just overflowing doing and needs to kind of maintain a similar quality in their you know for their employees at a at a location that's nearby and so the Innovationlab of some of these fortune one thousands or actually starting to take foot inside of convene locations because they need something cool so they need something interesting. I mean need something different to keep their employees happy and to also retain talent or to even attract talent NGOs that they you currently don existing and so yeah I mean I think it is it's becoming table stakes. It's like I was saying before it's it's just in general the expectation and not only from the landlord's but from the employers and specifically from the employees is you know it's just changing and so we're trying to weed the weed the charge with with partnering with Stop Full Companies that are accretive to that specific experience in the workplace any new services. You're going to integrate the great beyond what you know the tradition ones that you talked about but are there any others that people haven't thought about incorporating into the workspace yeah I mean. I think there's there's a lot of folks who have thought through kind of what the physical amenities standpoint looks like we are close on on a on on Shell childcare concept we have worked at pet care. I have not seen that care in the co working round but it's something that you know you're hearing a little bit more and more of especially in areas like New York City SNB Is something that's interesting. obviously there's the standard kind of the ground floor retail world but there's a concept called Ghost Chechens that is starting to get a lot of traction and you've heard a couple of big names the tax base who have who have recently entered as well and we're looking at some exploration their kitchens so it goes catching is is effectively a commissary kitchen that builds out different bays for companies to come in and rent these these different ways so that they don't have to build a commissary kitchen on their own and so what I mean by that is you might have five thousand twelve thousand feet and you might have six to twelve different. FM be concepts in there renting smaller kitchen space so that they don't have to go and build a commissary kitchen on their around this is on the back of GRUB and seamless Lebanon and caviar and Uber eats and you know all these other food delivery companies that have started to drive more of a larger and larger percentage of these different smp retail brands you know kind of overall revenue stream and so these folks are starting to acknowledged that maybe they actually don't always ground for retail and instead they kind of position themselves around the the different regions where they get the most volume for delivery orders and bill but smarter and a little bit more efficient and so the interesting thing for us is it potentially allows us to have a cheaper view at building out one of our own kitchens while simultaneously providing a broader SMP offering to our members to the the rest of the building and also to the surrounding neighborhood what sounds very interesting and we look forward to seeing some more innovation in the space and thank you for taking the time Brooke yet. Thank you very much appreciate it. Brock Stress Burger is the vice president and head of partnerships for conven- we'll be back in a minute this is rabbi Richard Address join us for our podcast series from Jewish sacred aging entitled seekers of meaning will explore or some of the issues and events that impact ourselves our families and our Jewish world at large in light of the current revolution in Eiji the secrets of meaning podcast airs every Friday morning at eight. AM AT JEWISH SACRED AGING DOT COM do you can't wait for the media to cover your company. You have to be the media take advantage of the power of audio and video. It's the best way to showcase your expertise to prospective. If customers let the LUBEC in media companies handle the technical side we're award winning audio and video producers. We can help you produce podcasts and video programs comes remotely or in our fully equipped studio in Cherry Hill visit being the media dot com for more information the data data center industry so a slowdown in demand through the first half of two thousand Nineteen Jones Lang Lasalle is out with a global data center mid year report. It says that although demand for space remained robust internationally in twenty eighteen so far in twenty nineteen operators have recorded only two hundred under fifty six megawatts across major markets of absorption. That's down twenty three point eight percent from this point last year. Cloud adoption continues to accelerate the rate globally building off momentum from twenty eighteen the report also notes the majority of development activities occurring in established data center markets as operators around around the world expanded established product joining us to talk about the data center trends is Bo Bond Managing Director and Data Center Solutions Co lead lead four Jones Lang Lasalle. He's one of the authors of the report and we'll put a link to the report in the show notes accompanying this episode of the podcast both thanks for joining us on on the Sierra Newshour. The data center industry has been pumping along but you're now seeing a slowdown in the first half twenty nineteen year report suggests that things are down a bit from where they were last year. Tell us what's going on. And what do you think is behind it. We've seen at blow down down but I think everything's relative. Two Thousand Sixteen was record setting year or something. We've never seen before two thousand seventeen and eighteen extremely strong wrong didn't necessarily meet the sixteen numbers but at the end of eighteen we finished with again just shy sixteen numbers but given incredible numbers. The first first of nineteen has pulled back some and I think some of that is just ebbs and flows of potential you know buying opportunities within maybe the the cloud sector or the enterprise sector. I think also the enterprise the data center developer has deployed heavily their infrastructure out there they have bought land. They have brought building so there is a healthy supply so I think we're gonNA take a little time to absorb that supply and then you know if you look at the public markets you know in two thousand eighteen we returned probably of the big publicly traded reits in in and around. I think the number was roughly sixteen percent eighteen percent return but you get out in front of the first six months of two thousand nineteen and and we've seen numbers in the high twenties so all relative nothing to be overly concerned about. I think we just have an abundance of supply and some and core markets that with some good leasing activity we will eat into that inventory the or the absorption will right themselves and will continue to be the darling of that read industry. One of the things you're suggesting in the report is that most of the data center expansion expansion activity is happening or development activity. I should say is happening in expansion in existing product what's going on. Why are people finding it necessary to expand what are already in a lot of cases very large data centers? Well I think first off you know there's a lot of investment assignment into those platforms right into those data centers and so you know if you if you were to think that the network capacity that was brought in as a big number if you can expand in that footprint so you're not replicating another network. You're not replicating it another deployment well. There's a lot of cost efficiencies and savings is there so if you can expand in that same footprint by potentially taking down additional power that would allow you to deploy additional servers right in maybe in the hire you rack you can gain efficiencies that way but I think conversely we are seeing small deployment globally to be able to affect in fact a bigger network a global network gateway to the cloud so I think the expansions are just coming a little differently maybe than they have over the last couple couple years you talk in the report about recycling being one of the factors that spurring innovation what's happening with servers. Why are they being recycled and what are people spending money on in the new round of investment sure well you know if you were to talk talk to a you know a person that spend their days on the data center floor the equipment on their for those servers typically refresh every three to five years and since you know this data industry data center industry has grown at such a rapid rate there is such an aggregation of servers right that has reached? It's their useful lives in the industry has said Hey we really need to be good partners. We have greening initiatives. We need to be doing the right thing for not only our environment environment but for all also the cost effective model of running our entire platforms and so there we have found that we are finding adding these leftover equipment the equipment that's reached. It's end of useful life. They are really pushing it to a recycling company company and those companies are growing dramatically so that they are placed in the right areas right. We are disposing of that information Asian that equipment those cards properly so that we can check the box that there is no risk and third just for our climate right. We're taking them inboard. You're putting that into the appropriate avenues where we are not being wasteful. What are the things that people are doing with data that are driving the demand? Is it just more of the same only more of it or is it different kinds of data that people need to access and to WHO upload into the cloud well burke the great question I think as you and me as consumers of data we're consuming data more and more right right. Most of us are cutting the cord right. How we stream content video just personally is much greater than it had before the amount of information that we use on handheld devices how we bank how we trade how we look at insurance how we read our medical records all done and the digital fat format all these data transfer and so we as consumers just use data whether we know are not a much greater rate every year and then if you you think about the big Iot Internet of things as we all call it right? I can think about machine learning companies are utilizing that to be able to learn more to bring us consumers to drive business more so that data aggregation again is growing massively and so where's that going you kind of mentioned. There's a lot of that is going to cost effective model where it can go up into the cloud riot people have virtual servers but I think businesses today or looking looking at this information and driving decisions because they have the ability to do more with that information and make more concise decisions uh-huh on how they deploy capital who they market to how they protect data but make no bones about it. The amount of data is growing exponentially exponentially. Is there anything unusual and anything new in terms of data that that you're seeing people wanting to store you know I wouldn't say there's one specific item. That's driving it. I really wouldn't you can't just say it's just you know government regulation. You can't say it's a specific industry health care insurance or financial services. I can't say that we personally have just everybody cut the cord and now now we're streaming net flicks every day. I think it's a general aggregation of content information that driving this consumption of data are there specific areas that developers of data centers look most closely at and I'm talking geographic areas when when they're deciding where to locate a center I know we've seen some stories about how some of the big Google and Amazon data centers they tend to put near inexpensive of hydroelectric power sources and things like that is that still a factor for a lot of these data centers definitely your you know any anyone that would be building a data center whether it is a user or whether it is a multi tenant datacenter developer or you know an operator of sorts that's doing it on a speculative basis basis for their business there obviously building it as cost effective as possible right so the people that build on a SPEC basis they're going to the higher concentrations of markets where the users are deploying and so in the US that clearly northern Virginia because of all the connectivity that comes comes through Northern Virginia and how the cloud providers have all taken down a significant amount of space other major markets. You know where business happens. That's right New York Chicago Dallas for were Northern California Southern California Phoenix big business centers have have been traditionally where these providers have gone and as they started this the aggregation developing more and then you could say on a third category you know the people that the data center is their business where they have the ability to pick it up and put it anywhere in the country or the world and they don't have to be in a specific geographic area they have made those decisions to go to places that were they can find extremely inexpensive power hydropower right at two cents. you know those are are drivers but make no bones about it. There are only a few very big companies that can make those decisions to go in and all of us a fun term here of Cornfield Cornfield in Iowa right to go to you know the great Great Pacific North West you know on the High Desert Plain and access some of that real expensive power. A lot of companies can't necessarily deploy a production data center that far away from business centered centered do digest latency requirements right the the communication between those two points is too far and so that's why you continue to see them really in the major Metros which kind of leads into that other big discussion people talk about which is the edge one of the things. I've also I've seen a lot written about is the the data mining industry the people who were doing bitcoin and other kinds of crypto currencies in some cases taking over existing power generating facilities and turning them into data mining centers. How how do those developments factor into your data center analysis or do they at all is that as sector that you're either starting to watch her have been watching so I we definitely are in tune with that so the cryptocurrency is unique because it doesn't necessarily have the characteristics of a traditional data center it it it almost mimics more of a manufacturing facility of a warehouse of swords? They need a considerable amount of power and they have the ability to go to as you described you know a generation facility. They don't necessarily have that need to be in a major metropolitan area a close to significant connectivity to be able to connect to customers in the world so that's why you see sometimes they are in some of these remote areas they also have a lot more fluctuation and the ability to manage humidity temperature control etc because that that minor that that actual machine that minor might not have some of the sensitivities that away very expensive you know high compute server might have so they are if you were to see some of the mining facilities they might look very a crude or rudimentary and form but that's because of the aspect what's happening on that minor and those are actually you know those does does minors themselves. Are you know somewhat disposable. If one was to go down they just throw another one in there but you just don't have the control systems in in their from a power mechanical safety not necessarily safety security that you would see in a traditional regional data center where you might see you know insurance companies financial healthcare here more traditional type industry verticals where they have their data centers when you're looking at your economic dashboard. What are the red and green lights that you look at to tell whether the data data center industry is in for tougher times economically when you look out over the horizon bombers always the stock market and you know the six or six months of the year the publicly traded data rates have done very well so that gives me a green right there? If you were to look at the Global Data Center footprint there are countries that are less mature in their data center and they're connective than the US you know the first big data center push was here at home and so we've probably are a little bit more mature in some markets we probably have some markets where the supply might be a little bit greater than demand and so we we will have to have some absorption take place but I think there are a number of enterprises that are really needing to deploy across the globe because their business is global and they are reaching out into many different company countries to be able to play knows that will give them the ability to get to the cloud and that respective region so I think the international growth is probably greater than the US broke and a lot of these very large firms or becoming not only US data center firms arms are becoming global data center firms so you know if we weren't if they what's the red side of it. I just think there are some markets where we probably have a little more supply then some that would like but that was because there was a great race to the space there were people that were trying to deploy to chase customers and you might have just seen too many the people come into a market but if you look at the top markets we're still getting healthy. Absorption in the next four months will really know kind of how that supplies starts to whittle little down and really were the numbers are but I don't think it's something that we have to get overly cautious about. We just need to have exercise really a good proven business practices from where vestment goes from a provider's perspective and that you'll probably just a little less development in the next six to twelve months but I think it will pick back up absorption starts to pick up well. Thanks very much Bo- we'll put a link to the data center report in the show notes for this podcasts and we thank you for joining us. Thank you very much for having a bow. Bond is the managing director and Data Centers Solutions Co lead for Jones Lang Lasalle and that'll do it for this week's edition of the Sierra News Hour. Don't forget to check out our audience survey by clicking on the purple. Take the survey button below the PODCAST S. player on the show page for this episode and please consider becoming a financial supporter of our podcast by clicking the Patriarch Button if you have comments about our program or a story idea that you'd like to see us cover send me an email addresses steve at St Broadcast News Dot Com you can also leave us an audio comment by using the voicemail feature on the right side Bar of our website at St Broadcast News Dot com we produce this show in the state broadcast news studios in Cherry Hill L. New Jersey some audio in this program was provided by our content partner public news service DOT. Org for everyone at the Sierra News hour and state broadcast news

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Ep. 44  Coaching for Business Success with David Bradley

Make the Grade with Dr. Steven Greene

57:32 min | 1 year ago

Ep. 44 Coaching for Business Success with David Bradley

"Welcome to make the grade with the success. Dr Steven Green were. You'll discover actionable strategies to help your student to reach their academic goals to excel at standardized testing into bland for the college admissions process painlessly. And now here's your host Dr Steven Green Dr Steven Green Hair the success Dr podcast time. It is podcast time. Thank you for those who are listening subscribing supporting the. Make the great podcasts. My goal always is give people actionable items. They can use right away to maximize education. My goal is you can listen to podcasts positive and turn it off. Go do something immediately to help yourself or your child or your students to move forward and get better grades and all that fun stuff so today. Get your pencils. Get your thinking caps. Excellent guests in attendance today. David Bradley I think this is going to be really interesting discussion. So as a matter of introduction. Welcome Dave Steve. Let me. Dave gave me a copious Biography here but I think it's very relevant shared with the audience. We'RE GONNA Dave David. Twenty five years experience in the architecture design business founded blueprint for living coaching with a mission to help design professionals to seek access their untapped potential develop their leadership and create great things in their personal professional lives draws upon his skills as a coach architect leader Motivational Speaker Mentor and businessmen to inspire excellence in his clients and call them to be their best to two thousand fourteen graduate of accomplish coaches training program comprehensive intensive yearlong emphasizes an onto logical approach to coaching. I really don't understand what that means. You can wait an extensive hands on leadership experience. I get that that sounds solid state on the leadership team for the coaches training for Chicago. Seattle Washington DC Victoria British Columbia and the United Nations always a member the international coach that ration- in a PC certifies coach prior to being a coach. He brought a successful career an architect my dream job growing up and I as a principal Bradley architects leaders a Managing Director of the North American operations of off from saying that write offs. Yom german-based design engineering firm specializing tensile structures up to explain to me what that is a still actively engage in both firms. Active never the American Institute of Architects and in two thousand fourteen he was. The president graduated from Georgetown University with honors Basser Science in Foreign Service later with honors versus Chicago Master of Architecture degree licensed to practice addiction and state of Illinois avid cyclist. Just like me twice. Complete the five hundred mile. Whoa TWIN CITIES TO CHICAGO AIDS. Ride raising over thirty seven dollars for each of a sport organizations. I find this very interesting. And he's Certified Rescue. Diver been lucky to dive reefs from the Caribbeans. The Great Barrier Reef fluent in Deutsche German conversational in French and Dabbles in Swedish and Portuguese Avocado. Thank you very much. I forgot it. I think the three Portuguese words. I will dazzle you with my words right out of the gate here for my audience. There is so much value here. They've bring so much the tape to break this up and like eleven episodes but where do you WanNa Start David? Let's start with. Let's start with your background it is. It is impressive. You've obviously worn a few different hats in your in your life right so we'll talk about where you are now. I happen to know I know a little background. Here Davis on a big adventure he is uprooted himself from the corporate world in Chicago and is living in Lisbon Portugal right now on a of discovery journey which I think is a really a great positive sort of risks. So this time. Let's talk about your personal mission for a Secondary Personal Journey into the coaching. And the counseling. How we can help students to reach their potential as well so yeah. I think it's a Lisbon a production. You know what's funny first of all? Thanks thanks for having me and I'm really excited to be talking to hear your audience in on the conversation we're going to have you know what's funny when I've listened to Obviously I wrote my bio but when I listened to somebody else read it sort of objectively from the outside. It's like I have won a lot of hats. It's been a really. I've been blessed to have an extremely varied and differentiated background. I've dabbled in all sorts of things and I think to if I think one of the things that really strikes me about my own background is just renaissance. Man Sort of experience. I've really kind of run. The gamut in terms of educational experiences work experiences life experiences and yet somehow all of it has managed to coalesce and put me where. I am right now So as you mentioned I currently have basic nutshell is. I'm a licensed architect. They still you practice of working with sufficient Out of stood guard Germany And we do have very specialized type of architectural tensile structures that's structures that are all stainless steel cable in Stainless Steel Mesh netting. So they're all under tension rather than a compressive structures which would be like brick and concrete and wood I those are under compressive strength whereas tensile structures held up by being under tension. There actually be pulled into place like a bridge. Kinda very much so I think it's on the Golden Gate Bridge actually is a great example of a tensile structure. Leon's we have them in Philadelphia and one of the projects that might firm worked on. The German firm is D- currently under construction suicide prevention barrier for the Golden Gate Bridge Air currently hanging stainless steel mesh nets off the sides of the bridge to prevent people from jumping and might firm in Germany was responsible for the design of that. So the very niche kind of architecture. Most people could architects designing houses and buildings. I just happened to be in a different branch of architecture. That's unusual and extremely interesting. A lot of fun so. Let me ask you one question here. Yeah the the the sort of renaissance concept right. Which is I think something everybody would like to be able to do. But sometimes the trappings of a house in the family and all that sort of thing and this is something. I think parents relate to more students but just to start. My audience is students and parents students. And I when you were in high school or college or even graduate school. Did you see a linear any sort of linear connection from where you were then to where you are now is just sort of like the boat going across the ocean in the current? Took you where you were going to end up because obviously you need. You need it the academic credentials to get to where you already can't just walk in an office the architect of cool so there had to be some combination of a book. Track of courses right some sequential architecture architecture to whatever tensile strength advanced pencil strength but then also you're driven by your own passion. If that's the word I can use and this is this is I get with my students a lot? I'm sitting here with the tenth graders. Why do I need to learn geometry when I'm ever going to use it why I only like history or you know what did learn Spanish where we speak English United States? Yeah and I try to explain to them and as far as the same thing their parents would say. Hey you never know be sometimes learning for the sake of learning is important right but but from counseling standpoint. I mean you're you're also a certified coach. Who who are you looking to work with? What's your ideal coach? Abol person here in Ohio. Well let's see. Let me start with the first part of that which was Backup on step in your mind for my audience. Let's define coaching. Let's make sure that is because coaching baseball coach in orders and is coach so awesome professional coach at your levels is that is doing what it yet. Seven addition to being an architect. I'm also certified and trained as a professional coach an executive coach and what that means is that I partner with people. In my case I've I've chosen to work specifically with architects and other design professionals because those are kind of the people in my community and partner with them to have a conversation about where they are now where they wanna be and what's in the way of them getting their policy and quickly so it's a it's coaching is a professional partnership. I can't come in objectively to be able to point out. Behaviors thought patterns speech things. That people are doing that are getting in the way of moving themselves forward policy so one example. Just one example. I was approached by a husband and wife both architects who were working foreign architecture firm and they were being offered golden handcuffs. Basically they were being offered a partnership in the firm but in order to do it they were going to have to be constrained not really do the kind of work they wanted to do. And they approached me and said hey we actually want to open our own firm and they hired me to first of all figuring out how to extract themselves politically diplomatically from their current situation. And then how to lay the foundations or building their own and over the course of six to eight months we worked together. They now have their own architectural practice in Seattle. It's actually really really successful. One example of a client is the classic conundrum of life right security versus right versus on the other side unknown right exciting sometimes boring Boring Security. A little bit sarcastically versus or the excitement of the unknown. But you know the scary. How do you do it? So that's one example of the kind of client that I would work with us a coach but what I think your your listeners might be really interested in is a task when you mentioned it. Being sort of the boat with the current. It's much it's very much like that. I did not go into college either. Wanting to be an architect or wanting to be a coach I actually wanted to work international and I've sort of had it in my mind. I knew that I loved languages. I loved history economics and politics and Georgetown School of Foreign Service. Their program was very multifaceted and really spoke to who I understood myself to be. As renaissance man sort of a loved a little bit of everything and their program was very very well rounded liberal arts education with an international bent to write. I explored all the time in school. I had economics. I had some business classes. I was required to pass a proficiency in the language which I did in both French and German I think let's see history classes politics. International politics was my nature and I minored in German and none of this was really targeted. Like somebody who says I'm going to be a doctor or someone who enters school and says I'm going to be an architect. I really was getting a well rounded education then. I think the thing that worked best for me was that in my undergraduate degree I learned really basic foundational skills like critical thinking how to speak clearly an intentionally how to write well and with clarity. I gained those skills and I also gained a lot of general knowledge and I think that sort of Laham really solid foundation. So I know that there's kind of a joke out there that if you're an English major you're never going to be employed. I DON is out there. What is it fair to send? It can't context because as an English major you're taught to think critically you're taught these skills that are incredibly valuable in any any. Let me put this into slightly. Different language were you. You have a very strong foundation education. We're I'm going to call life skills. Yes but sort of through the lens of learning through Book Knowledge Critical Thinking. I don't think anybody's going to say is not as valuable skill and listen to. I don't care if you're ten years old twelve years old fifty thousand years old right in my sort of world. I use these terms anonymously. Coach teacher Tutor Guide There's probably other words throw in there but because some people compartmentalized world like coach is almost like an esoteric is sure to teach your sounds more accessible. Yeah maybe because people have teachers their whole lives tutors like Like almost as quasi negative connotations. Sometimes 'cause you only tutor if you need tell that which isn't true audience. It's not true but all right so I would put coach in in the. It's it's it's interesting where you're where the definitions live because find on compartmentalize. I you know just from people in different people from a different perspective even though the four words a throughout their kind of have the same role right depending on where people are and what they're ready for which is a coach. I know you'll understand that they're going to look at these things differently. Maybe almost graduate from a teacher to a coach in a sense because coach might be more specialized one thing she said I found very interesting was kind of like. Here's now here's future and you're trying to help you create a path to get there. They might already know what it is. They don't well they might want to know what it is but they're things in the way there's things that are preventing them from understanding there's inhibitions holding them back negatives fears So this is going to have to explain to me onto logical versus. Yeah Facultative couple as you can wait distinction so let me get abducts and I think your listeners will appreciate this so ontological is the study of. And they're two different types of comes from the comes from the Greek and there are two different types of coaching out. There one of them is facilitated. Coaching TO SILICATE. Coaching is a lot like consulting so a facilitator coach at here. I'll give you the best example. Say that a client comes to name. They say David might finances mass and I wanted. I wanted to retire in ten years. Okay as up facilitative coach which I've got training to do. We're going to take a look at their income at their expenses. Were GonNA balance their checkbook. We're going to get them on A software like quicken or quickbooks. We're going to connect them with a financial advisor. We're going to put together a budget to set goals for them right and give them practices and things to do that are going to get them from point. A. TO POINT C. That's a facilitative approach Gary very badly bins term. It's it's it's sort of a structural. Yes and it's a it's an it's very much like consultants that you would hire to come in something you give me a plan. I do the plan. I get the results. Exactly okay. Difference is I'm also trained as an onto logical coach. What that means says we start asking other questions that are broader. Like who are you being about your money? What's your relationship to money? How does money work? In Your Life by motivation. There'd he s but they're also it's it gets to the root of their relationship to money power all of it finances. Fat is at the root cause of why they are where they are quite a breakdown in the finances and once we can determine what their relationship to money as and shift that then you actually get the results but think about this like somebody who tries wants to lose weight for example right you can put an. We've all seen it before and I've gone through it before you join you get on a diet you do all of this stuff and you lose the weight but a lot of people gain the weight. Batum is the reason is because they haven't actually dealt with the on typology they haven't dealt with their relationship to food in their body and their Celtic. Let me give you an example. I think it'd be very close to him with my caseload. Most of the people I work with even if I'm starting with them eight or ten years old ultimately their goal is to go to college a lot. You Know Tutoring Subjects College. Prep so really. There's exact same thing. There's the facilitator part. Which is here's how you do math. Here's how we're GONNA book and then there's the why right so the easiest example would be. Sat Prep doing sat. Prep is is arduous. It was a good language that comes from Moscow. Latin somewhere in it it's annoying. It's not fun for kids. But they're why is bigger is announcing the overcome right. I want to go to college. So I'm willing to put the work in to do the structural things to get there and the ontological part would be. Who Do you understand yourself to be as a learner? Do you walk around for example from a coaching perspective. What's your thought about learning do you are you walking around saying? I can't do mass right. I'd say he's a marine suit up that you've got that story. That context of math is hard. I can't do math math Stupid or whatever. That's in the way it's it doesn't matter how much you practice math if you don't shift your relationship to mass and your relationship to who you are as an intelligent person it's GonNa be a heck of a lot harder to actually achieve the results that you want. You might get there right. Facilitative coaches and there's I'm not bashing facilitative. Coaching at all. There's value to it but like I said with the if you you can put all the structures in the world in place but if you don't shipped somebody's core beliefs about who they are. It's going to be a heck of a lot harder to get the results and the results may not stick so think about it this way too. I took the SAT's. I'm a really good test taker. I'd something in my mind. Just I I take us well I always have. I have friends who are no There in many cases I think far more brilliant than I am but they don't take tests well and they have a story about it. But they're brilliant people so if they could shift that I watched a couple of dude is they actually shifted. They're they're being around test-taking where they stopped. The story of kept repeating of. I don't take tests well right. They started learning how to become a person who takes tests well so it's trying to for sure mindset. Dan Very very attitude. That doesn't guarantee you're GONNA get a sixteen hundred on the. Sat right in my world. I talk all the time when I student aware. However I'm working with about reaching potential. Not Everybody's going to get an a plus right. That's our goal right if you're capability is A. B. or whatever twelve ten eleven hundred fourteen twenty. Sat that's where we WANNA be so so in coaching situation. Because I think what we do in this way kind of similar whenever I started with a student or a family. There's an assessment point right. Where are you now? What's going on? What are you good at? What are you struggling with your here? You WanNa get here. What are we need to do to get in between? It's not unlike any sort of coaching guidance. Tutoring you know the the walls all of it so sometimes you just define a goal. I Want I wanNA sixteen hundred and then we work towards it. I think it is sense. What you're doing is on a bigger stage. You know. People sort of changing their whole lives around but possibilities. Let's talk about that fit into all of this. Just pick that word out what? So here's the thing you mentioned earlier. I'm in Lisbon Portugal Right. I decided about a year ago after twenty six years of living through Chicago winters that I did not want to go through another winter in Chicago. I was just Kinda done and I thought I don't have anything to prove. I decided I wasn't going to be in Chicago for the winter and I didn't know what it was gonna look like but I told my coach because I work with a coach. I told my coach. I said I will not be in Chicago this next winter. I'm just done my and I created the possibility of traveling outside the country. I didn't know how it was going to work. I didn't know how I was going to pay for it. I didn't know where I was going to go. I just created that possibility an over time with my coach we created a project around with milestones with goals. To kind of narrow things down make checkpoints. I call them. Yeah absolutely and I moved here January seventh. And I've been here now for about three months. We don't know you got adventure on the horizon which we have a huge adventure coming up but part of this lies and I have to say you have to create the possibility and learn how to say yes in the face of all of the reasons that come up in front huge Will be nut you job. You're going to hell the problem. Is WE CREATE POSSIBILITY? And it's we can get really present some terrific possibility. Like I'm GonNa go to X. College or I'm going to go into this industry in this field and that possibility gets distinguish it gets extinguished like that it just it's very very fleeting so you've got internal reserves external both we're wired wired to be at the effect of the circumstances that we experience it's almost as her mechanism survival thing to keep us safe right right when. I said I'm going to move abroad for three months. And in Singapore on your subconscious says immediately. The question starts a pop up. How can afford that? How are we going to keep your business running? What if Blah Blah Blah like all have no friends and there's all stops most people? I'll tell you something when I guess I can't tell you how many times she said this earlier in the call when I tell people at a cocktail party that I'm an architect if I had a nickel for every time somebody said God. I always wanted to be an architect. I wanted to be an architect. We'll tell you don't make wine a second but finished yet and so what happens is and you know what the reasons that they give. I'd I couldn't I couldn't deal with the mass. I couldn't deal with Max so they do the math to become an amber. They fought. The math was too hard or they didn't like math. Or whatever else right so what I find fascinating about that conversation his. There's a possibility somebody who in their education sauce something that inspired them the I would love to be an architect and the great reasons for it. They wanted to impact society. They wanted to design things. They wanted to be created fright and they let mass get in the way of their dreams. I and I four hundred word right but that math is context. Math is hard is a story. It's just a story but we lead stories like that. Squash are possibility constantly. So if somebody out there wants to be a doctor and they have some story or maybe their family members have story about why. You can't be a doctor. They'll start to. They'll start to believe it. We believe these stories because we think they're real. Math is not hard. It's just not we have a story. That math is hard and we gather as much experience as possible to prove ourselves right see. I got that problem wrong. Math is hard. I can't do math. There's the really insidious one girls can't do mouse. Well that's a bunch of that. But but how many women has that prevented from becoming mathematicians? Were going into the science strike. These are dangerous context in some respects This extended to anything right. I mean you're talking specifically about mad about math but I mean it's saying with language. Listen I'm learning Portuguese right now because I'm living in Lisbon and I can tell you all these by Portuguese might be difficult but it's also a heck of a lot of fun and I just keep pushing and challenging ourselves so I think when you talk about possibility we do this everywhere as we create we have dreams. We have aspirations of things that we want and we are wired unfortunately to immediately put obstacles in our own way and back away from our trains. So may I ask you a question And just as a digression you know I wanted to be an architect to every show growing up and this'll date me was the brady. Yes I think Mike Brady did more for the architecture world absolutely than than than IEP around Michelangelo. And here's the dirty little secret actually. Do you have to know mass to become an architect idol? No Yes yes. You do missing trigonometry energy. I know I had to have a college level course in calculus so and for some people Calculus that's way too way too steep curve. It's fine I took a calculus class. I happen to like Calculus because to me. It was puzzle. It wasn't it wasn't it was like solving a puzzle by. Here's the dirty little secret. You don't need math today. An architect when career. Yeah well once. You're there in school. I used math sewing frequently. I needed it for my classes. Honestly you need more. You need more geometry than you need anything else because you have to understand how materials shapes work right but to this day. I haven't used Calculus in twenty five years so it's really interesting fallacy for most people. Yes you need mass to get in to be to get into school to be accepted to start architecture by-in-large once you're there and that's true with so many things. Let me tell you a comes up a lot in my world And this is true with younger children. An older one is the gap of time the gap of time Later in life. It's it's easier to pivot right if I'm forty three. I Dunno whatever just unhappy. I can pick up and go somewhere if I'm fifteen. I'm in ninth grade. I pretty much have three or four years. I'm going to be in high school of a ton of that ability in your life Obviously at that age Becoming more independent at least intellectually. It's really more a parent child relationship at that point but That that that is something that I see a lot is is is idea of. I want to do this. But it's going to be four five six years out. Were were the inability to connect when you do the work. This is one of the big challenges I have with prep kids for the. Sat if you think about it. We're not roughly through junior year Zyppah. Well by the time you take the test. Let's just say it's May Junior. You're right now. It's march but then you're not even GonNa apply to college till August or September October Hear from them until December or so. You're not going to go for a whole nother eight months so there's whatever the polar opposite of instant. Gratification is is very very very super prolonged gratification and in our society our world or whatever That doesn't always fly the I what what when you were talking about the whole possibility. Pc on top of my head was the whole field of dreams idea right. The bill that on created you modify the thought manifest the action the so. Let me ask you this. I think by all standards. Most people considered you successful in your career yet like you could've stayed in Chicago So to speak maybe been mostly happy. Had some frustrations of things you know. You always wanted to go to Paris or whatever but when when somebody's younger they don't have that same what we're to use angst that too strong word Is probably a German word for 'cause they have all these fancy German words at least emotions. You can't capture as well as English. But but from the perspective of my audience how important is it to just trust your instincts to just you know within what you can control? Because let's say you're talking to a fourteen year old. Listen I know you don't love school or maybe love school and you want to preserve that that the curiosity WanNa preserve that sort of childhood innocence. Innocence but yet. We need to be aware of the realities. What's going on under this kind of push into the opposing forces right is like the Peter Pan Complex versus you. GotTa pay the rent right so I know you. You're talking about trusting yourself and all that but how can we kind of put that from a parent perspective as motivators Like how can apparent positively influence? Their Children Some type listen. I got kids. I wish they listened to me and if I appear knows it yeah you could say your kid one hundred times and somebody else's say it to a once in the listen to him but if I'm a parent and I'll try to motivate. My children. Were child whatever Any message will give him language they could use workouts out so this is where I would actually turn to the ontological As an end in all honesty I'm not apparent show. I have the wonderful ability to stand outside and be judgmental without we call that objective. Okay there you got the objective. Here's here's what I think you know we were talking about this series here if I knew then what I knew. Now which is coming is just ask if if I at the age of thirteen fourteen. Fifteen sixteen You've got your entire life ahead of you and everything is super immediate. You want answers right then and there you WanNa. I wanted so much to just decide. What am I gonNa be on with your life or I'm going to be a doctor. I'm GonNa be a marine biologist. I'm going to be. I wanted that so much that certainty so that I could just do it. I got very frustrated because I seem to like a whole bunch of things in my future seemed so muddy cycle. Where am I going? I have no idea what I'm doing if I knew then what I know now I would say enjoy every single thing that she loves pursuit. Follow it have fun with it. Enjoy IT and don't go choosing something because you think it's the right thing to where somebody else is pushing you into somebody else's idea of what she should be doing. Follow your own path. And that's where as parents I think one of the hardest things that most parents I see have to deal with is having faith in their kids ability to to survive. Parents love their kids. And they want them to succeed and thrive and everything else and oftentimes have their own agenda for what's GonNa be right for their kid. The hardest thing that you can do that I've seen with my friends in their kids is trust. It's all going to work out all going to be okay and allow them to explore and have fun and enjoy what they enjoy and experiment and try on all different hats because it's all valuable at the beginning of my career. I knew I wanted to do something international. I had no idea what that would look like and there was no particular job path. There is no career path that I was following per se. I just started doing things that sort of pointed in that direction. Something International while I've traveled. The Globe is an architect and currently living abroad and my plan next year is to do a world tour of cities around the world cities in twelve months. Where I'm going to be interviewing architects and design professionals as I go working as digital nomad exploring the world. That is nothing that I ever could have imagined when I was in school but it all sort of came just sort of worked out part of it is trusting your gut. You're very right. I could easily well. Technically I could easily chosen to live a mediocre life and career being semi happy. Maybe or just feeling unfulfilled. I'll tell you honestly in some of the jobs that I've had if I had stayed in that job I'd be pretty miserable right now and part of my work as a coach is to work with people to get them. Un- miserable because they spent their whole life doing what they thought they should be doing rather than actually following their heart. May I ask you this David? Do you think you would have been unhappy because you obviously have a kind of a wonder lost right. You've you have this innate curiosity about the world you had since you were little of wanting to do it. And you're very fortunate debatable. To manifest it now right there are some people. Were perfectly happy with this. These companyman only absolutely nobody saying that's good or band is not. There's not something my own personal choice is exactly. Everybody has their their pass if Only you gotTA follow your heart. Let me ask you this. Let's let's if you want to expand because I I know a little bit about your twelve in twelve idea. We're let me ask you this because we're all finding very interesting here. Is You got from A to B to c to D to Now? Where do you see yourself in? Let's say five years Or do you even know. Do you even want to protect you know you know what's funny is? I'm actually going to ask Peter Fifteen year old and I it. Yeah what in finding overtime stadium is? I think as I progress through these various stages of my career. I'm becoming more and more attuned to uncertain of what my skills are. What my purpose is what? I'm doing all four and what I want to create and so I went from very muddy in high school. Like oh I WANNA do something. International to now at actually For my career as I move forward but it's taken years sorta trying out different things and taking some leaps of faith and now I would say in the next five five to ten years I definitely see growing my coaching practice with architects actually becoming the Goto the go-to Guy Amongst the architecture community for coaching. I see creating an international community of coaches. I'm sorry international community of architects. All of whom are committed to impacting the environment society culture. I see myself giving motivational speeches. Traveling the globe interviewing other architects exchanging ideas creating an environment where the nobility of architects actually against expressed. I think I love. I love the the industry of architecture because architecture some of the most creative people I know they have a real mission for having an impact on the world. They have a vision for how things could be which is just brilliant and in many cases. There're people wearing the white hat. They kind of come in with this broad based knowledge of how the world works how materials come together what spaces should look like and how they should funk to and I don't know an architect who went into the profession wanting to be a millionaire. It's a really tough profession to be honest It's very demanding. It's not for everyone but it's also incredibly satisfying one too when you walk into a space that you designed and you see how it's impacted the environment the society around to I'm once I'm going to be five years from now celebrating those people because I think they're heroes of our society. Hey Listen I go down. You're GONNA get there. Let's do this as sort of a at least coming into closure here Is I know I sort of another way before but My hope for this conversation was to learn more about you but also to give a very different perspective to my audience chairman. This podcast often as you would say. Very facilitative right. I'll do you manage time. He hears techniques to help you study. Who's techniques up you prepare for tests So I'm GonNa Kinda group this one in the ontological side of motivational. It's almost in psychology world sort of cognitive versus other types of therapy on. But I think I think we're really asking people to do. Here is just explorer. Their motivations right her and I think part of that is you just have to accept the fact that you're going to have to do some things maybe majority things at times. You don't really want to be doing or don't seem important at the time to you but are going to get you to a larger goal. So the example was you had to take calculus which wasn't such a horrible thing as you described it but you need to. You need to invest yourself in that to get to your bigger goal right. That's the message. I'm hoping student parents can transmit to students. Is that what you're GONNA do in seventh grade? Six Grade Eighth Grade Ninth Grade even in university studies may not always directly. Seem like it's going to lead towards GonNa get you. I mean the way I got to where I am a kind of a rambling story like yours as well. I do day to day. Just out of curiosity Can you say something fancy German just to wow us with your language skills? It's actually Say No funny math German. How would you say telling? Journalists put like eleven words together. They want big word. When I can tell you along those lines I took German because I had in high school. I had an extra an extra class that I needed to take. And they gave me the option of language or Jim and there was no way that was going to take gym. I chose I chose German. I started it. I really liked it because again for me. German was like a puzzle. It was figuring out the grammar structure. In how the words I'll go together. I didn't know where that was ever. GonNa take me or whether I would ever use it now. See what you've gotten the job with this German firm if you didn't know German while it's funny. I did get the job without knowing German but when I showed up in art and I walked into the office I was able to say can Allah here stretching Deutsche. We we can all stretching by Deutsche Went Been Americano is most larum rights. We we can all speak German here. Because that's your language. I'm an American. I'm here to learn and they probably said Hey. We know English am I. They all did no English but what was amazing. Is I heard my boss later at a cocktail party. Telling one of his guests talking about me he said I had no idea has. German was so good it actually stood me in good stead. When I got there and IT facilitated. It wasn't a requirement for the job. But it actually really really was a great thing and I never would have known that was gonna but here's the important thing Matches there is not that you could speak German and it was that it helped to establish relationships with people who are going to be. Your coworkers might spend a lot of time with that. You know not uncommon in the workplace It broke out some barriers to major more accessible and made it right. I was able to function in foreign environments Yeah you know. I got to the point where I had people in stood guard came up in were Germans. Were coming up in asking me how to use the ticket machine at the Metro because they thought I was. German responded back to them and they never said anything like Oh you must be an American so I think the thing that I would say and I understand where you're asking with your students who are like. Why should I have to focus on this thing? Now because I don't see the benefit right or forget Wash focus on a period. I am address. This is to do whatever I hate. Design everything everything is an opportunity. Even a setback is an opportunity. If you can start to shift. You're thinking to see the opportunity in everything if you think. Math is difficult. Look at it as an opportunity to expand your ability to be with the challenge. I look at. I don't know if it's language science sword even English class. Look at it as an opportunity to learn something about the world's because that information you will never know where that's GonNa come in useful but I promise you at some point in your life your bank yourself for having taken the time and you never know you know. I have a friend recently. Who contacted as an architect? But he hadn't taken his licensing exams. And here's the deal you can't you can work in architecture firm but you cannot call yourself an architect until you become. License and becoming licensed is not easy like a bar exam for lawyer. It's like a bar exam. You'll it costs money. It takes a lot of time. There are seven different exams. You have to take. It's very intensive right. And this one friends I was talking to. He didn't have his license. Said you know I could just continue working for this farm and I. I don't know that I actually need it. And I really gone on his case about it. I said because how many opportunities are you shutting down right because you're not taking a not even know because nobody would know what opportunities could be available to you if you apply yourself in you. Take on this challenge. While he finally went any got his exam and because of it eventually was able to go out and create his own business. He started getting side jobs. He started getting hired to design things that he couldn't have he couldn't have done it. You don't know what opportunities you're shutting down by not taking on opportunities tremendous advice. Make that the title of this podcast area now. Everything is not There's another t shirt. It's all about possibility. And so that she things I would actually say to ask people to walk away with three facts Francis another one you're if you're a parent of a kid who's in school right now. Who's searching I would say? Trust them love them and support them in whatever they show interest in and really teach them to say yes to anything that shows up the interest and really fostered not so many possibilities are killed off by people who tell their kids. No No. You can't do that no you're never gonNA make a living doing that. No that's not the right thing to do. Support Your Kids. Love Them. Let them explore. Let them play. There's going to be plenty of time for them to figure out where they're headed and permission to work to at least have the vision open create possibility. Teach them that. It's okay to say. Yes in the face of everything. Else Analogous now. I'm going to start forgetting what three points. Were not number two weeks and she wanted Portuguese. You Go Number. Two is actually create possibilities for yourself and notice how quickly. Where're you shut it down? We walk in to create all these beautiful dreams ourselves in our kids in what we want in life and we very very quickly shut the possibility. Because we've been trained to do so to keep ourselves safe and playing small and if you need help with that talked to coach because the Focused on staying in the possibility of moving beyond the objections. And I'M GONNA I'd forget the third one was so I'm just GonNa make something up added and it really is just dare to love what you do passion. I'm the thing in your life that makes you passionate and don't settle for less if you're unhappy if you're unfulfilled Change you can choose anything outside of that and I am always devastated by the number of people who choose to play small in their lives or choose to settle because they think that that's worth so trust yourself believe in yourself and create something pretty phenomenal. Because you're worth it. This is Steve Green on the eighth grade. Podcast I have had the real pleasure of speaking David. Bradley for this episode You can get a hold of me at s Green S. G. R. E. N. E. It makes the grade dot net's or on social media at make greater at facebook and all that jazz. It'll be shown it's I. I talked about it every time. You don't know by now you should Do you have anything or plug? I mean? Obviously you're coaching. Why don't you let the audience on how they get hold of you? Thanks yeah I mean if anybody has any questions or they simply just WanNa talk about either architecture or coaching Checkup a website. It's www dot blueprint for living dot coach Luke. And that's a great way to see what I'm up to and learn a bit more and happy to talk with anybody about hose it with this What what's the what's the next big thing for you? I mean what? What are you going from here? Like like like these to say with the entertaining in Vegas this week in Mexico. We're going to and I am super excited so I am hearing on in Morocco. That sounds at Lisbon until April twenty eighth. But there's a three week period between now and then that I'll be traveling to three different cities in Morocco. A good year. Marrakesh and then. I'm heading home to Chicago. At the end of April to be there for a few months unless the conferences cancelled. I'm going attending a conference in Rio in jar as an international union of architects concerts. April is not winner right. April is not winter that clear here. The next End of November is set off with a program called remote year. I'll be joining twenty five to forty colleagues from all over. The world. Were traveling to twelve cities across the globe. One City per month living and working and will be hitting Hanoi Vietnam. Let see chow mein thailand kyoto japan kuala lumpur malaysia santiago chile lima peru magazine colombia mexico city mexico split croatia lisbon portugal valencia spain and then finally ending up in cape town south africa. So it's GonNa be a year of International Travel and architecture. Coaching and Roy. Off-line Kyoto's one of my favorite cities in the world. I was fortunate to spend extended. Can I'm so excited I can give you all. I'll tell you the best rom in Japan where to go excellent fabulous. I still miss it all right. So let's let's wrap this up again David. Thank you Opera Gado Sharon there. You GO COO multi-lingual speak Vietnamese. You'RE GONNA have to put that in your portfolio is. It adds a mind. I think you've given a huge amount wisdom perspective and knowledge. I hope people take advantage of Of this in their lives. A little tiny it all starts with a small change right and small changes. Add up big changes in. That could be a whole nother discussion. Check out the next podcast. I appreciate all my subscribers and listeners. My goal is to get this into the ears of as many people as possible. I really feel the more people can get this sort of information. More people can get helped and and move forward in their school lives in case it's as discussion may be in their lives in general so until next time. Dr Steven Green the success Dr signing off. You've been listening to make the grade with the success Dr Steven Green. If you enjoyed this episode we shared a subscribe for more resources and support. Please visit make the grade dot net.

Chicago Dave David Lisbon Dr Steven Green Seattle David Bradley Lisbon Portugal Right American Institute of Architec Great Barrier Reef Germany baseball Georgetown School of Foreign S Motivational Speaker Mentor Dave Steve United Nations Golden Gate Bridge Morocco Dave Caribbeans
NPR News: 02-25-2021 5PM ET

NPR News Now

04:40 min | 2 months ago

NPR News: 02-25-2021 5PM ET

"Live from npr news. I'm janine herbst. President biden today celebrated the fifteen million corona virus. Vaccines administered so far fifty million shots in just thirty seven days since i've become president. That's so weeks ahead of schedule. Even with the setbacks we face during the recent winter storms. that's halfway biden's pledge of one hundred million people vaccinated in his first one hundred days in office by also says his administration will launch a campaign to educate people about vaccines this as a food and drug administration. Advisory panel meets tomorrow on drugmaker. Johnson and johnson's one dose vaccine. The fda could authorize this weekend. If that happens it would be the third vaccine available in the us former michigan governor. Jennifer granholm is the country's new energy secretary. The senate voted sixty four to thirty five today to confirm. npr's jeff radio reports. She is expected to refocus the department of energy on climate. Change like president biden. Jennifer granholm has focused her climate change message on creating jobs at her confirmation. Hearing last month. Granholm told senators that every state could benefit from the transition to cleaner energy. The products that reduce carbon emissions are going to create twenty three trillion dollar global market by twenty thirty. That is a massive opportunity as michigan. Governor granholm worked on a federal bailout package that encouraged automakers to focus on cleaner technologies like electric vehicles. Republican senators said they're concerned. The new employment may not be in the same places and at the same pay as current fossil fuel. Jobs jeff eighty. Npr news first time jobless claims fell last week but are still at a historically high level. The labor department says the number of people applying for unemployment benefits fell to a seasonally adjusted. Seven hundred. thirty thousand. That's the lowest number of weekly claims. Since november more than nineteen million people remain on some form of assistance. Meanwhile stocks lost ground today as the yield on treasury notes climbed here scott horsely reports. The dow fell one point seven percent after hitting a record high just a day earlier for months now. Investors looking for any kind of return had little alternative to buying stocks but the yield on unsafe treasury notes has risen swiftly in recent days the yield on ten year treasuries topped one and a half percent today for the first time in a year. That's more than the dividends paid by stocks and the s. and p. five hundred index making riskier stock investments relatively less attractive orders for durable goods rose by better-than-expected three point four percent last month aircraft provided much of the lift. Now that polling seven. Three seven max jets are flying again. New claims for unemployment benefits dropped last week though. Bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count scott horsely. Npr news washington and you're listening to npr news. In colorado tribal members are calling on lawmakers to replace a statue of a union soldier who took part in the slaughter of native americans during the civil war with a lightness of an indigenous woman. The soldier statue was top last summer amid a nationwide reckoning over racial injustice in the movement to remove symbols of racial oppression from public spaces. President biden has revoked former president. Donald trump's executive order calling for classical architecture for federal buildings as npr's elizabeth blair reports. Trump's action took aim at modern design president. Trump's executive order called modernist designs ugly and inconsistent. And that the preferred style for new federal buildings should resemble the architecture of ancient greece or rome. The american institute of architects is thrilled. The order has been reversed in a statement. The institute says the biden administration has restored communities with the freedom of design. Choice trump appointed justin shoe one of the champions of classical architecture to head the us commission of fine arts. The commission advises the federal government on design. He tells npr. Seventy two percent of american adults prefer classical and traditional design for federal buildings. According to a survey shoebox says the commission will work with the biden administration to build quote a truly democratic architecture. Elizabeth blair npr news. Washington and wall street was sharply lower by the close. The dow down five hundred fifty nine points. Thirty one thousand four hundred. Two the nasdaq down. Four hundred seventy eight the s&p five hundred ninety six. You're listening to npr news.

Jennifer granholm npr news President biden janine herbst scott horsely jeff radio department of energy on climat president biden fda jeff eighty Npr news npr drugmaker michigan Granholm biden
SMNTY's Female Firsts Playlist, Episode 4: Norma Merrick Sklarek

Stuff Mom Never Told You

39:58 min | 1 year ago

SMNTY's Female Firsts Playlist, Episode 4: Norma Merrick Sklarek

"Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost better than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game. He never passes the rock. He constantly bricks threes, and who completely hack you and then put his hands up and say no foul, no foul with GEICO. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switching, save with Gyco. It's almost better than sports. My. Name is Nicky Santos of dominion a morning show and on the move I want to personally invite you to my new podcast. My name is Ado. Show where I'll talk to artists, community leaders and people like you together. We'll learn more about the triumphs and failures that empower my weekly guest. You could my new show on the free iheartradio. APP or wherever you listen to your podcast. This zanny Anthony Mantha. Theft ever told you production of iheartradio's house effort? Do. You know what today is. What is today I don't wait what, but it's time for another female I. Was Really Anticlimactic Of course, it is a big day. That is the biggest day Vermont. True is true. However, I thought there was something else added. Maybe there's going to be. Well. You know what next time! Champagne, we'll do it, yes. It's. A huge. Yes, we're going to build it up every time, but that means that we are joined once again by our friend and CO worker Eve's. Hello Hi. Doing is good, but I have a request. If there is cake next time, can it be cheesecake because a lot, a huge fan of other kinds of Katie so if we can do if I can be that person and request? Comes No. That's perfect. I'm the same way and so my birthday is this month just? Up, and since I was fourteen years old, because I did not like regular cake, my birthday cakes always been cheesecake so every year. A couple of years couldn't go home. My mom would make me a fancy homemade cheesecake. Oh my birthday, so I like that, yes. Yes, we will do cheesecake. Are you in on the cheesecake game to any? I am, but I actually have a very funny story about cheesecake because I once when I was in middle school I bought an entire cheesecake from Kroger and. Chocolate flavored every slice that little special. Try Me and my friend eight, the entire thing while we were watching the stargate movie with Kurt Russell James Spader, and we got very sick. And so I haven't associated. I just have to get past it like every time I have the I. It's good, but you know there's like. Nervousness and That's not good, but you are the winner you get to make the request. Okay will be a cheesecake. I made. The toppings are playing cheesecake pretty fit cheesecake. I will say ooh. Or a strawberry? I don't really get much more interesting. So the reason I fell in love with cheesecake because I. Watch my mom make it and I helped her make. It is like these mini chocolate chips with the chocolate crust. All time favorite. Don't like anything over that like do some strawberries and all of that, but I don't Wanna be all facie with keep live. My teeth fall. Matiara A- An orphan thing no. Well, you walk up, thank you. Decide I used to be where my parents in college. It'd be like me. Does at the cheesecake factory and I'd be like. Okay. Fancy. Fancy. Book I just. Overwhelms me much. We're on the same page. But today we are not talking about just cheesecake. Fine. We'll return to that topic. Did you bring us as female I of the day as Well today's female. I is Norma Merrick S- Clark, and she has a lot of I to her name like a lot of them, but one of the biggest ones is that she was well. She was one of the first black female licensed architects in the US wasn't the first one. A lot of places list her as the first, but she probably wasn't the first. in the US, but she was the first black woman to be licensed as an architect in New York and in California and she was the first black woman to be a member of the American Institute of Architects, and she was the first black woman to be appointed a fellow of the American Institute of Architects. So. This one is I. Guess a little bit different than previous I just because she died in two thousand twelve, so that wasn't that long ago. I think the people we covered in the past kind of like stuck to. I think it's important to show that like this was a first. That happened not too long ago and this is still field. That is very. The number of black women. People in general let alone black women in the field of licensed architects in the United States is very small in disproportionate. And something that's growing, but like it's still. It's still a small number of black women in the field and. Yeah so we're GonNa talk about normal today. Which is she was? You know a pioneer in the field and her story is pretty interesting. Yeah I. It is pretty telling that It's such a recent I and normally when we do these I I. Get a bunch of bullet points then I'm like okay. Here's the things that they've done. And this one is three page, yes? She did a lot. Yeah Yeah, so I guess let's get started. Let's get into it. Already. Ready. So normal was born on April Fifteenth, Nineteen Twenty eight in Harlem, and her father's name was Walter Merrick he was a doctor, and her mother was Amy Merrick and she was a seamstress, and they were both immigrants there from Trinidad, and she was their only child, and so she was raised during the Great Depression. Moved from Crown Heights in Brooklyn when she was a child or excuse me, her family moves to Crown Heights in Brooklyn when she was a child, and her father got a medical degree from Howard University. so when she was a child, she was already exhibiting. Signs that would lead toward architecture I don't know about y'all, but like architecture's very interesting I could never I could never do. Like but I think it's amazing. and just something that's. Grown like. Become so innovative so quickly but just like it has so many different elements of things. The are there's the math? Yeah, they're the visuals in. You know to so many the physics of it like so many different things that go into it, and so as a child. She exhibited signs of being good and all these different areas, so she had this art things he sketched, she painted, and she drew anti carpentry work. She worked on furniture. Yeah. She was really a cool Gal. She was young and she went to public girls. School called Hunter College High School. She was a high school student to some of those same fields. She said that her grades were pretty good and pretty much everything. I love it, I know. She was really good at art sciences and math, which is still pretty much everything. All of it. Good Yeah in general. But it was her father who suggested to her that maybe you should do architecture, and obviously there are now. There aren't many black people who were in the profession, but that didn't keep her from pursuing it. So. She wanted to go to Howard like her father did, but her father didn't want her to her. Parents wanted her to stay closer to home and so to prepare for Columbia University's architecture program. She took liberal arts courses at Barnard College. And Barnard College was associated with Columbia University, but it was for women Mike was for women as Columbia didn't accept women students, so she went through that those courses, and then she got into the Columbia University School of architecture, so t remarked on how her first year there was super hard, but that didn't keep her from coming back after the summer, she came back in the fall. Like many of her classmates were war. Veterans somehow bachelors or Masters degrees so basically they have people around them, and they already had all experienced able to help them through the process of getting through these. Amazingly I can't even imagine how difficult courses they were those people what kind of work on assignments together, but she had this situation where she was commuting to school, in sometimes had to finish her work on her commutes or at home alone, and so that kind of having. We know like having how having that support system is important when you're going through school. Right, Oh, yeah. She got her bachelor of architecture degree in nineteen fifty, as she was one of two women in her class in the only black win after that she applied to nineteen architectural firms, she said in interviews like I won't forget that number nineteen while but was turned down every one of them. Yeah and she got hers on She got the Twentieth This is a coat that she said she said I don't know. If the rejections were because I was a black person, because I was a young woman, or because of the economic recession at the time, but she said that those places weren't hiring. Women are black people so I think we can kind of go like. What the issue was here Yeah. So she her twentieth, that was when she went to work in the city of new. York's Department of Public, works, as what she says, it's a junior person. And, she didn't like that job because she couldn't really be creative in. It so she wasn't there long. She took the New York State Architects Licensing Exam and she passed it on the first time which everybody doesn't do, even though it was a really tough days long test and she became a licensed architect in nineteen, fifty four, and that was when. I first comes along. She, became New York State's first black woman licensed architect. So she was hired by a private architecture firm at that point after she quit her job with the city. Even though her supervisor gave her a bad rep, friends and relationship with that supervisor with her boss wasn't. There wasn't anything wrong with it, so he but he said that she was lazy. She got to work late a lot that she didn't anything about design and architecture Nazi socialized, so he had a lot of really negative things to say about her, even though she never had any issues. and. She thought it had to do with the fact that. Her boss wasn't a licensed architect and was older, and she was a younger black in licensed architect. so. A. Job. She was a threat yeah! I'm sure like old dude is like pain. I've done nothing. We feel this way similarly, but we don't lash out. Recommendation saying. Felt threatened. So, even though she got out of her old job, because she felt like she was wasting her potential, she was still doing small tasks like designing bathroom layout, so she's still kind of felt away about that. She spent a year at that small firm, and in nineteen fifty five. She joined the office of Skidmore owings and Merrill. She ended up working there until nineteen sixty, so that was a pretty big firm. And at that major firm, she was working on large scale projects and Evening Architecture courses at New York City Community College and so around this time she was a single mother of two children. She had already been married in been divorced, and her mother took care of her children while she worked, so she did have a support. System is not like nobody was there while she was doing all this stuff. And in nineteen fifty, nine. I by to be a member of the American Institute of Architects. loon wow. In, one thousand nine hundred sixty. That's when she moves to California and there. She took a job at Gruen and associates in Los Angeles. And just a side note about Gruen Victor Gruen was is the person who is credited with being a pioneer in American shopping mall. He did a lot of work in that area. I think I talked about him recently. Because, we were talking about food courts. Point me I don't know. Your Lord. Yes, shopping malls are. I feel. I don't know how sad I am about them leaving, but I I do remember the glory days of going into the Disney stores. Oh, yeah, and into. Double layers, and then you see store, Tom. Tom. Trying to outweigh ago. Cookie in between always feeling like you're close to like falling over the edge because they always had those on the top level, the glass and I would always be scared like. Oh, my gosh, there's. Not Perfume every. Funny things years. No one else would say as. You can look down. Smell perfume everywhere. Kin, small, town Walmart with three. Giant Mall. A yeah I went out well. You've been to China. I'm not sure if you have. But they had a million shopping. I don't yeah, they have so many mall. It is ridiculous. And they're huge there. There's a basement and then there's a basement under the basement. Organiz. Organiz. You're probably isn't something. That they would name what the categories of things are on each floor. When you got to that floor. Yeah, I was like. Wow, this is only makes sense. Very organized like anyway. GO-TO malls in China. You'll be there for the next ninety years. So when she was at grew in, she recognized how much scrutiny she was getting from her boss there, she didn't have a car and she got rise with one of her colleagues, who was a white man to get to work? And later she said in an interview it took only one week before the boss came and spoke to me about being late yet. He had not noticed that the young man had been late for two years. My solution was to buy a car since I. The highly visible employees had to be punctual. And I think it's funny how she said highly visible employees. I feel like this is definitely skating around all the black woman. Yeah. I'm they wanted me to see my mistakes? We we get the subtext there. She got her architecture license in California in Nineteen, sixty two, and so she was the first African American woman to have one in California and she remained the. For twenty years wow until the eighties. Geez. We're all about it today. Sorry. Speaking of weird noises, all we should. Be Right back. Okay, so a recent study found that a great hair day makes you happier more confident, but that same study also revealed that ninety five percent of women don't feel great about their hair. I definitely relate to the confidence part, because if my hair is doing something. A. Little Weird something I don't want it to do then I. I can't stop thinking about it. The rest of the day Alma I. We've all been there. Paintings. Rosewater collection feels and smells amazing, and comes with a deep treatment that leaves your hair pedal soft. It was inspired by Ramadan traditions when many in the Middle East break the fast with rosewater, because of its hydrating benefits and the collection is. Is Free of sulfates, parabens, dyes, and Mineral Oil. You look really great, thank you. I actually worked in a place for a while that was very sensitive environmentally, and we weren't allowed to use shampoos that had sulfate them, so that's something that I look for these days and bonus the way the heroics now so experience something new and discover what's good with the Pantene nutrient blends collection. Here's the thing. Saving money with Geico is almost than playing pickup basketball. Because there's always that guy who joins your game, he never passes the rock. He constantly brings threes, and who completely hack you and then put his hands up and say no foul no FAO with GEICO. It's easy to switch and save on car insurance, no need to fake an ankle sprain because you're absolutely exhausted so switching. Save with GYCO. It's almost better than sports. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. So. Yes, she. She becomes the first another I another. Woman architect in California, and stayed that way for very unfortunate long wait until the eighty. Wow, yeah, and she was at that firm for a while to after six years at that I became the director of architecture there and she hired people at oversaw staff. Coordinated the technical aspects of some really big projects, and some of her projects were California Mart Fox Plaza Pacific Design Center, San Bernardino, city, hall, and the US Embassy in Tokyo. And Her son said that she thought designing building the actual easy part of the job while the production of it all the other nuts bolts that went into it was the real work of the job. Easy to downplay when you're. You've worked hard to get to some wearing. Such a major position is easy to downplay. Yeah right I just knew it. Is You know that's the easy part, but yeah, get how? Things like that have so many different moving parts. Yeah, so everybody's job is important, but yes, so she got she got to that point and for a lot of her career, she actually served as a project manager rather than a design architect, which was actually the case with many women architects who worked who worked in corporate farms, so she didn't design most of the big projects that she supervised and Marshall Pernille who was a former president of the I the institute architects told the La Times that she could design large projects, but that it was unheard of to have an African American female. Female, who was registered as an architect? You didn't try that person out in front of your clients and say this is the person designing your project so Marshall Personnel. who was a former president of the AA told the La Times that she could design large projects, but quote it was unheard of to have an African American female who was registered as an architect. You didn't try that person out in front of your clients and say this is the person designing your project. She was not allowed to express herself as a designer, but she was capable of doing anything. That's what Marshall said. Either, way she was a really good project manager, and she stayed with in until nineteen eighty, and she got, she was married several times throughout her life. During the time she was at grew, and she married Ralph Sclerotic an associate at Gwynn. In Nineteen eighty-four dot years after they married. In nineteen eighty, here's another I she became the first black woman appointed to the College of fellows of the Aa, and she was the first woman in the Los Angeles, AIA chapter to be given that honor. ooh! That same year she became vice president at the Los Angeles firm Welton becket associates, so she was the project director on Terminal One at Los Angeles International Airport, which was a fifty million dollar project that she finished before the start of the nineteen eighty-four Olympics, oh. Wow! This is another part of her life which I think, you will really appreciate yes. founded the women owned firm. SEGEL's cleric in diamond with Margot Siegel and Catherine diamond, and that was the largest completely women owned architectural firm in the US at the time. yeah like that. She, was the first. African American woman to co own and architectural practice. Wow, yeah, so many I nine hundred five. Yeah. The firm made a bunch of proposals made proposal on five projects. It got all of those commissions, so they worked on the Tarzana promenade, which was ninety thousand square foot, medical in retail center and a remodeling of the Lonsdale, civic center and they worked on additions to schools and other institutional buildings. One, thousand, nine, hundred five. This was after her previous husband died. She married. Doctor Cornelius Welsh. So another marriage in Hawaii. And she left Seagulls, cleric and diamond in nineteen eighty nine, even though it was a really cool thing to do because, even though they had these fifty million dollar projects, they couldn't get the large-scale projects that she really wanted. And she missed that kind of challenge in the money that came with those projects, which is totally understandable. Yeah, she became the principal of project management at the Jetty Partnership which was a firm that was known for his design of public spaces, and while she was there, she helped design and construct the mall of America. More back. To The mall of America. I've seen the Mary Kate and Ashley Short video where they visited. Okay now I'm just annoyed. But Not Gable. I've seen it multiple times. Katie Okay Yeah. Because, a lot of the days are in my lifetime. Accomplished and I'm just like. Wow, it took that long. Awarded and honored as she should have been. Crazy it is. What we have a little bit more for you, but first one more quick break for four sponsor. Okay, so a recent study found that a great hair day. Make your happier more confident, but that same study also revealed ninety five percent of women. Don't feel great about their hair. I can definitely relate to the confidence part because my hair is doing something. A, little weird. I don't want it to do. Then I can't stop thinking about it. The rest of the day Alma Guy. We've all been there panting. Rosewater collection feels and smells amazing. An comes with a deep treatment that leaves your hair pedal soft. It was inspired by Ramadan traditions when many in the Middle East break the fast with rose water because of its hydrating benefits, and the collection is free of sulfates, parabens, dyes and mineral. Mineral Oil your hand does look really great. Thank you I actually worked in a place for a while. That was very sensitive environmental. We and we weren't allowed to use shampoos that had sulfate them. So that's something that I look for these days and bonus I love the way that my hair looks now so experience something new and discover. What's good with the Pantene Nutrient blends collection? Have you ever seen something you couldn't explain? There are tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of people that report these experiences that believe they're having interactions or abductions with aliens, simply that defies logic. Scientists haven't found any evidence of extra tracks, you intelligence, and yet the mythology is that we have them, and they're coming in. They're here and they've been here and they're here all the time. One night in one, thousand, nine, sixty, one on the side of a dark highway, Betty and Barney Hill Kat lights in the sky. True I don't believe it two years later. They underwent hypnosis to try and recall what happened there. Story became internationally known some took it as fact. Others thought it was a fantasy, but what really happened that September night in world in Hampshire? Join Me Toby Ball. For the inaugural season of stranger rivals a CO production of iheartradio and grim and mild from Aaron Monkey. Stranger rivals debut March, thirty first listen on the iheartradio APP, apple, podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. So. Mall of America Future Destination for Mary Kate and Ashley Sure Big. Project is the point I think. News. or Of course a big set for their little mini. Adventures American. Around and get lost. Again. Stu I. Don't remember much other. Roller Coaster. Day. Mary Kate and Ashley Video I. Just got to hold onto the old days. You use your judgment of what I gotta do. Just saying like it's not like we're that fresh I'm not that fresh up on it because I imagine it would be a thing that you go back to. No never not. Oh, well, maybe you do no judgment notice. She retired from that practice in nineteen ninety-two, but you know she had a long illustrious career, and she also did a ton of other things besides that career, she also taught at the University of California Los Angeles and served as a director of the University of southern California architect skilled, and she was a member of the Commission of the California State Board of Architectural Examiners Wow, yeah. A whole mouthful in the nineteen nineties. She lectured at Howard. University Columbia University and other schools, and she held seminars for people who are taking the architecture licensing exam, so she kind of worked as this mentor to other people. She said that she didn't have any mentors and. Role models growing up, but was happy to be one to others. which I feel like is important. They remember like lift as you will. Problem for anybody WHO's a first. How do you find? When you're the one that's paving the way, yeah! Remember when once you have! Let's teach others to do so. Yeah. I mean big league You definitely have to have a lot of Brazilians to be a person breaking down barriers like that. Especially, that is dominated even now by pretty much mel. People's Mel Peoples Mail people. Are. Always, that's. One of those words I love the word people's because it just automatically makes you smarter. Money's. Bill? When I say no. No Oh. We want you to take care. Giving I'm getting these. Enduring. You right now. More concerned. About the worry about the got to be really hard to come into a field that is still predominantly male based in male-dominated and trying to lead away. Try New seminars. That's phenomenal as a black woman just paving her way through. She felt that quote. Should be working on improving the environment of people in their homes in their places of work and their places of recreation, it should be functional and pleasant, not just in the image of the ego of the architect. I think that's good insight into how she felt about the work that she. Once. He retired. I like this part. She lived with her family in southern California is she had garden parties in the spring time. Really Fancy I don't know if I've ever been to a garden party before, but I would love to. I've been to one and it Wisconsin by Jin, company and beautiful. Jin. They're also much. I feel like doing is doing the thing that you drink at garden parties. Though No, you drink like Is it mint Julep type of thing and that's more. Isn't that Whiskey Inbox? Stops so more on those lines, maybe a little bit of lemonade hanging tease yes! But that would be what I think of as a garden party but if it was Mike Garden parties. Have a lot of done. I think we can make our own rules when it comes to the Garden Party so I think there's a lot of like that croquet game. Yes, again, whichever's to heathers? Oh Two people. WE'RE LETTING SAMANTHA DOWN ON. Friends here? If you if you keep naming things will eventually You guys also have the spongebob reference. True, yeah, I will watch heathers even I. Yes, we have a party. Let's have a garden party. Actually that was a theme party for that at one of the restaurants in Atlanta. DRESSED UP I don't know what it was for, but it was really cute. They're really cute and stuff like that. Yeah, we can, we can make it work. Is there like. The heather is like this is the sporty. Heather is spice girls, but with others. WHO's the leader? Okay, so I can just like scary heather when? Heather would be winona Ryder's character oughta heather. She's off Bianca. Oh, I can't do that. I can't that's. Out because. My. For you. Get me. heather on Ryder's character is the dark haired one in comparison Shannon Doherty isn't as well as well as Christian slater. Oh what a cast! She was still really active in all the architecture thing going into the later years of her life in two thousand and three, she was appointed to the California architects board where she served on the professional qualifications, committee, and the Regulatory Enforcement Committee. Is Really hoping you know she was just the. You want. The, whole community. Yes I am. I'm here for it. And she was on a bunch of other boards and committees to which we don't even go into in two thousand eight. They I gave her the Whitney. M, young junior award, which is an award that recognizes an architect or an organization that embodies the profession's responsibility to address social issues. And she died four years later in twenty, twelve of heart failure at her home in California when she was eighty five years old. But she. was clearly recognized for the work that she did while she was alive, but she has gotten a posthumous ord as well just this year in July twenty nineteen, she became the first black woman to be given the Institute of Architects Los Angeles Gold. Medal and that gold medal is given in recognition of a significant body of with lasting influence on the theory and practice of architecture, and that's the highest honor that the organization awards, so she's as many people are in have been awarded things posthumously as well so it's good to know that a person. He's talking about giving people flowers while they're still alive and for them to be awarded while they're alive, but. Also, important to remember people after they've gone in, they've done especially. Pioneering feels like this kind of opening like she acted as a mentor to opening it up to other people who may think that they don't have a place, and that feels like this and I think about this all the time when it comes to. Being a black woman to pioneer in spaces that a lot of people make think of as Weiss basis, but they are our meals spaces why spaces are spaces for men? and not having a kind of path, or not seeing a path or a way forward for you, because you can't see yourself in that organization, but there are you know they're they're you know they're? They're there and I think having you know being able to look back at a legacy like hers and being able to continuously honor her legacy is important. When it comes to remembering that we can continue forward on the path that she created there can be more black women architects in the feel they can. You can be licensed. You can fail, and you can apply somewhere nineteen times and the twentieth. One will be the one that you get, so that's why I think it's important to look back at a legacy hers. Right I spend well, put us. Yeah I agree I think we talk about on this show a lot power of seeing yourself somewhere and how much that can impact you especially when you're young? Child if you don't see anybody that looks like you, then you kind of think all that must not be for me right so I'm glad that we have people like this. We have our female I. that are s being examples and being mentors Oh. Yeah, and female I I wanted to shout out a couple of other people because I know. I mentioned in the beginning that she was the first licensed black architect in the US, so the first black architect period to become a member of the was Paul Revere Williams in Nineteen twenty-three. And before Norma, there were Beverly Lorraine Green and Georgia. Louis Harris Brown and they were also thought to be licensed as architects in nineteen, forty to nineteen, forty, nine, respectively in both of them were registered in Illinois, and so both of their stories are interesting as well and I felt like. We talked about this a lot in I and how there is. Is a path for a person to get to a I. There were so many other hands involved especially when it comes to inventions, right and stuff like that that a person's I wasn't isolated and also continuing to put into perspective and context why I is important in terms of like well, other people had access, and there weren't barriers for them necessarily but. But. You know it's there were leading up to her becoming having her first, there were other people who came before her in beverly and Georgia. Where two of those people and so their stories are really interesting, as well and Brown recognize the bears face because he was a black woman trying to work in architecture, so she learned Portuguese and move to Brazil in nineteen fifty-three, because you kind of realized, there was a burgeoning growing architecture seeing there, and she later got her architecture license there as well in Brazil and she moved there, knowing about all those advancements that were being made, and she was also kind of seeking racial democracy, because there was this kind of propaganda machine going on right now, saying. Look at us we have this really open. You know racial situation going on in Brazil but without needing to go into the details of the racial yeah, like a maneuvers of map, and still is happening in Brazil right now like Obviously as Propaganda made it seem so. You know the thing, but she also was. Successful when she got to Brazil started working there architecture, but yeah, those are stories as well if anybody wants to go on that path and. Continue. Looking at all these architectural first pioneering women in it. And you got a bonus, female I listeners like many female I within the female for homework. Homework Yeah I've always wanted to assign homework. Your opportunity. It's time. Listeners go out and find more female I for US and send them our way. because. They think that's about what we have to say. About Norma Thank you so much as always use. Yeah, it's enjoy being here so pleasure. Okay me, too. When you come here, we do and we would love for listeners to be able to find new because you do other things than this. You have a lot of other stuff going on. Yeah, I feel like I never know where I could tell them to. To find me, but I will say that I also host unpopular, which is a show about people in history who stood up to the status quo ended. Things were often persecuted for it. You can find unpopular and all the social media things like the facebook, the twitter and instagram and instagram's to grab, and you can listen to this show on all of the also. Things where you listen to podcasts wherever you're listening to this right now. You can also hear me on this day. In history class, which is also on all the social media, things and also on the podcast also on the. Thing that you used to listen, pick up the phone and. I don't do a good mid mid central midwestern. Whatever that old accident is. Transatlantic. Yeah, that thing. Get London on the phone. I don't want to hear any critiques because. The only thing they say over over at the London. General. that. We're not here to criticize him. Validates you at. Just to call London I WANNA call one. I've been waiting my whole life. To debut that. Everyone. That works. You can also email us at the media. MOM stuff at IHEARTMEDIA DOT com. You can find us on twitter at MOM's to podcasts or on Instagram at stop I'm never told you thanks as always to our super producer, Andrew Howard, Andrew and thanks to you for listening supplement ever told you production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP, apple, podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. So, here's something that some of you might find shocking. Ninety five percent of women don't feel good about their hair, but pantene is. That pans rose water collection combat's bad hair days with an innovative formula that uses rosewater derived from the pedals and buds of the Rosa Galca plant with paintings rosewater collection. I can really feel how much more hydrated my hair is, and it's sulfate Paraben, die and Mineral Oil free which makes me feel good because your needs. All those additives experience, something new and discover what's good with the Pantene, nutrient blends collection the btk. btk Killer Dennis Rader was dogcatcher married with children weighing. He doubled as a clown at children's birthday. Parties Ted Bundy was a law student. They all blend in I'm Nancy grace host of podcast crime stories with Nancy Grace and our new original concept killers amongst us where we break down the most evil crimes and focus on unsolved homicides year crime stories with Nancy Grace on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get your podcasts.

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How to make Minnesota's buildings more climate-friendly

Climate Cast

04:02 min | 2 years ago

How to make Minnesota's buildings more climate-friendly

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America as one of the largest global financial institutions Bank of America is in a unique position to help society. Transition to a low-carbon economy Bank of America NA member FDIC good morning chances are climate change wasn't on a top consideration. When your office was designed and Bill, but architecture that's informed by climate is expanding the sustainable, building twenty thirty energy standard is designed to dramatically reduce the carbon footprint of big buildings in Minnesota Richard graves is the director of the university of Minnesota's center for sustainable, building research pro the most important thing for climate-friendly buildings are that they're designed for energy efficiency. You know, we have the technology now to design buildings that are sixty or seventy percent more efficient than they were in two thousand two that seems like a lot of progress in just a dozen years or so, yeah, it's significant progress. I mean if. You had interviewed me back then in two thousand two and did I think we would be at the point where we are right now. I wouldn't have thought that. So you know, we've made significant progress let's face it. The overwhelming majority of our current home and building inventory was not designed and built with net zero carbon and water in mind. How far do we have to go there? Or maybe another way to think about that is how big of an opportunity is there ahead. Well, you know, if you think about a two thirds of the buildings we have now we'll still be here in twenty fifty. So, you know, we're not going to build new buildings and build our way to solve climate change. And we have to get at existing buildings in some way because for two reasons one the more efficient, we make them we saved carbon there. But also, we have all the embodied carbon in those existing buildings that if we can maintain them and renovate them, you save the energy that it would take to build new buildings. So that's probably our most important opportunity to be seen. Using on the next ten to twenty years. What are the costs and the job opportunities for these kind of projects? Whatever the initial capital costs often pay for themselves within four to seven years in the return on energy savings. And you know, the job opportunities are tremendous with people creating construction jobs for these renovation projects creating design jobs here in Minnesota. So if you factor those in it's probably one of the most cost effective climate change strategies that the state could undertake I like to think about where we've been and how far we've come from many different angles on climate change, and it comes back to technology and a lot of ways. I mean, we're doing things so much differently than we were twenty or thirty years ago and a hundred years ago is like another era. What's the future, the sort of futuristic view? How far could we push this technology in the places we work in live to become a truly almost heaven negligible impact on greenhouse? Gases. That's a great point. I, you know, I think a lot of the technologies we need are here. And it's more of a design problem putting them together. But I think emerging areas for new technology are things like more efficient solar technology that's better integrated with the building design also thinking about battery storage and things like that. So that we don't just generate energy, but we can store it when you know, we have a surplus to use it at different times and also to help us with climate resilience as we're going through weather changes and storm disruptions to energy systems in water systems. If we can have these more integrated systems that not only generating capture things, but also store it. So that we can have resilience that's an emerging areas. Well, it's a fascinating thing to think about it. I'm sure the fascinating for you as an area to work in Richard graves, director of the center of sustainable building research at the university of Minnesota's college of design. Thanks so much for your insight today. Thank you. That's climate cast. I'm NPR chief meteorologist, Paul hunter.

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Episode 69: Keeping The Promise Of Wilderness With The Wilderness Land Trust

Rewilding Earth

30:25 min | Last month

Episode 69: Keeping The Promise Of Wilderness With The Wilderness Land Trust

"Music you're listening to the wilding earth podcast immune The rewarding earth podcast Supported by businesses such as patagonia tula and bio habitats as. Well as the weeden foundation and listeners like you if you love the work that the rewarding institute is doing please consider donating at rewinding dot org and be sure to sign up for our weekly newsletter. While you're there it may come as news. To some people that many wilderness areas have private roads and properties cutting into them these are called in holdings and they make wilderness areas less wild. There's a group that thankfully works solely on these issues. And that's why i'm talking to. Amy rutledge vice president and senior land specialist for the wilderness. Land trust once wildernesses designated. They remain many threats to the borders and interior of designated wilderness. That's where the wilderness land trust comes in. They're gonna sanchez. Test has been around for almost thirty years and we have always worked to acquire private lands. That are either inside next to or directly benefit wilderness and that can include designated wilderness. You know the wilderness act of nineteen sixty. Four allows congress to designate wilderness areas that are the highest level of protection in the us for ecology and that basically means that there can't be any motorized access to those areas. That man can be a visitor at shall not remain. I love that language from the act So recreation is allowed but not motorized recreation and hunting is allowed but not motorized access for hunting. So there's lots of different uses evil are actively enjoying in wilderness including obviously thinks like backpacking but also came and just seen it all it is and wildlife viewing we worked throughout the nation to try and make sure that these wilderness areas stay ecologically secure and safe from non-consistent private uses and we try to complete some of them some of these wilderness areas are riddled with private lands. Because long ago you know we thought mining and other agricultural activities homestead Was most important thing to do on. Wild lands in since then We've reevaluated some of that but those private lands that were granted out needs. He needs for purposes. Such as those are still private and so they have the right as they should as private property owners to be able to access their properties and when we started about thirty years ago there were about four hundred thousand acres of private land inside federally designated wilderness in the us not just through our work but also through our work in the work of our partners other conservation groups at that amount is now down to about one hundred and eighty thousand acres. That's still over three thousand. Private landowners are making individual private management decisions about wilderness. So we try to work with people in do deals that worked for them from a business standpoint. We tried to move quickly which the federal government really can't do very well. They have a long process for acquisition of land. We are private nonprofit and bring her on sunday from individuals donors lenders foundations and others that want to help protect wilderness and we put that those resources to bear to be able to do fair market value deals with willing landowners and help them protect their land. We will then purchase it and hold it and clean up either. The title or the physical properties ltd becomes wilderness quality legally with all the mineral water rights attach or physically if there are problems on the property like mining pits or impacts or a cabin or other things we physically can clean up sites and get them ready for the federal government to acquire them in adam to the wilderness. Really gratifying word to do. The i deal with the landowner that really wants to preserve their land and get a fair deal which is absolutely what should happen. And then you know we turn around and get it ready and then permanently protected by doing the second deal to transfer to the us. So it's really gratifying. Were i would imagine so. I think it's really awesome that we've gotten that number down. I had no idea that was four hundred thousand. You said four hundred thousand acres of and that's just in the continental. Us if you add it. Alaska be lot but it does still seem like a number on the number and what impresses me more as just the number of private landowners that are still you know making individual private decisions about what happens inside wilderness. And that's you know that's a hard. It's a hard balance for both the private landowners sometimes the agencies that are managing areas. And so it's nice to be able to come to a really good join happy solution in these cases as you know everybody's talking about thirty by thirty now and what we're going to be doing over this next decade group every land trust. Everybody has a different role to play. Of course this and a lot of our roles are changing at all. It's just need to say that we're all in the same you know we don't often get to be in the same boat you know in terms of wilderness and protection a lot of people are left wondering and ask all the time what constitutes protection and of course our answer and i'm sure answer as well as well the we start with the absolute best protection in the country and that's wilderness. We consider that. I and national parks and and it goes from there. What are your feelings about that program. And and i know that you've probably put wilderness at the heart of this is what we need as much as possible in that thirty percent absolutely set for the last almost thirty years. You know we've protected fifty almost fifty three thousand acres of land that is now wilderness. That was private. That's added four hundred ninety three parcels wilderness. And we've also completed seventeen wilderness areas and held several others become a designated. And so that's really practical on the ground work So we're very familiar with the quality of wilderness. How hard it is to get a piece of land into the shave that you know will be a part of the wilderness system were man shelby visitor. Shot remain since our name is the wilderness. Land trust we really only work. Our mission is very very focused on the highest level of protection and making sure that we are doing deals that directly benefit wilderness values. So we will do very small deal. We joke that we did quote a credit card deal on a on a on a very small. Five acre piece of land in arizona was important trail access point and we've also done injury. Large deals multiple thousands of acres for example in new mexico. We added over four thousand acres by donation actually with the foundation that opened the savviness that wilderness up to public access whereas before it had been landlocked. So you know we do all sizes and shapes of deals but the key factor is that they have to need that highest level of protection so we do indeed as an organization at from our mission. Feel that that is some of the most meaningful conservation works be done but i will also say that. Sometimes we do deals as we do in the organ mountains desert peaks area. Both of her deals have interacted with the oregon mouse wilderness so far but we also work in national conservation areas and national monument areas. Because sometimes those can be incredibly important linkages and can include potentially future proposal serious. We also sometimes work in inventory lists areas. Which is a designation that the forest will use the us for service to you know designate the ecological qualities of area in the fact that motorized accesses. You know not appropriate there so it it's short in the wilderness designation. But you know all those types of designations can really be helpful to draw together landscape level protection and wilderness areas can be a really important part of that another example that we're working on right now where the linked together is the klamath siskiyou wild area. In southern oregon. Northern california is in the millions of acres overall it has about six wilderness areas that are part it and we have done several deals on all throughout that wild area. That goes all the way through from the pacific to the sierra in california and from again the klamath river and a county office area up in oregon down all the way to Below mount shasta in california and even further south it's it's very gratifying. Work down to the river watershed. So we're we're working all throughout their north south east to west and different wilderness areas. And you know. Our work is important for both the individual wilderness area. Were working in which could be. You know anything over five thousand acres up to but it links together all this landscape do you get to go do site visits and things i mean. I'm i'm imagining people. Listening to this going. Wow she must have an awesome awesome job. Wouldn't like do you get to do ground. Truth thing or be part of on the ground stuff. I did the a lot of office work and also a lot of field work. And i enjoy them both. I love her relationship building and working with our partners and there's nothing better than on the ground To build partnerships and also an appreciation of the land and the resources just last wednesday hiked. The snow flirt With a representative in las cruces from In the occupied canyon from senator heinrich sauces. Us senator Mount desert peaks on some other folks locally in. That kind of experience really reminds you while you're doing the work and and obviously is very important. It was one of our final inspections to look at some features of the property. And make sure we're moving forward in a way that makes it easy to have it be wilderness quality transferring it to you're listening to the rebounding earth podcast. Did you know we also publish insightful. Inspirational content from leading scholars poets artists and organizers from around the world you can visit rewarding dot org and sign up for our weekly digest to receive. Brilliant fresh insights. On everything re wilding. You'll find over a of articles and news from the front lines of wildlands protection in all kinds of restoration efforts. Check us out at rewinding dot org and don't forget to share it with friends. I remember dave foreman very early teaching me the importance of knowing what you're trying to protect and knowing and of course you guys that just comes with your mission. You have to know literally what's on the ground for the purpose of exactly what you do but Others who were just conservationists that are not you know land trust and working out boundaries and all of that Government stuff that has to be done to to return something to the government and have them considering designated wilderness. He just made it very important. You have to be out here. You have to even got mad at me. One time when i felt guilty about not being back in the office because i was very busy with proposal writing and things. He says you're at work now. We were going down a river a nine day rivers. it's free rein hardy right right. There's there's like this connection with the land that when you're building partnerships or when you're just building your own inspiration or ideas and creativity for the work You need to be outside in those environments to understand and You know we do both things because our board has to evaluate each property carefully. We have inventories in each state that we work in to give the start. For where all the private lanson designate wilderness hourly male periodically of those folks but the other ways we find deals and we're really careful lands committee level to review them to make sure they are directly benefiting as we interact with local groups like the french organ mountains desert peaks wilderness alliance in California or i mean. I could name many of nevada wilderness The list goes on all over the country. They they also help be our eyes and ears S escola forest service national park service staff They're out there. District rangers managing those those lands every day. And we get advice from them about deals. That are really important to do. And landowner management issues and just relationship building as well as making sure we picked up the trash items. Like large helicoptering out a large cabin or that list could. Also you're dealing with an access issue now in the organ mountains desert peaks area. You wanna talk a little bit about that. Yeah so we are excited. There is a lot of Leon that's right along the edge as the organ mountains wilderness near las cruces that has been zoned residential by the local jurisdiction and instead of seen five acre watts developed in these areas. Some of which Go into the wilderness and some of which are right next to the wilderness. You know we've been targeting needs to be able to add. Protection for wildlife prevent any future residential development and also kicked spots that blm has prioritised for future public access points. There's only a couple of access points to the organ mountains wilderness. right now. they're really popular and they're getting overrun. Frankly in it which is great that people care about it and are engaged in the wilderness so much but they want in the future to be able to spread out that access. And so we're we're getting a triple win right preventing residential development approaching further. Protecting you know hundreds of acres wildlife habitat locations in also Securing public access points for a popular trail areas and from highway. Seventy on the north end of the wilderness. A place where there's not access now so we're very excited to be sort of getting that triple benefit out of these students. Yeah it's checking off a lot more boxes than your average situation. Probably does to the satisfaction thing from earlier. One of the is explicitly with the agencies to make sure we're doing high priority acquisitions that makes sense for the public Because i mean we wanna make sure we're has the highest possible broadest possible impacts and this has to do with the aachen Canyon trail access specifically the current project. That i'm were raising funds for working with supporters on right now is hundred nine acres. That is zoned for residential development but is currently vacant and for sale and is used by many members of the public currently to be able to access the five point five mile aachen back canyon trail. It's gorgeous trail. I was just out there the other day. we hiked. Deb a key. Can you could see from a high spot in the canyon. All the way out to the rest of the monument which is hundreds of thousands of acres and belie- coming in in the snowstorm approaching and then all of a sudden snowflakes starting to fall on us which convinced us that we should have back was pretty unique experience in the desert the plants there are fed by seasonal streams. Coming down the canyon. And it's it's just an important areas for not only wildlife scenery on and enjoyment of the area and we saw several people hiking the trail when we were out there and this this property has flattery that will allow people to be able to continue to access the trail from the trail header and it could be incorporated into the management plan in the future. And then you know formerly developing them as as access the access issue and and the traffic being very high in any place. That's not even moderately interesting. Let alone the places like this that you're talking about that are really well known and very well traveled and and people really really interested in them. We can love our places to death sometimes or or or put at least tax them very very greatly but It brings up that. There's a back to the thirty thirty thing before the thirty thirty thing. There were There have been calls for more national parks that there are a lot of places that and wilderness. There are a lot more places left that are not really designated. That are defacto or you know. Really great candidates for wilderness recovery areas for like buffers and connections between core areas. And maybe you can talk a little bit about that. I mean that see how much these places are loved and you also see that you know if there were other places that were designated that were protected. It might take some pressure off some of the areas that you have interest in that you're working in and spread people out a little bit more and that's a countrywide thing but here in the midwest there's no access except for people who live close to the smokies to significant national parks Which contain wilderness area sometimes sometimes are bordered surrounded by in others. We just don't have that kind of access so the smokies are beat. I mean they're they're and they're managed. You know as well as can be expected for twelve million visitors a year. But could you talk a little bit about that. The the the interest. It's there because a lot of people just immediately talk about oil and gas and access and private landowners and everything but it makes people maybe think we'll what are all these areas for like. What do people even use them. Can you tell them what it's like out there when you're watching people love place so much and you want them to but it would be really great if there was some more places out there and there are great candidates for more places right. Yeah absolutely and you know as i said. That's one of our main goals on the aachen by shannon project and the other property to the north that we acquired is to spread out access appropriately in the wilderness area. But i i have a couple of other related examples. It's interesting you talked about the smokies. Because i was back east for about three months in the fall i did some hiking. Not in smoking. I wish i had been able to do that. We drove through their back In the on the appalachian trail which is another. You know what i mean. Well well loved a place that goes through a lot of different kinds of parks and historic sites. And i have to admit that i stopped at a pub one day so it wasn't full wilderness experience. But that was still pretty nice beautiful so that was interesting next but i to talk about on a project that we're doing in northern california that really speaks to this we There is the last largest remaining in holding in a wilderness called the castle crags wilderness. That includes a leg and you can drive right up to the slave on a on a paved road year round so it's plowed in the winter. Even though it does get snow there and there is a well well. Loved trail goes to a lake called lake. The goes through this property and through the wilderness to get to the brought to the way and it's braided and when you get above the tree line into the alpine area it's highly impacted because people haven't found the trail it's never because i'm privately unfor- the section. It's never been signed as a national forest trail and people have just found their way. We saw this as being a problem and we did a community hike. Data help raise support and awareness of this acquisition project. It's a six hundred thirty seven property. Total that we're gonna hopefully we've acquired now out of public action a year and a half ago. We're working hard to transfer to the forest service but before we transfer it. We created a partnership in and brainstormed. Actually nudity hype day with the mount shasta trail says in the siskiyou land day then were tarred over the year that we they knew we were gonna be in ownership of the property To get access to a trail crew and so at the end of the season they called us in november wreck for thanksgiving. We have trail crew. They can come out the next two weeks we've gotten a plan approved with forrester his staff to restore this trail. Put it on wine route and we want to get him out there and get all the work done so we hustle and we worked hard together to get a license agreement done on to authorize them to head out there and within a week Right after thanksgiving made popped out there and they worked on that trail on now. That trail is a steady secure single trail route and they will be doing more work in the spring before we transfer it in. The forest is planning to ban sign it and designated as part of the national trails system when they acquire it. So that is very gratifying. Because that alkaline environment there is extremely sensitive literally was being leads to death and now will be able to recover. That's the kind of project that we feel. You know it's really meaningful in and it was very efficiently done with to nonprofits With the close coordination approval for his service. And that makes it a lot mercian for everybody the tax payers and everybody to get that work. How does the wilderness land trust. Is it magic that you raise the money for these places. Or where does the money come from. I have figured some way to conjure it out of thin air because it sounds very expensive to to. I mean if i'm if i'm a landowner and i haven't been holding i'm probably gonna want fair market value and that is just the most you know what what does that even mean because every one of these things is so individual and unique i would imagine. How do you guys get support. And how can people listening Support you it is very hard word to reach out to people and thanks for your help in letting us do that today about the work that we do in the resources we need in the partnerships. We need to be able to make it happen. We are bored and staff or tirelessly to make connections like we're doing today on to let people know about resources that we need just to give an example. I mean some properties can cost in the millions of dollars other other properties. Are you know a few thousand dollars in. it's all everywhere in between we do appraisals on every property. We buy so that we are very careful. Federal appraisal rules and we know the sales comparisons in the area are supporting the market value. We taught closely with landowners about that. Because obviously sometimes people's listening prices even on their own home might be higher than sales comparisons around right at the beginning so sometimes it takes close partnership in coordination with landowners and honestly we were some landowners for over twenty years before we finally reached a deal that we stay congenial. we don't do advocacy only focused on real estate work. Because we wanna be able to have these very good partnerships with all these different folks including all private landowners. We work with an we raise money on our website. of course sometimes foundations. We'll give us loans but we also have individuals in lenders oath donate and loan money to our wilderness opportunity and this provides support for land acquisition. So there were ready to move when property owners ready to sell. We don't have to wait for money. We have it and We also need money for transaction expenses like. I said we need to do to deals. Every time you buy it from the landowner we hold it and get ready and clean it up. And then they sell it to the forest matt takes money for example it took thirty thousand dollars a year actually more than that to hold timber insurance on the property along castle league and the reason for that the appraisal dependent on the timber value that was the highest and best use. Oh fit bernard we would be in a lot of trouble and you know it. Sometimes we have foundations. That gives us large grants and allow us very generously to donate land of the federal government. Add immediately wilderness. A section of the wilderness act allows us to do that lamb touch but that's rare that an organization would be willing and able to put money into something. Allow us to sink. The money in so to speak lasts at times for rotating the money in and out of projects. You know we buy property. We'd resell it. We rotate the money back into the wilderness opportunity fund so if people donate to our to our cause they're money is getting used over and over again to protect lands and we have some private lenders and That have supported up to five acquisitions over a several year period With the same money. So it's really a satisfying result. Space thing to work with our partners in. Yeah you know everything. Everything costs money as you say. But we think this is a higher level of return for the investment. That was very cool. The idea that My donation can actually be cycled through and through. Because i can tell you that most organizations that you donate to it goes and then they you know. Hey we need some more because it's another year either way to kind of balance people's money goes into actual land acquisition in awe and then helps us with our transaction has to a really tangible thing. Besides removing a cabinet or a trash is a title issue like outstanding third party rights that could be exercised in the future while we wanna get ownership of those and so sometimes we need to. Do you know like a court action that takes time research funds to pay an attorney and then pay the court recording fees to be able to regain those mineral rights or negotiate with the private company and get them back either donated or buying them. So you know. It's all these kinds of things that create a knee. Are there opportunities for people to come and help with ground through thing or restoration efforts or anything on the property that you're working with. Yeah we're actually. We have at community hike day after the mount shasta area on the little castle lake before code that was august two thousand and nineteen and were planning on doing something at combat canyon. Las cruces while mccann. We have had volunteered trails. Days or property cleanup days where we've partnered with organizations so if there are organizations that are interested in doing that with us. It'd be great to know we also had go fund me site up on the Aschenbach canyon properties so but going to our website is by far the best way to find out how to support us and that's just wilderness. Land trust dot org. What are you hopeful for. What are you excited about coming up. We're hoping that there will be even more properties for us to be able to purchase to stitch wilderness together and we hope that people will get in touch with us about proposed wilderness areas that perhaps could benefit from our work so that the boundaries make more sense and the college of those areas can be when they are designated as proposed areas so hundred and eighty thousand. Eggers is still hanging out there. We're working on that. So that's that's whatever long-term goals that are other long-term balls as more of those acres get added because more wilderness gets added as part of thirty thirty or these other areas national conservationists national monuments that directly benefit land values that we get in there and help make those the best destinations we can buy advanced work with private property owners And linking all these landscapes together so our goal is to be the go-to organization if people around the country has property issues related to proposed wilderness areas or areas that could be proposed in the future or designated wilderness. Give us a call. We wanna help and goto wilderness trust wilderness land. Trust dot org. And amy thank you so much for taking the time. Thank you and your organization for all the wonderful wonderful work that you do. It's so vital. Thank you so much. We really appreciate rewarding all you do. Thanks for listening to the wilding earth. Podcast we do what we do because of you. This podcast is supported by listeners. Like you who long to live a wilder world. Please consider donating at rewinding dot. Org and subscribe to our weekly news article digest. While you're there to go the extra mile you can follow and share rewarding on instagram facebook and twitter. Bonus points for sharing this podcast with your friends to listen to past episodes go to rewarding dot org slash pod that's rewinding dot org slash p o d.

weeden foundation Amy rutledge oregon federal government us Below mount shasta river watershed north south east senator heinrich sauces las cruces dave foreman french organ mountains desert escola forest service national
'In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson': Ep. 8

20/20

43:40 min | 3 weeks ago

'In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson': Ep. 8

"Wednesday june fifth. The phone jarred me awake from a deep sleep. It was landon saying briefly. Tersely you come in here. I resent what did not see how it could be morning and sure enough. I saw with amazement. That the hands of glock said four twenty. Nothing good can come from a phone. Call at four. Am ladybird goes over to linden's bedroom. Her anxiety rising. It was cracked up again. Those in his room looking is oh he had never been to sleep and all the tv sets were on. And i realized that something was happening gentleman. We've kept the on. We've heard an alarming report. That robert kennedy was shot in that ballroom at the ambassador hotel in los angeles. A very loud noise like a clap of thunder was hurt. That heard it. I can stand up to kennedy. Had been shot. You bring you more jews as we learned it. So far all the information we have from best-case studios and abc audio. This is in plain sight. I'm julius wag crystal clear episode eight. Claudia all my life. C. a linden ladybird have both had a fraught relationship with bobby kennedy. It dates back to nineteen sixty when i was openly opposed to his brother jack pudding. Lbj on the ticket. They've been through extraordinary times together. Great things and terrible things. Jack's victory in the election his assassination in dallas the passing of major civil rights laws. The murder of martin luther king just two months ago. they've been uneasy allies but mostly adversaries. None of it matters anymore. Beholding had taken place under the eye of the television camera and we saw over and over film of the shooting itself and her light correct gunned open shots event. It has senator kennedy call. My senator kennedy has been shot thirty. Hold onto the guy. We don't want another long running away from him. I saw him lying on the floor on a pool of blood andres head bam a unreality about the whole thing a nightmare quality. It couldn't be your drained it. It had happened before it had happened before jfk. Then dr king. Now this three assassinations in just a few years. And every few moments that would come on screen smiling phase of senator kennedy tasting the wine of victory making little jokes with f. l. by his side and then we go through the whole thing over again. He age of television has its downside. Then asked me to get some coffee. I went into the kitchen or not nine. That coffee of covid lot wise and searched until i fan instant sanca and put the kettle. Don at t and cream and sugar and the president. I took a tray back. Facials television kept repeating the hideous story. Joe not clear on what happened going in for brain surgery. Steve determined that the bullet had lodged somewhere behind the ear reports. That operations of this sort can take up to four hours so this may still be a long vigil. We repeat at the hangs on for almost twenty six hours. Mounts into montage thai everybody was stricken face the air of unreality. This can't be happening. And then the need is deep wracking. Sob my country. My country moving martin luther king just two months ago day and president kennedy. The worst fears of the american public been confirmed with the passing of senator robert kennedy. That came at one. Forty four this morning pacific daylight time. Senator robert kennedy was brother. President john f. kennedy was murdered about five years ago died early today at what must have been the zina's of his brilliant political career. That's from a massive brain injury inflicted by an assassin's bullet in the days that follow. It's like time has stopped in the white house. Phone calls meetings waiting. There's a portrait of president. Woodrow wilson that used to hang in the grand staircase at the white house. It was painted after he had a stroke in one thousand nine hundred nineteen one that left him incapacitated in the back of her mind ladybird has always worried that some similar fate might await. Lbj know what. I always say in wilson's country. Its message to me is a president should have his portrait painted reasonably early in the office. Time's running out for lbj. He'd had his portrait painted in nineteen sixty five but neither of them like the result although it does hang in the national portrait gallery today. Lbj is scheduled to sit for a new portrait. The day before bobby's funeral the timing is definitely not great but they decide to keep the appointment. Maybe sitting still for an hour is exactly what they need. The artist is madam. Elizabeth shumita off a russian emigre. She was in warm springs georgia with franklin roosevelt. Doing an initial sketch for his when he died from a cerebral hemorrhage in april nineteen forty-five now with the specter of death hanging over the white house the president the first lady and madame schumer tov gathering the lincoln sitting room linden allowed from letters from his son-in-law chalk in vietnam white house photographer yuichi okamoto shoots a few candidates in a few of the images. You see lady bird sitting by the window watching. She's not the artist or the subject. She's the one orchestrating this moment. Fixing it in history. Saturday june eight was a day for me completely. Detached from the normal capsule of time suspended in unreality burial of santa. bobby kennedy. We barely and read the papers which were drenched with every aspect of the story. The johnsons fly up to new york for the funeral. Service is held in saint patrick's cathedral in midtown manhattan york was a strange side streets lined with people who stood sound motions for three days. Television had been invoking the phrase like a greek tragedy and indeed. There was much of a greek. Play out this. These craft the voiceless course new york. Abc news commentator frank reynolds. Good morning one hour now. A solemn requiem mass will be said for senator robert francis kennedy forty two years old like his brother. The victim of an assassin's bullet all during the night until shortly before five o'clock this morning the people of new york and for that matter people from all over the country some from all over the world. I'll ask the task senator. Robert kennedy police estimated that forty thousand persons at slowly walk past the casket on the presidential limousine. The secret service car behind on the fenders first lady in black white trim with color president and a grade. I don't know glorious but a small chairman proud. Gosh lady thought. An kirk escorted in saint patrick's that magnificent setting include any sarah and enjoy pierre salinger. Jfk's former press secretary escorts johnson's to their seats. He looked absolutely stricken as we approach the dark shiny coffin with a flag talk candles and he paused briefly and so today and then turned and took the seats that was shown to us a front row. The enormous neo gothic cathedral is packed with four thousand mourners artists. Intellectuals journalists lieber leaders like cesar chavez and dolores huerta civil rights leader john lewis cabinet secretaries and dozens of members of congress candidates running for president from both parties. Knock george wallace. I had noticed. Just as we moved into ac- the congregation silently and without signal had risen. It was mrs jacqueline kennedy and black and failed with a two children entering. Jackie had almost fainted. When she entered the cathedral she passed in front of us sat in a front row seat on the right hand side with all the numerous kennedy family. Somehow it seemed ethylene. Her children slipped in more quietly. The celebrated conductor leonard bernstein. A friend of bobby ethel's mahler's adagietto was a ceremony of staggering drama and beauty. I can see only the back of the director which was in itself a study expression of the utmost passion comment and data and that little piece in this whole most say always you were away on. The flag draped coffin in the middle of the with. It's an incredible burn. This has been the only thing the most unbelievable event in the nation's life as i have shared it heightened made all the more so by president. Kennedy's assassination nearly five years ago. Behalf of mrs kennedy or children obvious last surviving brother. Senator ted kennedy gives the eulogy want to express what we feel to those worn with us today in this cathedral around the world strong and composed his eyes by red graham completely through his voice began to quaver came under controls and it comedy the acid. His brother be remembered. Simply as good and decent man Wrong and tried to write it so suffering and tragedy so awhile and tried to stop many parts of this nation those he touched and sought to touch him. Some men see things as they are in safe. Why i dream things that never were and say why not. As the johnsons make their way out of the cathedral. They stopped to greet teddy and her children. And bobby's mother rose. And then i found myself in front of other is jacqueline kennedy called her name and put out my hand a hard to know how to describe next few moments of time. She looked at me as though from a great distance as though our an apparition jackie and lady bird lived through so much together so much tragedy. Maybe finally too much for jackie to summon that generosity. She'd shown to ladybird almost five years ago after dallas failed extreme. Hostility was it because i was alive. Linden lady are back at the white house by one pm. They wait for the train carrying came from new york. The train travel slowly. There are crowds lining the tracks for almost the whole way from salute from their hands over their hearts. It takes hours to arrive at union station in washington and actual campaign train. Senator kennedy would be on the platform of last car. Today feels endless. Sambre visitors at the white house nonstop television coverage they that's where his calf get rest on a one foot high platform covered in velvet family and closest friend joining three cards. It's almost ten o'clock at night. When the funeral procession finally begins the journey to arlington national cemetery. The president's limousine follows fourteen cars behind the hearse on the way. The cortege stops at the lincoln memorial overlooking the national mall since late. May the mall has been the site of a kind of large scale protests called resurrection city a fifteen acre encampment over five hundred makeshift dwellings. Health clinics and community buildings. It's home to thousands of people from all around the country. The reverend jesse. Jackson is the quote city manager. Resurrection city had been built in the weeks. Following martin luther king's death the legacy of his poor people's campaign. The national park service had even given the encampment. Its own zip code to double o one three celebrities. Like sidney poitier marlon brando and barbra streisand a visit to lend their support. It's a highly visible rebuke to lbj's great society and the idea. That lady birds beloved beautification campaign offer any kind of meaningful improvement to people's lives as the procession passes. The crowd is singing battle. Hymn of the republic. Written by abolitionist. Julia ward how in eighteen sixty one at the start of the civil war. The secret service tells lady bird. She should not lower her window to listen. Lining the route to arlington. There are crowds at times. Six people deep holding candles in silent vigil. Many who have waited all day for. Bobby's funeral procession to pass a great white moon riding high in the sky. A beautiful night. This is the only night funeral. I ever remember an incredible unbelievable cruel and wrenching time. Eleven days later. A hundred thousand people gather at resurrection city for a rally. It's june nineteenth also known as juneteenth. The days celebrating the emancipation from slavery actor. Ozzie davis master of ceremonies. Bill cosby performs mahalia jackson. And pete seeger saying an earth. A kit addresses the crowd in both english and spanish. Kereta scott king is there. This place holds special meaning for her stand here today with many mixed emotion. Five years ago nine my late husband. Dr martin luther king junior still at this very spot and tall the nation about his dream hushed crowd listens as mrs king reads a message and i should like to read to you a telegram which are seen from another jazz race victimized by the same tragedy which my family and i won't victimized by today on this most important dame all american maya heart and fran With you the finest memorial. Dr martin luther king what be the tangible action our country tanks now to implement the program he and my husband about so deeply dine business. Apple candidates maybe. The death of our s k. Has sapped the will of washington and the country or the hope that peaceful protest can bring real change that the mainstream media had turned on resurrection city. Depicting it as a disaster. It had rained for thirty days. Straight people in the encampment are sick. And they've messed up the grass on the national mall. It takes all of ninety minutes for hundreds of policemen just riot. Helmets and jackets and armed with shotguns and tear-gas dismantle the place. It's the day after. Resurrection city is destroyed on their way to the airport lady. Bird and her policy age. Sharon francis drive past the remains of the encampment. We pass the resurrection city site. And she said she wished could know what they were thinking and how they felt news wanted to have an embassy with them and couldn't know them well enough realized she couldn't lady bird is on her way to portland oregon to give a speech to the annual conference of the american institute of architects. It's a profession. That's doing some soul-searching at the moment are architects. Who profited from massive urban renewal contracts. The hulking towers of inner city housing projects somehow complicit in the problems tearing american cities apart wednesday. June twenty six. I had breakfast and read my speech in the comfortable. Little room with the sheraton motor inn and andro. The civic santa by the american institute of architects was having its annual convention with less than six months ago in the johnson presidency. Lady bird is ready to stop pulling any punches. She's introduced by secretary of agriculture orville freeman. Thank you mister secretary. As you may know my concern has been expressed in an effort called beautification. I think you also know what lies beneath that rather inadequate word if ever. There's a time to move beyond flowers. The summer of nineteen sixty eight is it and go straight to the terrible legacy of urban renewal the destructive a of unfettered freeway construction i earnestly hope that acid. The station is remembered for more than its mammoth three ways and vast urban superblocks for more than isolated impersonal gigantic public housing projects of our cities. Too many of these great projects seem to me to be reproaches. Not signs of progress. But like so. Many aspects of ladybird. Johnson the substance of what she's saying goes pretty much unnoticed. Thank you for letting me share this morning. And the thing about her and flowers. It's very hard to shake after knee. That came a panel discussion on nature. Leading off with all the freemen all announced that under your white and very lovely was being named from the the mrs lbj. Another one of those times. When i wish i had acquired a nickname but it just been cloudy all my life. I thought a lot about that nickname lady bird. How it makes her seem so approachable at least in that era but also how it obscures. How serious she was. I wonder if she ever felt it diminished her especially as she grew into her ideas and the work she was trying to do became so much more substantial. Claudia her actual name certainly has more gravitas and it might have felt like a better fit as she became a more powerful public figure but like the thing with flowers a feminized euphemism if ever there was one nicknames can become pigeonholes and their implied identities are hard to escape. If you don't know about audible it's the leading provider of spoken-word entertainment. All in one place audible has the largest selection of audiobooks. So you'll never run out of options choose from bestsellers and new releases. Including my new book ladybird johnson hiding in plain sight. Which is the basis of this podcast. I've been immersed in this work for years. But when i listened to the talented kirsten potter read the book. I hear so many more dimensions to the characters and their compelling stories audible also gives you access to thousands of popular and binge worthy podcasts and now with audible plus you get full access to their popular plus catalogue. You can listen to as much content as much as you want including ad free versions of your favorite shows and exclusive series. New members can always try audible. Plus free for thirty days just visit audible dot com slash site or text site to five hundred five hundred. That's audible dot com slash sl t. or text s i g h t to five hundred five hundred okay. So you're staring at the wall. The one that's looking kinda sad you know the one and you know you need to paint it but what are. The trendy colors does read work with wood. Floors is blue to bold with this couch. Will beige feel to blah. How do i even choose a color. Luckily the color experts at bows bar have heard it all and they're here to help find the perfect color for any room by working with your vision answering all your questions. Start your project off right with free consultation at val spar dot com slash color. Help lebron's indictment of mammoth freeways isn't just a rhetorical flourish for a speech in washington. Dc a bill to fund a new round of highways is making. Its way through congress. The plan will do all kinds of damage to dc communities mostly the black neighborhoods of this segregated capital city and congress has given. Dc's still new local government. A kind of ultimatum. Start building freeways or lose the funding for a new public transportation system. The metro in their ambitious plans for the neighborhood of anacostia lady. Bird and architect larry halpern had proposed rerouting part of that new freeway system in order to preserve a prime piece of public land called kingman island. They hoped to develop it as a vast park in the inner city. The project had stalled. But in the wake of martin. Luther king's assassination. There is renewed momentum for it but if the freeway bell passes the island will be more or less destroyed and their hopes for the park along with it unless lbj can be persuaded to veto it. Sharon francis talked about how lady bird approached her lobbying effort with lbj. She wanted to reassure me. But but all the editorials and material up were really of opposition to the bill She had conveyed to him and she kind of make the decision for him. It's been very sympathetic to those people who are urging a veto pleaded. Bird's not just sympathetic as she told sharon she's working behind the scenes with cabinet members like stewart udall who are most opposed to the legislation. But even if he's sympathetic to linden really doesn't want to veto a democrat lead bill just as he's leaving office. Lbj signs it into law and with it. He signs away any chance that his wife's signature legacy project will ever see the light of day august. Sixty eight is convention. Mont the republicans. Gather in miami. Where richard nixon is the favorite for the nomination. The democrats will be in chicago. Linden ladybird had to the ranch. But with bobby kennedy. Gop various factions in the party has started putting out feelers about drafting to the top of the ticket. As far as lady birds concerned linden's decision is irrevocable. She's already started packing up. Her things shipping them home but as they head to texas for the month. It's not entirely clear that lbj thinks done. Friday august nine. I was up early. Had a swam with lyndon about twenty and a half. The day was going to be a busy date. Would as much air traffic is delays. That was a flurry of arrivals. We got the message that some to eastern plane was circling and about to land one of the many visitors to the lbj. Ranch is mississippi. Senator james eastland eastland democrat yet a hardened opponent of desegregation and civil rights but he's a senior member of congress and he and the president have to work together. Lbj's invited him to the ranch because he needs something from eastland and vice versa. A brief detour here for context back in nineteen sixty four despite extensive news coverage and public outcry eastland told that he didn't believe three civil rights workers and mississippi had gone missing. Senator thank you dependence. Senator eastland on nine one hour. Got three kids. What can i do well. I don't know. I don't believe i don't believe in three minutes down here. I believe it for this here. Come down to go after a six week search. The fbi found the bodies of the three civil rights workers. James chaney andrew goodman and michael showrunner buried in an earthen dam on a farm in philadelphia mississippi. Not a publicity stunt now in one thousand nine hundred. Sixty eight as eastland is arriving at the ranch. The president is meeting with his secretary of housing and urban development robert weaver weavers the only black member of lbj cabinet instinctively. I thought that senator eastland secretary went. But what are they exactly a cozy little company. So perhaps i could be useful by meetings and not to eastern and around the place by linden conducted his business with the secretary. Senator eastland has come to the ranch to do a little horse. Trading islam is chairman of the senate judiciary committee. The president has nominated his longtime personal lawyer. Abe fortas is now an associate justice on the supreme court as chief justice. Lbj needs the senator support. Get ford is confirmed but eastland has another agenda at the eastern was determined to talk. Politics said you know your husband's gobi nominated don't you. I said no sir not at all not going to be any movement of that sought that is not with any portion behind it. And if he were he wouldn't exam eastland is surprised her conviction and her clout with the president who seem some have taken aback believing as i had hoped it would happen that way but bentivoglio unshaken in his conviction as a democrat. Eastland is looking at the election. Pragmatically sure he's got differences with lbj like civil rights. but the administration's poverty programs have played well in mississippi. And anyway there's no great alternative as little as they see. Add as much as last between them. He would rather see lyndon nominated and anybody now before the democratic party but in terms of a last-minute draft in chicago another run for president for lbj. No way finally at ruled back to the main house considered believe so mannion's convertible just going around the barn conveying secretary. Were until the plane and that other business securing eastland vote for abe fortas. No dice with one foot out the door. Lbj just can't rally that kind of support. And the ford is chief. Justice nomination fails regularly scheduled program will not be seen tonight so that. Abc news can bring you color coverage of the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention. Good evening from the international amphitheatre in chicago. Within twenty four hours convention will begin at this moment. It is the column and the eye of the storm just outside. The building is bring with more police than i have ever seen in one place and beyond them their federal troops convention in chicago opens on monday. August twenty six thousands of anti-war protesters descend on the city. Mayor daley has deployed twelve. Thousand police officers and lbj's backing fifty six hundred national guardsmen and five thousand army reserve troops. The cops have shoot to kill orders against anyone out after curfew police state but the police haven't heard that yet. Another guard is pushing. The people back with rifles. Some people down now rifle butterfly young blond haired man about twenty years old streaming down his face. It's been like this for free straight nights confrontations between youthful demonstrators chicago. Police martin times off us. What seemed to be unnecessary and often brutal for us to get their captives into patio sites from afar. It seemed like a stephen colbert of emotions and hippies and ups and standing by packers have been without being me. I would like very much. What is looming up. Because of a spectacle to their time a twenty six year old aretha franklin opens the convention with powerful rendition of the star spangled banner. The new york times reported that quote aretha franklin saying what too many years notably those of thoroughly rattled. orchestra was the first soul version of the star spangled. Banner of get a better line. Back in texas lyndon is still hemming and high. He calls texas governor. John connally to have him sound out. Southern state delegates was eastland riot. Would they draft. Lbj the answer is a definitive. No relaxing is to look at this from a distance of a noncompetitive. Have been talk about going to the convention make thought about in valedictory speech to receive good wishes on birthday and under bright they. I mean no decision. On his birthday while ladybird is planning a low key. Party eh daughter lucy's house in austin. Lbj still working on a speech. He might give that night at the convention. He's on the phone with hubert. Humphrey mayor dealy members of congress. No i made a plan skilling rather doubt that well i don't know i might change my mind but i have made plans to go and i don't know easy august the twenty seven. It was probably a strange and dramatic and in a way sand birthday as any he'll ever have. Meanwhile back at the ranch. President johnson had dinner at daughter lucy's house. He celebrated his sixtieth birthday absence but not forgotten by his party. Convenience chicago lucy's house a small group of journalists sing to the president. Someone asks if he'll be going to chicago. I have not decided yet. Linden says it's almost six in the evening and then sat on the sofa. Newsy brought in his cake with one candle on it. We took land on his lap cake and gave len abe's properly began making a mess. It was all very low key but some are in a way the atmosphere burden by about twenty of their local friends to join them at the ranch to watch the convention on the three console. Set eating dinner off of tv trays in the living room at a station had been made irrevocably on march thirty first but somehow there was a special saying goodbye this week rahu political life. There's a candidate set of black and white voters of the johnsons in bed. The next morning passing the phone. Back and forth linden ladybird and their girls gathered around the tv set. Just like the rest of the country watching it. All unfold clue. We go on to this strange year. Old is undergoing convultions around us at party. Our country the whole world. Iran iraq in year. For linden physically. It must be mentally and spiritually. And sometimes i think the greatest courage in the world is to get up in the morning and go about days. Were that has one of things. I like about him. On and on and on Every inauguration has special drama. I suppose the special dramas invest one is the game. The best in has played with richard nixon. Eight years ago he was defeated president of the united states. Something politicians recover from and like the surprise ending of a story. He's back today. The winner to be sworn in as the thirty seventh president of the united states. Former president. Johnson's leaving the capital to which came as a young doorkeeper. Thirty eight years ago. You'll go to andrews air force base where he taking off so many times before or texas at his ranch but this time of course it will be very different. Indeed january steps one carrying his faithful companion and stopped at the top the family and turned and waved conscious. Goodbye tableau. I looked over my shoulder and that was a silver present. The bright and clear and full of rama remanded rather precious after note. Who said he would look at the moon in years to come and remember what blunder that he was there and both linda and i look back at the presidency with one that it's august one. Thousand nine hundred nine ladybird and linden head to san clemente california to visit patent dick nixon. Four of them fly up. The pacific coast dedicate ladybird. Johnson grove in redwood national park. That bird had pushed for and that lbj signed into law in october. Nineteen sixty eight nixon under intense. Public pressure has little choice. But to build on the johnsons environmental agenda passing a raft of legislation and establishing the environmental protection agency in april nineteen. Seventy american celebrated their first earth day building. Consciousness had always been lady birds plan as she said in her eighties looking back. I never forgave. Linden's boys for turning my environmental agenda into a beautification project. But i went ahead and talked about wildflowers. So as not to scare anybody. Because i knew if the people came to love wildflowers it eventually care about the land grew by the summer of nineteen. Seventy protests in the streets lawsuits in federal court. Stop construction of all the proposed new highways in washington. Dc including the one that would have destroyed kingman island and twenty nine thousand nine hundred nineteen. The government proposed half a billion dollars for vast campus of arts and recreational along the anacostia river. Just like the one larry halpern ladybird had tried to make happen. Nineteen sixty eight. Who knows if it'll ever really materialize. But at least today kingman island is a nature preserve and at the end of nineteen. Seventy lady bird published a white house diary. A carefully edited version of the diary. She kept during her time in the white house. This series includes entries that were in the book and many more. That weren't a white house. Diary made the new york times bestseller list and stayed there for thirteen weeks. Linden's memoir published. The next year. Never made the list just a few short years later on january twenty second nineteen seventy-three lyndon johnson suffered a massive heart attack the lbj ranch. He was flown to the hospital. In san antonio lady bird was in austin on business and arrived at the hospital just minutes after he died he was sixty four years. Old women gathered in houston today as a symbolic torch marked the beginning of a national women's conference for that so via case the lack steps did at twenty six hundred mile. Relay from seneca falls new york site of the first american women's rights convention back in eighteen forty eight more than two thousand runners have passed this torch all the way to houston at the nineteen seventy seven. National women's conference in houston ladybird. Is there with coretta. Scott king bella. Abzug betty free dan barbara jordan and maya angelou their on stage in front of twenty thousand women rallying behind the equal rights amendment. The conference's captured in a special on pbs. And as ladybird takes the podium. We hear her connect with the women's movement in a way she never quite did during her time in the white house I watched the women's move belong more to my daughter's than to me. But i have come to know that it belongs. To women of all ages ladybird spends the next thirty years championing all the same issues that defined her time in the white house from environmentalism to public access to nature to documenting the historical record of linden. Johnson's political career and of their presidency. Really lady bird. Johnson died in two thousand seven at the age of ninety four. Thanks for listening. To in plain sight ladybird. Johnson in plain sight was written an executive produced by adam pinkus and meet julius wag. It's based on the work. I did for my book. Ladybird johnson hiding in plain sight executive producers for abc. Are victoria thompson. And eric johnson. Our producer is an karki alley. Gallo is our associate producer. Susie lou is abc's archival producer associated producers for. Our cable are isabelle. Vall and dana shaffer. This episode was edited by adrian. Lily with additional editing. By vanessa willow and help from lindsey craft. Well it was mixed by dean white. Our theme music is crossbones style by cat power. Original music is composed by sam rats. Are our music. Supervisor is linda cohen. Our artwork is teddy blanks chips and why special. Thanks to kevin famine best-case studios and thanks to joshua cohen liz lessee and stationed goo at abc audio. My kellyanne beth hoppy at abc news long for him. An an rosenberg. Kimberly brown who handled are legal and standards review in plain sight is a co production of s k studios and abc audio. Some material was edited for clarity and time be sure to subscribe to the in plain sight podcast and if you like what you heard leave us a review that we could see the burning. The negroes paddock tear. It was one of the most violent attacks in american history and one that americans were afraid to discuss. Some people were threatened with their very lives if they talked about it from. Abc audio comes a new podcast about the massacre of hundreds of black americans and why it was kept a secret for a century listened to tosses buried. Truth wherever you get your podcasts.

bobby kennedy Luther king senator kennedy linden Resurrection city white house Lbj Sharon francis kennedy julius wag crystal jack pudding senator kennedy call senator robert kennedy Senator robert kennedy new york President john f Elizabeth shumita madame schumer yuichi okamoto saint patrick's cathedral
How You Finish School Is More Important Than Where You Finish (Hour 1)

The Dave Ramsey Show

40:40 min | 1 year ago

How You Finish School Is More Important Than Where You Finish (Hour 1)

"Live from the headquarters of Ramsey solutions broadcasting from the dollar car rental studio. This is the Dave Ramsey show where America hangs out. Have a conversation about your life and your money sitting in for my good friend and my boss Dave Ramsey. I'm Anthony O'Neill and I'm so excited to be with you all today on this beautiful day here in Nashville Tennessee. I'm taking your phone calls right now. Triple eight eight two five five two two five triple eight eight two five five two two five. You have any questions about money about life about if you're a millennial if you're a high school student My name is Anthony O. New and I would love to have a conversation with you and so call on in. I'm a little bit nicer than Dave so I won't hang up on you too quick. I'm also you can reach me at Online at my instagram at Anthony. O.`Neil our be taking questions there on my twitter as well at Anthony O. Neil. I'm excited because Chris Hogan and I just came back from the DMV area Having a financial peace live event. They're such an amazing experience. You know just to be able to sit down with. Nearly two thousand people really encourage them about life about money to answer questions December two testimonies that we got from there which is absolutely amazing. So I would encourage you go to Daveramsey DOT COM for slash events. Amore you can go to Anthony. O.`Neil DOT COM and look up. When is the next time we will be in your city and I'll make sure to get a list of those cities Sometimes throughout the show. So we're going to go out to New York and talked to Rob Rob. How're you doing? How can I help you doing how? How are you man? I'm blessed and not stress and I'm grateful to you. How are you man doing well so recently? Debt Free I've got my three to six months saved up now. looking to save For down payment and I was wondering if I should do that. And they money market account or a simple savings account and then if money market And regardless of that first question what would be the best money market account To us that's a good question How long are you looking to save? it's GONNA be about a year one year. Okay correct all right all right all right how much. How are you looking to put down? I mean a purchase. I mean Close to it'll be twenty percent close at Georgia thousands tens of thousands. Okay cool cool with it. Within one year we called his baby step three B so clearly. You've already out of debt like you said And you've already set aside three six months of expenses. I'm excited for you or how it are. You Rob Mommy asking twenty six twenty six. And you're debt free. You got some money. Paid off seventy thousand for school. Paid seventy thousand dollars in school loans. Correct yeah man I love it. What what was your degree in. I actually went to school for Broadcast Journalism but now I'm working in the digital marketing field. Oh Man I love it. I love it man. Well you're you're going down the absolute right track. Here's what I'm going to recommend for for you right now is to go ahead if you have the Three to six months and three B. We says set aside at least ten to twenty percent to go down towards a house. You're twenty seven years old If you're going to be buying a house within next year I'm Ashley not too concerned about you. Put into a money market account or savings account. Could you not going to get that much interest in return maybe ten fifteen twenty bucks extra I'm okay would you just parking this into a regular savings account now for America and the people listening right now? Let's say if you was saving the safe about at least three to five years Then I would definitely say maybe look into a money market account or maybe parking into a high yielded a savings account online. I actually park my emergency funds into a higher interest account online only it is FDIC insured And it is quick and accessible. I can get to it quickly. Those are the two main things that we focus on But for you robin for anyone listening right now. If you're looking to purchase a home here the next six months we year You really don't need to be worried about interest on it or getting a lot of money back because you're not going to get a lot of money back Loans you just follow the baby steps launcher out of debt launch. She had three to six months. A set aside for your emergencies and a three P. Is You ready to move into a house? I'm excited for you. I mean rob you twenty seven moving into a home. What was I doing at twenty seven? I sure enough was thinking about buying a house going out to holly. How can I help you today? Good good thank you for taking my call. Thank you for calling in so I am calling today. I'm currently sauce for I community. College in Iowa goes on to this spring that free paid off But I have decided to go on a bachelor's degree and I currently have twelve thousand dollars in savings pied for the fast stuff and actively applying for scholarships but I just don't think that's going to be enough for me to pay for two more years going and I was wondering what advice you have. Maybe man you know I love the fettuccine even call in having this conversation with me you know this is something I'm really really passionate about. Was like stand up and had this conversation because I love is so much. So let's get a little more information. Here howdy right now. Holly I'm twenty twenty okay. Are you living at home with your parents right now? You have your own place My own okay. All right all right and do you have any student loans from your community college right now. I do not know okay. Cool so right now. We're we're in a good place okay. We we're debt free. It sounds like do you have any credit cards or anything I do. I put like ten dollars on it a month. Okay how much credit card debt you have none none okay okay and you said you have a credit card and you put in ten dollars hundred a month that I hear you correctly. Yeah Yeah Okay okay. Okay so we need. We need to cut that credit card up all right. I know that's not why you call in but I wanNA make sure that we're staying away from all dead because I want you to graduate ahead of the game not behind the game so let's go ahead and get this credit card cut up so what school you're looking at going to. How much is it a year? I'm so I'm looking at Northwest University. with housing rushing warning about eighty thousand years. Seventeen thousand Okay with housing. Is it possible you can stay home? no it's about four hours from home four hours from home right. And how much institution alone right at about eleven girls okay. So we're about eleven thousand and that's what I was thinking because normally all in states Not all of them but the majority of them in between six thousand and then and housing you're saying is about six thousand dollars a extra a year okay. Let me do some math here because way I'm thinking. Are you working right now on your okay? How much are you making a month? A little over two hundred. It's not much just WanNa have off time from college off time from college all right so it sounds like here. Hollywood. I'm going to recommend you do is eleven thousand dollars. A month is not too bad. That's going to be about nine hundred dollars a month what you need to come up with now. The housing situation. I'm going to recommend since your four hours away is trying to figure out how you can get an apartment or get into a situation to where you can actually split this income If you cannot do that then we gotta look at us. We have seventeen thousand dollars. How can we cash flow? Do I need to go into the job immediately? Not into the job into the College Education. My four year degree Right now immediately is way I can actually work and save up some money Is there a way that I could possibly secure some more? Grants AND SCHOLARSHIPS I. Would I would actually suggested you go go up to the financial aid office. Cb can negotiate you know because this is. This is serious. You going into it right. Let's make sure you graduate from it right arrive. You guys listen to the Dave Ramsey show here in dollar car rental studio. My name is Anthony Hill. And I'm sitting in for Dave Nabi right back One of the questions I get all the time is which life insurance company should I used for my term life policy? Look it can be a tough decision when there are hundreds of plans out there with rates all over the place and rip off riders. That's why the only company I use and recommended for over twenty years is Zander insurance. They're a broker which means they shop only the top plans from repeatable companies. That I recommend call them at eight hundred three five six four thousand two hundred eighty two or visit Zander. Dot Com for instant online quotes. And we're back here on the Dave Ramsey show. We have any questions. You have a conversation about your money. Your team millennial younger male. You would ask me some questions. Please give me a call. Triple eight eight two five five two two five triple eight eight two five five to five. We're going to go back to the phones now. Let's go out to Ohio and talk to Elizabeth Elizabeth. How how are you doing? I'm good how are you? I'm blessed enough stress and glad to be on the phone with you can help you all right I was just wondering if it would be harder to get a job with an online degree. Compared to an on campus degree do employer the online degrees Having like lesser value than an on campus. Carry at all know. What what do you think? Do you think. Online degree is worse than on. Campus Agree Well based off the research I have done. I don't think so I just wanted to get comfirmation like you tell me about yourself. How old are you Elizabeth? I'm nineteen years old ten years. Okay are you currently in college right now? I am okay. Are you currently in college at I am a freshman at southwestern assemblies of God University okay. Okay no-go southwestern. What was your major their social work social work. You're going to be helping some people I like you. I like you. So are you considering? Maybe because I'm guessing it you're actually on campus correct. I was on campus at seed Avila University in Ohio and I just wanted to get confirmation about my decision. I had to make some financial decisions with the campus. I was at compared to online degrees at southwestern assemblies of God and used the University. It just seemed like a better option for me. And that's why I had this question for you. Yeah Elizabeth. You're asking a great question that I think a lot of people listening to you right now. Live on the air or are asking. You know West best raw and always say this. It doesn't really matter about where How you start where you start. It doesn't matter where you finish a banners about how you finish and how you finish his debt free and as long as this degree is accredited fully credited And you can pay cash for this is the cheapest price The possible option for you are totally okay with getting an online degree. I think what we have to stop doing is telling our young people in America that they have to go to a four year traditional school know what they need to do is go the best route. That's best for them. Which is online is okay. It is Ashley Great. I mean I know for me if I was go back to school. I would have to go to campus. Not because online is bad but because my attention span can't focus on the computer screen that loan but if you can focus I and get the education an impasse on a glasses and do all your homework. Assignments online go for it is is cheaper is GonNa save you some time you can get your degree quicker so Elizabeth you do was best for you and no a job. Career is not gonNA look at you any different because you have a on line a degree. So we're going to go out to Texas here and talk to Z. Ad How can I help you today? Man Hi Anthony I have twins. Appoint a girl of Sixteen Juniors High School. Okay and I was wondering how I can get them motivated and excited and Is it too late you know. When do I start taking scholarships and getting them to apply to a lot of scholarships Mexico question Now give it. Give me a little bit information about your your twins here. Juniors tell me about them are they self motivated. What are they passionate about? What do they love doing? What do you know what they even want to do? As far as a career right now. Yeah they're both really passionate my son He He's an ice hockey player and he He wants he thinks he wants to. Maybe play ice hockey at school but he also wants to be an architect and he's looked at a couple of schools a couple here in Texas and around the state and my daughter Yet just as motivated. She's really into agricultural and she wants to get some type of act sciences degree s good Hook Okinawa's in DC yesterday and a young couple. Aspen is same question it was like. Hey how do I get my kids to become motivated? And one of the things. I'm telling? Parents is have actually sit down with them and show them the possibility of their futures. I have this chart chart that I share called Aaron and tied chart. Why actually showed him my cave? You all can secure scholarships And you can actually graduate one hundred percent debt free. 'cause you will hear our here's what you can do in the future. Here's how you get ahead of the game so I definitely say for for your twins Sit DOWN WITH THEM. And just say you know what? Hey here's what you can do if we can go to this college one hundred percent debt free. This is what your life can look like. You can actually start becoming a everyday millionaire as early as twenty six twenty seven years old if you actually work hard. And if you get the scholarships and the grants that you really go after right now Ashley you can actually go to the school at you desire but telling the truth if we do not get the funds one. We'RE NOT BARRING INTO. You may have to go a different route and so if you really excited about going to this particular school. Hey I wanna make sure that we do everything that is possible to get you into that school. But at the same time if you don't hear irritate rows and I think when kids are actually approached as a young adult and they fills if they have some sweat equity in their future They get really really really passionate about their future. So thanks for your call. And as going out here to Texas. And we'll be talking to Isaac. How can I help you man? It's a nice talking to you. Finally I have a question. Don't know exactly where to start but I have a fulltime job from seven to six and I am looking to go to architectural school in Was Kinda WanNa your opinion on that if if you would go that route or Or study programming at home okay. That's another thing that I've been looking into and Because of my work schedule I the exactly where she added that car. How old are you as twenty three twenty three years old? Okay all right. And what do you do for a living right now? I'm a Cabinet project manager and I also do that. Cabinet design work and also P- redesign on an office buildings and stuff like that. Okay so you go into office buildings and I'm thinking you go into homes as well. He helped built cabinets For homes and and the corporate space in my correct. Yes okay What do you make in a year? They are you happy with that salary or is it. Are you not happy with the salary? I'm I'm happy at the moment. But of course Would always appreciate more but I make fifty six thousand a year. Okay six thousand dollars a year. Do you have any debt right now. Just mortgage just a mortgage. Okay so you one hundred percent debt. Free mortgage Do you have a fully funded Savings Account Emergency Fund. I'm working on the okay working on Keiko's let's talk about this Architect or programming. Both of these are two great routes. I don't have a problem with neither. Neither neither is of these. I think architects is a little bit more in. Lima which are ready. Doing you already building cabinets Passionate about that. I have no problem with that. Now here's truth. It's going to be very hard to go to architect school and also worked a full-time job and so for me. What I'm going to suggest that you do is I want you to look up. The American Institute of Architects. A I A as a great program is a great organization that can possibly help you get into this and go buy the cheaper the most affordable route. I WANNA say cheaper and downplay but the best affordable route for But also look into programming because programming is great money Also what I'M GONNA do is. I'm going to give you a book Madison I want to give him a King Cole. Ms Book In this discovery. Here's a career expert. Man He can really help you decide. What's your passion and how to align your passion which a career. Because I want I wanna make sure that whatever route you go is to find a route that you're in and Ken Coleman wrote a bill called the proximity principle Isaac that that would definitely help you out with choosing was the best route for you but a key thing here is. Let's not being a rush K. Because you're already making good income. You're one hundred percent debt free outside of your mortgage so this means this means that you really do not need to rush into this process. You can take your time cash flow but looked up. The American Institute of Architects Madison is GonNa get you that book. I'm telling you right now. Man Futures Can brought you twenty three years old. I love talking to young people and help them becomes accessible guys. Listen to Dave Ramsey show. My name is Anthony. New York Bang. Christians have an affordable incredible way to meet their overwhelming healthcare costs it's Christian Healthcare Ministries. Original health cost sharing ministry a better business. Bureau accredited organization see members share to pay each other's medical bills. It's not insurance. It's Christians financially and spiritually supporting each other. It's what Tim has done for. Over thirty five years learn more at C. H. Ministries Dot Org that C. H. Ministries Dot Org Christian healthcare ministries is a proud sponsor of Dave Ramsey. Live events. Get this Americans. All about one point six trillion dollars in student loans. One point six trillion dollars. I can't even dream about what one point. Six trillion dollars is but we owe it in suited loans that breaks down to about thirty five thousand dollars per student To me that's just absolutely crazy. That young people today are graduating with about thirty five thousand dollars student loan debt but then fifty students are graduating with one. Hundred thousand dollars or more So pretty much. That's a mortgage payment with no real estate if you're sitting in a student loans and think they're just going to go away or the government will magically forgive them. You're absolutely wrong. You guys you have to have a plan to cut through your student loans or any kind of debt at all something. That helped me tremendously years. Ago Is Financial Peace University. It is the best plan to help you. Pay Off your loans early. We've been teaching Gods We've been teaching All kinds of people How to handle money for over twenty five years in nearly six million people have learned how to pay off debt including student loans and save for the future in fact most people who go through financial peace university are debt. Free this out within a matter of eighteen to twenty four months of starting a class. It's time to get those loans out of your life. It's time to get started today to learn more about an inch apiece. Diversity can go to Daveramsey DOT COM or call triple eight to peace triple eight to two piece. I remember when I first took. Financial Diversity was actually a thirteen week. Course and it a tremendously changed. My Life I didn't really understand finances. I didn't understand finances. Of God's way I understood a the world would America was teaching me about finances in America says. Hagel out there get three trae lines. America says go out there and become a homeowner. A America says it's best to be a homeowner before renting America says. Go to school and take out as many loans as you need. But they're so many people that I've met that followed The miracle way going after the American dream American dream is simply freedom but one thing I've learned From looking at everyone and really looking at their situation The American Way Lisa. I'm down to American nightmare and I believe that the American dream is still true. We just can't listen to America to get him if you want freedom if you want financial peace you want to be able to leave a legacy to your children's children if you really want that financial joy. Don't listen to America listened to guy and he'll help you and listen to us because we have it skoll financial peace university go to Daveramsey DOT COM or call triple eight two two peace triple eight two two peace you guys. We are coming To Dallas Texas and a HAM Anaheim California Chicago Illinois To do a lot of different things. April thirtieth. We are doing financial peace live in Dallas Texas at First Baptist Dallas. That's going to be Dave Ramsey and myself. I can't wait for that one Dave Ramsey myself on the same stage is that's a beautiful situation. You know he is known for his Cheetahs story and Dave is running across the stage and I'm right there behind him running as well because I'm excited the right around the corner April Thirtieth Chris Hogan myself be in California or may six will be an Indianapolis Chris Hogan and myself on May Twelfth Chris Hogan Eh myself will be in Chicago Illinois's and I'm telling you man. We literally walking through the seven baby steps. We walk you through how to actually get that financial peace. And what I love about Dave Hogan and myself we share our stories. You know. We're not hitting the stage. Just experts were hitting a stage as human beings who have done some stupid stuff with our money. We've made some mistakes heck for six months of my life. I didn't know where I was going to sleep some nights. I'm sleeping in the car some nights. I'm sleeping on Florida friend's house. I was thirty five thousand dollars in debt all because I was trying to impress friends. Impress people and my poor decisions led me to the back of my car and when. I hit that stage On these events I'm coming from just a genuine place. Here's my story. Here's what I learned. Here's what you can learn. And here's how we together can get financial peace and go after all of our dreams so make sure go to Daveramsey dot com go or go to Anthony Oneal DOT COM. And let's have a conversation about How we can together become better. I'M GONNA go over to twitter. Let's go over twitter. We'll have some questions from twitter. You can go to twitter or instagram. At Anthony. O'neill and similar question at Anthony. Oneal look for the blue checkmark and some of your questions. Here's when I got today from Nikki. She says you recommend taking the act and sat or choosing only one test to focus To prep on. That's a question you can't go wrong with taking either or I'll talk about this in my book debt. Free degree If you have the time if you're good tester go ahead and take both of them but I want to research for example you go to one particular school and they only focused on. Act Let's say your top three schools at you're looking at they only accept the act. You know what? Go ahead of focus on the act. Only and prep and study for. And I really want to encourage all parents to get my book. Debt-free degree because I actually teach some secrets inside of the book on how to prep. When should you start prepping? When she'd you start having a conversation about the act or sat there are some schools that only accept the sat a so one due to research make sure And know what your school is. GonNa Require here nicky and then from there. I will stay focused on that one but if you can do both of them do both of them is going to help you in a long time. It's a great question so real good question. We're going to go out to Virginia and we'RE GONNA be talking to misty missy. How can I help you today? Hi Anthony I'm calling about my son We're a home school family okay. My son will be graduating this June Just a few days short or shy of his sixteenth birthday. Wow He's yeah he's decided he doesn't want go off obviously to university team so my question to you is what is what should we be doing. Or what should we help him be doing before he goes to college? Should he be doing community college which is currently doing Or is it okay to give them some space than let him be a kid? Or what's the mixture? What is going to benefit him? This and this is good so your son is about to turn sixteen and graduating from high school so clearly is smart because he has more parents. I just love. So what is he? What is he wanted does even know at sixteen of the Career Field. He wants to pursue. He was talking about doing medical school. and being a dermatologist. But he's not committed to it I think his heart is in Engineering but the way he puts it he doesn't want to go to college and spend four six eight years getting a degree and then having to work his way up in the field so that's why he doesn't want to do computer engineering because they said after we graduate he then have to start at the bottom and work his way up before he can make good money so he isn't totally decided yet. But I'm my husband and I are thinking about getting him a mentor and I've also connected with a local dermatologist. And maybe talk to him about that route I just don't know what to do once they graduate and I don't want I don't want his resume to look bad or as application to look bad. I don't want him to have gaps but I also wanted to be able to be a kid But I I want to do. What's best for him? So that's why I wanted to call you Daska missy. Thanks for calling in. I think this is a great question because your son is sixteen and I believe right now. He doesn't have to rush to choose what he wants to. Fats are having this conversation. Now is amazing I I'm split between two things. I still want him to be a teenager. I mean enjoy the teenager life but at the same time. I don't want his mind to drop so if he is okay with going to community college earlier on. I think that's fine. Take one class online. Maybe take one class inside the on the building. I think getting creative. There is great but the fact that he is already thinking about what he wants to do. I agree with you. Get Him a mentor. Game around some different people. He looked up to into the career fields that he wants to get into so by the time he his eighteen. He can go hard after what he wants to do. But this is absolutely amazing that he's ahead of the game. Let's keep ahead of the game. So let him be a teenager. Let them enjoy life or make sure that we keep fueling his head and his mind was some good stuff. You guys are listening to the Dave Ramsey show and I'll be right back so in honor of black history month has a black man I decided to have a conversation with six good friends of mine. Talk ABOUT MONEY. Talk about legacy. Talk about Our Pass Our Future. Where are we going as a culture and race and We are excited about the conversation. We're having so I want to encourage you. I've released about six videos and I'll be releasing about eight more this month on To celebrating black history month get into thoughts and opinions of This this young generation. We have A lot of opinions on there and so you can go to my Instagram at Anthony O'Neill o. N. E. A. L. or YouTube And check it out there as well but I'm telling you right now. A lot of people having some good opinions and I WanNa know your opinion you know I want to know what do you think about what we're saying so? I don't share my opinion. I just want to hear from others so I can see what else is should be teaching going to help all people Get better with their finances. But I wanted to make sure that I had this conversation so ruined. Go back to the phones. Weren't go out to Ohio and to Stephanie. Stephanie how are You doing today? Asu Got Florida. I'm sorry and we're going to talk to a chase yet there. How you doing? Hey I'm doing well man about yourself. Sorry about that. Nor'easter of for just a big Fan of you and your ministry My wife and I got the chance of financial accelerator down in Orlando last year. I read your book and they become a big Fan When my oldest son in two young ones are either college or trade school but My question is pertaining to myself I did a lot of stupid going through college myself and did sign up the stupid student. Loan whatever I was able to cash flow by masters but since cleaning up my mess. Question is Are there any resources? Tell me find a pick. Shovel already scholarships or grants that may be applicable to me trying to get myself out of this situation. So what are you currently doing right? Now give me give me a little bit more information about you right now. What you currently making a year right now. Oh Oh household income's about one when thirty one thirty okay and what do you do for living again? I I'm a supervisor in corrections. Okay Okay Rodney corruption. Junior police field all right closer than what you want to go to school. One more time for not no. I'm done with school. I'm I'm I'm done with school like little masters I'm I'm trying to clean up. My my Undergrad mess that I made. I was on the Fan Wilder Program and took seven years to get my bachelor's degree. Okay I Christian student loans over that process and maybe step two right now. This is our final in baby. Step two but we're still just looking for a bigger shovel to get out of this whole Aso. Since it has a couple of things you ask a question that a Lotta people actually do not ask which I love I love the question which he acts was are. There any grants scholarships out there. That will help pay back your student loans. Now they're not a lot. Now lives scholarships and grants are going to be to help undergraduates or people who went to further their education. But believe it or not. There are a couple that I've come across and I went and recommended. Jimmy go to my scholar Dot com every year. They do a huge huge scholarship. Close to about one hundred two hundred thousand dollars toward ages. Give give give it away to people to help them pay back their student loans but the very first thing when he comes to your shovel is really not going to be a scholarship or grant ordered government. You know chases really going to be based upon you and how hard you are willing to work to really go aggressively after it. So outside of your student loans What OTHER DEBT? You have more than just a mortgage okay. Cool great so yeah. I will say that very first day in that you need to do. It's just really attack it yourself lineup in debt snowball if you have multiple student loans get it all in that area and then after that go check out my Scali. My scholar is doing real good They do about once or twice a year. They team up with some people and they do offer. Some grants scholarships to people who currently have student loans and they pay it off. And so that is one thing recommend but before I'm waiting on anybody I'm focusing on myself. I'm going to go ahead and get on a budget Let's listen all my income this out everything that I have going out and then after that I'm going to go ahead and attack my student loans and then go ahead and work on my three to six months of expenses They now we're GONNA go out to Ohio and ruined. Talk to Stephanie. Now Stephan how can I help you? Hi I want to get your opinion on what is appropriate for parents when it comes to helping their high school seniors or even current college students. Searching and applying for scholarships teacher recently gave my child a hard time. Because there's no been our head help them when they ask for assistance and guidance on a scholarship application completing. So where do you think of for staying in that process? Let me ask you a question. What's your definition of helping? How are you helping? Your students are Either searching or like in this particular incident lose uploading some documents you know everything is online and they want things uploads it how wanted I have to seniors senior college in a senior in high school senior in college and graduating debt? By the way I love that one. That's what I'm talking about. Did you help her as well? Your senior in College. Go through The Sun So a little bit Senior a little bit more guidance as far as searching and finding them around. So let me ask you this question to ask this question but I I wanna be respectful. Here you said that you said that you're uploading the information for them you send. You're searching for them I think that you shouldn't be doing neither one of those. Two things are thinking if your child is a senior. I think that your child needs to be doing all the searching Child needs to be doing all the work and uploading now have no problem with the parent assisting like making sure that the application is correct making sure that the grammar's correct on The estee but you gotTa make sure that they. They're doing all of the work Now if they find out of one hundred scholarships if they find ninety you find ten a because you're doing some a searching on your while you break or something like that. I have no problem with that at all but the most of it needs to come from this child from your. Does it make sense because I really WanNa make sure that our young people America have Some type of sweat equity and a gay. I remember when my dad gave me my first car. I was excited. Of course they paid for but I wanted some nice wheels. It was back in like the nineteen nineties. ninety is. I'm sorry the early two thousands And I remember I got the car my dad said I you got the Gar you gotta pay for Insurance. You want wheels on it. You gotta buy the wheels if you want to a boom box and a bat you've gotta by somebody are boombox was status a system and it was loud and it was annoying now. I can't stand it And then also I wanted a tent and it was all right. You got to do it all yourself. We've helped you but you have to put some sweating a game. I did all of that. Y'All I wash that car every single day and check this out. It was a nineteen eighty-seven Nissan Maxima and a car could even go in reverse. The transmission was messed up but I treated it like it was the best thing ever because I worked hard and I put money into it. And so that's the same thing with today's generation of young people. I get it parents. It is your job to guy them on a journey. But it's not your job to do everything for them on the journey and so when it comes to college when it comes to prom when it comes to buying a car if the car is going to be twenty five hundred dollars they need to earn a thousand. They need to earn fifteen hundred. If it's my child they're going to earn all twenty five hundred of it you know. They're going to be washing a lot of cars cutting a lot of grass babysitting a lot of children. I WanNa make sure that young people feel the weight. They may not be as much as they should but they will fill it as much as possible. He Gosh this is just been a great day and I would encourage you to go over to my Youtube Anthony O'Neill and make sure that you check out this conversation around black history month. We are talking about money where we're talking about. How can we Get more income. How can we build wealth? How can we Start businesses. How can we get out of debt? What can we do differently? And what should we do Agriculture and. I'm just extremely excited about that. And and what we're doing here Many guys this has been absolutely fun. The Dave Ramsey show for a good hour. If you will thank you for your phone calls. Thank you for giving me an opportunity. Thank you for listening and I wanNA thank the producer James Chow and filling in for our social producer. Kelly Daniel Madison browder on the phone. Some remember you guys. The caliber of your future will be determined by the choices you make today. This is the Dave Ramsey. And this is James Childs producer. Dave Ramsey show. Did you know you can now listen to the Dave Ramsey show on Pandora and spotify for all the ways to watch? Listen check out our show page at Daveramsey DOT com slash show. If you're make more money doing what you love check out. Kristie Rights Business Boutique. Podcast Christie's inspiring and equipping women to become successful running their own business Pam Christy Wright. And I help women. All over the country take their ideas and passions and hobbies and turn them into profitable business. Do you have an idea in your head or dream in your heart and you've ever wondered if you could make money doing it. I'm here to help. Join US on the Business Boutique podcast where we are equipping. Women to make money doing what they love. Hear more from the Ramsey network including Christie rights. Business Boutique podcast wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey James producer of the Dave Ramsey show. This episode is over but check the episode notes for links to products and services. You've heard about during this episode. Thanks for listening.

Dave Ramsey America Anthony Anthony O'Neill Ohio twitter Chris Hogan Ashley Great Elizabeth Elizabeth Dave Isaac Ramsey solutions FDIC Anthony O. Financial Peace University Stephanie Rob Mommy Nashville
'In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson': Ep. 8

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44:09 min | 3 weeks ago

'In Plain Sight: Lady Bird Johnson': Ep. 8

"Wednesday june fifth. The phone jarred me awake from a deep sleep. It was landon saying briefly. Tersely we come in here. I resent what did not see how it could be morning and sure enough. I saw with amazement. That the hands of glock said four twenty. Nothing good can come from a phone. Call at four. Am ladybird goes over to linden's bedroom her anxiety rising. It was cracked up against those in his room. Looking is oh he had never been to sleep and all the tv sets were on. And i realized that something was happening gentleman. We've kept the on. We've heard an alarming report. That robert kennedy was shot in that ballroom at the ambassador hotel in los angeles. A very loud noise like a clap of thunder was hurt. That heard it. I can stand up. Kennedy had been shot. You bring you more jews as we learned it. So far all the information we have from best-case studios and abc audio. This is in plain sight. I'm julius wag crystal clear episode eight. Claudia all my life. C. a linden ladybird have both had a fraught relationship with bobby kennedy. It dates back to nineteen sixty when i was openly opposed to his brother jack pudding. Lbj on the ticket. They've been through extraordinary times together. Great things and terrible things. Jack's victory in the election his assassination in dallas the passing of major civil rights laws. The murder of martin luther king just two months ago. they've been uneasy allies but mostly adversaries. None of it matters anymore. Beholding had taken place under the eye of the television camera and we saw over and over film of the shooting itself and her light correct gunned open shots event. It has senator kennedy call. My senator kennedy has been shot. Kirk hold onto the guy. We don't want another long running away from him. I saw him lying on the floor on a pool of blood andres head bam a unreality about the whole thing a nightmare quality. It couldn't be your drained it. It had happened before it had happened before jfk. Then dr king. Now this three assassinations in just a few years. And every few moments that would come on screen smiling phase of senator kennedy tasting the wine of victory making little jokes with f. l. by his side and then we go through the whole thing over again. Age of television has its downside and asked me to get some coffee. I went into the kitchen or not nine. That coffee of covid lot wise and searched until i fan instant sanca and put the kettle don t and cream and sugar and the president. I took a tray back facials. Television kept repeating the hideous story. Joe not clear on what happened going in for brain surgery. Steve determine that the bullet had lodged somewhere behind the ear reports. That operations of this sort can take up to four hours so this may still be a long vigil. We repeat at the hangs on for almost twenty six hours. Mounts into montage thai everybody was stricken face the air of unreality. This can't be happening. And then the need is deep wracking. Sob my country. My country moving martin luther king just two months ago today and president kennedy. The worst fears of the american public been confirmed with the passing of senator robert kennedy. That came at one. Forty four this morning pacific daylight time. Senator robert kennedy was brother. President john f. kennedy was murdered about five years ago died early today at what must have been the zina's of his brilliant political career. That's from a massive brain injury inflicted by an assassin's bullet in the days that follow. It's like time has stopped in the white house. Phone calls meetings waiting. There's a portrait of president. Woodrow wilson that used to hang in the grand staircase at the white house. It was painted after he had a stroke in one thousand nine hundred nineteen one that left him incapacitated in the back of her mind ladybird has always worried that some similar fate might await. Lbj know what. I always say in wilson's country. Its message to me is a president should have his portrait painted reasonably early in the office. Time's running out for lbj. He'd had his portrait painted in nineteen sixty five but neither of them like the result although it does hang in the national portrait gallery today. Lbj is scheduled to sit for a new portrait. The day before bobby's funeral the timing is definitely not great but they decide to keep the appointment. Maybe sitting still for an hour is exactly what they need. The artist is madam. Elizabeth shumita off a russian emigre. She was in warm springs georgia with franklin roosevelt. Doing an initial sketch for his when he died from a cerebral hemorrhage in april nineteen forty-five now with the specter of death hanging over the white house the president the first lady and madame schumer tov gathering the lincoln sitting room linden allowed from letters from his son-in-law chalk in vietnam white house photographer yuichi okamoto shoots a few candidates in a few of the images. You see lady bird sitting by the window watching. She's not the artist or the subject. She's the one orchestrating this moment. Fixing it in history. Saturday june eight was a day for me completely. Detached from the normal capsule of time suspended in unreality burial of santa. bobby kennedy. We barely and read the papers which were drenched with every aspect of the story. The johnsons fly up to new york for the funeral. Service is held in saint patrick's cathedral in midtown manhattan. New york was a strange side streets lined with people who stood sound motions for three days. Television had been invoking the phrase like a greek tragedy and indeed. There was much of a greek play about this. These craft the voiceless course new york. Abc news commentator frank reynolds. Good morning one hour now. A solemn requiem mass will be said for senator robert francis kennedy forty two years old like his brother. The victim of an assassin's bullet all during the night until shortly before five o'clock this morning the people of new york and for that matter people from all over the country some from all over the world. I'll ask the task senator. Robert kennedy police estimated that forty thousand persons at slowly walk past the casket on the presidential limousine. The secret service car behind on the fenders curtis first lady in black white trim with caller president and a grade. I don't know glorious but a small chairman proud. Gosh lady thought. An kirk escorted in saint patrick's that magnificent setting include any sarah and enjoy pierre salinger. Jfk's former press secretary escorts johnson's to their seats. He looked absolutely stricken as we approach the dark shiny coffin with a flag talk candles and he paused briefly and so today and then turned and took the seats that was shown to us a front row. The enormous neo gothic cathedral is packed with four thousand mourners artists. Intellectuals journalists lieber leaders like cesar chavez and dolores huerta civil rights leader john lewis cabinet secretaries and dozens of members of congress candidates running for president from both parties. Knock george wallace. I had noticed. Just as we moved into ac- the congregation silently and without signal had risen. It was mrs jacqueline kennedy and black and failed with a two children entering. Jackie had almost fainted. When she entered the cathedral she passed in front of us sat in a front row seat on the right hand side with all the numerous kennedy family. Somehow it seemed ethylene. Her children slipped in more quietly. The celebrated conductor leonard bernstein. A friend of bobby ethel's mahler's adagietto was a ceremony of staggering drama and beauty. I can see only the back of the director which was in itself a study expression of utmost passion comment and data and that little piece in this whole most say always you were away on. The flag draped coffin in the middle of the with. It's an incredible burn. This has been the only thing the most unbelievable event in the nation's life as i have shared it heightened made all the more so by president. Kennedy's assassination nearly five years ago. Behalf of mrs kennedy or children obvious last surviving brother. Senator ted kennedy gives the eulogy want to express what we feel to those worn with us today in this cathedral around the world strong and composed his eyes by red graham completely through his voice began to quaver came under controls and it comedy the acid. His brother be remembered. Simply as good and decent man Wrong and tried to write it so suffering and tragedy so awhile and tried to stop many parts of this nation those he touched and sought to touch him. Some men see things as they are in safe. Why i dream things that never were and say why not. As the johnsons make their way out of the cathedral. They stopped to greet teddy and her children. And bobby's mother rose. And then i found myself in front of other is jacqueline kennedy. I called her name and put out my hand a hard to know how to describe next few moments of time. She looked at me as though from a great distance as though our an apparition jackie and lady bird lived through so much together so much tragedy. Maybe finally too much for jackie to summon that generosity. She'd shown to ladybird almost five years ago after dallas failed extreme hostility. Was it because i was alive. Lady are back at the white house by one pm. They wait for the train carrying came from new york. The train travels slowly. There are crowds lining the tracks for almost the whole way from salute from their hands over their hearts. It takes hours to arrive at union station in washington and actual campaign train. Senator kennedy would be on the platform of last car. Today feels endless. Sambre visitors at the white house nonstop television coverage they that's where his calf get rest on a one foot high platform covered in velvet family and closest friend joining three cards. It's almost ten o'clock at night. When the funeral procession finally begins the journey to arlington national cemetery. The president's limousine follows fourteen cars behind the hearse on the way. The cortege stops at the lincoln memorial overlooking the national mall since late. May the mall has been the site of a kind of large scale. Protest called resurrection city. A fifteen acre encampment over five hundred makeshift dwellings. Health clinics and community buildings. It's home to thousands of people from all around the country. The reverend jesse. Jackson is the quote city manager. Resurrection city had been built in the weeks following. Martin luther king's death the legacy of his poor people's campaign. The national park service had even given the encampment. Its own zip code to double o one three celebrities. Like sidney poitier marlon brando and barbra streisand a visit to lend their support. It's a highly visible rebuke to lbj's great society and the idea. That lady birds beloved beautification campaign offer any kind of meaningful improvement to people's lives as the procession passes. The crowd is singing battle. Hymn of the republic. Written by abolitionist. Julia ward how in eighteen sixty one at the start of the civil war. The secret service tells lady bird. She should not lower her window to listen. Lining the route to arlington. There are crowds at times. Six people deep holding candles in silent vigil. Many who have waited all day for. Bobby's funeral procession to pass a great white moon riding high in the sky. A beautiful night. This is the only night funeral. I ever remember an incredible unbelievable cruel and wrenching time. Eleven days later. A hundred thousand people gather at resurrection city for a rally. It's june nineteenth also known as juneteenth. The days celebrating the emancipation from slavery actor. Ozzie davis master of ceremonies. Bill cosby performs mahalia jackson. And pete seeger saying an earth. A kit addresses the crowd in both english and spanish. Kereta scott king is there. This place holds special meaning for her stand here today. With many mixed emotion it was five years ago. Nine mile lane has husband. Dr martin luther king junior still at this very spot and tall the nation about his dream hushed crowd listens as mrs king reads a message and i should like to read to you a telegram which are seen from another jazz race victimized by the same tragedy which my family and i won't victimized by today on this most important dame all american maya heart and fran With you the finest memorial. Dr martin luther king what be the tangible our country tanks now to implement the program and my husband can't about so deeply dine business apple candidate maybe. The death of our s k. has sapped the will of washington and the country or the hope that peaceful protest can bring real change that the mainstream media had turned on resurrection city. Depicting it as a disaster. It had rained for thirty days. Straight people in the encampment are sick. And they've messed up the grass on the national mall. It takes all of ninety minutes for hundreds of policemen just riot. Helmets and jackets and armed with shotguns and tear-gas dismantle the place. It's the after. Resurrection city is destroyed on their way to the airport lady. Bird and her policy age. Sharon francis drive past the remains of the encampment. We pass the resurrection city site. And she said she wished could know what they were thinking and how they felt news wanted to have an llc with and couldn't know them well enough realized she couldn't lady. Bird is on her way to portland oregon to give a speech to the annual conference of the american institute of architects. It's a profession. That's doing some soul-searching at the moment are architects. Who profited from massive urban renewal contracts. The hulking towers of inner city housing projects somehow complicit in the problems tearing american cities apart wednesday. June twenty six. I had breakfast and read my speech in the comfortable. Little room with the sheraton motor inn and andro. The civic santa by the american institute of architects was having its annual convention with less than six months ago in the johnson presidency. Lady bird is ready to stop pulling any punches. She's introduced by secretary of agriculture orville freeman. Thank you mister secretary. As you may know my concern has been expressed in an effort called beautification. I think you also know what lies beneath that rather inadequate word if ever. There's a time to move beyond flowers. The summer of nineteen sixty eight is it and go straight to the terrible legacy of urban renewal the destructive a of unfettered freeway construction i earnestly hope that acid. The station is remembered for more than its mammoth three ways and vast urban superblocks for more than isolated impersonal gigantic public housing projects of our cities. Too many of these great projects seem to me to be reproaches. Not signs of progress. But like so. Many aspects of ladybird. Johnson the substance of what she's saying goes pretty much unnoticed. Thank you for letting me share this morning. And the thing about her and flowers. It's very hard to shake after knee. That came a panel discussion on nature. Leading off with all the freemen all announced that under your white and very lovely was being named from the the mrs lbj. Another one of those times. When i wish i had acquired a nickname but it just been cloudy all my life. I thought a lot about that nickname lady bird. How it makes her seem so approachable at least in that era but also how it obscures. How serious she was. I wonder if she ever felt it diminished her especially as she grew into her ideas and the work she was trying to do became so much more substantial. Claudia her actual name certainly has more gravitas and it might have felt like a better fit as she became a more powerful public figure but like the thing with flowers a feminized euphemism if ever there was one nicknames can become pigeonholes and their implied identities are hard to escape. If you don't know about audible it's the leading provider of spoken-word entertainment. All in one place audible has the largest selection of audiobooks. So you'll never run out of options choose from bestsellers and new releases. Including my new book ladybird johnson hiding in plain sight. Which is the basis of this podcast. I've been immersed in this work for years. But when i listened to the talented kirsten potter read the book. I hear so many more dimensions to the characters and their compelling stories audible also gives you access to thousands of popular and binge worthy podcasts and now with audible plus you get full access to their popular plus catalogue. You can listen to as much content as much as you want including ad free versions of your favorite shows and exclusive series. New members can always try audible. Plus free for thirty days just visit audible dot com slash site or text site to five hundred five hundred. That's audible dot com slash sl t. or text s i g h t to five hundred five hundred okay. So you're staring at the wall. The one that's looking kinda sad you know the one and you know you need to paint it but what are. The trendy colors does read work with wood. Floors is blue to bold with this couch. Will beige feel to blah. How do i even choose a color. Luckily the color experts at bows bar have heard it all and they're here to help find the perfect color for any room by working with your vision answering all your questions. Start your project off right with free consultation at thou spar dot com slash color. Help hi this is brad milkey from. Abc news and if it feels hard to keep up with everything going on these days got podcast recommendation for you. The show is called. Start here each weekday. My team and i aim to give you a quick straightforward understanding of the day's news. So you can listen and get on with your day. Everything from the latest on cova into what's happening in washington and what it all means for you start here clear reporting from abc's most experienced journalists. Checkout start here wherever you listen lady birds. Indictment of mammoth freeways isn't just a rhetorical flourish for a speech in washington. Dc a bill to fund a new round of highways is making. Its way through congress. The plan will do all kinds of damage to dc communities mostly the black neighborhoods of this segregated capital city and congress has given. Dc's still new local government. A kind of ultimatum. Start building freeways lose the funding for a new public transportation system. The metro in their ambitious plans for the neighborhood of anacostia lady. Bird and landscape architect larry halprin had proposed rerouting part of that new freeway system in order to preserve prime piece of public. Land called kingman island. They hoped to develop it as a vast park in the inner city. The project had stalled. But in the wake of martin. Luther king's assassination. There is renewed momentum for it but if the freeway the island will be more or less destroyed and their hopes for the park along with it unless lbj can be persuaded to veto it. Sharon francis talked about how ladybird approached her. Lobbying effort with lbj wanted to reassure me but all the editorials on material is up to her really of opposition to the bill. She had conveyed to him and she had trying to make the decision for him. Been verse Urging that he veto pleaded bird's not just sympathetic as she told sharon she's working behind the scenes with cabinet members like stu utah who are most opposed to the legislation. But even if he's sympathetic to linden really doesn't want to veto a democrat lead bill justice. He's leaving office. Lbj signs it into law and with it. He signs away any chance that his wife signature legacy project will ever see the light of day august. Sixty eight is convention month. The republicans gathering miami where richard. Nixon is the favorite for the nomination. The democrats will be in chicago. Linden ladybird had to the ranch. But with bobby kennedy gone. Various factions in. The party has started putting out feelers about drafting lbj to the top of the ticket. As far as lady birds concerned linden's decision is capable. She's already started packing up. Her things shipping them home but as they head to texas for the month. It's not entirely clear that lbj. He's done Friday august nine. I was up early. Had a swam with lyndon about twenty. The day was going to be a busy day almost as much air traffic is dully. That was a flurry of arrivals. Got the message that some of the eastern plane was circling and about to land one of the many visitors to the lbj ranches. Mississippi senator james eastland eastland is a democrat yet a hardened opponent of desegregation and civil rights. But he's a senior member of congress and he and the president have to work together. Lbj's invited him to the ranch because he needs something from eastland and vice versa. A brief detour here for context back in nineteen sixty four despite extensive news coverage and public outcry eastland told. Lbj that he didn't believe three. Civil rights workers in mississippi had actually gone missing. Senator thank you sir. The dependent senator eastland on nine one. Free do well. I don't know. I don't believe i don't believe this three minutes. Got down here. I believe leave it for this thursday. Here come down to go go to be interviewed after a six week. Search the fbi found the bodies of the three civil rights workers. James chaney andrew goodman and michael showrunner buried in an earthen dam on a farm in philadelphia mississippi. Not a publicity stunt now in august of nineteen sixty eight as as liz arriving at the ranch. The president is meeting with his secretary of housing and urban development robert. Weaver weavers the only black member of lbj's cabinet. I thought that senator eastland and secretary win. But what are they exactly cozy little company so perhaps could be useful by meetings. They're not to eastland driving around the face by linden conducted his business with the secretary. Senator eastland has come to the ranch to do a little horse. Trading eastland is chairman of the senate judiciary committee. The president has nominated his longtime personal lawyer. Abe fortas who is now an associate justice on the supreme court chief justice. Lbj needs the senator support to get confirmed but eastland has another agenda at the eastern was determined to talk politics. He said you know your husband is going to be nominated don't you. I said no sir paul because not going to be any movement of that sort. That is not with any porsche behind it. And if he were wouldn't exam eastland is surprised at her conviction and her clout with the president who seem somehow taken aback. I look disbelieving as though i had hoped it would happen. That way. But relatively unshaken in his conviction as a democrat eastland is looking at the election. Pragmatically sure he's got differences with lbj like civil rights. But the administration's poverty programs have played well in mississippi and anyway. There's no great alternative. As little as they see. Add as much as last between them. He would rather see lyndon nominated and anybody now before the democratic party but in terms of a last-minute draft in chicago another run for president for lbj. No way family at ruled back to the main house considerable relief so convertible just going around the barn conveying secretary waiver to the plane and that other business securing eastland vote for abe focus. No dice with one foot out the door. Lbj just can't rally that kind of support. And the ford is chief. Justice nomination fails regularly scheduled program will not be seemed tonight so that. Abc news can bring you color coverage of the nineteen sixty eight democratic national convention. Good evening from the international amphitheatre in chicago. Within twenty four hours convention will begin at this moment. It is the column in the eye of the storm just outside. The building is ringed with more police. Than i have ever seen in one place and beyond them there are federal troops convention in chicago opens on monday august twenty six thousands of anti war. Protesters descend on the city. Mayor daley has deployed twelve thousand police officers and with lbj's backing fifty six hundred national guardsmen and five thousand army reserve troops. The cops have shoot to kill orders against anyone out after curfew police state but the bullies haven't heard that yet. Another guard is pushing back with rifles. Some people don't know rifle butterfly. I could see young blond haired man about twenty years old streaming down his face. It's been like this for three straight nights confrontations between youthful demonstrators chicago police department times off. Here's what seemed to be unnecessary and often brutal force against their captives into padding way credible sites chicago this week from afar like a colin of emotions and hip is in ups and please standing by packers have been day without being me. I would like very much team. What is looming up. Because one of the spectacle taveras time twenty old aretha franklin opens the convention with a powerful rendition of the star spangled banner. The new york times reported that quote aretha franklin saying what too many years those of thoroughly rattled orchestra was the first solo version of the star spangled banner. Kind of get a better line back in texas talk. Linden is still having in high. He calls texas governor. John connally to have him sound out. Southern state delegates was. He's land right. would they draft. Lbj the answer is a definitive. No are relaxing. It is to look at this from the distance of a noncompetitive. Talk about going to the convention make thought about valedictory speech to receive good wishes on birthday and break. The i mean no decision on his birthday. While is planning a low key party at daughter. Lucy's house in austin. Lbj's still working on a speech. He might give that night at the convention. He's on the phone with hubert. Humphrey mayor daley members of congress. No i made a plan skill and rather doubt outwear. I might change my mind but I haven't made any plans to go and i don't know august twenty seven. It was probably strange and dramatic and in a way sand birthday as any he'll ever have. Meanwhile back at the ranch president. Johnson had dinner at daughter lucy's house. He celebrated his sixtieth birthday abn but not forgotten by his party. Convenience chicago at lucy's house a small group of journalists sing to the president. Someone asks if he'll be going to chicago. I have not decided yet. Linden says it's almost six in the evening and then sat on the sofa. Lucy brought in his cake. One candle on it. We took land on his lap cut. His cake and gave len apiece promptly began making a mess with all very low key in a way the atmosphere Berdon bites about twenty of their local friends to join them at the ranch to watch the convention on the three console. Set eating dinner off of tv trays in the living room at a station had been made irrevocably on march thirty first but somehow there was a special saying goodbye this week rahu political life. There's candidates set of black and white photos of johnson's in bed. The next morning passing the phone. Back and forth linden ladybird on their girls gathered around the tv set. Just like the rest of the country watching it. all unfold. We go on to this year. Is undergoing convulsions around us at party. Our country the whole world ronald iraqi neha for linden physically and it must be mentally and spiritually and sometimes i think the greatest courage in the world is to get up in the morning and go about the day's work that has things i like batting and on and on every inauguration has a special drama i suppose the special drama of this was the game the best in the has played with richard nixon eight years ago. He was defeated for president of the united states. Something to polishes recover from and like the surprise ending of the story. He's back today. The winner to be sworn in as the thirty seventh president of the united states. Uh former president. Johnson's leaving the capital. To what you came. As a young doorkeeper thirty eight years ago he'll go to andrews air force base where he was taking off so many times before or texas at his ranch. But this time of course it will be very different. Indeed january twentieth steps obey force one and then carrying his faithful companion and stopped at the top the family and turned and waved conscious. Goodbye tableau. I looked over my shoulder. And that was a silver president of the neom around bright and clear and full. Rama demanded rather precious life from one of the astronauts who said that he would look at the moon in years to come and remember what the one that was fair and both linda and i look back at the presidency with one there that with their. It's august nineteen. Sixty-nine ladybird linden head to san clemente california to visit pat and dick nixon. The four of them fly up the pacific coast to dedicate the lady bird. Johnson grove in redwood national park. That bird had pushed for and that lbj signed into law in october. Nineteen sixty eight nixon under intense. Public pressure has little choice. But to build on the johnsons environmental agenda passing a raft of legislation and establishing the environmental protection agency. In april nineteen. Seventy american celebrated. Their first birthday building. Public consciousness had always been lady birds plan as she said in her eighties looking back. I never forgave. Linden's boys for turning my environmental agenda into a beautification project. But i went ahead and talked about wildflowers so as not to scare anybody because i knew is the people came to love. Flowers it eventually care about the land that grew By the summer of one thousand nine hundred seventy protests in the streets and lawsuits in federal court stop construction of all the proposed new highways in washington. Dc including the one that would have destroyed kingman island and in two thousand nineteen. The dc government proposed half a billion dollars for vast campus of arts recreational along the anacostia river. Just like the one. Larry halprin and ladybird had tried to make happen. Nine hundred and sixty eight. Who knows if it'll ever really materialize. But at least today kinmen island is a nature preserve and at the end of nineteen. Seventy lady bird published a white house diary. A carefully edited version of the diary. She kept during her time in the white house. This series includes entries that were in the book and many more. That weren't a white house. Diary made the new york times bestseller list and stayed there for thirteen weeks. Linden's memoir published. The next year. Never made the list just a few short years later on january. Twenty second one thousand nine hundred seventy three lyndon johnson suffered a massive heart attack at the lbj ranch. He was flown to the hospital. In san antonio lady bird was in austin on and arrived at the hospital just minutes after he died he was sixty four years. Old dog of women gathered in houston today as a symbolic torch marked the beginning of a national women's conference or that soviet chase the lack steps in at twenty six hundred mile relay from seneca falls new york site of the first american women's rights convention back in eighteen. Forty eight thousand runners have passed this torch all the way to houston thousand. Nine hundred seventy seven national women's conference in houston leading. Is there with coretta. Scott king bella abzug betty for dan barbara jordan and maya angelou their on stage in front of twenty thousand women rallying behind the equal rights amendment. The conference's captured in a special on pbs. And as ladybird takes the podium. We hear her connect with the women's movement in a way she never did during her time in the white house Start the women's move more to my daughter's than to me. But i have come to know that it belongs. To women of all ages ladybird spends the next thirty years championing all the same issues that define her time in the white house from environmentalism to public access to nature. Documenting the historical record of linden. Johnson's political career and if their presidency had a lady bird johnson died in two thousand seven at the age of ninety four. Thanks for listening to in plain sight. Lady bird johnson in plain sight was written and executive produced by adam pinkus and meet julius wag. It's based on the work i did. For my buck ladybird. Johnson hiding in plain sight executive producers for abc are victoria thompson. And eric johnson our producer as an karki alley gallo was our associate producer susie lou. abc's archival producer associate producer for our cable are isabelle door fall and dana shaffer. This episode was edited by adrian. Lily with additional editing by vanessa. Low and help from lindsey crowder. Well it was mixed by dean white. Our theme music is crossbones style cat power. Original music is composed by sam. Are our music supervisor. Is linda cohen. Our artwork is by teddy blanks chips. And why special. Thanks to kevin famine best-case studios and thanks to joshua cohen. Liz alexi and station dishes. Go at abc audio. Mike kellyanne beth hoppy at abc news long for an end rosenberg and camera. Brown or handled. Our legal and standards review in plain sight is a co production of s k studios and abc audio. Some material was edited for clarity. Time be sure to subscribe to the in plain sight podcast. And if you like what you heard leave us a review now when it matters most the straightforward facts. Abc news is america's number one news number one in the morning number one in the evening with america's most watched newscast number one in late night versus the competition number one in politics and most watched across this historic election versus the competition. 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bobby kennedy dr king senator kennedy linden Lbj Resurrection city white house Sharon francis julius wag crystal jack pudding senator kennedy call senator robert kennedy new york Senator robert kennedy President john f Elizabeth shumita madame schumer yuichi okamoto saint patrick's cathedral frank reynolds
302: Ed Shriver, Strada Architecture, LLC., Pt. 2

The No B******t Marketing Podcast

26:55 min | 2 years ago

302: Ed Shriver, Strada Architecture, LLC., Pt. 2

"It's the Nobis marketing show. I'm Dave fastage CEO of mass solutions, the world's only noble shit. Marketing firm today, we have part two of my conversation with Ed Shriver, one of the founding partners of Strada architectural firm in the first episode Ed talked about why he chose architecture and how his experience in the military helped shaped his leadership style in this particular part of the episode, he delves into how working with Disney impacted him and how he was able to help Disney, and how he and the partners of Strada have infused their own culture and involved over time and how they focus on design with people in mind, hope you enjoy it. Then you get back to the United States New come back to Pittsburgh. Yeah, I came back to Pittsburgh. Couple of friends were either still hang. Around here or or when they heard I was back. They came back. And so I found a job with the little architecture firm that hated. Lasted about two months and I got another job with a bigger firm JSA, and I spent twenty years there and my best friend who inspired me to go into the army. He took my job with little architecture. And then a few years later when that firm folded he came to work at JSA as well. So, so we literally kind of our whole career was like that. But the twenty years at JSA any management and leadership positions there. Yeah. Probably the last eight or ten years were management positions beyond just project management that I, I was operations for longtime. I worked under the directly under the I guess he would be the CFO Tom Schmidt. He was my mentor. So Tom taught me what I hadn't learned in the army, but how how being an architect really worked, and he was great. He was great. I remember a story, I was the project architect for the renovation of the monroeville mall, and we were taking the ice skating rink out of monroeville mon- turning it in. To food court, and I was the project manager and the president of the company was the principal in charge of the project, and I had done all the drawings most of the design work. I did the budgeting, I did almost everything went out to bids and the day that the bids were due Jim Johnson. The president of the company was on vacation in Florida, so he called. Tom and said, would you go with Edward to the bid openings about? So we went out together. I think we had five contractors bid on the project and the average of the five projects was exactly my estimate, which is unheard of absolutely dumb luck. I did no credit for being a great estimator. It was it was probabilistic dumb luck. But after we finished as we're driving back to the office. He says, let's go have a beer, so. He stopped off somewhere in green tree, and had probably ten beers. At one point in the discussion, Tom said, so where do you want your career to go? What do you want to do? And I said, I want your job. And he said, great. That's what I'm looking for. So he became my mentor, and we worked together until yet heart attack live nother six or eight years after that, but he retired after the heart attack and. There was a great relationship. I learned an awful lot from Tom and still think about him a lot mentor is a huge part of all of our lives. Some glad you had the chance to talk about that we've learned a couple of things about Ed Shriver of Strada architects, that when the going gets tough drink beer to make decisions. That's how you ended up in the army. That's how you end up celebrating this great estimate, and then becoming the number two with your mentor. When do you realize the entrepreneurial spirit kicks in that it's time for you to start your own thing? I think it was drinking again. Well, I was part of the AA American Institute of architects, Pittsburgh chapter. I was on the board of the chapter at that time you were the founder, though too well, right. Yes of Strada not AI. Okay. All right now, I'm not that old. So I'm on the board of the a and Alkatiri was also on the board. We know our neighbors, and John Martine was on the board and other one partners. And Michael stern was not on the board. But Michael was a consultant to the chapter on a project we had been working on. So I knew all those guys and I came home after a board meeting and I got a voicemail is back before emails voicemail from the. The president of j they knew president who I did not like in did not have any respect for. But it was a voice mail saying that we, he had just hired a new marketing director for the company and the guy that they had hired name was Tony poli. Well, Tony Pola was Alkatiri partner up until the moment. I heard the had left. He didn't even talk to Allah's completely caught off go. And so, I called the executive director, the, the chapter because in and our good friends, and I said, what the hell do I do with this? I mean, you know, and of course we had been drinking. Yes. Always good to get a second opinion. When you've been drinking Lloyd, I know L del kick. This guy's ass made them. Well it, it got ugly. But, you know, so all of a sudden, there was this little explosion in the architectural community and so shortly thereafter, I got fed up with the JSA dick, and I said, I'm outta here and Al at that point was short a partner by about maybe a month. So when I quit, I didn't quit to go to work with ou-. But when I quit, I had kind of this idea of a firm made of the four of us. And so, I reached out to all of them, and I said, why don't we sit down and talk for a little while? I have this idea about a new firm that I think would be good for all of us. And we got the other head more drinking and kind of hashed out the idea of Strada it so important when you have a company to build the culture, and so you went out to find people at like-minded values and you found the four of you, and that kind of drove the beginning of Strada talk a little bit about how that culture began. And then how it's evolved to where it is today. I think that similar culture is import values are important. But I also think that different perspectives are important. You don't want a firm full of yes, men or people who all think exactly alike, but you do need the same values. And so our thoughts around, what Strada could be was that with these four different perspectives. John John Martine, who is award winning architectural designer John's a great guy. And he's in my mind. Best architect going certainly the best architect, I've ever worked with as a designer Michael was is still outstanding urban designer and landscape architect. Michael went to Harvard. He taught it university of Virginia. He was the project. Manager for the city of Pittsburgh when they redid the entire downtown master-plan. So he managed that whole process. That's the process that put the stadiums where they are. Now it identified the fifth and Forbes corridor as a target that was critical to fix market square. That's all done through Strada note. This was before strana. Okay. That was what Michael had with the city and then Alan, I both had strong practice experience, we knew how to be architects, and do that. Well and such though is a good. It was a good mix and values were there. We wanted to make a difference. We were strongly focused on urban design and city planning, and that kind of thing we weren't interested in doing McDonald's or Ryan homes or things like that. We wanted to work downtown. We wanted to make a difference. That was a period. It wish there were several development, schemes floated about the fifth, and Forbes corridor. And, you know, they were bulldozing sections of downtown and proposals like that. And we were looking at that gun, we could do better than this, both we in the four of us. And as a city, we can do better than this. So those were the kinds of discussions that sort of brought us together. So in in architecture with marketing will we can make fun of when there's lousy marketers? They do like bullshit marketing do lousy creative. They. Do stuff that's just garbage. Okay. Do that, too. But it doesn't doesn't really hurt the world much. I guess other than bad social media. Bad billboards bad messaging. But when there's architects that are compromising the values it impacts a city a region. Talk about that a little bit it does. But it's hard to judge a design if you're not on the inside, you don't know what the budgets are. You don't know what the program is. You don't know what the client's vision was in a weaken. Do phenomenal sculpture. But we can't do buildings until we have a client, who's got a program that wants that we can then solve those problems. But if the building cost ten million dollars and the client can't afford it, then it doesn't matter how pretty it is. And we can challenge the client, we can push them to try to make things better. But in less you. You understand all of those elements. It's hard to judge another architects, work. You know, you can look at the really nice ones and say, wow, that's you know, the Guggenheim wow, that's great. That's very cool. Building probably cost today's dollars twenty five hundred dollars a square foot. Most buildings cost honored and fifty dollars a square foot. Guggenheim's got money. They can do that, that being said, though, I think, philosophically, you're probably being humble, and politically, correct. Because philosophically, you can tell the difference between architects, and I've worked as a company or companies worked with a number of architects in other jobs. I was responsible for some building expansion. I've worked with architects, and there are some that have a philosophy that's a little bit more volume oriented and margin oriented. And when you walk into Strada you can tell the culture and everyone on our team has said this that when you first walk into Strada, you can tell the culture that this is not a cookie cutter a volume based. Architectural firm. Yeah. I think that's true. And thank you. I'm glad that shows, there's sort of maybe three silos one is the cookie cutter repetitious make money things. You know McDonald's when she got McDonald's down, you can make a lot of money doing McDonald's on the other end of the spectrum is the architect, who doesn't really care what the client thinks it's their project, and they own it, and honest to God, I have heard architects say he hired me to do the job. Now get the hell out of the way and I'll design it. And that's the other end of the spectrum mostly because they don't get a lot of repeat clients, but. That's the other side we're more in the middle. I feel strongly that Strada is not so much a design firm, as it is a creative firm that we looked to resolve those issues in the most creative way possible to meet all of the requirements that we had strategic planning retreat last week. And the example, used his idea is a creative design firm. It's not so much about what these iphones look like. It's the fact that there was no conception of this intil Ideo conceived of it. That's what I think, stratas is that kind of combination of technical and artistic and practical and budget all together. How do you make all of those pieces work? It's just. Beautiful and has not code compliant doesn't matter where you can't afford it doesn't matter. So I think the key at least for for me and for stratas focus on creativity. Your big idea is designed with people in mind, and I think you are alluding to that. But talk a little bit more about how design with people in mine resonates with you and your clients and your clients clients. Yeah. That we, we started the firm with that whole concept at that point. We were calling places for people, but it is where we start in the creative process. It's not sculpture. It's not music is it's people places. That's what drives us. That's what we're interested in. I'm fascinated with the whole concept of neuroscience how the brain perceives space, and how space affects our brains. Winston Churchill's great line that we shape, our buildings than they shape us. And that's absolutely true what we don't really understand is how that happens. And so we're working with Disney down at Epcot on expansion to the Japanese pavilion, and it's fascinating to me, how Disney designs their parks because they are so good at creating space that affects people, you know, that makes you feel this way or that way, and how they do that is really fascinating. It's, it's more set design than it is architecture. But when you work with them, you find out how hard it is to make the architecture to support the set design to create the effect. And it's been a real education as. To the neuroscience of architecture talk a little bit about your work with Disney specifically Disney's philosophy of a magic nearing when we started Strada, one of the examples that I had in mind was Walt Disney Imagineering because Disney Imagineering was built out of basically set designers and lighting technicians and people like that, and Walt Disney started putting those people together to create his own design firm, but it wasn't all bunch architects. It was a whole bunch of different design talents together, and he would throw out some new concept. I think we ought to do a show around pirates of the Carribean and then. A bunch of them. Sit down and figure out. What's the story? You know what's the set to support the story? How do we create the lighting? How do we create the sound effects? How do we do all of that? All of these people are in the same design firm effectively, and then they go out and they build it. And that's my idea of what strategy would be doing a sitting down with experts. We have architects, we have interior designers landscape architects. We have exhibit design. We have graphic design. We have a whole bunch of different expertise in the firm. We really liked to find Polly, mass people who have multiple interests in different areas, because those kinds of people are curious, their creative. They're constantly seeing things from different perspectives. And that's the. Kind of people, we wanted Strada is the kind of people who they're interested in architecture, but they might also be training dogs for the blind, or they're learning statistics online at Ed X that kind of curiosity and interests are the kinds of talents that we want to pull together. You can see your passion come out when you talk about Imagineering and design with people in mind, and how they're tied together. You've done some work with Disney in the past and you're doing more now. Well, we're still finishing up the Japanese project right now. We've we've submitted our portfolio to the contracting folks to see we can be put on the approved architect list. So we'll see how the goes, but certainly like to do more there. It's exciting to have you with Disney now and do some rapid fire. When to go back to those three examples that I gave. To start the show. That's Trotta worked on here in Pittsburgh. And I want you just take a few seconds and just tell us the one thing that you remember that's a memorable part of that project, and we'll start first with market square place in downtown Pittsburgh today, that project was the g c Murphy buildings because it's actually seven buildings was the crux of the problem in Pittsburgh, when Tom Murphy, was the mayor and the fifth and Forbes Michael's work on the master plan. Nobody could figure out what to do with that. The Preservationists wanted the building saved, but the developers wanted a tour down. And so that was basically the hang up for g c Murphy for years and client of ours, milk craft finally stepped up and decided to take a shot at it. And our her member, the first meeting the kickoff meeting, and it was in our conference room. There were ten or twelve people and client said, okay, you know, we're gonna kick this thing off. Our plan is to tear the building down. And here's what we want to do. And I said, you can't do that. The Preservationists just crucify haven't you been watching? You've been watching the news for the last three years. I said, it'll never happen. And we had a thirty forty five minute heated discussion about tearing down versus not tearing it down. And finally, Jack by the president of the company said, okay, fine. We won't tear it down. But remember, this is your idea. And so we worked out a way to interconnect seven different buildings and their CFO. Brian Walker worked out of way to make it work economically, there's creativity to Brian would work great in Strada, but anyway, so we created a project that is both economically feasible, it is lead gold level and a historic tax credit project all that without tearing the building down. That's a success are. Let's go to advanced technologies in Pittsburgh. What he remember most about that project. It was the most creative challenge. I can remember as a project not because it was a hard program or anything. But the schedule was. Tight the, the program was constantly evolving. Because when you're doing research, you're trying to guess two years ahead. What kinds of construction you need to do, but the rate of change is so fast that you're tearing out stuff before the painter is because somebody's got a better idea. And things were just volving people were coming go. And from the, the crew it was my most challenging project manager management project. I think it's beautiful. I like it a lot. I just love working with Mark people. You get to work with two hundred PHD's and robotics people. And it's gonna be fun to nother success and the third. One was the north shore place, nor sure place is one of our longest running projects. We actually when they tore down three rivers stadium and opened that whole space. The city put out. Out a request for developers to develop that space in between it and continental real estate was selected to be the master developer in conjunction with both the pirates and the Steelers and so- continental decided that for their first project, they would do a design competition, and they picked, I think six firms actually initially they picked five firms than they added us. We were already working with continental on smaller another smaller project. And somebody said, well, maybe Strada, we gotta give them a shot. So we took that on designed what is now the equitable building. Well, I call it the equitable building now. It's the insurance company over there. But we designed that the third hand report about the, the selection process was that all of the continental real estate, all continental people got together after having all looked at the, the submit. From the Sixers so firms and continentals. I guess he's president or chairman from Frank Cass and his son, flew in from Columbus, as part of this decision, and Frank's son came in and before everybody's even set down, yet, he walks in, and he says, well, if anybody doesn't think stratas the only choice, the year an ass and then he sat down and everyone's looking at each other going well, that was a short meeting. So we got picked and since then we've built everything between the stadiums, except the Hyatt place hotel. What's that like to as part of the architectural from the drove that so anytime you go to the north shore anytime you're in market square is got to be a sense of pride? Yeah. It's great to look around the city and realized, you know, we did that we did that we did that my wife's a tax accountant, and she always tells me that she really envies the fact that I can point things and people can see what, what I do. She's I never get the show anybody their tax return. So it's a great profession. It's a great pleasure to see things get built to be able to point those things out. And there is, of course, the downside, which is when people all look at it and say, I not very good. But it goes with the wow, that's great. You know, sort of washes out it, what's a tool that you could tell our audience that you use on a daily weekday quarterly basis to increase productivity, improved communication or help with your leadership. I don't know that I have any tools in particular, the leadership skills, I learned I learned in, in the army, and it's basically take care of your people, and they'll take care of you. And I think that it's really important that you're always teaching you're always mentoring, but you're also always protecting the people that work with you. And they respect that, that some Nobis words to live by it was there, anything you thought I'd asked you, that I didn't or any last comments you'd like to make. No, I really haven't thought about what you were going to let you. We're gonna ask. No, I don't have anything there. And I think. I've talked enough will, thanks for being on the no BS marking show. Thank you. And to our listeners, thanks for being loyal Nobis IRS. Remember, go to mass Lucien stop biz to sign up for your Nobis weekly marketing fix. And also remember to ask yourself, what's the big idea, and build your story around the answer? It's all about boats solutions. Nobis.

Strada Pittsburgh Disney president army Tom Michael stern Ed Shriver John John Martine JSA McDonald Strada Strada architects Strada project manager partner CFO United States project architect monroeville mall
99% Invisibles Roman Mars on the benefit of slowing down and looking around

The Current

28:44 min | 4 months ago

99% Invisibles Roman Mars on the benefit of slowing down and looking around

"In nineteen ninety five. A college student disappeared on a trip across the usa. Report him missing right away but they wouldn't take it so. His mother started investigating the case file. I started going through and saw. It wasn't interviewed. I joined this mother search for justice or you recording us. i am. Yeah someone knows something season six available now. This is a cbc podcast. Fan of podcasts. Like i am chances are this is one of those familiar. Sounds that brings a bit of a smile to your face. This is ninety nine percent invisible. Hey i can't find that in on the radio. I'm roman mars. You'll turn to that station in the ten years since it launched. Ninety nine percent invisible has become one of the most popular podcasts around with more than four hundred seventy five million downloads. If you have never heard it host roman mars and covers the surprising stories behind everyday objects from the stamps you see on sidewalks to those funny looking waving inflatable men outside of used car lots. He and longtime producer. Kurt kolstad have bundled together many of those stories and some new ones into a new book called the ninety nine percent invisible city a field guide to the hidden world of everyday design. Roman mars joins me now from his home in berkeley california roman. Good morning good morning. Thanks for having thank you for being. I'm reaching you in the midst of a pandemic and you're in california and i know things are grim there. What is life like free these days. We've kind of taken it seriously like in this household in this region for quite some time so even though there's been various stages of of lockdown and and sort of relief Been kind of all locked from me. So so Things are really rough in southern california. Were hoping for the best here. Your dad died in november of covert. He did he. He He he's he lived in In ohio which was also overrun especially during that time period So yeah this is real serious. It's affecting us very gravely and I'm really hopeful that people Take care and do what's right so it gets over with as fast as possible. I'm really sorry for what you've been through And i mean this is not what you talk about on the podcast at all. But i mean given what you've been through and you say you hope people take it seriously. We're seeing me. Vaccines are starting to roll out. But there are way too many deaths on both sides of the border. What is your sense to how those who are in charge are handling this virus right now. I think most of those in charge or not hanlin. Well at all i mean. It's a truly preventable crisis. It's a lot of behavior can mitigate the effects in the spread It was not taken seriously. And it's you know for the most part I'm going to be eager for when our government transitions to who believe in government and believe that government has a role in the public health of the nation. And i think that will only improve things this so personal free. You given what you've gone through but like many of us. You're spending so much more time at home these days in lockdown. What is lockdown. Meant to i mean. How's it practically. How's it changed your life. I mean i work a lot so we're like it mainly affects work. I have the kids round hunt. You know like you have to sort of be a kind of a teacher and guide to them in a different way But you know a lot of the you know the the editing and writing show and tending in meetings. Those are kind of the same. But they're just ramon and they they feel it more distant. I miss staff It's been a surreal an odd. It seems like i'm kind of used to it. The double dose of things is is when it really sort of ways on me like so. We had wildfires in california in august and september. And when i was stuck inside it was bad. But was when i was stuck inside and i couldn't open the windows because of air quality i that was really loose-knit but you know things moved on from there in some ways i mean a book like yours and your podcast is perfect for this time. Because they're both about seeing things with different is in some ways and i just wonder whether i mean it's your sense that you know. The pandemic is kind of unlocking new way of seeing for some people because of of of where we are. And where we aren't. I mean obviously wasn't written for this moment when he was turned in right before. The the lockdown com started here in the us in mid march but it is sort of this strange book of the moment because it is about recognizing the cool stories behind everyday things that are right outside your doorstep and it's it's a field guide to those things and so when this moment when we can't go too far flung Cities and other countries and marvel at the cool things that they have there. You really can look at the everyday things right outside your door and and marvel at those instead outside your door or inside your door avenue in march after the first lockdown began you did an episode that was recorded at home Where you went around your house and described what you saw Let's take a listen to some of that. I am starting in my bedroom. I'm sitting on a casper. Mattress is not an ad. We eat our own dog food and bug as business. Oh i have a casper mattress. But i digress. As i look around i see. I have five windows in this room. Now if i were in england or france or ireland or scotland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries would probably not want this many windows. Let's because back then the more windows you had the more tax you paid. This was all variable from place to place in overtime but the principal was that a window tax was in good standing for a progressive income tax. The bigger the house the more windows higher the tax you all right. So there is the toilet There is an extremely common misconception. That toilet was invented by a man named thomas. Crapper clamper was a sanitation engineer and entrepreneur in the uk. In the late nineteenth century that held a few patents. And he's credited with improving indoor plumbing for toilets he was a good businessman in bala county installed untold a lot of plumbing supplies with the name crapper and company while we here in the bathroom. Let's wash our hands. There was a very good explainer on soap recently. In new york times by fares jaber So molecules look like little sperm with a head that loves water and a tale. That hates water. So when you put soap and water on your hands these little soak tales find things. That aren't water. And they dig their tails into trying to get away. This breaks up bacteria and viruses membranes and surrounds any debris with soap molecules and makes them easy to rinse away win more water and friction or applied for the sake of your own health and for everyone else's wash your hands regularly for at least twenty seconds. That is longer than you think so. Pick a song to keep you on task long before i had you in my dreams you came and captured my imagination. Those things are never what they seem. I never have to worry. Because i know you are better than being the milo linen do string but other than the promise of a good one thing better than a big book and betty page pictures even if it comes with the us subscription better than the first time that you saw on the podcast. Yeah but i was moved by this. Really remarkable episode of reply all where they dissect it that sort of lost and And so it was on my mind when i was recording. Are you surprised that it took you this long to to give a guided tour of your house. I mean it sounds like a normal episode in some ways of and visible. It's it's funny because So much of the origin of the show was inspired by The book at home by bill bryson which is essentially the that you know but More learned and better written And so eeo it. It did make sense. It just was like you know. The lockdown happened so much was happening in the world and now they're a bunch of people work on it not not just me. It's really a made by humans and you can feel it and if something's happening in the world we we try to reflect and there was this moment where it just felt like the thing. We had slated for the next week even though it usually takes us you know. Six to eight weeks to make an episode was just inappropriate and i wanted to reflect the time and and give people kind of comfort and have a fun moment in because we were all kind of locked in homes and and and maybe we could enjoy that space and encourage people to stay in. Let me ask you something. Also giving people comfort a lot of asserts dealing with anxiety and stress in the midst of this and i had heard that people were listening to the sound of your voice to help them fall asleep during the pandemic. Is this true here. I hear that a lot. I you know. I think it's true you know. The show has calm town. I've always wanted the show to sound like it was a friend or a voice inside your head and i think that is comforting to some people. You mentioned some of the roots of this. This started A decade ago As a project of a l public radio and the american institute of architects in san francisco. What were you trying to do. I mean what was that. The elevator pitch for nine you. I was working in the news department. Kale of you and The general manager matt martin. Call the office with with this idea. That the a wanted to kind of have a little drop into play dorning morning edition here in the. Us radio in states and it would be about a local building and Would i be instead of what what i would think of that. And immediately i wanted to expand it to the whole the broader concept of design. Like not just a cool building but you know a curb. Catis a sewage great. You know something like that and it evolved from from there. And that's what i mean. That's what the title means ninety. Nine percent invisible. It it of lose two things. I actually that came out at a meeting is recalled of different types of designers when i was a planning the show and there was like a landscape architect and a product designer Building engineer and i was like what's a unifying thing that you all do. Besides the word design. I didn't want the word designed the title at all. For some reason. I was very against that and The this consensus was That wh- what they do they do it right. It's it's ninety nine percent invisible. And and i loved that idea. It was really of aug. to me what's wrong. What's wrong with the word design. he does. I just didn't want to be tied to it. In this weird way i i found it. I dunno. Ugly are cumbersome. I i liked the word design. Just fine and use it. Hold the time We have a design bell in in the office a week. Sometimes we get pitches. That are very far afield of You know maybe. Our original purview and But we sorta covered them anyway. So when one is buried designing the design bell in the office but but besides that I just i kind of wanted it to be more poetic than the word design. You've talked about this being a mindset that these are your words allows you to go out armed with type of curiosity and questioning so that you notice these things and can support the good ones. Tell me more about that. What does that mean. It's pretty easy and you know our brains are made this way on purpose to ignore the things that we see every day So that we notice the changes like the tiger. That's coming out you know. And so what. What i like about the sort of the project of the show over ten years is i know this is how it's worked on me this curiosity of the every day and paying attention to it and noticing that these things are Choices made by usually smart people to make our lives better is like a lovely way to navigate the world. because it's it's it's really easy to get caught up in the bow design design of things that aren't working And eight noer the ninety percent of things that are working really well for you and Making life better and and also that there are stories behind those decisions and those stories are interesting and just makes the world More delightful delight is one of my favorite words and delightful kind of perfect for this. Is it difficult though to spark that delight in something as banal as a sewer grate or a bench until you tell somebody. There's a reason why there's an arm in the middle of that bench so that somebody can't lie down for example you know i think in it can be hard. But that's just what we do like. That's the that's the place i've staked out. And at this point i think it works like the people who were on board for the shower or onboard for it. It's pretty fun To have those moments of connection and to talk about a thing in a new cool way and make you You know sort of enjoy it or get angry about it just notice to scare and and and either of those things. I'm i'm looking for. Hey parents if you're looking for some screen free family fun will you're staying home. Check out the story store podcasts. From cbc kids and cbc podcasts. New story store shorties are released every week. These short original and hilarious stories fit anywhere in your day from breakfast to bedtime. The story store available on smart speakers or wherever you get your favorite podcasts throughout the nineteen eighties a strange phenomenon with sweeping north america. They were in a panic and like people in a panic. They want solutions allegations of underground satanic cults torturing and terrorizing children the thing is there were no satanic cults sprang on children and nearly thirty years later the people touched by it all are still picking up the pieces. This isn't a work of fiction. This is a work of history satanic panic available. Now wanna play a little bit of one of my favorite episodes. This and you talk about connections. This is such a great example of you kinda pulling together design and politics and culture. This is from episode one hundred twenty. Four of ninety nine percent. invisible is called long box. I went to graduate school in athens. Georgia which is a great place to be from the ages of about eighteen to twenty five if you like going out to bars and listening to live music. Even though athens is a fairly small college town it's had a huge an important music scene for decades and the most famous ban to come out of the athens. Undoubtedly was r e m to be provocative right from the start. I'm going to say that. Rem's out of time is the most politically important album in the history of the united states. And this provocateur. Is reporter whitney jones. This isn't one of those. Oh it's a soundtrack to a generation or anything like that out of time made such a huge impact because of its packaging. The box out of time originally came in led to a bill being passed in congress and an actual concrete law. As i said. I have long supported the idea of motor-voter. I'm pleased to be able to keep the promise today that i made on this rock the vote card. Which still has my savior back in new hampshire shaking his hands after the bill. Signing we identified ourselves as rock vote. He said you guys got this past. It was really one of the most surreal moments of my life roman mars. What exactly is that. I love that episode but for people who don't know what what is the connection between rem. I mean and your hometown of athens georgia bill clinton at this time period Cds were In their ascendancy and the packaging of sees was this Long cardboard box because you could fit two of them Upright in the old ben's where vinyl record us to go and so that was the package he put a cd along box that more than doubled the sort of surface area of it. So it could stand upright flipping through the benz and rem was an environmental m amount environmentally-minded a group that did not like these cardboard wasteful boxes and so they made a deal that if you put the cd in a long box They designed these coupons to register to vote in the in the rock. The vote campaign and Because of that that widespread They they they would send in. They would send in support for this bill. They were overwhelmed by it. A congress was and It led to the passing of the motor voter bill and so It was a strange thing. Where morality and ethics of of the band. Hit this sort of design of the packaging and changed the law and it was a really kind of fascinating story. What do you love about that story in terms of what it is that you're trying to do with the podcast. I love that sort of that intersection of the mundane of and Something profound you know like that. There's a this this little thing that a decision made because of the shape of a been To to To put A record in Led to the shape of the cd that needed to stand upright. And then they had to deal with that. And the and the the record companies could not abide the fact that a cd would be released without a big cardboard piece of packaging and the way they dealt with it and it led to a law. It's that cascade of decisions that that have a story pint. each one of them that lead to something bigger. I mean that's just like our bread and butter. We love that stuff. Okay so i want to ask some questions of things that these are things that you talk about but things that i have been musing about as well weird nerdy type things like stamps and sidewalks so in our neighborhood there art stamps that say when the sidewalk was put in and i sort of became obsessed with looking at those stamps because it tells you the date some of them are from two thousand and nineteen one goes all the way back to nineteen sixty. Why is there a piece of sidewalk from nineteen sixty. Tell me about what you've learned about the stamps that we see on sidewalks depending on the area. They're they're standardized in different ways but often when new construction is is done and the sidewalk has put up. The construction company in charge of that project puts in the sidewalk and then they then they stamp it with their with you know the kind of basically an ad for their construction company and i love these things as well like. They're all over the east bay where i live and And you can sort of mark the date of the neighborhood through these construction projects you can even follow. There's this one company called schnorr which was concrete layer in the neighborhood. And you can follow these from the you know. The various like kind of nineteen hundred to the thirties and forties and the mark on him says Schnorr and that says schnorr and sons and that says schnorr brothers and you can follow the the the the evolution of like this company called snore. You bring the sons into the business. Dad retires and the short brothers company. And you can watch this over decades and it's it's this information layer about a local business. That is right there underneath our feet that you can read. Great example of paying attention Another example of that is The plaque always read the plaque is what you say. And these are you know. Historical markers these are plaques insides of buildings or on a bench in front of someone's home why what do you think people can learn by reading the plaque again. It's right there. There's like an information. Where about the built world. That sitting right there in front of you. And i think they're always worth reading even though they are absolutely incomplete in because they can't tell a whole story on plaque but they just tell you something to get. You started and get you intrigued. And they're worth interrogating like you should always read the pipe. You shouldn't always like believe everything on the plaque. You wonder whether the that takes even greater significance. After the summer that we've had with black lives matter protests and people paying it. Why is that statue there. And who is that statue of. And why is it in this neighborhood in two twenty nineteen or twenty one. Yeah yup and in one of the things. That's really important about historical markers in particular. Is that there as much. Even maybe even more reflection of time that the plaque was erected rather than the time that they're depicting like a lot of the you know the civil war monuments in the american south or you know were erected in the twenties and thirties as a really a tool of oppression. even though they're commemorating a time in the eighteen sixties. I was pleased to see notice in the book of our In toronto our beloved trash pandas That we love to hate or hate to love and the innovative so-called raccoon proof compost bins In the city of toronto somehow cooked up when you take a look at those bins and the raccoons. What's the bigger story there. It's really just a design story about our values and the war. We have with us and anthrax that that have thrived in our cities. You know that one was just kind of fun more than you know. Because what. I love about toronto's Relationship with the raccoon is it. It's kind of fun. Love hate in the end. It's you know it's a nice of cold. War of escalation of arms race of these really really clever animals and All the things we have to do to make it so that Ah latch is Still usable by by humans and can be an open bowl by these clever little creatures with creepy little hands and so And to me that that is is hilarious. It's their city. we live in it. You have a a section. And i've been thinking about as well that talking about the nameless places in cities near the patch of grass maybe between highways or the little spots that it's hard to define what exactly they are but they're still part of the urban fabric due date offer a to think about space differently. What should we be thinking about when we see. You know you're in the car and you're driving and you see this little patch of green summer. I think giving it a name just gives you a way to like grab onto it as a concept and not think of it is just dead space that you ignore so that like that little triangle that's created by an on ramp and so a highway This fellow graham carl allen Named a freeway eddie. And it's as poetic and of aug. And it makes you think about it as a space and thinking about all the times you've seen bases like that and therefore kind of use it. There's a lot of debt space in cities that be used in interesting ways and it's kind of fun to engage without in your mind even if it's just you know just to engage with it of as people use it is to walk over it. You talk about desire paths for people who don't know what that phrases. What does that mean so for example if you if you imagine parkin there's Walkways there you know like sidewalks and have concrete on that are planned by designer but if if they aren't efficiently laid out and you there's a ninety degree turn coming up that's the concrete pathway. And you just wanna get across Often people like you don't walk across the grass and created a little diagonal cut through and And when somebody sees that piece of grass tramp down the you know they also tramped down on it and his recreates this sort of dirt path and those desire paths are You know they're just kind of people voting with their feet as to how they wanna use a space and i find them fascinating Because they are this intersection and about what public space like how it was designed versus how it's used and It's worth paying attention to desire past because We could learn how to use spaces better if we pay attention to the people that you do. You worry about how cities are going to change because of this pandemic i mean we aren't at. They're walking in those public spaces. We're staying home And people worry about where people are going to work where people are going to live. You know people whether they'll take feel comfortable and taking transit for example. Do you worry about the future of cities i do. Don't i don't have a like existential worry about the future. Cities cities have always been through lots of changes. And i do think that said he will survive and people you know being together and creating culture together as like a i think a fundamental need of ours You know around here. Even though i think we've taken the lockdown pretty seriously There's more people walking in my neighborhood than ever before you know like like they're out all the time they're just not gathering in bars and stuff. It'll be interesting to see what sticks in again it kind of depends on if this is a part of a wave of pandemics. That's going to be in our future with some people predict or not but what i found interesting about the moment was all the rapid changes that happen so quickly to cope in a city like all the plexiglas that went up almost instantly. Like i don't even know where you get a ten foot piece of plexiglass but it showed up in the corner store. You know like a fixed to the ceiling So quickly that i. I was sort of amazed by that. And the tape on the floor that gives you guidance as to where to be which. Actually i kind of enjoyed that one. And i kind of hope that one. Why don't like because you know. I find navigating. Public spaces can be kind of Anxiety inducing and knowing where to stand knowing if you're in the right line on whatever and there's a information layer available you know to space on the floor. It's available to you to provide so much guidance. That is rarely used and i i kind of found it cool like you know like maybe it won't be you know hope it's not dire and you need to stay six feet away from people but i do kinda hope that Like the floor is used to guide you through a single serpentine line so you can efficiently get through a register like that would be pleasing to me. We've been forced to slow down. I mean part of it. Is you see those things and you see them in a different way. But you're also mean people aren't traveling as much and so hopefully they aren't And so you're spending time walking around your neighborhood or walking around community and and learning about the streets that you've been around for a long time what happens when you're able to unlock that kind of curiosity and people do you think i think it makes the world look a little bit better place because you recognize the fact that there are a lot of things that are working for you and when things in the world seem broken. I do a show for ten years where i've talked about how great you know. Roads and bridges and these municipal projects that we all get together and build the things that we can't build on her own and aren't they sort of marvelous and and and sometimes a really beautiful to look at. But you know if. I'm in my car and i'm you know the word it to where i want to get to. Because of construction. I can get impatient and i get angry and i could be like wise. I can't deal with this way now. Whatever and to slow down and go. Hey you talk about how much you loved these things. They have to be made some time so just chill the just tell the hell out. Just take the moment of recognizing that the world is trying to be made better for you and And i think it just it resets my mind a little bit to think about the care that goes into making the world I've become you know much more optimistic person Through the production of this show just because of that just node seeing that you know people care. They're trying hard and they're making stuff in there making so for me. It's made me see my we'll differently. Which i love Real pleasure to talk to you roman thank you oh my i really enjoyed. Thanks so much. Roman mars is the host of the podcast ninety nine percent invisible and co author of the book the ninety nine percent invisible city also a founder of the podcast collective radio topa. He spoke with us from berkeley california for more. Cbc podcasts go to cbc dot ca slash podcasts.

schnorr Kurt kolstad hanlin athens california Crapper clamper bala county In new york times united states cbc jaber whitney jones cbc matt martin bill bryson ramon berkeley
Green New Deal

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

30:50 min | 1 year ago

Green New Deal

"You're listening to Monaco. Does the finest I program all about the cities we live in. I'm Angie talk coming up on the program. At building an inclusive green economy were ensuring prosperity for everyone and that actually what we do as a municipal government we need to lead by example the new green deal. We hear about to every week on the news so this week we decided to unpack this bowl. Proposal is all about how it wants to tackle both inequality and climate change at the same time we're in Los Angeles to explore the plans of Eric Garcetti. <hes> pity meet one of the co-authors of the original green new deal published in the U._K.. Over ten years ago and head over to New York for the state governor has just passed climate action bill all of his own plus what roads architects play lake in its discussion that coming up right here on the urban est with me so welcome to this week's this program ever since Donald Trump decided to pull the United States out of the Paris climate agreement is fallen upon city and state leaders to fight the climate crisis head on in the weeks months followed announcement. We saw a mobilization of leaders across the country committing honoring the ambitious goals of the deal. I'm progressive. Politicians have also been getting behind the notion of a green new deal that looks to fix the economy and protect the environment to is named takes inspiration Gratien from Roosevelt's new deal that helped pull the U._s. out of depression. The idea of for modern green version has gathered pace since gaining support of Progressive Democrats One U._S. City that has been at the heart of the debate is is Los Angeles. Eric Garcetti has created a climate emergency mobilization department and the first Climate Emergency Commission in the world and back in April. He announced his green you deal for his city setting in Los Angeles on the course to be carbon neutral by twenty fifty and driving. The implementation of this plan is the city's chief Sustainability Officer Lauren Favor O'Connor Monaco's bureau correspondent in Los Angeles Collado Roberta calls out with Lauren on the sidelines of the L. A. Design Festival to understand how the city got to this point and what lies ahead for better or worse. We were ready on the day. We knew that this was the big announcement that president isn't trump was making back on June first two thousand seventeen but who's counting and instead of crying in a corner and being so frustrated with the world around us mayor Garcetti decided he needed to move into action and the moment that announcement was made think he was really the first public figure to come out and say that if the president is out were still in I'm going to be working with my counterparts. My peers around the country to show that America has not turned its back on the international community and so we went out that day with a statement of network that mayor Garcetti created back in two thousand fourteen to really support what the administration was doing under the Obama administration than sixty mayors on the day came out and said we will uphold the Paris climate agreement by the end of that day our membership and climate mayors doubled and by the end of that week our membership in climate mares quadrupled and now we're four four hundred twenty-five climate mayors across forty eight out of fifty states representing seventy one million Americans are saying we're upholding the Paris climate agreement and so no there was no question in megacities mind what we needed to do and it just shows so you know regardless of you've federal government policies if you've truly don't identify with it does another way around it now. Another thing you mentioned was this idea of every citizen here in Los Angeles have access to be part of the green economy deal. You get a lot of community I._T.. Pushback I guess people saying you know what yes there's all. These incentives and interior is all great but I simply cannot afford it because it is a long-term investment or has city hall made it easier for people to actually join said economy me you know it's been really interesting and exciting the reaction that we've been getting from communities across the city we actually hear from communities and families and not the were asking them to but that they'd be willing to pay more for to be able to access more recycling or solar on their roof for all these things they'd be willing to do it because they know that it's going to pay off in the end and that's what we're asking because actually we have programs in place to enable them them to be paid to put solar on their roof or to work with us to improve the amount of food recovery that we do in homes and businesses so we're not asking this to come at a cost of people but we're see that there's there's such urgency in the minds of our families across Los Angeles that they're willing to go the extra mile to make a difference in their children's lives now. That's not across the board. It's not all nirvana right. There are people that are genuinely concerned an anxious about the changes that we need to make people are concerned for their jobs that they're in the current fossil fuel industry and we have to be really intentional about how we help people through that transition. It's not overnight but it is a transition and we do have since we are setting these goals as we have the ability to help you part of that transition. There are people that are concerned that were maybe asking them to get out of their car and to take public transit or to take shared vehicles that are electric themselves that may be the case in some places but it also also as people start to take on these new habits they see their improvement in their quality of life and so these are definitely leaps of faith that some people have to to make myself included. I drive to work. I don't live near metro station so I drive my electric vehicle to work and I know that I can because I got charging at my workplace and you know near my home and and those are promises we have to make to Angelenos as well now while we were talking and seeking about numbers there was one that was mentioned in talk that was really striking to Mitch was the nine hundred thousand trees initiative. Tell us a bit more about that so we know that trees play such an important role in an urban environment like Los Angeles for many many reasons for public health an air quality the improvement for shading extreme heat and hot weather that we're seeing increasing incidences of high heat days from climate change it absolutely improves the liveability of communities moorpark space more greenspace ace by having treeline streets and so we have some very ambitious goals as you said ninety thousand tree planting over the next three years twenty twenty one and by twenty twenty eight increasing the tree canopy the of our most needed neighborhoods by fifty percent. That's a significant amount of programming. We finally been able to restore our budget for tree planting and maintenance to pre recession levels. So we have to come back from a lot of lack of investment over the last decade in our trees and green infrastructure so now we've restored them to whether used to be we're hiring an urban forrester for the first time in the city's history and developing updating for many many years Urban Forestry Management Plan. That's going to allow us to look at areas of most need the types of trees that will thrive and really bring those attributes back to our communities that was lauren favor connor chief sustainability officer for the city of Los Angeles and she was speaking to Monaco's Kaleta Rabelo now while the concept of green new deal has been gaining being momentum after getting the backing of leading Democrats in the United States Congress. This is not a new idea in fact twelve years ago in the United Kingdom. The green new deal group was created bringing together environmentalists and experts from the water finance energy politics to find a solution to the ongoing climate breakdown that conclusions were published in two thousand eight in a report called the green you deal the analyst author and campaigner painter Andrew Sims is one of the co-authors of that original green you deal and he joined me a little bit earlier back in two thousand seven when the financial crisis was starting to kick off there were a range of individuals working in things like green energy renewable energy the broader environmental agenda but also people looking at some of the big macro flaws in the economy. We gathered together in a cafe in south London said we think something needs doing about about this because it wasn't just that there was a problem to do with the climate back then you had a triple whammy if you like the financial crisis was kicking off there was seen to be a systemic failure of banking occurring the oil price was over one hundred forty dollars a barrel which itself was driving really high food prices plunging tens of millions of people into hunger around the world and they will also extreme weather events happening which were leading to crop failures so we thought we need a solution we need a way to reengineer the economy to set it on a more sustainable path both in terms of how it operates fundamentally in terms of his kind of financial system but also in terms of what is delivering what it needed to deliver at that time was getting the economy onto a path of being climate-friendly but also insulating it from the external shocks that came from the big geopolitics of energy extremely high prices and the rest of it so gather together and we published a report with green new deal which had a sort of to step process to it. The report was published in two thousand eight as the financial crisis was getting into it sort of full stride and we suggested the way that you could solve the economist problems at the same time setting on a low-carbon path and generating the kind of jobs that we needed in every constituency was massive investment in a low-carbon transitions dancing with the retrofitting of the nation's <music> housing stock. We've got your twenty six million plus houses most of which reportedly energy inefficient and that by doing that you could provide any economic stimulus you could tackle fuel poverty you create more convivial living conditions for people at the same time setting the country on this transition pathway for for low-carbon now at the time it was picked up a little bit some of the Political Parties in Europe. Pick it up picked it up one or two of the United Nations institutions picked it up but it fell on fairly death is in in terms of Maine the mainstream political parties in the United Kingdom globally that was a wave of so-called green stimulus spending in Britain the things which for announced by then Labor Chancellor of the Exchequer at us to darling translated through you over three year period into no more than half hour delay in the accumulation of Britain's greenhouse gases and was only focused on cashing in your old car for one the met the European average fuel efficiency standard and swapping hang out some old borders for more efficient boys so it was kind of accepted in theory at the time but nothing done in practice and just tell me Andrew the idea here is not that you you stop the economy functioning not that you say we shouldn't have production that the economy is bad in itself but the reengineer the way the economy is Ron so that you can be a bit more sustainable in in the things you do you can be more carbon-neutral in the in the in the way that you run cities for example so it's not opposed rose to the economy O- on the country it's it's a reimagining of the economy. It's a way of getting the economy to do. The things that you want to do to give you good quality of life to give you good quality jobs to give you cleaner to breathe to give you cities which convivial to move through an easy to get around to give you homes which are pleasant to live in in in heat ways the likes of which we're experiencing in Europe the moment it's about finding places safe homes for your savings. One of the great things about renewable energy is that the period of time that you expect I said of wind turbines a windfarm to operate over beautifully matches a typical savings period for a pension. It's about getting the economy to deliver better quality of life and to allow us to thrive within whilst tackling the what had been cooled existential environmental threats that we face at the moment like climate breakdown and tell us when we come down to the level of the city what impact do think the green new deal could have had or could have their I live in London one of the great cities but also sadly in spite of our advanced level of development still a very polluted city Assissi in which the last cost estimates suggested that ten thousand people each year die prematurely because of our poor air quality if you imagine in city light London if we were to green the city both by having improved clean public transport so that we were less reliant upon the car that would have a huge impact on the health of our children and older people and indeed everybody if you could imagine physically draining the city by increasing the amount of green space available that would also have a huge be a huge huge bonus for our health and well being we know that more contact with green spaces is fundamentally important for mental health and cities can be lonely place in fact just a few days ago London became declared as the first National Park Hong City. That's an invitation to re imagine your urban spaces that we live in to see them for their potential for us to have a better relationship with the natural world so there are huge positives about meeting economic goals meeting environmental goals meeting social goals to do with better health and better wellbeing all there for the taking and as the debate about the green new deal takes off in the US do feel the branding of these changes visit the notion of coming back to the concept of agree. New Deal is likely to take off in the U._K.. And in other European citizens all well. What's interesting is that it almost took the green new deal to be taken up by the new intake of exciting young Democrat senators in the states to reignite interest in other parts of Georgia and now we have Yoenis verifier kissed going around Europe pushing the idea? We have the green parts of. You're pushing the idea in Britain. We have the opposition Labor Party bringing forward initiatives around that and several independent initiative so it seems that the the green seed has been truly planted and is already beginning to sprout in the political soil of your the question will be for is whether we take advantage of this in a timeframe and with the urgency that the climate science tells his is necessary and it's still the case that wall lip service this is being paid to these ideas we're having national governments and declaring climate emergencies but still pursuing policies to lock in some of the old polluting ways of doing things whether that's expanded airports or whether that's giving tax breaks to fossil fuel companies so there was a gap between the awareness that we've arrived at with the debate around the green you deal and practical steps to actually do something practical constructive and coherent in policy terms so you remain positive about the potential here for us. Ah Changing asset is and and changing the way we live in the near future their actions that we can begin taking today there are actions which are happening today that if you would join the dots were all the most progressive policies to do with introducing renewable energy introducing Clean Public Transport retrofitting people's homes you would end up with an almost perfect city as it stands at the moment all those things are not happening in the same place but we looked to the major cities of world especially cities like London to be pioneers and to create a world which we can all thrive in Britain Andrew Great speech you and inspiring stuff thank you now. You may have missed it. Among the splurge of doom and gloom headlines has been one good piece of environmental news to recently emerge last week New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law the climate leadership and Community Protection Action Act is billed as New York's answer to the green new deal being championed in Washington. The new legislation is highly ambitious in its scope and if it meets his goals the state will switch to seventy percent renewable energy by twenty twenty thirty and go carbon-neutral might twenty fifty this will not just be one of the most ambitious laws in the nation but also one of the most progressive in the world are America's editor at large at stocker sat <hes> with the New York Times and Bonnard who covers the region's climate an environment beat to impact little I would it means for the city and the state this New York State. Law is one of the world's most ambitious pieces of legislation nation past anywhere in the world. It's an effort to completely transform the economy of New York state in order to reach a point by twenty fifty where there will be zero carbon emissions from the state's economy in May know exactly the flown under the radar but it hasn't received maybe the attention that it should have given that it is potentially anyway such a watershed moment. I just wondered what your thoughts on that were well. I think that makes sense because there have been so many extreme weather events events and so many alarming reports coming out about climate change. There's also the extinction rebellion movement and a lot of social and political movements around climate change that grab a lot of headline and they should whereas state legislation is nuts and bolts governance issue that might not be sexy headline especially in international news but in this case it really deserves more attention because we're talking about the region that includes New York City this is if it were country on its own it would be one of the world's largest largest economies and it seeking to lead the way in developing new green technologies transforming the way we get our electricity the way we drive the way we heat our houses and all these different aspects of life in order to reach this very ambitious goal and I wonder if you could just unpack it a little bit more. Obviously you mentioned the fact that by twenty fifty states looking to go carbon neutral but what are the steps along the way and involves a very ambitious cut in emissions not just adjust for twenty fifty and maybe we can look at some of the winners such as win power for example and also just how much say this city New York would have to change in order to me or those goals okay well first of all in order order to go to seventy percent of electricity coming from renewable sources by twenty thirty which is one of the interim goals of the plan in order to do that that means radically increasing the amount of wind and solar energy that we use it's currently only about four percent of what is used in the state so that means a huge investment and huge new construction of wind and solar energy facilities which is also expected to create a lot of jobs and opportunities for investment assessment. We don't only have to reach seventy percent but the total amount of electricity generated is going to have to increase as well because another part of the plan involves moving away from natural gas and oil powered heating and also a big push to move of two electric cars if more and more cars and more and more heating systems are driven by electricity that means we need more electricity total now governor Cuomo has been decidedly luke warm on an environmental bill. It was in Albany without being able to be passed for several years and now there's a suggestion that in order to sign it now he watered down the components within it all that people who are disappointed that it doesn't go far enough absolutely some of the groups that were critical to the bill's passage with their activism have said that while they're happy at past they're disappointed in the watering down of the social justice part of it so governor Cuomo did support the bill in the end it really the turning point was the change in control of the state Senate but then Cuomo himself did have some questions about the hard requirement to send a certain percentage of the investments to certain poor communities and language which was changed to offer a little more wiggle room in that area now it says that a certain percentage of the benefits have to go to those communities which could be interpreted as to say that you don't have to actually locate a green power plant and all the jobs that come with it in an environmental Armenta justice community if you can say that community is benefiting in some other way so there's a little wiggle room there and some of the supporters of the green new deal aspects of this are disappointed in that but they say it certainly better than nothing the grey areas of politics talking of politics. I wanted to know how susceptible this bill is to changes in Albany. We were talking earlier about how a change in the legislature it turning fully democratic at allowed this to happen in the first place on their fears that if Republicans rest back control of one of the chambers this may go down the drain well it is theoretically possible. I will say that to actually pass countervailing legislation that would repeal this law would require a passing both houses in the New York state legislature and the House of Representatives in the state legislature has been democratic for a very very long time and I don't think that's likely to change the political problem that the law was trying to solve was that in the past governors have issued. Would set some goals and guidelines and ambitions for the state but they weren't enshrined in law so when an administration would change the next one could just completely deplore ties or change the climate goals now these goals are enshrined in law and there's even a provision saying that state agencies in the future when considering other policies or permits or actions that might not on the face of them look related to climate change. They have to actually consider the impact of those decisions on on states ability to reach its climate goal so that means when certain land use policy or building a pipeline or any other kind of issue comes before the state government is supposed to take that into account bylaw final question. Do you think that New York is going to be able to follow through with all of these plans. It's one thing saying it's GonNa do it. But do you think it's GonNa meet those targets well. That's the huge question we are talking about a really transformative set of actions and it's not a lot of time when you look at it but there is quite a lead time before anything really start to happen. There's a working group that has to meet that will take two years to set out more specific goals and then those goals will be handed to the state agencies to draft regulations and so it'll be you know probably three or four years before specific regulations are given out to say what people in companies have to do to comply with this so obviously these targets are very ambitious but there is not a clear roadmap to how we're going to get there a report by Monaco's Nichols America's editor at large Ed Stocker finally on today's episode architects for climate and the United States the architecture lobby has come out in support of the green new deal calling on architects architects and designers to become activists within the industry to understand what this means Monaco's Colorful Bella is but with Sydney Franklin the associate editor the architects newspaper. Let's hit that conversation essentially what they were doing is outlining four key things that need to happen within the profession and the day-to-day worker firms for us as a collective group to fully support the greed new deal so I'll just go through them number one practice it just needs to be reformed so firms across the country larger small need to promote diversity and equal pay and allow voices to be heard no matter their experience or age because everyone has something of value to contribute contribute number. Two resilience needs to be redefined from the way it spent traditionally tackled over the past fifteen years in terms of elevating goals for carbon neutral cities and structures number three the architecture lobby believes that technology needs to be reassessed which that's their term and it's huge so the question is how will automation and more advances in building construction help decrease build times and lesson impact on the environment and the last asking is that Labor needs to be Reim- powered which is actually two parts architects need to reject collaborating with groups that utilize unfair labor practices and they also need to seek to only use building materials that are truly sustainably made across the world and in the U._S.. So these four elements speaks to how the profession should move forward in the next few decades as we fight climate change and the growing inequality here in the U._S.. Now I know that a couple of months before the statement the American Institute of Architects also issued its support for degreen deal. I kind of it kind of begs the question then what role can architect play then in this discussion absolutely so it's interesting because the A._l.. Last year before the greed new deal really got heated they had told architects to really see themselves in a role as an architect attacked activist and whatnot means is thinking of yourself beyond a service professional who simply just engages with developers and the government to make buildings happen to design but instead to really be political political and think about yourself not just as an architect by that someone who's like embedded into you know civic participation and thinking about you know what architects can do you specifically with their own unique knowledge to push those four things forward that I mentioned from the architecture lobby in terms of making sure that their own internal practice is kind of reengaged and that means diversifying find the workforce making sure that all voices are heard redefining resilience of course is huge architects are looking for to tackling new ways to fight climate change in you know everything from hurricanes hurricanes to earthquakes global warming. It's all super super difficult and Rian powering Labor is another thing that is I personally think is a huge huge item on the list in technically means that it's two little hard right now to understand where exactly building products are being sourced from and whether or not that Labor across the world is being done by say oppressed populations such as children or immigrants we definitely know that some grand pieces of architecture and the world have been built by what you could call modern-day slaves so it's kind of a call for architects to be hyper hyper aware of you know what what they're doing and how they're designing from top to bottom Sydney Franklin the associate editor the architects newspaper speaking to Monaco's Kaleta Rabelo and that's all of this edition of the honest with me Andrew talk this show who is produced by Colored Rubella research by Nick Minnie's and edited by Alex Port Phoenix to play you out of this episode of the Urban Est his Sharon Jones and adapt kings with this land is your thank you for listening to g Z. Lovers from onto the team and that was made for you yeah why not take a wonder into the wonderful world of Monaco with an annual print subscription. You'll receive ten issues of the magazine. A year plus are seasonal specials. The forecast Austin the escapist subscribes to one year plus and premium package is also receive our new annual the Monaco drinking and dining directory and that's not all age of our plans comes with a free tote bag delivered to your door. We invite all fans.

Los Angeles Governor Andrew Cuomo United States Monaco New York City London New York Eric Garcetti Paris New York State Europe Monaco Britain Kaleta Rabelo Climate Emergency Commission
390- Fraktur

99% Invisible

39:34 min | 1 year ago

390- Fraktur

"This is ninety nine percent invisible. I'm Roman Mars early one Monday. This past December Peter Door full started his week. The way most of us do which is to say reluctantly so it was a normal Monday morning. I was GONNA go to work and I've only been awake for half an hour or something so I was still live. Peter Lives in Dresden Germany where he works in elder care visiting clients at their homes and to do that he usually takes the bus but that morning he noticed something unusual as he boarded when they got on the bus. I see that the bus driver had put up a sign inside of the bus that said in German decent booths style dining dodge afoul which means this buses driven by a German driver a homemade. Sign saying this is driven by a German driver was not the kind of thing Peter was used to seeing on his daily commute. That's reporter Kevin. Kinder's Peter the drivers message was pretty clear. I can only interpret what the person who put up the sign would have said but the location to me was. This is a good bus. You do not have to worry you can talk to me in German one of the good ones and not a foreigner but what really drove. The message of this sign home was not just the words but the typeface they were printed in a typeface from a larger family of typefaces once used throughout Germany and commonly referred to as tour in which an English goes by a different name block. Letter block letter is the type of old. Timey Gothic typeface that you often see us for the bold front titles of newspapers like The New York Times or Washington Post. You might also see on twos or the t shirts of heavy metal bands. Put It on a page and brings to mind the time of castles nights and feather quills but for many people especially in Europe. Black letter is most closely associated with one thing. It's the Nazi font. I'm not that good with like history and stuff by what I know. Is that the fund that was used by Nazi? Germany is really really like looks the same way as this October. Nineteen thirty eight adults typically made his triumphant gender Slovakia's date just days earlier. The world was at the brink of war France. Great Britain reluctantly. Signed up the fact. If you've ever caught even one minute of the history channel or really any documentary about World War. Two you have seen this typeface on Nazi posters on Nazi office buildings on Nazi roadwork signs usually say something like verboten with a big exclamation mark today in Germany black letter. Typefaces are frequently used by Neo Nazi groups and for many Germans. They bring to mind the dark times of the country's fascist past which is why it was pretty clear to Peter and the other passengers on the bus. What was going on with this bus. Drivers sign the message by itself is not well coming. And has this nationalist tone. The Fun Choice adds to that blowing. Harvick is a graphic designer in Berlin and the editor of a website called Fonsi News. He says that in Germany when it's not being used on Banti or masthead black leader has a very specific set of connotations type phases as genre have been associated with German nationalism for a long time and everybody who sees them today knows that. It's not a standard choice. It sends a signal emphasizing. The Germany's even if it was like in a in a neutral fund it would still have been problematic thing but you know it's kind of like the Cherry on top. The one thing that really drives the point home the sign that Peter saw that day would end up causing a big stir in Germany and get folded into an ongoing debate thrown in racism. Nationalism and culture a debate in which the use of block letter often serves as a kind of symbolic dividing line today depending on one's perspective block letter. Ken Are the represent German cultures rich and proud heritage or alternatively symbolize everything. That's wrong with that but understand. How people's feelings about a simple typeface got to this point. We need to go back to the moment of it's birth. Because once upon a time in that bygone era of Knights and castles whether quills block letter wasn't limited to Germany. It wasn't even dramatic instead it was used all across Europe. Black letter may seem incredibly ornate like was created for the sole purpose of turning letter forms into little individual flourishes of art. It definitely does not seem like a common means of communication but back in the Middle Ages black letter with its angular forums was actually considered practical especially for monastic scribes copying out entire books by hand black letter initially developed in the Middle Ages because forms that had these kinds of angles were easier to write more rhythmically and correctly than rounded forms. Dan Reynolds is an American type designer and historian who has been living in Germany for the last two decades. And he says that today we're used to typefaces with perfectly rounded curves think of our owes. Us PS and sees but while these shapes look easy enough to draw if you're using a quill to dry out. Thousands of them page after page. They're not in then justice. Now readers valued standardization in the text every letter. Even the rounded ones had to look exactly the same but it was hard for a monk copying out a long text to draw consistently perfect circles so black letter writing styles probably arose so that the products would be more even in their appearance and probably also faster to produce. If you were a scribe. It was a lot easier to produce all those Os and use and sees out of a series of short straight lines the technique of using straight lines instead of perfectly rounded curves gave the letters a fragmented appearance which is actually how. Germany's most common form of black letter. Hype WOULD GET. Its name from tour. That's the Latin term for broken because the letter forms have these broken angle curves block. Letter was first developed in France in the twelfth century. But within a few hundred years it had become standard throughout Europe. Wasn't even really a stylistic choice. It was just what words looked like question. That was what people thought of when they thought of writing When they thought taxed Susan Reed as head of Germanic studies at the British Library and she says that black vedder became so ingrained in the culture that even after it stops being needed people kept using it and so when the printing Pressler's was introduced. Most of the early type places were some variety of black letter typeface as with so many big leaps in technology the printing press started off by borrowing heavily on the design conventions that came before it even though the new operating principles made those conventions unnecessary even Gutenberg. The man who developed the first popular printing presses was no exception. He went for a text tour. A narrow very angler black letter typeface that was also used by scribes at a time and I the printing press appeared to only further cement block letter status as Europe's dominant form of writing but soon it would be challenged by very different kinds of typeface. Roman rolls off the tongue and trust me. You've definitely seen before too. It's the style of letter. It's associated with Imperial Room but just like the letters chiselled onto the side of an ancient marble column. Roman letters are speyrer and more vertical than their block letter counterparts. You'd also probably find them a lot easier to read and there's a reason for that. The letters are instantly recognizable because they look like Letters that we've been reading our entire lives today. Almost all major Western typefaces are Roman from times new Roman to aerial every time. You open up Microsoft word or Google. Docs you're using Roman type. It's our era block letter. It's just what writing looks like. It's a strange thing. People who lost you know y y factor became the default typeface in Germany. And I always almost want to flip the question on its head and say why did Roman become the default everywhere else? When most printing started in block letter tie Roman script might have stayed lost to history but right around the same time Gutenberg was printed block letter bibles in Germany. Something else was happening in Italy. Renaissance Scholars were rediscovering ancient Roman texts. You had this rediscovery. In the renaissance of classical literature in the classical world and classical letter forms were being brought back committed to bringing back the culture and wisdom of antiquity. Italian scholars began consciously developing their own Roman style letters which drew heavily on the classical forms they encountered and so when they started printing classical tax than they started using those as well at first Roman type was used strictly for texts written in Latin the language of antiquity and the church pretty quickly and for reasons that remain a little hazy. Roman type broke out of its cage and kind of took over by the end of the sixteenth century. Roman type had become come in the in the written vernacular languages of France in Spain. England followed suit in seventeenth century. The Netherlands Sweden in the eighteenth. It had become the very same thing that block letter had been before ubiquitous and unquestioned even as Roman became the Western world's dominant form of writing Germany and the German language state resolutely committed to block letter an island a broken script in a sea of curves. And it's mostly thanks to the bestselling author in the history of the German language. Martin Luther chose didn't Luther and the Protestant reformation he set in motion in Germany through everything that has to do with Rome and the Catholic Church into doubt reassessment of the Pushkin foundations opposed to Germany and in the process. He gave German as a reading language. A big boost luther by writing so much and trying to write to a broad as possible audience really codified. A lot of what written German was Luther and other German. Protestants were especially keen to distinguish German writing from the writing of Catholic Italy which they saw as corrupt even evil and that included the churches favorite typeface so there was an explicit casting of Roman type is being associated with the pope and with Catholicism and things that were not German and this was at least by the time. Luther is getting to his Bible editions. This is an explicit. Wish that they'd be set in German type and not not enrollment type but there was one German typeface in particular which would end up being used more than any other frock tour. Proctored came to be seen as uniquely German almost as if it were imbued with special Germanic values so much so that people would eventually refer to all German black letter typefaces as tour this Association of fructose with all things good in Roman with all things bad became so strong that in some of Luther's German Bible editions unpleasant words like wrath and Davel and punishment were set in a Roman typeface to distinguish it from the rest of the taxed which stayed in frog tour later. German texts would go even further applying the rule if even part of a word was borrowed from another language and yet she got each other wonderful things that were. There's a foreign loan words. How say a lot in stem and a German suffix that stem within the same word? We'll be printed in Roman letters and then the ending in facto said. This is a clear break typographically on the page from Rome and just as there wasn't going to be a reconciliation between Germany and Italy. There wasn't going to be a typographic reconciliation. Either at first black letter remained popular in many parts of Protestant Europe but one by one. The other Protestant countries began to give in to the temptation of Roman type until finally Germany was the lone holdout in part. Because I'm like the people. In those other Protestant countries Germany remained a fragmented jumble of smaller states until the late eighteen hundreds so fractured came to be seen as one of the things holding German national identity together especially in the nineteenth century when the country was invaded by Napoleon. The occupying French had their room and letters and the Germans had frock tour Germany as a nation without nationhood as a collection of small quite fragmented. State needed these are symbols of national identity and I think this is one factor particularly becomes associated with Germany. The German language and German culture many came to believe that where there was no tour. There was no Germany. Including the mother of Germany's greatest writer gutters mother. She shot. She described Roman letters. Just think toll as as if they're almost sort of painful for her to read that's something that's often quoted as evidence of this naturalness of tractor of Germany's greatest writers mother approved of it in eighteen. Seventy one with Germany finally unified free. Tour became the official government typeface and out of on Bismarck. The first chancellor was such a staunch supporter that he said he would refuse to read any German. Buck not set in German type but ran around the time. They finally got their own country. A growing contingent of German's began to wonder if they really needed their own typeface liberal cosmopolitan and future facing these. Germans came to feel it was silly to keep using letter forms from the Middle Ages. They began pershing for Germany to drop. Its beloved Frat tour and move to Roman type now where people sort of in the spirit of progress and modernism. Who thought that? This is crazy that we should be a more international country. Were connected with. We've our neighbors. We have business ties and cultural ties. Increasingly academic and scientific papers intended for foreign distribution will being printed Roman type and as the world became more international. Roman type also started seeing in began to be taught in schools alongside Fred Tour and by eighteen ninety one about forty percent of German books were being printed in Roman but more conservative. Germans pushed back. They insisted that block letter was and should remain a cultural staple in nine hundred eleven. The German Reichstag actually held a vote on whether country should switch over by having Roman replaced Frat tour as the official typeface German schools and government offices but after a fierce debate. The legislation didn't pass German. Typography had reached a stalemate with neither side willing to buy even by the end of the nineteen twenties in the era of telephones radios refrigerators and jazz traditional tours street signs could be seen hanging next to art deco posters featuring sponsor Roman fonts. It was a dual thing if you look at photographs from the city scape and eighty eight or eighty ninety s e would to see both at a forms and maybe even more enrolling type because that was the style associated with commerce and advertising was as though there were two separate typographical realities representing two. Different Germany's tour would end up. Losing the struggle for Germany's soul but it wasn't the liberal freedom loving over educated cosmopolitans who finally broke the impasse. Instead it was the most ardent German nationalist of all time responsibility lies on the show of one man by latest act of naked aggression. Hitler has committed a crime against the whole human rights in nineteen thirty three. The Nazi party rose to power on a wave of German chauvinism and at first. This seemed like great news for those in favor of traditional black better typefaces every appeal for a peaceful settlement all been rebuffed by the leader of the German Nazis senseless criminal read. Papa factor was in Roman was out. There was a lot of push from certain areas within the government and within the party to us the moment in nineteen thirty three to ram. This changed through the get rid of Roman type and really make everything be black letter. Directives were given in the interior ministry said from now on. They would use black letter. Typewriters for everything. Many publishers changed over and the proportion of books and newspapers printed and fracture type crew substantially. And You you see placards tell Germans to be German to think German to even be German. They're writing and of course these are in fact hort there was just one problem. Out of Hitler hated Franck tour by the turn in nineteen thirty four. They actually made a speech in which he criticised their obsession with outward trappings of German this among which he included Gum Gothic. He writing this Gothic Romanticism. Hitler says is ill suited to our age. Iron Glass and steel. How Hitler wasn't into traditional German values. He just didn't think that should mean be old-fashioned that it's hard to have everyone living in the mountains on farms with their cows and their sheep and goats and also working factories to build high tech airplanes and rockets and when the Olympics came to Berlin in nineteen thirty six he insisted the a lot of the publicity and the posters for that shirt should be enrollment factor type. But did you were? You were bringing the world to see the new Germany. Besides Hitler thought his fascist values shouldn't justify the Germans the Third Reich was supposed to span the globe. Hitler actually said that German becoming the world language and within a hundred everybody would be speaking German. But even Hitler's delusions of grandeur had their limits. He knew that if he wanted to rule over the world we would have to use a typeface but the rest of the world could actually read and so in nineteen forty. One and edict was circulated all publishers and printers on behalf of the fuhrer himself. Decreeing that Roman type become the standard type throughout Germany effective immediately neither frock tour nor its cursive. Counterparts were to be taught in schools used in government documents or appear on street signs. All magazines and newspapers were likewise expected to change over to the Roman script which is quite extraordinary thing to do in the middle of World War. It's very expensive. Just suddenly going from one typeface to another university and the explanation in the ladder is that you know shock horror. They had found out that a black letter was actually a Jewish invention and that it had to draw immediately. This wasn't true but it was an unassailable argument. It was impossible to come back from that. Fractured didn't vanish. Everywhere overnight but with the edict quickly fell out of use and it would never fully recover. The Nazis broaden and to block letters eight hundred year run as a common form of writing. So it's ironic that the typeface Hitler Band and personally disliked remained stubbornly associated with them. Perhaps it's because the Nazis promoted FRAC tour so heavily before changing course but it's also just because they were German nationalists and it was a traditional German typeface. Maybe it shouldn't be surprising that they've found it hard to check the connection. Especially telling was the edict itself. The one banning frog tour although the memorandum was typed in Roman Font de Nazi letterhead at the top was printed in black letter by nineteen forty-five when Germany was finally defeated. No one wanted anything to do with the quote unquote Nazi fought and by the nineteen fifties. It had pretty much died our. I saw some statistics that between nine hundred fifty one thousand nine hundred seventy nine thirty four books published in factor in that whole period so but astonishing whether or not. It's okay to use block letter. Today is a complicated question especially in Germany. It depends on the context in it doesn't always make sense. Yeah effect on on a restaurant sign or on the bill able is invisible and you can find mastheads newspapers like New York Times. Because that's that's that's normal. That's what we used to consumer items and commercial ventures that VOCA innocent sense of tradition and quality often use black glitter without any trouble. The same goes for heavy metal bands and other people that WANNA play up its medieval or gothic qualities but they're also context where its use is not innocent and can't be forgiven as naive when Peter Doraville. The bus in Dresden saw that sign the one that said this passes driven by German driver it was printed in black letter and Peter knew exactly what it was meant to communicate like. I were a person that was potentially targeted by potential Latsis. I would definitely take the next bus. In fact the side of the sign and the font was so alarming that there was no way could just let it go so I was thinking to myself which I do. She talked to the guy and I didn't know what to do but then I thought wait. This is an official public bus. I don't think that's even legal when Peter got off the bus. He took a picture of the homemade sign on this phone and tweeted it at the dress in. Public Transit Authority asking essentially. What the Hell is this? And they responded like really quickly half an hour later and they were like. Yeah somebody already debt Told us that we we don't know how that could happen. We already took the bus driver not be driving today anymore so I was like all right. Thanks for the Quick Answer. Good thing and that was it but a little later journalists message. Peter on twitter this they. Hey I'm with the press. Do you want to do an interview like okay. Sure and from there on that. Just kind of spiraled. The story appeared on the local news then on the national news when the driver was go. Some German nationalists wrote tweets in the driver's defense than some some right-wing politicians retreated than got some hate mail. Who IN THE END? It took a couple of weeks for everything to die down although that doesn't mean the larger issues swirling around Franck tour or anywhere near resolved alright. Nationalism remains on the rise in Germany and especially since the refugee crisis controversy surrounding the use of the typeface seemed to be happening with more frequency. No mainstream conservative. Politician publicly uses Frat tour but in two thousand seventeen. A police anti-terror unit in the state of Saxony was sanctioned for using a logo on the interior of one of their specialized vehicles that featured a black letter font mostly though the only people openly using fraught tour our new Nazi groups promoting their hyper traditional version of German nationalism. Apparently most of them still don't realize that Hitler considered their favorite typeface hopelessly tacky and provincial and many nationalists don't even understand which typeface it is. They're using the Dresden. Bus driver for example may have thought his sign was in fact tour. It was actually an old English a black letter typeface that has no historical connection to Germany. Of course if Peter Story about the bus driver and his block letter signed demonstrates anything is that no matter what the real historical facts are. Fuck tour will never return to the mainstream. For better or worse. It's GonNa keep on being the Nazi font this long. Tradition of centuries of of us is kind of forgotten. And all we can see now. Are these twelve years of Nazis and you can. You can change that. It has happened and that's the way it is and it won't come back but even if they don't think it should return to everyday use those who study frock tour don't want to see it completely forgotten either and perhaps no one more so than Hanno numb cannons Hano Bloom on or visit him. Bloom is seventy six year old retired teacher and is the president of the Association for German script and language which is dedicated to preserving and improving people's knowledge of tour and other old writing styles on Desi Dessel mashing psych. He says that the fact that Nazis used block letter typefaces only shows that they know nothing about Germany's history. Swiss much of this historical ignorance is for a deeply ironic reason. Most Germans have trouble reading older German documents precisely because they are in frock tour. You can probably read something printed and fracture but even then only with a bit of effort and patience and handwritten factor is much more difficult. It's basically eligible for most people today as a consequence many of the books and letters and diaries of the past have become harder to connect with which is why one of these associations main activities today in the one Hano is most passionate about is teaching children how to read and write all German cursive during our interview. He chose me some correspondence from the nineteenth century whose handwriting I can't make details and I say values heart disease even that's country assures me I'd learned fast can can't that I'd be amazed at myself. Yeah it's even exempts Stalin. Kono hoops documents like this. One will help. People avoid making the mistakes of previous generations. After all that seventy six. He is old enough to have lived through the war. When as a small child his city was destroyed in a bombing raid and his family had to be evacuated vanish vice or here at calmed so he tells me how important it is that we learn from history device off niche invasion convictions about war and peace and about how to get a lot about the Germans of the past like Luther and Gooda. Who wrote about all these things and mostly in fact tour Culture wars and fights about. Nationalism aren't just for fun. We have these arguments about buildings to. We're talking about making federal buildings beautiful again after this. We often don't think of winter as a time of growth are creation. But if you think about it. It's the perfect time to create your own website because you're cooped up. You're thinking about being productive and now squarespace can help you do it with squares base. You can take your cool ideas creative content your services and goods and you can turn them into a beautiful website and just a few clicks. This is because they're easy to use templates or created by world class designers. And then you have the ability to customize the look and feel and the different settings for your own needs for example my side Roman Mars Dot Com squarespace. The landing page features. A close up of me talking to a microphone so it has my very handsome beard but if I should ever shave it. I don't have to wait for my web guy to change the photo. I can do it myself. And maybe the next photo will feature. My soulful is one of the pages. I've also picked out some favorite episodes of ninety nine percent invisible to share and the audio is conveniently embedded even on mobile. Try It yourself dot com slash invisible for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code invisible to save ten percents off your first purchase of a website or domain. Your local police probably receive a hundred calls a night from burglar alarms and the door to the time they have no idea of their false alarms or if they are real it could be a crime or it could be you going downstairs for a midnight. Snack and setting off the motion sensor but simply safe home. Security is different. There's a break in. Simplisafe has real video to tell please whether there's an actual crime and then they have the evidence to back it up and they can tell them where the intruder is and what they're doing and that means please dispatch up to three hundred and fifty percent faster than for other burglar alarms. You can set it up yourself with no tools needed or they can do it for you. And it's only fifty cents a day with no contracts visit simplisafe dot com slash nine. You'll get free shipping and a sixty day risk-free trial got nothing to lose. Go now and be sure to go to simplisafe dot com slash nine nine so they know than our show is sent you that simplisafe dot com slash nine nine as we were producing the story front tour and it's starring role in this centuries long drama of German nationalism. A contemporary story hit the news. That was also at the intersection of design in nationalism. In this case with story it was about the architecture of us. Federal Buildings on February fourth twenty twenty architectural record published a story commenting on a draft of an executive order that they get a hold of called the White House to adopt federal guidelines to ensure that quote the classical architectural style shelby preferred and default style when it came to new created federal buildings. The order was authored by group called the National Civic Art Society and it was titled Making Federal Buildings Beautiful Again in cakes. All confused as to the audience that this particular order was pandering to our friend. The architecture critic and celebrated mcmansions skeptic Kate Wagner wrote a column in the New Republic about it and I called her up to talk about it the first thing I did was ask her what the authors of this order mean when they say that all federal buildings should be in the classical architecture style. So it's kind of funny. Their idea of what classicism is is basically just anything inspired by Greek and Roman architecture but also like nineteenth century Victorian catches fine too because they included the Eisenhower building. Which is this ridiculous Second Empire Building with a million columns and I hate it so much and it's so ugly but they're like this is great architecture for the record. The Eisenhower building. It's pretty fussy and very French. But the point is that when people extol the greatness of classical architecture there basically talking about collins basically talking about columns this broad advocacy for classical architecture is in opposition to more modernist or Buddhists they believed that modernism is degenerate. And it's ruining everything and people hate it and we need to free people from modernism because it's not the architecture of the people or whatever which is of course ridiculous. How many people go to see falling water literally every year? I don't know so this proposed order is a one hundred eighty degree reversal. To a seminal document written in nineteen sixty two by Daniel Patrick Moynihan called guiding principles for Federal Architecture that explicitly stated quote design must flow from the architectural profession to the government and not vice versa. Yeah so there is basically a mandate in that document that said an official architectural style must be avoided and that federal buildings and new buildings should be exemplary of the time in which they are built the opposite in spirit to the proposed executive order. The architecture community reacted very strongly to this proposal and stress. Here that this is not an official proposal from the White House. It's a draft of a proposal. That one influential group hopes the White House will adopt but people have taken it very seriously. The American Institute of Architects released this statement quote the strongly opposes uniform style mandates for Federal Architecture Architecture should be designed for the specific communities that it serves reflecting are rich nations diverse places thought culture in climates architects are committed to honoring our past as well as reflecting our future progress protecting the freedom of thought and expression that are essential to democracy and quote beyond the convocation of one federal style. The architecture community objected to one aspect of the order in particular. This order would allow trump to create a quote president's Committee for the re beautif occasion of Federal Architecture which is such a truly name. And which would enforce a this classical design mandate and this panel would exclude quote artists. Architects Engineers Architecture critics members of the building industry or any other members of the public that are affiliated with any interest group or organization involved in architecture so basically anyone who works in architecture has anything to do with architecture like is not allowed to comment on architecture in this panel. So of course everyone is. Mad is mad. The preservationists are mad. Kate Wagner the architecture critic is mad the objection from the community including yourself is not an object into classical architecture right. No classical architecture is is great ever since architecture has existed there have been architectural revivals of past styles. I mean it is a debate that frames the history of architecture and the debate is constantly is commonly known as the ancients versus moderns in. The debate is like a healthy debate debate. It's like part of architecture. It's part of culture. Yeah exactly like when? When do we look towards the past for architectural ideas? And when we push forward through various integrations of those ideas together in sort of eclectic mash or like furthering like technological progress. I mean it's like a one of the classic debates of architecture but the thing is is that classicism is is. I mean classical buildings are beautiful obviously And it's important that architects be trained in classism. And it's IT'S IMPORTANT. That a lot of architects go onto study classism into practice building clack classical buildings because we always need people to for example like make additions to historical buildings make restorations to historical buildings to Lecture on historical buildings to work Across other fields including anthropology and archaeology to talk about how historical buildings may have been in the past. I mean it's a really central. An important part of architecture that being said time always moves forwards and architecture historically and today has always been a conversation between past and present not a dogmatic argument between past and present though that has happened. That's what preservation is supposed to be. It's not supposed to be like making a mothballed museum of every building. It's how do we reconcile historical architecture with contemporary needs with contemporary economics with contemporary politics? That's what preservation does and modernism is included in that. The problem is not classical architecture. The problem is that there's a certain type of Judd Online. Who think that classical architecture is proof that Western society is better than other societies and that we had a beautiful western society that was infallible but crumbled under like globalization or immigration or whatever right wing like crypto fascist element you think ruined columns the one and only Kate Wagner. You can find her writing at the new republic and Magin Hill Dot COM. If you WanNa hear more from her. She's this or of episode number two thirty two of ninety nine P. I it's called McMahon hell let's Nine Percent Bisbo was produced. This week by Kevin Kinder's edited by Joe Rosenberg. Mix and tech production by reviews with music by Sean Riyal Katie. Mingle is our senior producer. Kirk Cole Save is Digital Director. The rest of the team is Delaney Hall Emma Fitzgerald Avery. Trauman Chris Baru Vivian. Legs via clots and me Roman Mars. We are a product of ninety one point seven. Klw In San Francisco produced on radio row in beautiful downtown Oakland. California ninety nine percent is a member of radio. Toby from Peo- wrecks usually independent collective of the most innovative shows in all podcasting buy them all a radio Tokyo dot. Fm can find the show enjoyed discussions about the show on facebook. You can tweet me at Roman Mars show nine. Pi Work on instagram and ready to you can come yell at us about Fontane. Nieto Klesko architecture with peon Dot Org

Germany Europe Peter official Martin Luther Hitler New York Times Berlin Kevin Kinder France Middle Ages Dresden Dresden Germany France Slovakia New Republic Peter Door Roman Mars
The Devils In the Details | What is an Effective Contractor for Contractors & Home Remodelers - Ask Clay Anything

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

31:28 min | 1 year ago

The Devils In the Details | What is an Effective Contractor for Contractors & Home Remodelers - Ask Clay Anything

"You have questions America's number. One business coach has answers. You're from Minnesota. Here's another edition of ask clay anything on the thrive time business coach radio show. Yes yes yes tribe nation on today's show. We have a special guest and his name is wes yet right folks. His name is West which Kinda rhymes with guest. It's incredible West Carter. How are you sir. I'm amazing how are you. I'm excited heavy on the show because this is the segment called. Ask Me Anything or ask me any question and so I'm a Asia. Could you read the question from the thrive or here. I've highlighted on the show notes there in in green for you could read the question from the driver pulling ended up all your interest in meanwhile meanwhile why. Anders pulled it up here West. I gotta ask. You my friend. This just in we were talking about this a lot. What was the last time time that you cancelled something that you committed to do to going to you. I like representing a client of yours. You had to cancel because you have the sniffles I I. It's been years since I cancelled anything for being sick. You're a beer dayquil guy we are you just gotTa show up and get it done so you dayquil guy or what you know. I take as little medicine as humanly possible is Kinda my move. How do you get through it. What do you do you know barren barren Greenwich. Okay this presser injure. What are you doing today. What are you are you taking taking dayquil and whatever else the pharmacists gave me the daily podcast story. Can I share a store share store. Yes my partner how to trial that started yesterday and him and the other teams working on the case. We're both sick all weekend YEP but they stuck it out. 'cause we don't cancel clients. That's right they show up to court they start at nine thirty start litigating their entire side of the case until about three thirty wow until the judge notices his how bad they look because he's so sick yeah and says. I'M GONNA have to pause here. We're GONNA reschedule this. You're too sick to continue to sick to contain. My Attorney Says No. I'm I'm fine. You're on. I just got allergies this good. I'm good chatting here. The judge actually made them stop and reset it for a few weeks later because the judge just couldn't bear to watch anymore but that's how dedicated multiple dedicate the winters and king team is now Andrew. We have a question from a thrive or what is that question so the question is what is what does ineffective contract for contractors look like now the question were asked to me directly. I would say well. Here's a template. Here's a document that I've paid for in the past have made by an attorney and this is what it would look like and I would show them the actual tinplate so I wouldn't just talk in circles and I wouldn't say hey. I'm not an attorney but my professional opinion would be. I don't give people broad. Charlatan circular surveyed advice when it comes to legal issues and if I didn't have a template or a best practice document that I would say this because that's who I call so we're so I want to talk to you about a contract here on. Have you seen the sample contract. Did you see that document. I have okay so you saw the sample contract and I just want to go through a few things that I saw that I brought up to the client that said hey these are. These are some things that maybe we need to worry about one. This person is a general contractor which means that they get paid to remodel homes and to do home construction projects and I was looking to the contract. I noticed that there was no agreed upon final price in this contract I didn't see that I saw the I saw the required deposit right but I didn't see a final price nor did I see a specific end date nor did I see a specific start date and the question from the driver was hey. Hey you know I agree to deal with this client and we agreed on the down payment amount and now they've gone out and bought all the materials from from under me. They didn't ask me I bought of the materials and because I make a little bit of money on those materials now they've kind of pushed me out of that phase of the project and this is is not what we agreed to in the contract and as I read this contract I couldn't see anyone in the contract where prohibited the cut consumer from buying their own products or materials nor do I see official start time or an official in time nor do I see an official total priced. Anyone agreed upon We're those concern areas for you at all or what were the biggest it concerns that you saw when looking through this contract well let me start with my legal disclaimer here for our drivers that hell no matter how much knowledge we drop on you hear that you know this is not a substitute for legal advice for your specific situation relation so we're going to discuss general issues with the contract but just no you don't take this and do it yourself. Go find yourself a good attorney that gets advice about. Give advice talk about your specific situation just for clarity. Can you help a thriving who's in Texas or Missouri or Florida or what states can help people. In what states can you go can't help you but I can punt well a lot of states that we do work in and depending on what state it is either. We can do ourselves because we have license attorneys or we can associate with local local councils in some instances so just if we can't do it gives us a shout we can point you in the right direction but we can help a lot with reiver's out there. Okay so looking through this contract on what kind of concerns that you have or did you have any concerns it overall a good deal or was it was more of a concern and what would you think about this well. There's a lot of concerns with the contract and common people come in my office and they say hey. I need you to do a contract for this. I don't want it longer than two pages and that's kind of one of these. This contract contract is it's a it's a couple of pager that someone's tried to be short and sweet with and the danger there is as you alluded to anytime we don't get into details tells it leaves it open for us to argue about it later. So you know you mentioned the price issue so with a contractor. You can do a cost plus contract where her look. I'm GonNa Charge you what my cost are and then. I'm going to make a margin on that cost plus ten percent cost plus fifteen percent so you can do that. You can't do that but you have to put a lot of frame around that. You can't just say that because this contract doesn't cover what about out of pocket expenses doesn't even mention that so what if it's not a material driller labor but so what if I as an example. Let's say I'm a I'm a builder and this builders is based in Michigan. Okay so say they're doing a project for Lake House and and the Lake House is thirty minutes from town thirty minutes from the closest place whether you can you know like Grand Lake home on the lake but if you want to go to a nice restaurant or something you don't have to drive fifteen twenty minutes so let's say this guy. He's not doing this just say he did. He has to take off his guys to get so much. under this kind of broad agreement one could say that. I bought my guys Burritos for lunch and I mark them up. You know thirty percent because that was a cost ahead. You know yeah or could go the other way. You could have a legitimate cost. Let's say you have to get a special license or permit that you didn't anticipate or you have to rent some equipment that you don't own bulldoze right. That's not covered clearly in here. So do you get to mark that up. Do you have to pay out of your fifteen percent any kind of ambiguity or things that are unclear. Just open it up for drama to fight about later so if you were going to take this contract and we're gonNA help the driver. WE'RE NOT GONNA share this contract with the thrive nation seen it just Andrews scene and we're not going to share this with anybody else for this thrive or what else were concerned as you look through was the clarity on about the specifics. It seemed like it's pretty broad. God pretty broad. especially relate to cost. There was no many times if we can do a cost plus. There's a maximum in there somewhere so everybody knows what they're getting into it. For the schedule payments very vague you know usually there's a lot of language when you're talking about draws and the proof of I've completed at twenty five percent complete so now I'm entitled to twenty five percent of the payment. You have very specific language. Usually there's an architect the signs off the bank signing off. I mean there's just not enough meat on the bone for anyone to read it and understand clearly exactly what the process looks and you've sooner our pool construction going on here I have. I have my wife tell you the name of the company was the name of the company. Pool creation creations right here in Tulsa and I would just say to anybody out there who's listening. I Love Pool Creations. They've got great references. They're doing a great job but if you were to go out there and look at the pool what percentage of the pools and your mind what percentage of the pool slash man cave slash grotto slash hot tub slash sauna slash indoor outdoor eating area slash pool hall slash is done on in your mind slash outdoor kitchen forty percent forty percent to you you know about the problem is to me. It feels like twenty percent right but I think you know you. GotTa dig a whole. That's gotta be like ten percents all by itself right and you've got to laze so that's the problem. Nobody schedule and I'm not just saying this. I love pool creation and they're going to be done right on time and they're great but what I'm saying to listeners out there. Is there probably half done but the deck that building probably a third done because a lot of detail work takes care of the Masonry Dan rea and all that stuff so again. It's so subjective so you gotta put on here. You'd put on your detailed. You would say I'm going to have I'm just making it an example. I'm going to have the deck completed all the citing completed and the windows installed as phase one and you're GonNa pay me this much for phase one and then draw to. I'm going to have have the outdoor kitchen. The Sun installed and the hot abets phase three or whatever right right so in the other thing I noticed in here is that you mention the time for completion. How long is this going to take. We'll says we're going to complete a timely honored before you know. Let's just say July thirty first okay well as an attorney. I'm thinking what does that mean. Are we talking about substantial completion. Are we talking about total completion the punchless authority we all knocked out. I mean most time on his contract. You're talking about substantial completion. I'm going to have the majority of it done but there may be a window here or a floor here that out to come back in and fix later. Have have you ever bought your incredible life a couch west. I have an interview about your wife account yet and not yet. Let me explain to you how this works. You're going to buy your wife a couch. It's going to be a beautiful couch. Your wife's GonNa like it West. His wife Darcy Loves Vanessa. She goes my the couch. Women love the couch you go to a place like a math brothers. You find it. You know you meet the furniture guy and whatever kind we don't have in stock that we wanNA custom. Get it you know it's like they have red and blue and dose skin and the you know the height of of a cow this and that and leather no matter what kind you want. Do you have that in Fuchsia right. No matter what so you can get the customer ship so ships and then the people at the furniture store they deliver delivered the furniture West. Are you following me. This farm got you. Have you had furniture guys. Do you typically have them delivered. You'd pick it up yourself and create it in yourself. I have the luxury of letting them deliver it so they deliver it. They move it up to like where they think. It's GonNa go right and they would ask you know Darcy Vanessa. There's a where should this go and most women I might this is just my opinions where I've seen and just people that I know and I'm in West. May We haven't colluded on this. Maybe I'm wrong here but then they'll set down and then you're like well good couches this is done. Let's go get a pizza. Let's go for a walk. Let's go something in about ten seconds after they leave the vehicles far enough passwords your wife my wife would say hey. We move it over there. I want to see what it looks like next to the mirror and you run out to the front yard screaming. Just come on back. Come on back in the guys are gone yeah. The drawing up drove drove off in the moving truck and I realize now you who bought the couch and paid for the delivery now. You have to move it. Has that ever happened to you and I have on my couch but I will tell you a bed. It's giant pitchers really we're holding them up up on the wall. Okay and your wife's like little to the left to try it a little higher right and pretty soon your arms start to burn silvery dropping break the whole thing right. I understand stand the concept. So what happens is you move the move stuff around and even though you and your wife are on the same team and you want her to be happy as I want my wife happy they keep changing their minds about where they want it to be and then finally they find the perfect place all as well and it's good but imagine that you are doing a deck check for a woman or a man typically. Women are the ones hiring of people to do home remodeling. It's almost always women if the man who's signing the contract typically. It's a woman who's driving driving the signing of the contract and then the man might go well. Tell you what with looks good to me. I mean partner. What's Square up now. The wife might come outside. Well well well well. Oh that Beranda over there. The crown molding is not what I wanted and you're GONNA go. Ray looks good to me right right and then then then there's little dispute dispute there so what kind of language roughly and if we have to hire turning here knock this out but what sort of should say upon approval of the customer then that's when the final payment she'll be paid should say upon passing a local inspections. What kind of language would you wanNA throw in there. I think there's usually a few different benchmarks benchmarks to meet and one I would avoid for your on the contractor side. I would avoid any kind of final approval language because you run into customers. You're never gonNA make happy substantial completion than I'm entitled to get paid and then you can do something called retainers where you can hold back a little small amount until we finish out punch out list or we you have complete per complete everything but there are some people that will never be says right and I know people who fought with contractors for years because well they find out six months laters. All the windows does have condensation and that's the contract the builder's fault and so they go back to them or guys like me. The first time I got wood floors installed not aggressive enough to sue people random things. I don't like to do that kind of thing. I think litigation as a general rule I try to discourage that idea good rule but wood floors put in a brand new house. We built years ago one hundred eleventh and and memorial yeah. I remember I was trying to buy I was trying to buy west of trying to much house. We built our first house. I met with different builders and the one who could give me the most house for two hundred and sixty thousand dollars where my kind of guy like. How much house can you give us. So how much how do you want US bigger. I want more space. You know I'm a big man big head on a big space so the guy was like yeah. I'll give you base so somehow oh he was put together a drawing. I'm not kidding four thousand square feet for like two sixty to fifty huge and I had like carpet everywhere. Waldo Waldo carpet no fixtures that you would ever want no granite anywhere and I was like. Oh Yeah my wife's going no. We're going to build our first house. We're not gonNA build that the garage Mahal. We WanNA build the Taj. What are you thinking here. Come on man why never been I never grew up in a home with wood floors. I'd never grown up with it. I I never saw wood floors in someone's home except for a girlfriend I had in high school. My junior and senior year never saw west with wood floors I did I grew up in a very very old. Take out your original wood floors nice. You know the so I wasn't aware that one of the attributes of whatever time that people like is that it actually kind of ages just a little bit and it Kinda creeks when you walk here and people actually like that and I don't understand that but people like that stuff yeah yeah I lived in an old two story home and you could hear the wind blowing would make the floors upstairs creek and you can't sneak out of that house. No so the thing is is that when and we put in the wood floors it started to warp a little bit now on what in the world where is that we should have gone with carpet vendors like that's part of the deal you want that to happen. It's just settling its but certain people can never be satisfied now. West what else when you looked at that contract that you think yourself. This contract needs to be tighter. Well one of the things I looked at it. Was You know we talk about a lot. If you're going to contract you need to have a real tiger. GonNa get divorced. there was no termination provisions for anyone so if you're working on the project and you don't like the Guy Right or is there a way to fire. They're just being obstinate or you're doing a bad job and they. WanNa fire you or they fire you and now there's no rules how we're. GonNa handle that so even though it doesn't Satan here doesn't mean a client's going to say hey you're fired. Don't ever come back now. What do we do and there's nothing in the contract about how we handled so also. I noticed that it really doesn't define liabilities ability at all. It doesn't say anything like if in the event that we burn your property down this happens I know with my. Dj Contracts even back in the day with my disc jockey company it said under under no my attorney time crafted but instead under no circumstance and even if the for a foreseen liability of this entertainment wedding entertainment performance exceed basically explained that even if there's an active godless even if like the DJ didn't show up for the wedding at no point. Are we liable for more than the total. We're charging yes and the customer is accepting this as terms for US continuing to offer low prices because a lot of brides would super emotional injury yeah seriously so our contracts said under no circumstance and even if acts of God or the. Dj doesn't show up anything we're only liable up to what you've paid us and so we did it was one hundred and fifty dollar deposit. The other four fifty wasn't until the night of the wedding and that's what we did you know and but it stated there our liability and people would sign off on it. What kind of liability should we put it in a contract like this. We're going to be fine and this is what it looks to be this to be about a six hundred thousand dollar home remodel yeah. There should be a lot in here about liability so one like you're talking about limitations apply limitations. If I get sued we have consequential damages which is kind of your out of pocket damages you have punitive damages which are supposed to be a penalty for being a bad person right and you you have all these different kinds of Damon as you're alluding to infliction of emotional distress in these other damages that you're GonNa want to say. These are the only things that we're going to be liable for eight. If you want to put a cap on on those put a cap on those and then you also have certain legal terms like indemnification where look if I get sued for something you do or you get sued for something I do are. Are we going to pay you know. How are we going to handle that and so insurance. Is another one look. I have insurance. Do we need. You have insurance if you get. If your house burns down that's covered by your insurance company. You can't come double dip and get after me too. You know there's something called subrogation. Where if your insurance company pays for it then my interest I don't have to pay for it so you have all these complicated not in his contract none of that's in the contract the other thing that we get into a lot with from innocent tied liability or warranties especially Ashley with a new home. There's one sentence in here about warranty materials nothing else in here. About what about factory warranties. Do they transfer to you. What about `bout warranties that we're doing for our workmanship. You know what about how long the warranty is. What kind of warranties are we providing. You know. We're not warranting that this is going to be a good use for a discotheque. This is a personal residence. I don't see in here hard start date at all no hard start date. I don't see that now sometimes you can get away with that. We have to craft it very carefully because all of your other dates then usually come back to some sort of effective date and so it's very dangerous. There's just leave that blank or Lou that up in the air because this contract could be binding for ten years and you still haven't started the contract now most of the contracts I've ever signed for home remodeling and I've seen quite a few of them are with the Pool Company recently which is pool creations great company. They typically have the company's letterhead on the contract in the companies address at the bottom and their phone number. Is that a best practice or is that just something that needs to be done legally. Should you always put your company's website and your physical address and all those kind of things on your contra that matter at all to have that in the contract some of it's just marketing I mean putting it on your letterhead with your logo and things like that but there are bare necessities yeah I mean you have to identify the parties to the contract. Lewis a certain degree of specificity so you have to need to name the name of the corporation not you you the individual yet be very careful about that using of your corporation. Yep You know what state are you incorporated in. What's Your Business Address. I understand you my understanding. Is You have to put the business address. Yes yes on one business address and make sure that you keep your personal name out unless you're doing business as an individual and that's another problem so you want to list the name of the company which I see that they did adhere right the name of the company. I do not see a business address. I see what appears to be a Po box which you know you can get into it. I've seen people in the past though so you know get into contracts and it's like hey that's not your legal place of business. That's not what you're actually doing. Business needs to be your legal address. Do you does that matter not matter. What do you think it depends on the circumstance. I mean you don't have to list a street address on a contract. Should you but yes because a lot of times in contracts. You have to give notices to the other party for certain things yes and you. WanNa you WanNa be very specific about where that notice has to go so they give you a thirty day notice of termination. It doesn't go to your mom's home address that US instead of Your Business Address where you're actually checking your mail or an old address or something only check once every few months so you need to be very very pay very close attention to what address you're using and making sure also that is not used in a way that's deceptive. There's some people will put appeal box. That's in a separate state state. Were they get mail and then your customer thinks they're doing business with an instinct business and you can open up to some liability in that regard as well. I also whenever I've signed a bigger bigger construction deals. There usually are exhibits attached so as an example they would say instead of like seeing it's saying on the contract like see proposed used plan or plans to see construction should be completed. See the plants yes. It would actually say see exhibit. A. Attach New would actually attach a pdf of the actual plans and I have to initial the plans to state yet again that these are the plans. I've actually agreed to I'm so it's not the bait and switch move. I don't see that in here. It says construction drawings but I don't see where it says see exhibit A. or B. Right and getting. We're getting into avoiding drama later on down. The road and what's going to happen is inevitably an unscrupulous customer. Yes is going to purposely pulled out a different drawings saying when you drew this deck your honor the deck they built was not the deck that we discussed on the fourth of Autobahn and because I remember everything I can tell you this right here was not when I check or I've never seen that join in my life seen I don't know we never show that to me or I've had in cases where people literally take. PDF edit it edit ally nice and just to favor them in a lawsuit so by attaching them to the contract. Yes everybody agrees these are the documents were referencing and there's no room for argument around it later. The it all goes back to clarifying all these variables now. We talk about you. I've seen you discuss this and previous deals in previous conversations. I'd like you to educate the listeners about this thing called sever ability so talking about what what that means and how that applies or doesn't apply to contracts for contractors so several is this concept that if I make a twenty page contract Yup and at some point later on down the road a court says that paragraph eleven is illegal or unlawful or doesn't apply for some reason. There's twenty points in the contract. There's let's say there's thirty sections point. One is thrown out point once throw now. There's a concept except in the law that will if that fails the whole contract fails okay and usually what you'll see at the end of contract are a lot of general provisions and one of those several ability clause says just because one of these might get overturned or you know posed yup does not negate the effectiveness of the rest of the entire contract but you still date that kind kind of thing in this kind of contractor because without someone's going to say hey if that's if that's no longer good than the whole deal is no longer good and I'm free and clear from everything. There's a guy out there. WHO's doing business us and let's say this project is a six hundred thousand dollar project yeah. Let's say the average project. He does is one hundred thousand dollars and the average profit on his project. Let's say twenty percent so the average deal for twenty eight thousand non profit. How much money would it cost you or an attorney that would be in the Michigan area that what would they charge to make make a contract like this that would be stone. Cold lead pipe locked a kind of a locked in. This is the real deal contract. This has all the details and it's going to be three page for patriots. GonNa be tight. Everything's in there. We're checking all the boxes. I mean this right. Here is a hot contract. How much money would that cost to get. You know. There's something probably the quote you never want to go. There's there's something to take into account where they're kind of our industry standard contracts for an organization called the the American Institute of Architects got many of these buildings. There's an architect architect involved that leads it and they have formed contracts for about everything and a lot of times. What happens is someone who practices area will take one of those form contracts because the entire industry district used to seeing those Yup and they'll use one of those as a starting place to modify customized for your specific situation so should actually be lower lower than starting from scratch so I'm saying on the low end. You know you're talking probably four or five hours worth of work to do you know an very involved building contract young. You're looking at fifteen hundred dollars somewhere in there going up depending on how much time you have but then you can use this over and over and over and over right once you get a template. I mean you draw you should draft the contract contract with the thought that I know have to come in and tweak it here and there but I'm gonNA use the majority of this over and over. It's an investment for my business. I use the same contract for DJ connection for I think over over fifteen thousand weddings yeah but I had to pay initially for the one and the one you know why to pay for the one west. You don't happen to what happened. We had this wedding for the sweet late. It's been far enough. The past I can mention the first name only but I won't mention that here what he was at the Moose Lodge or and it was at eleven garnet the day of her wedding arrives and and it was twenty years old twenty twenty one and the phone rings singular phone did it he did it do you do. She calls DJ connection. She says where where is my DJ. I'm like oh well. Let me just check. I never had A. DJ Ghost me like that. I'm sure is right around the corner. She's supposed to be an hour ago. I waited waited till the end. I just want to call you because this is a big problem. We're going so I'm. Dj Show you know in my show starting like thirty minutes and her wedding starts in our psychology Guy Light Him up light him up. He's like I'm on my way. He keeps saying that and then he just never showed up but he said I'm on my way found out. He was in the process of conceiving a love child. Oh with a girl that he met at or option versity true story so he was in the process of conceiving the lovechild which he told me years later he thought it was funny. I was it's not funny then or now but so after her I found out and again I'm you know. Dj a wedding and she was like. Hey Guy never showed up her. Dad's an attorney. It's always fun and my contract was definitely not a real contract. It free contracts DOT COM or one of these places where you can go and download something something where it's I mean you've seen these tinplate contracts and I thought it was awesome. Got Paid like maybe twenty bucks right and he was like why won't you know do emotional distress us and the fact that I paid for the wedding. I'm an attorney so I'm not gonNA. Stop going for this like you only twenty thousand dollars because that's we spent on the whole wedding and you ruin the whole wedding literally ruined the whole thing so your name is going to be all over. Tulsa people are going to talk about this which they they did for about three or four years and but beyond that you ruined my daughter's wedding and I want an apology I when you come to our house look her in the face and apologize and handmade chick. He's like if I do that. Sign an agreement saying. I'm not GonNa talk about this anymore but if not I mean I'm just like what I didn't make you know fifty thousand year profit that point right and so Vanessa and I worked out an agreement and I settled for a lot and as a lot more than a contract act because the contracts are like how much was the contract where they're saying oh I mean. This is your time for it for a venue like this. You're providing a service. You should be able to get one five hundred Bucks Luke seven fifty. You know what I mean. I was thinking about that contracts a lot but ended up being a lot more to not have a country yeah and so this guy's going to six hundred thousand job right now and if this deal goes sideways and we're talking about twenty percent. I mean that could be one hundred twenty thousand dollars profit that we lose because is we don't have a tight contract. Yeah like you said then you never know. Also how much turns fees are going to be to fight that lawsuit suit right. Sometimes those are as much or more than the damages and you may get stuck paying your attorney fees their attorney's fees and the damages so you you can just Jack that number right on up a little higher. If you're out there today and you have any legal questions at all. This advice does not take the place of having an attorney but we hope to do here. Is We hope to provide you the right context the right details the right circumstances the right mixture extra business coaching advice and legal feedback from an attorney so that you can make an informed choice as to what to do we would just encourage you to please do business with the real attorney who knows what they're talking about and I would encourage you to have an attorney that you use before having litigation because once you get involved litigation. It's now too late to find find a great attorney. Money's Klay Clark that's West Carter with winners and king any legal questions or you'd like to set up a consultation with him. Go to winters King Dot Com. That's winter's winter's King Dot Com. If you have any other questions over email us today at info at thrive time show dot com that's info at thrive time show dot com and we'd like to each and every show where the boom canal that he further ado pre to what.

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