35 Burst results for "American Indians"

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

Morning Edition

01:48 min | 12 hrs ago

U.S. And India Sign Military Agreement During Pompeo, Esper Trip

"The 20 Indian troops killed in a fight with Chinese soldiers this summer on the two countries Himalayan border. And he used his visit to rail against the Chinese Communist Party, or CCP. The CCP is no friend to democracy, the rule of law. Tom Hair, Esper signed a pact with India to share sensitive satellites often used to steer muscles and drones. Big things are happening. As our democracy is aligned to better protect the citizens of our two countries and indeed of the free world. The US has long seen India as a bulwark against China, and the Trump Administration has pushed India to buy more US weapons. But there was an awkward moment when India's defense secretary was asked whether he's willing to stop buying Russian weapons. That depends on negotiations. Demure Tanvi Madan at the Brookings Institution, says it's significant that India hosted Pompeo an Esper Well, tensions are so high with China after that border crisis this summer. At another time, India might have declined to do AH, high profile visit like this with American officials, George a time of crisis in case China was provoked further at a press conference. Indian officials did not mention China by name. Pompeo head's next to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia, where the main topic once again will be China. Lauren Frayer NPR news This

India China Chinese Communist Party Esper Pompeo United States Lauren Frayer Brookings Institution Tanvi Madan Sri Lanka Tom Hair Trump Administration Maldives Indonesia George
The chief of the Sipekne’katik First Nation says the lobster fishing dispute in Nova Scotia is costing his band more than $1.5 million

Native America Calling

03:57 min | 4 d ago

The chief of the Sipekne’katik First Nation says the lobster fishing dispute in Nova Scotia is costing his band more than $1.5 million

"This. Is National Native News I'm Meghan Camera Imprint Tony Gonzales. Confrontations continue between indigenous and non-indigenous lobster fishermen in Nova Scotia. Canada senior police officer is defending the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Response Dan Carpet Chuck has more the MP Commissioner Brenda. Lucky says, the RCMP is fully committed to keeping the peace keeping people safe and enforcing the law. She also confirmed that additional officers have been dispatched to Nova. Scotia there have been violent confrontations, property destroyed vandalism and lobster plant burned to the ground that after indigenous fishermen. Out of season claiming it was their treaty right to fish whenever and wherever they want a right that was upheld by Canada's highest court twenty years ago that first nations had a right to fish to earn a moderate livelihood but not indigenous fishermen auto ought to stop the indigenous harvesting saying that court ruling also said the government could continue to regulate the fishery an emergency session in the. Canadian parliament earlier this week failed to find a solution to the issue of just what is a moderate livelihood the chief this having Equity First Nation Mike sack says the dispute has caused his band more than one and a half million dollars and is fishermen are being shut out of the market. Nobody will deal with us like we reach out to so many trying to move lobster. Anyone could buy with a buyer's licence and nobody will take him so. We have a at least one and a half million dollar hit through our community are we can't sell our lobster Everyone in the area has been told that they will not take care if they take lobster. They'll be they'll boycott or blackness to sack says, it will take time to rebuild relationships in the industry with people in companies who are now afraid of retaliation if they deal with the indigenous fishermen sack says, he wants those responsible to be held accountable. He's also filed an application for a court injunction aimed at any harassment of indigenous fishermen with fleet is based for National Native News I'm Dan. Carpenter. A, native American tribe in Oregon has become the first in the US to receive full authority to manage its forests Kale CC's Brian. Bull reports the Bureau of Indian Affairs approved the Co Quell Tribes Indian Trust. Asset Management Plan Tuesday this grant autonomy over its ten thousand acres of trust forest land and resources a first for any of the country's five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribes. Mark Johnston is executive director for the Co Quell Indian tribe we're. Just really excited about the opportunity to be I. WE respect the burden at that creates going I because you better do it right? You mess it up for those folks that come behind you. We know we're not going to be the only tribe that considers because of the value promise hopping perspective sovereignty or self-governance as a longstanding goal for tribes and timber is an important resource for the CO Quayle Johnston says annual revenue support, key programs including tribal healthcare and. Education for National Native News I'm Brian Bowl a federal judge ruled Thursday that he will not force the Pima County recorder to establish an early voting site in southern Arizona tribes reservation next week, and Gibson with Arizona public media has more the past Gliac he tribes sued Pima County. Recorder, F.. N.. Rodriguez. In an effort to reinstate in early voting site, her office closed in two thousand, Eighteen Jonathan D. as part of the tribes legal team, he says though this. Isn't. The result they wanted he knows tribal leaders will continue to advocate for voting opportunities in the reservation members of the we often tribe testified. I really highlighted the burdens and the obstacles that tribal members face in accessing early voting without honor closer to the reservation during the hearing the tribe argued that with lower car ownership distrust of voting by mail in higher rates of underlying conditions, and early in person voting site in the reservation would benefit its residents. For National Native News I'm Emma Gibson. I'm Megan Camera.

Nova Scotia Quayle Johnston Canada Jonathan D. Co Quell Tribes Indian Trust Emma Gibson Pima County Mike Sack Tony Gonzales Royal Canadian Mounted Police Rcmp Arizona Commissioner Brenda Nova Megan Camera Bureau Of Indian Affairs Officer Oregon Vandalism Harassment
Pandemic power-grabs: autocrats seize Covid opportunism

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:15 min | 5 d ago

Pandemic power-grabs: autocrats seize Covid opportunism

"At the beginning of this year, protests were roiling India. For one hundred days, hundreds of thousands of Indians raged against proposed changes to citizenship laws that would discriminate against Muslims. It was the biggest campaign of civil resistance in decades. But the protests swiftly died out after local curfews were imposed in response to covid nineteen curfews that were particularly strict in mostly Muslim neighborhoods. Too many these new it seemed like a calculated move by the Hindu nationalist Prime Minister Narendra Modi quashing dissent under the cover of the pandemic we'll muddy don't believe. In. A televised address to the nation on Tuesday, he underscored the dangers of the virus and called for renewed vigilance as the country heads into it's festival season. Eve. The bobbly. Deployed but behind the scenes, there's growing evidence that he's been using the crisis for his own partisan ends. Last month citing the risk of covid nineteen spreading within India's parliament. He announced measures that severely hampered lawmakers questioning the government the opposition walked out allowing this mody to Ram through twenty five bills in three days. These kinds of authoritarian tactics are on the rise around the world. The think tank Freedom House counts eighty countries where the quality of democracy and respect for human rights have deteriorated this year. The pandemic has been terrible not only for the human body, but also for the body politic Robert Gassed economists foreign editor. With everyone's attention on covid nineteen, what a crats and would be autocrats in many parts of the world have figured out that they can do all kinds of bad things safe in the knowledge that the rest of the world will barely notice let alone object and where are the countries where this is the most worrying it's a completely global phenomenon. A one end you've got China, which was a dictatorship before the pandemic but has really cracked in Hong Kong the human rights abuses against the we have gotten worse this year we're finding a lot of places is that the pandemic gives governments very reasonable cause for tightening down on on civil liberties for reasons of public health. But. What then happens is that many of them have taken it further than that. So it's not just that they are restricting public gatherings to stop people spreading the virus. They're also using those rules to prevent demonstrations and protests against their own terrible policies and what does that kind of repression look like in practice So you take in Uganda for example, it was an opposition member of parliament called Francis. Zach. Who noticed that? He's constituents we're going hungry because of the recession caused by nineteen. So he's the give them some help you know packages of rice and sugar just to get them through the hard times. Government had said that only the government was allowed to give out food and if anyone else tried it the government said they do incompetently, the crowds would gather and that would spread the virus. So the president actually said, you know we will charge you with murder if you try to hand out food aid when you don't the government will from. The opposition member of parliament. He was very careful to do it in a way that wasn't going to spread the virus. do packages and have them delivered individually to people's doors on on the backs of motorcycles the day off the he did it the police came to his home. He says jumped the fence while he was showering through minivan dragged him off, put them in prison tortured. Him are unbelievably horribly and they said to him while doing doing it we can do anything we want to you because no one can come out and protest because there will look down because of the pandemic. And that's something we're hearing. All over the. World. And it seems in a lot of cases though that it it's these leaders are doubling down on the kinds of populist attitudes and policies that put them in power in the first place. That's exactly right now, one of the strange things about a panic about a contagious disease, and this is something we can see from academic work that's been done on prior pandemics is that people become a bit less rational and a bit more xenophobic if your political persona is someone who is going to stand Up to external threats, then pandemic is a great time to double down on that. So you see Narendra Modi is government in India has always named Muslims for many of the problems in India, and now they're blaming the most super spreaders of the virus in Bulgaria seeing Hauch lockdowns on Romany neighborhoods and others are Turkeys religious authorities blaming gay people first spreading the virus Malaysian officials are blaming migrant workers, some of whom have been caned and deported. So you're seeing lots of this stuff it's a strangely Popular response when people get and I suppose pandemic conditions make it somewhat easier for for autographs for governments to control message. Well absolutely you're seeing a significant increase in the number of restrictions on the press and it's usually done in the name of public health. So people will pass a law against spreading fake news about the virus, which would, of course be be dangerous and they used that to criminalise any criticism of the government's response to the virus, which is completely different things. So you think all over the place. So in Zimbabwe anyone who disseminates wall, they called false information that impedes the. Response to the virus can get up to twenty years in prison and they're arresting people for things like trying to visit in hospital opposition activists who've been been by the ruling party in. El. Salvador they purged seventy journalists and relaunched a state TV outlet on the the president said I. I'm am watching a very balanced news cost with grin and then adds i. don't know what the opposition will see because of course, what they will see is something that's actually pro ruling party. But look innocence global freedom was slipping autocracy in general sense was rising. I, mean how much of this? Can we definitively pin on the pandemic? You'll right global freedom has been declining since probably just about before the financial crisis of two thousand and seven to eight. So this represents a an acceleration of pre existing trend and with each individual violation of human rights you can never say I mean, it's it's like weather and climate change. You can never say this incident could not have happened without the pandemic I mean would would China's rulers still have inflicted such horrors on on the weekends this year without Covid nineteen with Thailand's King of grabbed nearly absolute powers. would. Would Egypt executed fifteen political prisoners in a single weekend this month maybe they would have done those things but these these outrages would surely have faced stronger opposition. If the whole world's attention had been focused on the pandemic, which is tossing everybody's lives in chaos and sucking up all the attention is much easier to get away with these things without the rest of the world looking at what you're doing. So we can be pretty confident that his a significant factor in why things have gone worse this year.

India Prime Minister Narendra Modi China President Trump Covid Freedom House Uganda Hong Kong Robert Gassed Zimbabwe Zach Egypt Salvador Editor Murder
Netflix Misses Q3 Subscriber Forecast, Stock Falls

MarketFoolery

03:48 min | 6 d ago

Netflix Misses Q3 Subscriber Forecast, Stock Falls

"In the past twelve months shares of Netflix are up more than two hundred percent so. Forgive me for not wringing my hands over the fact that shares of Netflix are down about six percent. This morning third quarter profits came in lower than expected. That said. Weakest. Subscriber growth in four years. That's I don't know. It doesn't seem like something to worry a lot about, but it certainly is noteworthy. Actually, think it's something that's kind of to be expected. So there's something called the pull forward effect, which is there's rapid growth in the first half of the year. So then the dot com steals, the subscribers would have happened in the back half of the year. So they added two point, two, million new subscribers, which is less than the three point three, million predicted. By. In total for the year, they added over twenty six million customers, which is more than they did of all of last year. So through the first nine months of twenty, twenty they've. got a point, one million members and they're on pace to add thirty, four, million users in two, thousand twenty, which will be their strongest year of growth. Aber so even though this quarter is the lowest number. Since two thousand fifteen if you kind of zoom out look at the big picture, they're going to to almost two hundred million customers in total, which if you're going to compare it to Disney sixty point, five, million subscribers who has about thirty million. So it's still by and large the most popular. Streaming site. Did Not get a chance to listen to the conference call. Do you know the extent to which management game guidance on production schedule because that's certainly we certainly seen that in the traditional movie? Industry, of Television as well to a lesser degree, but we've seen a lot of movies just stopped production altogether. Did they give any guidance on their own pipeline? They did. So they finish fifty projects since the initial shutdown and they will release more programs next year in twenty twenty, one minute didn't twenty twenty. They are returning to production mainly in Europe and in Asia not as much. So in the US, they're currently filming season for of Stranger things they're filming red notice which I don't know if that's based on the book by Bill. Browder. But if it is, I'm excited to watch it. They're filming season two of the witcher. So they seem that they are both finishing filming finishing production and filming and re ramping filming outside of the US. One of the things I did know Yeah. The headline is a subscriber growth in four years their subscriber growth in the Asia Pacific region was really strong this last quarter. Yeah, it was the largest contributor to paid membership growth. So it was forty six percent of the global paid net ads. So I think that that's an interesting kind of problem or gift that they have is they now have such a global subscriber base. So you have to see shows that are in English, and then you have to see shows that are in different languages and you have to see show that widely appeal like I don't know if you watched Indian matchmaking but that was an interesting show that appealed to. I think you know I'm not watching a match making show I heard a plus reviews my sister really liked it. But I think that that's an interesting kind of experiment and you see that it was very popular in India but it was also super popular in the US trying to figure out how they can get shows and movies that have that wide appeal while also focusing on those knee shows as well that do really well like the umbrella academy or the Social Dilemma the documentary that came out.

United States Netflix Disney Aber Asia Pacific Browder Umbrella Academy Europe India Bill Asia
Los Angeles Dodgers Game Tonight

PM Tampa Bay with Ryan Gorman

03:03 min | Last week

Los Angeles Dodgers Game Tonight

"Story game, one of the world's Siri's between our Tampa Bay Rays and the Los Angeles Dodgers. It kicks off at eight tonight. Yesterday we had raised baseball insider from 95 3 w. D. A Steve Kearney on to give us a preview from the res perspective. So today I wanted to have someone on to take us inside the Dodgers organization, and there's only one person you want for something like that. Joining me now on the hotline is Andy McCullough, former baseball writer for the L. A. Times and now senior writer for the athletic You can follow his reporting on Twitter at by McCullough, Andy. Thank you so much for taking some time to explain to raise fans what they're up against in this Siri's and let's start with the fact that Dodgers have been a contender for years Now. What's held them back from winning a world serious title? Well, kind of. Yeah, I mean, I guess the short answer was 2017. They played it. He may have been cheating on me. You know, in 2018. They played a team who was better than them talk to also were subsequently accused of, you know, fine feeling and punished for it legally. And then last year, they kind of like bungled their pitching set up in the NLDS in law. Do you know the team that won the World Series? The national? I mean, I guess nothing kept him back. I guess if you wantto concede all that stuff is their death players have not played At their best in the highest levels. Moment, of course here, including Challenger did not hit particularly well in your courses. 18 Clayton Kershaw on Kendall Jansen and had some high profile sort of, you know failures in the post season, So I mean, it's really just, you know, they're superstars haven't played, you know as well as they could have, And that's really how you win in October is your best players have really, really well. Tell us about the changes the Dodgers made going into this season to try to finally take that next step. I mean, they traded for movie death, and that is a big one. I mean, yeah, like it's simple, but it's also pretty profound. The effect he had on the team. I mean, you just thought in the end, he didn't even hit particularly well. But in the field I mean Indian 5 67. He made a really like like game changing eventually reason saving catches. Huge defensive, please. When you add a player like that reduces the pressure on guys like Seger and Gallinger, and just because we know they know that you're gonna have some sort of value added that that way, and so that's the big thing is that they were the best team in baseball without you know, last year and, you know, add a guy who's you know, probably The second best player in the floor behind my trial to add him to the roster. I mean, it just It was a really game changer that that's a different issue. I'm joined by senior writer for the athletic Andy McCullough, who's been following the Dodgers for years. You can follow him on Twitter at by McCullough. How

Los Angeles Dodgers Andy Mccullough Kendall Jansen Siri Baseball Twitter Writer Tampa Bay Rays Steve Kearney Clayton Kershaw L. A. Times Challenger Seger Nlds Gallinger
New species of water bear uses fluorescent 'shield' to survive lethal UV radiation

Kottke Ride Home

02:09 min | Last week

New species of water bear uses fluorescent 'shield' to survive lethal UV radiation

"Tar Degrades you know the adorable microscopic water bears that can survive basically anything like being frozen for thirty years and then being revived again or as a species surviving all five mass extinctions. will newly discovered strain of tar grade has another superpower protection from lethal levels of ultraviolet light. A recent study published in the Royal Society Journal found that the Para macrobiotics because our strain of tar grade I detected in Bangalore exhibits of fluorescent shield to protect against UV, light causing them to glow. Quoting. C.. N. For the experiment send deep M S RAPA Assistant Professor at the Indian Institute of Science exposed this tar grade along with another type of tar degrade hippies exemplary to UV, light all of the Para macrobiotics agreed survived for thirty days after fifteen minutes of exposure to the lethal raise the other tar degrade died within twenty four hours of exposure. The hardy tar degrade was also the only specimen observed the experiment to have glowed under the harsh light which the researchers revealed the key to their survival. The research team proposed that the tar degrade has fluorescent shield that absorbs the harmful light and emits a harmless blue light, which is what causes them to glow after discovering that their ability to glow was the tar degrade secret weapon S. Orapa made a fluorescent extract from the Para macrobiotics be alarmed strain and covered the other type of tar degrade used in the experiment in the protective material when exposed to UV light this enhanced tardy grade which had originally died from exposure to the radiation after a day showed partial tolerance and quotes. The light used in the experiment is stronger than the UV light that reaches us on earth from the Sun. But after conducting more experiments on tar degrades Esmeralda to expand his research and says, it's possible in extract of the fluorescent shield from the tar degrade could be used as a sunscreen for

Rapa Assistant Professor Bangalore Royal Society Journal Indian Institute Of Science S. Orapa
How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

Self-Publishing with Dale L. Roberts

05:23 min | Last week

How To Self Publish Your Book Online With XinXii Publishing

"What's happening? I am just absolutely tickled to death that you take a little bit of time out today to spend a little bit of time with me to talk about one of my favorite things in self-publishing books. And you know how long we've been talking about it. They're going on sixteen weeks straight of discussing all the different Avenues it rest assured. We're not quite done but this is probably going to be one of the last month or this type of publishing they're going to talk about we're going to switch over into aggregate publishing and audiobook publishing more importantly in the coming weeks. So let's focus on this long last option. Now, this is not to say that I've exhausted every Avenue. I've just hit all the major Avenues some of the areas that people have asked me about the thing with self-publishing a book on off online is it can be overwhelming it can seem like oh my gosh, there's Amazon. There's Apple there's Barnes & Noble. There's Kobo. There's racket since rackets in scope. Oh, I said it twice just coughing. Twice is nice. There's smashwords. There's draft the Jewelers published. Oh my gosh. Well, I thought what better way to break it all down then just do an entire podcast series about this off. So in any event, we're going to be discussing an aggregate publisher an aggregate publisher works like this you upload your content to their platform and they feed it out to numerous Avenues on your behalf. Typically, typically an aggregate publisher takes a percentage of the net profits that come in from the different areas. Okay. Now too bad, there's other ones like published drive that charge a fee a subscription fee to do it since she's not so much like that, but I'm going to put a little bit of an asterisk next to this. So we're going to be talking about Shinji full disclosure song. I'm just curating information here. I've never used them. In fact today. I actually started breaking ground and started uploading an audiobook cuz I'm really curious. They have some Avenues. I don't see a page or through other areas like a CX or find a way voices or published drives. So I said, let's go and give this a shot. There's a little bit of an ambiguity about it though, and I'm going to discuss it here. Get too far ahead of myself. So Shen she's the name of the company. It's spelled x i n x i i and look it up. Yes. It is pronounced Shen. She actually found a video of someone saying it that actually is from the companies and she so european-based company and I always try to cross check to see if they're legit. If any aggregate Publishers good the alliance of Indian authors is one of the best organizations to cross-check any kind of services for self-publishers. You have something that's called the Watchdog service and on that Watch Dog service, they fully vet competition and they don't mince words if there's something a little bit of skew a little bit off. They're not going to recommend it. They'll probably put a caution rating or even avoid it altogether. With Shadow, it gets a recommended rating. Now that is like the top award, you know, there is excellent partner. But since she's not a partner, they're just recommending. So it's without that partner relationship that they have the recommendation. So that speaks volumes ahead of time. Keep in mind Ally the alliance of independent. Authors is run by any authors for any others. Isn't that somebody getting their you know Palms greased saying well, you know, if you give us good words, well, we'll go ahead and pay a little extra. Something doesn't work that way. So in any event, they distribute ebooks and audiobooks but no print books. And so if you're looking for another print-on-demand Avenue Shane, she's not it off. I try to do some digging to see if that was something I was coming any time soon, but I didn't find anything about it. Let's learn. With the books. They accept files. Oh my gosh, like I think thirty different file types. I will mention these ones real briefly here doc ePub PDF. Text PowerPoint. What? Yeah, they accept PowerPoint Excel. Yeah, they accept Excel spreadsheets what PostScript and so many more years. There's no minimum requirement or maximum threshold. Now, I'm going to have a little bit of an asterisk here because I saw they said there's no minimum requirement off. No, ma'am ran out of pages. Technically there is there is and and looks like it too far ahead ourselves here distribution goes out to Amazon the example Bookstore Barnes & Noble Google Kobo Scribd. They have 27 Avenues in total Plus. the shaanxi author page now Shinji author page is essentially a way that you can distribute through the senshi platform and because it's an aggregate publisher. You'll be going to the various Avenues. Let's say you're Distributing ebook over to Amazon. Everybody knows that if you have your book price between 299 and 99 at 70% through Amazon KDP. Well,

Partner Amazon Publisher Shinji Shaanxi Author Jewelers Apple KDP Shane Google Bookstore Barnes
The Lummi Nation is withdrawing from a COVID-19 vaccine trial conducted by AstraZeneca

Native America Calling

03:50 min | Last week

The Lummi Nation is withdrawing from a COVID-19 vaccine trial conducted by AstraZeneca

"This is national native news make an camera in for Antonio Gonzalez, a Montana County has agreed to open a satellite voting office on the black feet nation in settlement of a lawsuit by the tribe Mt. PR's Aaron Bolton reports Jacqueline de Leon is a staff attorney for the colorado-based native American Rights Fund, which helped the bike, the nation file, a case in federal court last week after the. Tribe requested that Array County. Opened a satellite voting office on the reservation. The tribe argued failure to do so would violate federal and State Law de Leone says the county has now read to open a satellite office in heartbeat on. October, nineteenth settling the case we were worried and have been worried that the move to vote by mail was going to disenfranchise native Americans because we know that. Vote by mail in Indian country. We know that lots of people don't get residential mail delivery under a county election officials declined to comment on the case. Di Leone says the native American. Rights Fund also helped the Fort Pack and Northern Cheyenne Tribes Negotiate with Roosevelt Big Horn, and Rosebud. Counties. She says that all three counties were offering in person voter services off reservation according to de. Leon all three counties have now agreed to open satellite offices on the reservations for national native news I'm Erin Bolton. A first nations leader in Atlantic Canada is calling on the prime minister to help settle a lobster dispute as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports confrontations in the Nova Scotia, lobster fishery have become increasingly more violent. Now, indigenous leaders are asking for more protection from police against targeted attacks by nonindigenous lobster fishers police say there were about two hundred people present during violent clashes near lobster pounds one van was set on fire. The dispute began after indigenous lobster fishers say they exercise their? Treaty rights to fish outside the federally regulated fishing season. The chief of this epoch attack first nation Mike sack says they have a right to fish for a moderate livelihood where and when they want and that's based on a Supreme Court ruling from twenty years ago sack says during the confrontation police were on site but did nothing to intervene I've also sent a letter off to a prime minister and hoping that him from they're not sure where to go with IT A. Number of community members throughout Nova Scotia Canada are willing to come in and protect our equal. Or we're not looking to add any fuel to the fire. So we're open the RCMP can just help come in. Charge what was wrong doing the chief says his council has also decided to take legal action against those who are interfering with his bands lobster fishery. In Ottawa Indigenous Services Minister Mark Miller called the violence unacceptable. He says, it's important to get both sides to the table to talk about exactly what is a moderate livelihood for the Magma for National Native News I'm Dan Carpenter Chuck. The LemMe Indian Business Council said this week that the LEMme nation is withdrawing from covid nineteen vaccine trial conducted by Astra Zeneca leader said, there were ongoing communication challenges with officials at the pharmaceutical company which had put its trial on hold following adverse reactions among some volunteers. The Lemme end the Navajo nation faced some backlash from tribal members participating in the trial according to Indian country today that's because of a fraud history of medical procedures and outside research conducted on Indigenous People Lemme nation medical director Dr Dakota Lane said Native Americans face greater risk from covid nineteen but are rarely included and testing vaccines and medications, which is a disadvantage to determining whether they're effective in native populations. LemMe Business Council. Chairman Lawrence Solomon said they would explore whether future trials are safe and appropriate for tribal members for national. Native, News. I'm Megan Camera.

American Rights Fund Jacqueline De Leon Di Leone Dan Carpenter Chuck Array County Prime Minister Mike Sack Antonio Gonzalez LEM Lemme Indian Business Council State Law De Leone Montana County Aaron Bolton Ottawa Indigenous Services Mark Miller Megan Camera Rcmp MT
Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

Science Magazine Podcast

09:03 min | Last week

Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

"The Corona virus pandemic underscores an issue Abigail Hawk the chief research officer of the Seattle Indian health. Board has been fighting her entire career, the exclusion of native people in public health data. We know that the data that's being collected across the United States isn't collecting race and ethnicity correctly however, even with that incredible lack of data, the data that we do have shows an incredible disparity. Growing up in rural Alaska. Echo Hawk was surrounded by examples of how a native community diligently cared for one. Another I was raised amongst incredible people who were the very first public health practitioners. I ever saw if somebody needed fed, they fed them. If somebody needed a ride to a doctor, a five hour trip tankards, Alaska, they drove them. All of my scientific background comes from that space of understanding what it means to serve the community and also the. As an indigenous person, I come from thousands of years of incredible indigenous scientists but after being stereotyped mistreated while seeking prenatal care in Seattle. Washington she knew how she can make an impact in her community. I had a medical assistant question me on how much I had been drinking. She pulled up my sleeves and then I realized she was checking my arm to see had track marks. It was really traumatizing to me is a a young person. I was only nineteen years old and as a result of that experience I didn't get prenatal care until I was in my second trimester, I became a grassroots advocate to ensure that native women were properly treated because we have some of the highest. Rates of infant mortality and maternal mortality within this country and as I went through my college years that turned into what I did my thesis on, she went on to study health policy at the University of Washington, but it wasn't easy navigating between Western, and indigenous knowledge systems. It was hard to balance who I was native person versus what the university is expected me to be and what Western science wanted almost insisted I had to be it became another struggle to be seen as relevant. As smart and as knowledgeable, the other people in the room, and in fact, in the first year of my career I would say that I did not actively practice indigenous science. We come from thousands of years of data gatherers in my communities. We know how to ensure that our corn grows for example, in a time where there is complete droughts I was called out by one of my elders in the fact that I no longer was representing or being an indigenous person it reminded me of. Who I was, and that I would not make any difference in my community. If I didn't go back to the knowledge that I knew was right that I knew was ethical. I was able to incorporate that and not only see how western science has a lot of basis in indigenous knowledge systems. But I also feel that western science needs to quit coming to indigenous people because they think we have all of the problems they need to come to us because we have all of the answers. Today Echo Hawk as the director of the urban Indian Health Institute, a Seattle based organization seeking to decolonize data by putting native people's priorities at the forefront of data collection by being intimately involved in the collection of information native people can shape the narratives told about their communities data and a Western context has always been used against native people. It has been used to show how bad off we are how higher suicide rates are higher diabetes is how we don't achieve the same educational standards Western folks that deficit narrative continues to build support stereotypes of those communities as being less than not as smart of they're responsible for. Their own health disparities all of those things as a result of that, many of our communities have protected themselves and have not participated actively data-gathering efforts across the United States and across the world and that was absolutely the right thing for them to do was to protect themselves. Tribal communities have a right to ensure that data gathered about them is used for their benefit and that they maintain ownership in control over that controlling the data also means making sure that indigenous people are counted in federal and state data sets in the United States. A practice not always followed despite a treaty agreement between tribal nations and the United States. Government. The US census didn't proactively count American Indians until eighteen sixty and this earth of data was used as settle on native peoples land. One of the things that we actively are fighting against is that a small population people don't gather the data about US correctly or they don't gather it at all. So very often albeit presentation, it will say a little asterix that we were American Indians Alaska natives were statistically insignificant to me. That is one of two things either you did not actively try or didn't know how to connect with the community to gather the data you needed to, and the other is, is that when? You eliminate us in the data. You are actively participating in the ongoing genocide of American Indians and Alaska natives, and that seems really strong to say, and yes, it is and I believe it one hundred percent. So I ask people to question these practices that they're doing and recognize that. Yes, I know they're not inherently individually racist but they're participating in a system that has been meant to eliminate my people. These data collection issues remain a major problem in the covid nineteen pandemic initially Echo Hawk was unable to access the CDC breakdown of race ethnicity data. Once she saw the data, she was unimpressed with its quality and breadth. What we found in twenty three states is that native people were three point five times more likely to be infected with covert than Non Hispanic whites. Why did we only do twenty three states in the country? because. The rest of the state simply hadn't gathered enough data for us to be able to analyze what was happening within their states. So only twenty three states had gathered seventy percent of their race ethnicity data policymakers are trying to make data driven decisions. How can they make data driven decisions with bad data? Gathering this data, the resources that we need are not being. In the right way because we don't know how to allocate them. Correctly, Echo Hawk has provided training to universities and the State Department about how to correctly collect race and ethnicity data as well as how to restructure their database systems to better serve indigenous people in all realms of public health. We know that there's about a twenty increase in domestic violence right now as a result of Covid and many of folks who could leave their homes for work or school or things like that to get away from their abusers for an amount of time no longer can do that. I'm deeply dedicated towards the safety of victims of sexual violence and domestic violence and other types of intimate partner violence and so. I am actively working with a large county here in Washington state where we are changing their database system. We are also going to assist them in working with the local tribal communities on what it means. Once they collect that data, how that data is shared back to the tribal communities, how it's analyzed and what kind of meaningful change can come from that at the end of the day. The individual story behind the data guides, echo hawks work. We are also listening to the stories of the community, the impact of a family who's lost both parents the impact of a tribe where cove nineteen has just ravishing through their communities causing so much destruction that qualitative data is justice important as the quantitative data. Simply. Because right now, we don't have enough of that quantitative data to get to those decision makers. So they can make those data driven decisions. Every single data point is a mother is grandfather is an uncle is an anti is relative. We have a responsibility to the story and two story teller to the story. We have a responsibility to ensure that it builds the strength of the community. It identifies gaps that we can then go in and work towards filling that it also shows the strength and the resilience season, the answers that are held within our community by hope for my great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great grandchildren. That they are not facing the same battles that I am facing that we have an opportunity to come together now as allies within the scientific community recognize we have gone wrong and to see our path forward. The story was originally reported by Lizzie wait as part of scientists, voices of the pandemic series.

United States Echo Hawk Alaska Seattle Abigail Hawk University Of Washington Chief Research Officer Washington Urban Indian Health Institute CDC Lizzie State Department Hawks Director Partner
Seattle mayor names task force to guide spending $100M on communities of color

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:34 sec | Last week

Seattle mayor names task force to guide spending $100M on communities of color

"Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan has unveiled who is now going to be on that task force that will determine how $100 million will be spent on communities of color. The Seattle Times is reporting this morning that 29 members include pastors, union leaders, the end of Thie Urban League, along with Seattle Indian Health Board and El Centro de la Raza. City Council member Debra Juarez is going to serve as a non voting member, Thie Durkin administration is going to pay consultant up to $200,000 to help this taskforce navigate its work between November and June of next year.

Mayor Jenny Durkan El Centro De La Raza Seattle Seattle Indian Health Board The Seattle Times Debra Juarez Thie Durkin Thie Urban League Voting Member City Council Consultant
The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

Serial Killers

03:17 min | Last week

The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

"Nineteen seventy four, thirty year, old Charles Sobhraj had an international rap sheet that would make any con artists blush. He committed grand theft auto and France smuggled black vehicles into Bombay oath thousands to Macau's casinos and robbed a jewelry store and telly. Perhaps. Worst of all Charles tricked his half brother Andre into switching places with him abandoning him to eighteen years of hard labor. Charles was a manipulator of the highest order and he was only shot just getting started after his escape from a Turkish prison. Charles made his way back to Southeast Asia from there, he concocted a scheme to con people out of their money and identities. Charles, stationed himself along the HIPPIE trail, a tourist laden road between Thailand and Turkey because he was half Indian and half Vietnamese he easily blended in and could pose a helpful local. He often claimed to be a gem dealer or photographer and offered his services to help guide Western tourists. Once he gained their trust, he robbed them blind or convinced them to smuggle precious gems for him. For over a year Charles Rome to Southeast Asia perfecting his scams and in May of nineteen seventy five, he was in northern India carrying out his usual scheme on some French tourists when he met a young Canadian woman who would change everything. Twenty, nine year old marie-andree. Leclair was French Canadian and had never traveled outside of her country. But when she arrived in India, she was delighted to meet a man who introduced himself as a long goatee. Along was really Charles who used his fluency in French to Charles Marie and convince her he was a famous photographer. Charles Pursued Marie suddenly at first coming across us a mysterious rogue adventurer then to Marie, it seemed like he wasn't entirely interested. So of course, she fell head over heels in love with him. When her vacation eventually came to a close Charles asked her to stay and travel with him through Thailand but Marie used she had a life back home in Canada once in Quebec. However, Marie couldn't stop thinking about the mysterious along she wondered if she should have prolonged her travels and as she felt the weight of regret, a slew of love letters from her dashing prints made up her mind. Convinced. He was the one Marie flew back to meet Charles in. August of Nineteen, seventy five. She was completely devoted to him and completely unaware of his criminal past or his criminal present for that matter. That Fall Charles Marie were in Thailand spending time in the coastal town of Taya. But when they met a young Australian couple Charles knew it was the perfect opportunity to test Marie devotion to him. He Convinced Marie to help him drug their coconut milk when the tourists were knocked out Charles and Marie stole all of their belongings and ran by the time. The Australians Awoke Charles. Marie were Long Gone

Charles Charles Marie Charles Sobhraj Charles Rome Thailand Southeast Asia India Leclair Bombay French Canadian Theft Macau France Andre Turkey Canada Taya Quebec
Native American groups condemn U.S. Supreme Court decision that halts the 2020 Census count early

Native America Calling

03:57 min | Last week

Native American groups condemn U.S. Supreme Court decision that halts the 2020 Census count early

"This is national native news making camera in for Antonio. Gonzales the supreme. Court. On Tuesday granted a request by the trump administration to suspend an order by a lower court that would have allowed the twenty twenty cents count to continue through October the move was condemned by the National Congress of American Indians the native American rights. Fund. And the National Urban, Indian family coalition who said the administration is trying to end the twenty twenty cents his count early in order to control the apportionment numbers which determine the number of each state's congressional representatives. A group of Native American tribes, advocacy groups, cities, and counties had sued to maintain an extended deadline for the count originally put in place by the US commerce secretary in April because of the covid nineteen pandemic that was later reversed NCAA I said in a statement that the administration's efforts will quote result in incomplete numbers, effectively excluding non-citizens and suppressing the. Count of minority communities including American Indians and Alaskan natives. The Supreme Court's ruling puts the count on hold while the trump administration and advocates argue in a federal appeals court NCAA I is urging the legislative extension of deadlines warning stopping. The census will quote condemn Indian country to a loss of political representation and its fair share of resources for the next decade. This year, the FCC opened a window of opportunity for native Americans to secure rights to their own wireless broadband networks as Jacob. Resnick reports regional tribes such as Central Council of the Clinton and Haida Indian tribes of Alaska are working to establish an intertribal broadband network to improve internet connectivity across coastal Alaska Southeast. Alaska tribes have few communities connected by road, and while the Internet has helped bridge gaps from physical distances, it's often far from fast or reliable tribal vice president will make Lynn says it high is among hundreds of tribal entities nationwide to apply for a special wireless spectrum license to fill gaps in communities underserved by commercial carriers we don't have a profit motive, our motives. Delivery of service. I really be broadband is a an inherent right for our tribal citizens and That is made ever clear to me by the impacts of the covered nineteen. Where efficiencies and infrastructures became ever more apparent this year, the FCC made possible by offering a spectrum for wireless broadband to native communities. Any unclaimed bandwidth will be auctioned off later to private carriers, but I, the SEC will need to issue the licenses and when it does of tribes across the US are expected to have a unique opportunity to fill gaps in connectivity in underserved areas, which describes most of Rural Alaska. For National Native News. I'm Jacob Bresnik in Juneau Alaska. The Alaska Supreme Court ruled this week that people voting by mail will not need a witness to sign their ballots Katie Oh reported the Arctic Village Council and others had sued to block the signature requirement because of the covid nineteen pandemic. The Anchorage Superior Court ruled in their favor but the division of elections appealed it to the State Supreme Court Natalie Lander is with the Native American Rights Fund, and represented the plaintiffs. She told the court voters at a higher risk for the virus including Arctic village residents face a choice between their health and casting their ballots. It's not worth it to vote. I have to expose myself to this illness for another person and I think that's the problem, the unpredictability and the fear that we're putting voters. Now, the pandemic is not the state's fault but the requirement is. The attorney for the division of elections argued changing rules in the middle of the election will confuse voters and that the plaintiffs didn't prove getting a witness as a severe burden. The court will issue a full opinion at a later date. For National Native News I'm Megan Camera.

Alaska Anchorage Superior Court Alaska Supreme Court Supreme Court National Congress Of American FCC Ncaa United States Jacob Bresnik State Supreme Court Native American Rights Fund Katie Oh Lynn Juneau Alaska American Indians Antonio Gonzales
Supreme Court sides with Trump administration bid to end 2020 census count

WSJ What's News

00:53 sec | Last week

Supreme Court sides with Trump administration bid to end 2020 census count

"The Supreme Court has approved trump administration plans to end the twenty twenty cents before an October thirty first deadline the numbers determine each state seats in the House and votes in the Electoral College for the next decade. So the census is often a partisan battleground. The trump administration pushed for ending the count earlier to get results in by illegal deadline of December thirty first, our reporter Paul Overberg explains why groups including the National Urban League and League of women voters sued the criticism is that unless you count every last person typically the people who don't get counted at the end of the people who are the hardest to reach who are often people of color. People living on Indian reservations and people who are often important to capture for reasons of representation in federal funding.

National Urban League And Leag Paul Overberg Supreme Court Reporter
Black Women & Intimate Partner Violence

Therapy for Black Girls

05:52 min | Last week

Black Women & Intimate Partner Violence

"Thank you so much for joining us today. Dr West thank you so much for having me Yeah I'm very pleased you a join us and always appreciate having someone who has a history. So much research that you've done relates black women as it relates to intimate partner violence and domestic violence, and so I'm curious to hear the Aleutian may be of some of. That work and how it may be looks different now than it did maybe even ten years ago in doing the work. So what we learned in the last ten years or so we have better research and that's one huge advance in the field that I own. So I, would say, think about ten African American women that you know via brand family member a coworker. or of those women according to. National. Statistics. will be a victim of. Violence Sexual assault or stalking. After the age of eighteen at the hands of an intimate partner it really is various stark to tick when you shared right like if you think about yourself in a group of nine girlfriends, that is quite a lot of people in the group who will have been impacted by this exactly. Yeah. That's devastating. Yeah, and so it it sounds like you're suggesting that it is not as urgent to people as really should be absolutely I think in some ways ironically with black women violence, it's so visible because his impacting us all the time which makes ironically invisible because nobody's talking about it You know interestingly enough of course, we have a very public violence situation between I think they were in a relationship Tori lanes and make the stallion rate, and so we have a very public example right now and I think it feels like it has brought together all of the pieces of your research in this one incident, right so we see that there has been lots of backlash against big for sharing this information, but even on her in. Initial reluctant to press charges or to say anything even on the scene because of fear for herself in fear for him and the other people who were there with him that evening. So I'm curious to hear more about your thoughts about how the media and just you know other black people have really kind of really ganged up on her in a lot of ways in are not necessarily believing her there were quite a few means shared when this initially happened I mean even now you knows horry lanes has come. Out with a new album, I've not listened to it. I wasn't a fan of his music even before I mean definitely not now but you know it sounds like there are some suggestions he's making on the album that he didn't do it right and so it very much feels like the pain that she has experienced is not being taken seriously, and in some ways he's trying to invalidate that it even happened in the ways that she saying it did and I think that we need to understand that what happened. Is actually a reality in the lives of too many African American women, black women or more likely to be killed by intimate partner at double the rates of white women often times sir when they're killed their killed by intimate partner in the context, would you see a handgun in the context of an argument and so she was Lucky actually that she didn't recover those statistics. Yeah. Yeah and it is very unfortunate. Me Know both the incident and the aftermath that we are now kind of seeing clout on social media, Indian magazines, another websites and stuff, and so I do WanNa hear a little bit more because it does feel like it's often very complicated situation and I have a background in college student mental health, and so have worked with lots of young women who maybe have been sexually assaulted infield Berry. Mixed feelings about whether they want to press charges right. So we know again the backdrop in which we exist in terms of police violence and how stories are not often taken seriously in the system, and so there is often some trepidation about do I prioritize you know trying to get justice for myself bursts what might happen to this black man in the system and I love to hear more about you know what has come out in terms of your work related to that. Happens and I think it's deeply rooted in history I. Think Historically. Women have mellowness from the very beginning where we just don't talk about these things because we know that there's a safety issue and it really is we're really kinda groomed and taught and encouraged to take sides against ourselves. I'm wondering, do you have some ideas about how we can begin to kind of shift that conversation so that we you know again, I think it is a very complicated situation, but it feels like the answer can't always be at our expense. Exactly think part of it is just really start having critical conversations about domestic violence and sexual assault of gender-based violence within the community. I, think oftentimes this expectation or belief that women are lying. Not happening that it's not really real but as I see it with the statistics, if four out of ten of US experienced this, this is very real. So we need to store opening our eyes and seeing these aren't. Strangers are there these are people in your social network that you know and listening to their stories and hearing their stories

Partner Assault Aleutian Horry Lanes Dr West United States Tori Stalking Berry
Jewelry Ad Featuring Interfaith Couple Sparks Outrage in India

Phil's Gang

00:39 sec | Last week

Jewelry Ad Featuring Interfaith Couple Sparks Outrage in India

"Popular Indian jewelry, Brad Hanish has withdrawn advertisement featuring an interfaith couple after a right wing backlash on social media. In the advert, a pregnant Hindu woman attends a baby shower organized by her Muslim in laws. It's promoting a line called Unity, but it came under attack on social media from critics linking it to love Jihad. That terms used by radical Hindu groups who AKI was Muslim men of targeting Hindu women for conversion through marriage. Some demanded a boycott of the brand. One question why the advert didn't show a Muslim bride marrying into a Hindu family. But others have defended the advert, saying it shows love and harmony between the two communities.

Brad Hanish
The Indigenous Practice of Controlled Burning to Prevent Wildfires

Kottke Ride Home

03:39 min | 2 weeks ago

The Indigenous Practice of Controlled Burning to Prevent Wildfires

"Four out of five of the largest wildfires ever recorded in California have occurred this year five, million acres of land have burned on the west coast. As officials look for solutions they're turning more and more to the native Americans who have long been forced out of tending to the land they once stewarded. So successfully, specifically officials have begun working more with tribal leaders on prescribed burning knowing when and. Where to intentionally burned parts of the forest in a manageable way to prevent out of control wildfires in the future quoting the New York Times long before California was California native Americans used fire to keep the land where they lived healthy that meant intentionally burning excess vegetation at regular intervals during times of the year when the weather would keep blazes smaller in cooler than the destructive wildfires burning today. The work requires a deep understanding of how wins would spread flames down a particular hillside or win lighting a fire in a forest would foster the growth of certain plants and that knowledge has been passed down through ceremony in practice. But until recently, it has mostly been dismissed as unscientific and quotes. Various organizations run by native American, communities have worked with other conservancy nonprofits and private landowners over the years to help them repair forested areas and make them more sustainable and in some parts of the southeastern United States prescribed fire has already been in practice officially by state governments for several decades. But on the West Coast, the practice has long been suppressed quoting again over the course of California's long colonial history native Californians were violently systematically systematically stripped of the ability to tend the land they had lived on for centuries as white settlers pursued gold, timber, and territory. This, dark history unfolded while modern firefighting agencies and techniques were formed under the heavy influence of Europeans who wanted to maximize timber halls said, Mary Huffman director of the indigenous. Peoples Burning Network the Nineteen Twenty article written by William B. Greeley in the Timmerman dismisses light burning as practiced by quote the Indians in various Western pine forests long before the advent of the white man end quote as fallacy propaganda that if he did would lead to the destruction of lucrative trees bill trip director of natural resources in environmental policy for the Kuru. Tribe Department of Natural, resources wrote in a piece for the Guardian the crew people were shot for burning as recently as the nineteen thirties. The idea of prescribed burning remained polarizing for decades as federal and state firefighting agencies were built up around the idea that wildfire was an enemy to be defeated using military-style tactics not a tool that could help prevent destruction and quotes. Now the US Forest Service and the State of California will be working intentionally with tribal leaders on prevention tactics including prescribed fire. It's a step in the right direction, but like everything will come with complications not only have the centuries of suppression built a deep mistrust, but the land itself has changed and new tactics accounting for climate change will need to be teased out while it's definitely a net positive Belinda Brown, a member of the Cosa Band of the Jima way ought to gain nation and travel partnerships director for the low Mukasey Restoration Project said quote we're getting that I told you so hard. My prayer is that ignorance won't stop us again end quote.

California Director West Coast Us Forest Service New York Times United States Nineteen Twenty Tribe Department Of Natural Mary Huffman Timmerman Belinda Brown Jima William B. Greeley
The former longtime chairman of the Seminole Tribe of Florida has died from COVID-19

Native America Calling

03:53 min | 2 weeks ago

The former longtime chairman of the Seminole Tribe of Florida has died from COVID-19

"This is national native news. I'm Megan cameras in for Antonio Gonzales. The State of Virginia is the latest State to recognize indigenous Peoples Day Governor Ralph, Northam declared October twelfth as the day for the state to recognize indigenous people instead of the official federal holiday named for Christopher Columbus. North the made the announcement in a video message as a country and as a Commonwealth. Too often say to live up to our commitments with indigenous peoples whose land we now call Virginia and they have suffered historic injustices as a result indigenous peoples day celebrates the resilient of our tribal communities and promote reconciliation healing and continued friendship with Virginia's Indian tribes. Virginia joins at least thirteen other states and dozens of municipalities that are opting to honor indigenous people either instead of or in conjunction with the Federal Holiday I established as Columbus Day in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, one. Heading into indigenous peoples day protesters in Portland Oregon toppled statues of Abraham, Lincoln and Theodore. Roosevelt police called the unrest overnight a riot protesters in Santa Fe New Mexico gathered over the weekend demanding the city remove a controversial monument dedicated to what a plaque calls heroes who fought against tribes during the settlement of the. West. Ahead of indigenous people stay President Trump signed Savannah's act over the weekend, a bill that seeks to address missing and murdered indigenous. People. USA Today reports the bipartisan legislation requires that Federal State local and tribal law enforcement agencies have updated protocols to address, missing and murdered native Americans. The law is named after Savannah Lafontaine Gray wind a twenty two year old member of the spirit lake, tribe in North Dakota who was murdered in two thousand seventeen while pregnant and her baby cut out of her womb. It seeks to address a gap and data where thousands of cases of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls were not entered into a department of Justice database. Despite many disruptions this year, the twenty twenty cents is carrying on to tally hard to reach communities including indigenous people, KFC sees Brian Bull reports the twenty ten cents ended up with a nearly five percent undercount for American Indians and Alaskan natives. Now, census officials have aggressively tackle challenges for the two thousand. Census Jessica Emma Tachi as a chickasaw Indian who's with the Census Bureau's La Regional Office. She says, they relied on tribal liaisons through the Pandemic Litigation and wildfires we had to be patient when there were areas. Where they're evacuations or when smoke levels and air quality were not great, and so it was not necessarily safe to have our enumerators out. So that is why we've been able to do phone enumeration but also making sure if a tribe had been evacuated and then they come back, we know when we're able to go back in sixty nine tribes Oregon of already surpassed their twenty ten self response rates. The deadline for all census data gathering is October thirty first for National Native News. I'm Brian Bowl in Eugene Oregon. The former longtime chairman of the tribal council of the seminole tribe of Florida has died the Tampa Bay. Times reports Max osceola junior died from complications due to covid nineteen. He was seventy Osceola help transform the seminole tribe with projects such as the Hard Rock Hotel Cafe and Casino brand which the tribe purchased from Hard Rock International. He represented the Hollywood seminole reservation and served thirteen consecutive terms from one thousand, nine, hundred, five to two, thousand, ten Chris. OSCEOLA is the current tribal council representative from the Hollywood reservation although no relation, he called Max a modern day warrior and a true love. For National. Native, news I'm making camera.

Virginia National Native News Oregon Max Osceola Christopher Columbus Census Bureau Savannah Lafontaine Gray Antonio Gonzales Hollywood Hard Rock Hotel Cafe And Casin Santa Fe New Mexico Megan Osceola Jessica Emma Tachi Eugene Oregon Governor Ralph Commonwealth Roosevelt Police Portland
The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

Serial Killers

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

The Hippie Trail Killer Charles Sobhraj

"We're all born with the need to be nurtured and loved we cry out for our parents when we're hurt or when we're scared for those whose please go unheard however, the desire for affection is sometimes unbearable and can lead down a dark road. Charles Sobhraj. Never felt the love and support of a stable family. He was born in the spring of nineteen forty four in Saigon French Indochina better known today as Vietnam. His mother was a shop girl named Chen Lang Fun who went by Noy and his father Hotan Chun Sobhraj was a wealthy Indian textile merchants but the union wasn't to last when Charles was only. Two years old noise took her son away from Hotan after learning he had another wife back in India. Fortunately, for Noye, she found a new start with French army Lieutenant Alfons Doro they fell in love and married in nineteen forty eight when Charles was four but Charles wanted nothing to do with his new stepfather and long to be reunited with coach and his real family. He got his wish in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, nine when they moved to France with Alphonse and sent five year old Charles to live with his father. But the reunion didn't go as Charles expected just like his mother Ho Chun had remarried and started a new family amidst the growing number of half siblings. Charles struggled to compete for hotel son's attention and felt unbearably neglected. Vanessa's going to take over and the psychology here, and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist, but she has done a lot of research for this show thanks Greg unlike some of the serial killers we've discussed in the past Charles never faced physical or sexual abuse. Instead, he endured a different kind of childhood trauma. He was ignored in favor of his half brothers and sisters according to psychiatrist Bruce, Perry, feelings of parental neglect can lead to increased aggression and cruelty. He adds that one of the most disturbing elements of this aggression is that it is often accompanied by a detached cold lack of empathy. Charles started showing signs of this developing aggression over the next three years. He joined a gang of street thugs who attacked and robbed on spending tourists. Unsurprisingly, his criminal activity didn't win his father's affection. In fact, when Noyon Alfons returned to Saigon in nineteen fifty to poach on sent eight-year-old Charles. His mother it's likely that the feeling of being unwanted by both parents haunted Charles for the rest of his life. In Saigon, Charles was still a handful. So in an attempt to curtail the unruly behaviour, Stepfather Alfonse formally adopted Charles, but it made no difference. The young boy was beyond caring about the acceptance of his family worse as he got older Charles started showing signs of Machiavelli Anisim the psychological trait based around manipulation and his favourite victim was his half brother. Andre. Andre, idolized his older brother which made him. The perfect target for Charles's machinations when Charles was ten years old, he convinced two year old Andre to steal from a shopkeeper when the toddler was caught under a confessed to their mother that Charles put him up to it to which Charles proudly scoffed I can always find an idiot to do what I want. It was clear to know that something had to be done before things got out of hand. So in. Fifty Nine Nov moved the family from Saigon to Marseille hoping the change would help to manage Charles's behaviour and further his education she enrolled the fifteen year old and an agricultural school, but it didn't help though he did display an industrious nature that December Charles tried to make some pocket money by selling Christmas cards on the street but his sales tactics were aggressive. The troubled teen was arrested for threatening people with a knife when they refuse to buy his cards in another bid to reform her son noise secured Charles a job at a cafe in Paris perhaps, some menial Labor would straighten him out that year. Charles Bounce from one Parisian restaurant to. Another either working as a busboy or kitchen hand peeling vegetables and washing dishes Charles, hated the work. But no, he refused to let her son slide. He needed structure Charles moved up in the ranks of fine dining and near the end of nineteen sixty became a busboy at la, Cupola of favorite eatery for the Parisian elite according to journalist Thomas Thomson at La cooply. Charles caught glimpses of high society from his place in the back. Those few seconds is the kitchen door flapped open were enough to inspire Charles to strive for more to be rich like them,

Charles Charles Sobhraj Charles Bounce Saigon Saigon French Indochina Andre Vietnam Hotan Noyon Alfons Alfons Doro France Stepfather Alfonse Ho Chun India Chen Lang Hotan Chun Sobhraj Vanessa Alphonse La Cooply
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

03:06 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"The Chew Gaze, made ice very strong, and is only killed by being thrown on the Campfire and kept their overnight Delta's melted beanie way Chu gay considered a curse and to punishment. By. The tale of the wind ago has been sucked. I loved it. I hope you did. Unlike the Wendy go I feel full I feel full of weird monsters right now I like it. Appetite. Sated. Thank you the time so team for helping. Put another episode together Queens Bad. Magic Lindsey Commons Reverend Dr. Joe Horseback Johnson Paisley. Billick. Logan and Katie Spicy clever and bad magic merch, dot, com and socials. Thanks to the script. Keepers Act flannery for doing some Great Krypton Research. Great anthropology research thanks to all those involved in keeping the cult of the curious private facebook group moderated. Countess of the Colt Lists Hernandez her all seen is there's also seen the bojangles emails. If you want more interaction outside of the facebook group, you can check out our discord channels well time suck discord channel, most easily accessed via the time suck APP available, apple and Google play stores, and also by the way I know for some of you. There was a problem episodes on spotify. Maybe some other players I think Google players end on our APP it was our host provider. There was an RSS situation they did address it within like I think twenty four hours and then. Then the the good guys at a bit elixir adjusted our APP with update to address the RSS feed change. Should all be fixed next week time suck? We add to our growing collection of depraved human hunters by heading across the Atlantic to investigate the life and fucked up meals. One of Europe's most grotesque serial killers ever Yoakam Kroll, but never heard of this dude prior to a few days ago, unbelievable this malevolent freak, unholy nature, not better known striking similarities between Kroll and other times suck shit stain. All stars like Andrei Chikatilo at Geene. O'Toole Albert Fish are all their? Call Rape and murder least fourteen most young women and children over the course of twenty year murder spree. His debauchery didn't stop when he killed his victims. It really got going. Beginning. In one, thousand, nine, hundred five is sexual. Psycho unleashed his unnatural fetishes on the city of Duisburg a city of roughly half a million people near the border of Germany and the Netherlands. Uncle. Man His name Uncle Yokum. he was known to the children. Is neighborhood was a hard dirtbag to hunt down German authorities thought they were tracking a criminal mastermind reality there on the erratic trail of cannibalistic maniac far from the sharpest knife drawer. so yes, more cannibalism next week going to be another dark gory dive into the depths of human depravity. Make sure to join US next week to find out just how far some people are willing to go to save a few bucks to grocery store, and that is next week on time. Suck now. Let's see what message you've been sending in recently on today's time sucker updates. Time you. Start with someone getting cum laude, this from super sucker and fire extinguisher. Doc, doc writes your master Sucker and all that jazz eleven. Whiled in the Pacific.

Albert Fish facebook US Yoakam Kroll Chew Gaze Google Andrei Chikatilo Dr. Joe Horseback Johnson Chu spotify Uncle Yokum. murder Wendy flannery Delta Atlantic Hernandez Duisburg Europe
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

05:41 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"End that story was a bit of a letdown for me. Happy want. He didn't get crushed, but really hoping for battle with hoping for a little bit of action. Unexpected, anyone movies to get greenland anytime soon. Pretty Pretty anticlimactic. I get the less you gotta use your brains rather than your blade whenever you can. Man, Scotty Wendy was a obnoxious before who? Use going to be intolerable after this. He's until that store for the rest of his life. Yeah, you took the stone giant. I've heard the story for. Five Thousand Times come on gun. Now talk about the Mohawk legend of the flying head. Also known as whirlwind or big head to fine head is also related to the plains, tribes legend of the rolling head. On a giants, cannibals and big heads, American Indian folklore. Flying heads are undead monsters kind of a colleague zombies flying head appears as a huge disembodied head with fiery eyes and long tangled hair. Flying through the air, pursuing humans to chase and devour them I'm already thinking a flying head movie better than it's movie. the origin of the flying head, legend vary greatly from story to story tried to try, and some tales of flying heads created from a violent murder scene, the severed head of a victim grows to enormous size, or sometimes the head emerges from a mass grave, and other stories human transformed into a flying head after an act cannibalism. There we go again cannibalism. CANNIBALISM REAL PROBLEM In American Indian history. here is one old flying head legend. There were many evil spirits and terrible monsters that hate in the mountain caves when the sun shone, but came out to vex, and plagued the native men when storms swept the earth, or when there was darkness in the forest. Among them, a flying head win. which when it rested upon the ground was higher than the tallest man it was covered with a thick coating of hair that shielded it from the stroke of Eros. The face was dark and angry, filled with great wrinkles, and horrid furrows long black wings came out of it sides, and when it rushed through the air, mournful sounds assailed the ears of frightened men and women. On his underside were too long, sharp claws with which is towards food and attacked its victims damn. Say makes the wind to go seem like no big deal. The nasty monster like my bobby yoga run for her monster money. The flying head came most often to frightened. The women and children came at night at the homes of the Widows and orphans are has real astle. beat his angry wings upon the walls of their houses, and uttered fearful cries in an unknown tongue. Then it went away in a few days, deaths followed and took one of the little family with him. The maiden to whom the flying head, appeared, never heard, the words of a husband's wooing the product of a purpose for a pestilence, came upon her, and she soon sickened and died. As Find Hetero piece of Shit. One night a widow sat alone in her cabin from a little fire burning near the door, she frequently drew roasted acorns and ate them for her evening meal. She did not see the flying head greeted her from the doorway, for her eyes were deep in the coals and thoughts upon the unseen happiness, in which she dwelt before her husband and children had gone away to the long home. The Flying Heads Stealthily reached fourth one of its long claws, and snatched some of the cold of fire and thrust them into its mouth. forethought these were what the woman was eating with Hal of pain. It flew away and the native men never afterwards were troubled by visits. That's trick. A giant flying monster head into leave and you loan got triggered into in some hot coals noted. Super Tough Masha was one huge weakness. Super fucking dumb. Can Be easily tricked into eating hawks all you have to just make a fire and stare Kohl's. Another creepy American Indian entity is the dough this little tough It's the. New Kwa does Oona Kwa the design acquire AK. The wild woman of the basket. Is a figure in the Hawk Wocka you walk mythology. Man This all do all the words in this language. You're tough. the people come from the coast of the Pacific northwest. She's a mixed bag monster. The basket ogress she can bring you wealth, but you can also steal your kids. Carry them home in her basket eat. She is the perfect monster to run into. If you a need money and be WANNA get rid of a couple of knowing kids. She appears to the naked black as midnight, ugly monster woman with long pendulous breasts. He uses her pendulous breasts for weapons, twisting her body back and forth slapper prey down to the ground with a fierce monster titties. Sometimes she'll do kind of helicopter spin move with a long old BOO Clubs World Him and Rollin Warren and of pound, pounding your with a razor nipples over and over beating you ruthlessly with the frozen a saggy Titi clubs. Shouldn't do that so boost, but she is described as having long pendulous breasts, and that's where my mind went with all that. Self described as having bedraggled hair. And Masks and totem poles us. Is She showy Bright Red Purse Lips? She is said to give off the call who? and. She has a kid doesn't get mentioned much, but she does have a kid hanging around somewhere for kid can imagine. She's an awesome mom. It's often Our children are often told that the sound of the wind blowing through the trees is actually the call of the CUA. Some who say that she's able to bring herself back from the dead inability. She uses some missed to revive for children and regenerate any wound wolverine. Wolverine had wispy hair and long asked titties. Man If. We'll really look like that. X. Men movie a real different field wouldn't..

Scotty Wendy greenland Oona Kwa Hawk Wocka Pacific northwest CUA murder Kohl Hal Rollin Warren astle. Titi
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

02:54 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Creepy, such good horror movie at least the Nineteen eighty-nine version I've yet to see the remake a Stephen King. Himself said this is the scariest story he's ever written in this book. The wind go was responsible for re animating, whatever animal or human was interred an old mic-mac cemetery which make Mac stop using because they believed the land was sour, the window manipulated events throughout story, infecting the characters mind as they became more stone-hearted and susceptible to the ancient evil whether human or pet, the resurrected cadavers came back horribly altered, they were strange in vicious and rotten. They were nothing more than human hosts for the evil spirit of the wind to go lurking out in the woods. A variety of other noted authors also written about the wind to go, and the winning go appears in various roleplaying games today, such as dungeons and dragons, where wolves, the apocalypse on television references to go include the series supernatural. The began in two, thousand, five and this series Hannibal the ran from two thousand, thirteen to two thousand fifteen. The show supernatural, just wrapping up now it's a crazy long run. shown up in several other series from around the world. The world of video games to win. Go shows up in multiple games including until dawn. Which player drives group of teenagers who must survive the wind to go in one night. on Mount Blackwood Nice reference there to the author that nineteen ten. My feet are burning up when to go story. Then there's the world of comic books and Graphic novels starting in the seventies marvel. Comics coopted the window legend, taking myths about bone fours, demon subtly sculpted into a comic book villain, eight feet, tall, covered muscle when to go, serve as the hulk antagonised a man cursed with primal hunger, after committing an act of cannibalism, the Canadian wilderness and cool nerd Trivia Lert. was during a hulk vs Wendy. Go Comic. That Wolverine made his first ever appearance. The incredible hulk issue number one eighty, one released in November of Nineteen, seventy four. That was win. That Wolverine showed up. Written by Len Wean drawn by John Remit a senior. Scrap. A little dude still had a significant amount of rebranding to do before you become a household name. Me Look differently whiskers. The time is smaller. But still managed to whoop two goes asked without using any silver at all established himself new awesome Superhero Hugh. Jackman should be very thankful for the window. Legend led to the most profitable and iconic acting role of his career. The to go first appeared in the Marvel Universe and the incredible hulk number, sixty, one, sixty, two, April nineteen seventy-three in the Marvel Universe to go now one specific person, but instead the manifestation of a curse they can strike anyone who commits of cannibalism and the Canadian Northwood stayed pretty true to the folklore. Originally, only one person can become a to go at a time, but then in recent years whole pack a windows been shown up as a win to infestation right now in the marvel universe near the Bering Strait. One point to win curse even infected the hulk, turning him into into window hoke. When hoke was that movie coming out? Bad Ass Mash Up. so that's the to go pretty cool stuff,.

Wolverine Stephen King hoke Mount Blackwood Mac Bering Strait Hannibal Wendy Len Wean Jackman John Remit
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

05:03 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Now, time for some Jiwei when to go tales dating back to who knows when are we really don't have any idea. When these stories originated due to the oral storytelling, tradition of the way, people's no name or data assigned any of these stories that have been passed down from one generation to the next for an untold amount of time. First story is called the Ojibway who slew the Wendy Go. Long ago the Ojibway people were sick. A terrible epidemic was killing them. There was a man called Obermann, who got sick and died in death. He traveled West where it's more beautiful than the sunset. When he got to the river that he would have to cross to the other side, the spirits asked him. Why are you grieving Obermann? He answered because people are dying. The spirits told Odin. He was to return to the way it was to tell them that their teacher was coming to teach them about the good life. Their teacher would bring to the ojibway their rituals and ceremonies to help them get over the hills in their lives, though saddened traumatic times that all experience. Over the years Yoji way experience many traumas. That is the way of the wind ago. A story is told of the window running amok amongst their people and killing them. There've been thousands of a job way in many villages. Before the wind came, the wind was killing everyone so in a man challenged the way to go to a race. If the way man won the Wendy, go would leave. They raced and the man lost. After that the Wendy go continued killing their people as the wind go continued to kill GPA, people another way man had a dream that he could defeat the wind to go. In his dream, he talked to a grandma who shared a story. She told the man that you traveled around to find out who was left. She had gathered the remaining ojibway children, and took them with her, and made them practice running upon a lake back and forth all day long day after day in preparation for the next race with the wind ago. Fuck! Yeah, grandma gets it. Train high putting some Jim Hours. If you'RE GONNA hope to defeat to go. You can't just roll up the track you know no preparation. Expect to be the monster. S. Fifteen foot tall craziest run thing. You gotta pop off the blocks to beat that bitch. And then the story goes. There were fifteen children remaining in each time a race occurred another child died. Oh okay, it's a bummer. Maybe. Grandma didn't have some you know. Good kids to work with training can only take you so far. You know if you don't have natural talent. says. Grandma will be the last one to raise the wind to go and I think she dies 'cause she doesn't show up again the story so that's that's bummer. A dream after all. Dreams are weird. The dude having this dream now all of a sudden. He's racing the wind to go and he wins yes. And the wind to go dies because that's what happens in this weird dream race. Is A dream death race? First Place gives you I don't know. Bragging rights in second place gives you death. Gives life second-place gives you death now the wind goes brother to go demands to raise the man and you'll. Jiwei man whoops his ass to this guys greased lightning. But this win go is die right away. He begs the ojibway man for mercy, but you man doesn't give him any mercy Cozma Liar and kills him to in the new G. Women races around the land of his people, and he sleighs many other windows. At regular wind. You had to take care of and that is a terrible infestation, right? That's hard to find an exterminator to take on that job you call and ask someone to come out and handle your termite infestation in no problem, of course we their ants. Hey, you gotTA. Bud CNC tomorrow. Wendy goes click hello. Hello! The OJ man kill all, but a few wendy goes. Some ran away the north, Brad. The white walkers showed up in the north, and the story ends with Yoji. Way Man Given Jiwei children that were boy names, so the world would now know who they are the end. What does the story about I think it's less about monsters more about being a strong people, not losing your identity, not letting some oppressor. Kill your people. Pretty sure Wendy go symbolizes the white man tale so. I feel awkward as a white man say Netflix thing is true. That's move onto the next og. Way Story. This is the Wendy go in the baby. It's like that movie, three men and a baby, except it's completely different in every single way. So, the story goes. One winter newly married couple went hunting with the other people would they moved to the hunting grounds? A child was born to them one day as they were looking at him in his cradle board and talking to him, the child spoke to them. They were very surprised because he was too young to talk. Where is that sky? Spirit asked the baby. They say he's a very powerful or they say he's very powerful. In some day. I'm going to visit him. His mother grabbed him and said you should not talk about the manatee do that way. Manna, do by the way powerful spirit they'll Jiwei. Religion focused on the belief in power, received from spirits during visions and dreams manager would be a- spirit synonymous with I. Don't Know Odin from norse mythology or the Holy Ghost and Christianity. A few nights later they fell asleep again with the baby and his.

Wendy Grandma wendy Obermann Wendy Go Yoji Netflix Jim Hours Manna Brad TA
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

06:55 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Can grow to a height fifteen feet, or even more is it devours more and more victims if it could just focus, stop digging around. The Woods dominate the super heavyweight division USC. When you go has milky is the pop out of its socket is a look as if they're decomposing because like most of the creature's flesh, they are Kinda rotten away. The windows hairs, wispy and sparse hair of a corpse lane in the ground for weeks has skin is hard as a shield in many recent stories of supposed. Sightings! The creature now has elk horns, sometimes even decapitated elk head, wrestling top its former human head. These details seemed to be pretty. Recent Editions Summa some Pasta. Maybe original legends don't seem to ever mention any elk related features. In the book Mantos the Mantos. Documenting oral traditions of his tribe Chippewa author, an ethnographer Basil. H Johnston describes the wind to go this way saying the wind ago was gone to the point of a mason. Is desiccated skin pulled tightly over its bones. With. His bones, pushing out over at skin, complexion, the ash grey death, and his is push back deep into it sockets the wind go looks like a gone skeleton recently disinterred from the grave. What lips it has or tattered, and bloody unclean, and suffering from separations of the flesh, the window gave off a strange and eerie odor of decay and decomposition of death and corruption, so not quite the romance novel cover description I laid out earlier. I'll talk about his behaviors fighting abilities. When does Monster Hunt and how the wind goes a creature of the night, some tales that lures victims through its voice victims who are never seen again other stories, the Wendy go appears to the victim grabs, victims hand, and makes the victim run alongside the when to go with long strides, evidence of which can later be found in the snow. Eventually, the human footprints in the snow disappear because the Wendy. Go has lifted his hostage into the air and devoured him at a very convoluted way to kill someone. I. Don't amy way to kill. Each you know. Come down, buddy. What are you talking about? I just I was Kinda hoping. We hold hands and just run snow for awhile is someone you could just be buddies and just run and stuff. Cook okay. Yeah, sure we can hold hands and. We'll just run through his. Buddies! Great, and after a while for them, running the when he goes like this fun run through like buddies hold hands. The guy's a gag. Okay I guess this fun I didn't expect is getting a little tired though. Winning goes like I'm going to. Let me, pick you up and carry you for a bit. I'm good, you know what I mean. It's easier for me. Fifteen feet, tall and long strikes and everything, and the braves like Oh. Okay, okay, cool thanks, and then the wind picks them no natural domino et dumps son of a bitch. Your Buddy. Out Her Tara. Braves dies something along. The lines of didn't use fucking. Eat Me right away. What was what was the point of the whole enhance running? Why I don't get it. as as you know, in other folklore, Baysox like in the brothers, Grimm and Bobby Yagi episode early this year. sometimes these stories They don't make a lot of narrative sense all the time. What more about moral lessons main less than the way to go is don't be Cannibal. And more on that bit, the murderous abilities of the wind to go vary considerably from legend to Legend tribe tribe, sharp nails, long fingers allowed to climb trees and scale walls in many stories. They're often super nationally fast, but not always. Some stories went to go walk in like a haggard manner. Kinda fallen apart I'll rotten away. Creatures almost always powerful beyond the realms of any human strength. or, sense of smell, far superior to the human, but their vision often actually worse. Most traditional stories. Our vision is based on movement. If you stay real still. He can't see you. I sound that sounds terrible. Your only options to stand still hope they don't see your smell you. Whether in the form of physical beasts or a spiritual entity, when to go is a hard creature to escape from once to begins to haunt you. It's immune to the harshest climates. Stocks is pray mimic human voices to trick you. One of its favorite tricks lure victims you know deep into the Wilderness game lost away from their party. Then consume them or possess them when he goes a tough son of a bitch, only grow stronger with age. The longer when to go walks the earth stronger its powers become. It can eventually gain the ability to control the weather. New Super Cool Shit like turn everything around you to before the sons actually said to make it easier to confuse you. Lower your way in eight. You an old went ago. That's walked. Earth for many many years can control other creatures of the forest with its window mind. The Bee's master can selman predators force them to strike on command it speed and strength also grow with age, as does its ability to heal itself. Basically, it's way tougher than bigfoot. If bigfoot and Wendy go were squaring off the octagon, you'd be a fool to put money on big fuck bigfoot. Especially, if it's a super old to go, get out of here. It's your bigfoot bullshit. Always bet on old Wendy go. Don't just bet on had beaten his opponent. You know better than eating opponent. why does the win to go on EU? Folklore's think because the lessons when you go. Tales were supposed to teach. mainly. The cannibalism is immoral. You really really shouldn't eat. People sounds obvious now. Don't need people, but cannibalism doesn't often come up in modern life. As an option you actually are thinking about doesn't come up as an actor. Circumstances dictate that you should maybe engage into stay life now. Most of us have access to food. You know or have food. Maybe not always food we want, but something most countries starvation, not a real concern right now, not so hundreds and hundreds of years ago North American, this legend began. Now, not so back when you didn't have a freezer and a pantry to keep food stored in when you couldn't go to Taco Bell for some cheap sustenance when the government was unable to give people food stamps, sometimes, they're long hard winter. You Got Real, hungry and fellow tribe members started looking less like buddies and more like snacks. Sometimes. People ate each other. They each other, often enough that eventually some tribal storyteller was like enough. We can't compete each other. It's a real problem. Several braves, the most our kids past winter to cannibalism. Now, am I GONNA! ASS kicked by tribal river over if more people to defend herself at all for anyone. Trying not two hundred gather shit for the next winter ahead. I think of a story. Revolves around how bad your life is going to become if you eat, it ain't nobody nowhere eight people at all, if now from now on, if people you turn into a monster. Cannibalism was truly wants a widespread problem within the elegant Queen, tribes. Are Gone..

braves Wendy Mantos USC Monster Hunt H Johnston Cook Grimm EU Taco Bell Bobby Yagi
"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

05:24 min | 4 months ago

"american indians" Discussed on Timesuck with Dan Cummins

"Create these designs sometimes, and it's amazing illustrations, such a cool skillset have. I've always admired it right. Just being able to sit there and look at blanks sheet, or yes, now it's like A. Paper like this big. GIGANTIC IPAD looking thing was an electronic pencil. Sketch `away automating. Also we have a bad ass. Wendy, go t shirt and the scared to death section of the store. If you'd like some Wendy, go MERC after today's episode, also bad magic merged dot com, and that's all the announcements for today moving back into the real reason. You're here extra quick today. Let's get to some show. There are a ton of different American Indian legends, regarding all kinds of different creatures. Why are there so many different legends well because there's so many different tribes each with their own distinct his folklore. Take a look into the tribal makeup of North America before we dive into the legend today I was I was a little to myself for knowing so little about all of the people who lived in this land before me live in land I've lived in for my entire life. There's five hundred sixty, eight different, federally recognized American Indian tribes, and just the United States alone. Over five hundred, so many different peoples. Now all just kind of lumped in together a lot of the time, two, hundred and twenty nine are located in the gigantic state of Alaska and the remainder spread throughout the rest of the US, the two thousand ten US sense reported that there were two point nine million people with pure American Indian ancestry in an additional two point, three million people of mixed American Indian ancestry, the combined population in two thousand ten was five point two million American Indians. Just US figures. They don't take into account millions of additional American Indians who live in Canada Mexico. Latin, America hundreds and hundreds of additional tribes. And, then there are many many more tribes and South America people that mind today you know, even though we're GONNA pop into candidate for some stories, primarily just folks, legends from tribes located in the present day us who knows how many other legends out there in the Americas? How did all these tribes get here, oh? We talked a bit about that two years ago and Aztec Suck June of two thousand, eighteen, so much human sacrifice in that one as tax loved a good sacrifice. And kills some kids in a in a heartbeat to grow some corn. But it's been a while been a while, so let's revisit today. How the various tribes of the US made its North America? Many thousands of years before Christopher Columbus ships landed in the Bahamas a group of people discovered America, the nomadic ancestors of modern American Indians hiked over a land bridge from Asia to what is now Alaska. Two thousand years ago by the time European Adventures arrived in the Fifteenth Century CE scholars estimated that more than fifty million people already living in the Americas of these some ten million lived in the area that would later become the United States as time passes, migrants send his push south and east, adapting to the climates and vegetation and animal life as they went. Nor to keep track of these diverse groups, anthropologists geographers have divided them into culture areas or rough groupings of contiguous peoples who shared similar habitats characteristics. Most Scholars Break North America excluding present day. Mexico and Central America into ten separate culture areas. The Arctic sub Arctic the northeast southeast planes southwest, the Great Basin California the North, west coast and the plateau. I up the Arctic, culture, area, cold, flat, treeless region, a frozen Detroit of sorts near the Arctic Circle in present. Day, Alaska Canada and Greenland home to the people of the US candidate in Greenland, and the alleyoop people of the Aleutian chain of nearly seventy islands Arkan out from south. Central Alaska over into Russian territory. The New People have formerly been called Eskimos that term now considered a pejorative by many no longer seen as acceptable to use. Both, these large groups of various tribes spoke and continue to speak dialects Senate from what scholars call the ESKIMO. Elliott language family is okay to use the term eskimo in the context of describing the language family. They're. Both of these groups northern tribes, when they have to deep down right at least deep down, be furious with their ancestors for not migrate further south when they decided to settle, I, don't they? What's like a lot of the present-day inhabitants of? Northern Minnesota Upper Peninsula of Michigan, heavy little pissed, just come on this frozen Tundra, this place this wasteland of icebergs in Tundra and permafrost and temperatures, the dropped it damn near sixty below zero winter without wind chill. That's where you wanted to settle down. You fucking kidding me. Sure seals are tasting pretty cool. Could be picking myself a tasty ask Orange Right now walking over to a beach on ladies if you have just kept moving south. Ib Best. Because, it's such an inhospitable landscape. Arctic's population always been comparatively small and scattered. They're less than eight thousand Elliott. People less than a hundred and fifty thousand total in at people, some of these people's ancestors, especially the you at the northern part of the region nomads more nomads, just like the Mongols last week they followed seals polar bears other games. They migrated across the. The Tundra in the southern part of this very northern region, the Alliott were a bit more settled living in small fishing villages along the shore, the early new it. alleyoop people's had a great deal in common, many lived in dome, shaped houses, made of sod or timber, or in.

United States Alaska North America Americas Tundra South America Elliott Wendy Great Basin Senate Arctic Circle Mexico Canada Mexico Central America Christopher Columbus Detroit Greenland Bahamas
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"In which he talks about his native american identity before a show with another american indian musician john trudell i'll rural broadly boy whose job will our ruled route review if you his uh something i hope that doesn't go by what were drawn jessia davis of course was really an accomplished artist he played with everyone from willing elson to john lennon to rod stewart stevie solace tell us how he inspired some of them is musicians that he played with we but just yet first of all when i first started to as a hobby to start to look for other native americans his when i was a kid and i was playing guitar for rod stewart and here i was thinking plan madison square garden that can't be the only guy doing this and i used to see the name jesse had davis all the time and it turns out i was actually playing jesse as guitar parts and some of those routes through it songs and didn't know it while i was searching for native american guitar blizzard i thought didn't exist so the just yet with is a fascinating story because he was really a catalyst for me wanting to do all of this and how can because i wasn't a recording studio with the rolling stones and 1994 hanging out and ronnie wood was telling me a story about a guitar and he said to me cbs news you know that guitars and when he goes chassis ed davis guitar in a couple nice of god ronnie just talked about just yet like he was talking about a superhero most people will talk about running would that way so i need to know that everyone people that we think are our heroes have heroes in some of those heroes in native american people being eric clapton these to cold air clapping god in on it but every club can use to get jesse at davis to play on his records second slice of what's that make jesse a dealer said their clapton's god you know when he wants jesse ed so just it as this person that every musician just worshiped and i thought why isn't anyone know about this guy back to the documentary rumble musician bossi's marie talking about her how her antiwar message was blacklisted by the fbi during the johnson in nixon administrations i was no longer a'marginalised person waiting universal sold is talking about natives america.

marie nixon jesse ed cbs ronnie wood john lennon john trudell johnson fbi elson bossi eric clapton davis jesse madison square garden rod stewart
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"And i thought that was really funny when i i recently found that when i moved austin i had to get my birth certificate and um it was because they thought it would give me a better shot at life and um i think it you know it was only bad things were happen native eric american people in the early 1900s in the mid 1900s so people never wanted to claim that you know robbie robertson said in the film his mother said you know be proud who you are but be careful who you tell and uh that kinda says it all and to link musicians embraced their identities hughes jeannie hendricks jimi hendrix's sister talking about her brother in the rumble documentary here's what she had to say about jimmy's cherokee identity he's very proud amine is very proud of the native being asked in america scottish it's part of your legacy it's part of your heritage it's part of who you are and what you want to reflect and represent the great jimi hendrix how did jimi hendrix change the way american indians could be seen on stage steve solace well i don't know if you could eat it'd be would i would ever think about that because you know when i was brought up he was you know to all of us he was an african american to all of us when i was being brought up christopher columbus discovered america to all of us when i was being brought up um the the delta blues rosa was a was a black art form you know there's a lot of things that we were told and we just assumed to be true so which important to me about that statement that genie made was was really is that she says he's proud of his cherokee heritage she's proud of this african american heritage and he's proud of his scottish heritage because what she's really saying is our country was was the flavour of what we became comes from a lot of little areas a lot a lot of things that were wonderful put together to create something special and somehow everybody took credit for little bits and we were taught that's how it was but um to me that says it all at show.

robbie robertson jimi hendrix jimmy america steve christopher columbus
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yeah and the real people always sort of they get confused ago i didn't know tony bennett was in native american and and he's not a native american but wild why all those people are in the film is because we wanted to tell a story and not make it a race story one of the toast story of influence in if you're going to tell the story of influence and how these native americans influence mostue we we know is in music history i wanted the people who are influenced to tell the story and not musicologists and not you know scholars and and that's why there's so many of those guys in the film you're musician but you didn't see yourself as an american indian guitarist and neither did link rail link was a huge influence to many guitarists which is played his song rumble that the top there in the documentary feature is a lotta people talking about what an influence rumble his hat on their careers tell us about that song well if you really think about rumble it's my team 57 1958 in this guy comes out and he's playing like he's kinda created the birth of heavy metal the birth of distorted guitar the birth of the power court and the birth of punk rock all in one thing in as time went on he just kept resurfacing you know um i talk about the three bits of link grave you know he's a big bang of rock and roll in the fifties he kinda disappears for a while he influences jeff beck jimmy page pete townsend the kinks and everybody else who study 'em you forget about him for a while and then he comes back again in seventy seven seventy eight with the birth of punk rock in new york city in areas with robert gordon and playing in london and steve jones from the sex pistols and everybody's checking amount then he disappears again and then he comes back is the is the go to cool guy for movie contracts the johnny depp and rubber rodriguez and in clinton tarantino and everybody else he just keeps coming back man here is slants.

tony bennett robert gordon steve jones johnny depp tarantino jeff beck new york london clinton three bits
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Yeah allocation now what is it now dean thank you it it's a good question con what we're trying to do here today and certainly what you're trying to do at the smithsonian cecile what would you say to our caller dean well yes it is part of what we're trying to demonstrate that in valorising and romanticising americanindians ending creating this imagery of imaginary indians it does serve in a way as a sort of inpenetrable curtain that keeps americans from knowing who american indians really are let's get joan here from milwaukee wisconsin hi joe you're on the air hard uh i'm going to story in and uh i guess a start off by saying that uh anybody's ever read the declaration of independence thomas jefferson speaks native people who savages complains to george the third who is the main characters speaking to as exposing uh his set of european columnist to the horrors of these savages the early government of the united states the they made many treaties that they broke all of them the only desire they had was to really move the native population is further and further west and the i mean there are so many episodes than forty nine er is for example in california when they arrived by the time they had left the area in california they had virtually murdered all of the native population than the area and when they went north for the fraser river gold rush in the eighteen 50s that his and british columbia canada uh one of the first.

joan thomas jefferson united states california valorising milwaukee wisconsin george fraser river
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Your full thing and people should be reminded of of the indigenous people that are the primary americans the first americans from by all means martha thanks for the call in for bringing that up you know there's a historical element to this exhibit at the smithsonian and really remembrance of painful times in american history for american indians the trail of tears explores the indian removal active eighteen thirty which was signed by andrew jackson it was the forced relocation of cherokee and indigenous indian people to the west in the eighteen 30s paul remind us thousands died during that long journey west in terrible internment camps as well you're was a catastrophe for duchess who cherki booked on other tribes of the southeast and actually other tribes even beyond the southeast and what we saw the opportunity here was to really talk about how rather than it being one very bad man president jackson it was a national debate around the indian removal act in indian leaders said agency and they have allies on their side and we really are asking visitors to look at it as a national decision versus one one awful thing uh a few people dead so i think that'll be revelatory unethical also be interesting to see how profound it was in the history of the country it it's often seen as a story of some means being victimized when in fact it helped explode the cotton kingdom in created enormous wealth and the country sort of knew what it was doing so it'll be it'll be new too many people who've who think a pretty familiar with a story you let's get mike in here from framing him massachusetts i mike welcome to the program.

andrew jackson mike martha paul president
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on one i'm jane place in that's a scene from the 19th 56 western the searchers featuring john wayne about him and american civil war veteran on a journey to rescue his niece comanche indians we are talking this hour about a new exhibit at the smithsonian and a big rethink about native american history and their influence on american culture today you can join the conversation how has american been shaped by its relationship with american indians from pocahontas to the trail of tears to the battle of big horn little bighorn do we know the truth follows on twitter find us on facebook on point radio speaking of pocahantas here's the 1995 disney version of the film popularizes the myth that polka hottest the native american princess fell in love with englishman john smith during the height of conflict between english settlers and the indigenous people of the americas here's the scene just after polka hannas throws herself on john smith's body he to prevent her father from executing him if you kill him you'll have to kill me to daughter stand back i want i love him father what look around you this is where the path of hatred has brought us this is the path i choose father what will yours be my guest today are appalled shot smith a member of the comanche tribe and cecile gone tome they are co curator of americans at the smithsonian national museum of the american indian so paul child smith said a straight here a little bit of hollywood and they're not so much the truth the poker honasan johnsmith were never really in love i guess right.

john wayne pocahontas twitter facebook john smith cecile smithsonian national museum hollywood disney paul
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Of what allowed americans to usurp american indian lands deter a paul how how would you add to that what would you say to our caller charles there's a bit i won't show charles knows how often um the the name black hawk is in is in these states as well and it's you know laundromat movie peters every kinds of things and i think before we get to be too prescriptive about which is appropriate which is it i think it's first useful to look at how pervasive it is and how unique that is is a phenomenon support for on point and the following message come from rocket mortgage by quicken loans chances are you're confident when it comes to your work your hobbies and your life brockett mortgage gives you that same level of confidence when it comes to buying a home for refinancing your existing home loan brockett mortgage is simple allowing you to fully understand all the details and be confident you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash on point equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states nmlsconsumeraccessorg number thirty thirty you probably heard about this russia investigation by special counsel robert muller every day there's a new headline about it well embedded is back with two episodes that lay the whole thing out start to finish of the news and make sense listen on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts.

charles robert muller russia special counsel npr
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Hi gene how are you doing i am well go ahead in a sort of here to my heart and kinda stuck in my craw for a while i'm from oshkosh originally okay and when feel high school with oscar good oshkosh west and we are mascot with guscott west indian now the city bus guys is named after chief oshkosh it's the lic could win a bagel county is the county seat of win a bagel which is an indian name um the largest park in oshkosh is monami park which is of course them in your name and due to political pressure and emma and our mask out with a very stoic um looking indian head with a war bonnets and in a we venerated our heritage through this and now we've become because of public pressure and i can totally understand um washington redskins and things like that but i mean now we're the oshkosh west wildcat and as far as i know there's not any cats at all wilder otherwise that i've ever seen in oshkosh charles thank you a cecile i want you to jump in here i appreciate your call charles it's just a great point cecile some fancy just you know taken this little too far they don't see the the disrespect they see history yet and well we certainly understand that people have both personally person personal and family connections to their sports teams and to the teen mascots but one of the issues involved in this is the imagery that uh that we see of american indians that's pervasive in american life is ninety nine percent of the time indians from the past and that is actually detrimental because americans have always placed american engines in the past they've never regarded them as contemporaries and pudding americans in the american indians in the past and saying that they're not quite equal to their white brethren is part.

monami park emma oshkosh west wildcat cecile oshkosh oscar charles ninety nine percent
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"For away without american indians and that what do we make of this that the national project involves dispossession of native people so rather than pointing out that okay the the symbol you see for um the washington nfl team that that's not like all indians or something else uh what we really became interested in is exploiting why people are so passionate about that and the role that it plays in people's lives and what you find out his asymmetry is useful like ironized cody not an indian incidentally he his use is to support an antipollution campaign the used to be given name of a tribe for a helicopter for the us military so they're all these ways the idea of indians are useful which of course is not the actual indian people you know we should now that the indian in that campaign at a socalled indian in that campaign the antilitter campaign and 71 the actor was actually not an american indian right correct yeah and so you mentioned now the nfl and the washington redskins i mean the cleveland indians our doing away with their longtime mascot the notorious chief who that's going away next year what it what do you make of that i mean people have emotional connections to these logos and yet um you know some of them are are not terribly well downright racist their caricatures right yeah and and i commend it from a sports fan and what i think about is fans didn't choose the name of the team the mascot a known or did in another century.

cody us nfl washington nfl washington redskins cleveland indians
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"On the imagery of the plane's engine warrior as a symbol of the american west and what that represented four americans which was rugged individualism the pioneer spirit in other words it represented the american spirit and as i say commercial artists were actually able to capitalize and literally monetize that image here's a famous public service announcement that became known as the crying indian add speaking of advertisement uh the antilitter organization keep america beautiful launched the eta 1971 and featured iron eyes cody an actor in native american guard with a single tear rolling down his face as trash from someone littering is thrown to his feet some people respect for the natural beauty that was once this country some people go people start pollution people can stop it paul is so many americans are fascinated by uh american indians conflicted certainly were shaped by american indians as you have described what are we getting wrong about about native americans about an about american indians well a lot of things on when when i first started of writing about this a couple of decades ago now it it was easy to be very dismissive and just pointing out how inaccurate it is but i think you know we need to give the public some credit i think they understand these images are not exert representations i don't think when you look at the butter maiden atlanta lakes are saying cheese she from this particular tribe in how accurate is that i think we're very used to all those representations in what i think it shows is a kind of profound ambivalence on the part of the public which sort of understands the whole country doesn't exist or exists in really.

america atlanta
"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"american indians" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Support for on point and the following message comes from rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage it let you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash on point from wbur boston and npr i'm jane place in and this is on point american indians make up less than 1 percent of the population yet indian names and images are everywhere as mascots of professional sports teams logos on butter packaging also on military equipment sometimes it's irreverent even a racist a new exhibit at the smithsonian explores the misconceptions about that native american imagery this hour on point native americans tell their stories you can join us on air or online are you native american how do you see the portrayal of american indians in our society john is at on point radio dot org or on twitter and facebook at on point radio later this hour we're talking about native americans in popular music but first joining me now from washington are the co curator of americans at the smithsonian national museum of the american indian paul shot smith is associate curator at this with sony ins national museum of the american indian is a member of the comanche tribe and author of everything you know about indians is wrong paul shot smith welcome to an point nice to have you heard jane ansah seal a gun tome associate curator at the smithsonian's national museum of the american indian she is the author of officially indians symbols that define the united states cecile great to have you hello jane listeners we have got a gallery of images from the smithsonian exhibit at our website on point radio dot org policy will tell us what inspired this exhibit at the smithsonian paul well we we opener museum in a two thousand four here in the notion woollen suits of we've learned a great deal about what the public knows what you're looking for for more museum and we gave a lot of thought to what this exhibition might be rebuilt at on this this paradox which is most americans.

associate curator smithsonian jane ansah sony facebook united states paul ins national museum boston smith smithsonian national museum washington twitter john 1 percent