35 Burst results for "American Foundation"

Bill and Melinda Gates Release 2021 Annual Letter

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:52 sec | 5 hrs ago

Bill and Melinda Gates Release 2021 Annual Letter

"Bill Gates says the time is now to prepare for the next global pandemic. His foundation is calling for a costly warlike preparation effort. More from comas. Corwin take when covert 19 arrived in the U. S. A year ago, Bill Gates had already been warning about a global pandemic for years. We're not ready for the next epidemic. He sounded the alarm and a now famous 2015 10 talk queen to do simulations. Term games, not war games. Now in its newly released annual letter, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is urging the world to prepare for the next global health threat as though it were going to war. The gates is say stopping the next pandemic will require military style readiness costing tens of billions of dollars a year. But they say that's a minor expanse compared to the current pandemics. Global cost, which they say is already $28 trillion.

Bill Gates Comas Corwin Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat
Police raid Russian opposition leader's apartment, offices

Not Too Shabby

00:50 sec | 6 hrs ago

Police raid Russian opposition leader's apartment, offices

"Are searching several properties linked to the country's main opposition leader, Alexei Navalny, aunt his supporters following nationwide protests about his recent detention. Mr. Navalny was arrested on his return to Russia from Germany, where had been treated after being poisoned. His Danny able hard close associates of Alexei Navalny have posted messages about on videos off raids. Police have targeted Mr Navalny's apartments, one where his wife, Yulia is said to be staying, as well as the offices of these anti corruption foundation on the studio of the online channel Navalny Live. Saturday's protest was some of the largest anti government demonstrations in years. The Russian Interior Ministry has accused those who organized and participated in them of breaching coronavirus rules. Senior

Alexei Navalny Mr. Navalny Mr Navalny Russia Danny Yulia Germany Russian Interior Ministry
Melinda Gates discusses annual letter from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:12 min | 10 hrs ago

Melinda Gates discusses annual letter from Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

"Bill Gates predicted the current pandemic. Now he and Melinda Gates are calling for a global effort costing billions of dollars a year to prepare for the next one. Let's learn more about that from Cuomo's Corwin Hate in the newly released annual letter from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation the gates and say it is not too soon to start thinking about the next pandemic. And how to mobilize the world's resource is against it. Bill Gates has more than a little credibility on this point, thanks to his Ted talk more than five years ago that warned a pandemic was coming and that the world was unprepared. He then called for the creation of military style strike forces to mobilize against any nation health threats. We need a medic reserve Corps. Lots of people have got the training and background who are ready to go with the expertise and then we need to pair those medical people with the military. Taking advantage of the military's ability to move fast to logistics and secure areas. Now the Gateses are renewing the call for this kind of preparedness, noting it will likely cost billions of dollars a year. The gates is say they like everyone want to return to normal, But one thing they hope never returns is quote our complacency about

Bill Gates Bill And Melinda Gates Foundat Melinda Gates Corwin Cuomo Reserve Corps TED
Philadelphia designer receives grant from Beyoncé's foundation

KYW 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 1 d ago

Philadelphia designer receives grant from Beyoncé's foundation

"Filled a few designer has caught the eye of one of the world's biggest stars, Beyonce and not just for her fashion. Her mission. The story from guilt of you Sharon Day, Howard. Kimberly McGlone, the owner, Grant Boulevard, opened her shop 36 05 Lancaster Avenue, just as the pandemic hit, And instead of giving up, she got motivated fiance in partnership with her nonprofit debate. Good Foundation work with the end of OCP to set aside and a pool of money to support businesses impacted by Cove in and she was really intentional, making sure that those businesses were black owned. But glands advocacy work over the years has taken on a life of its own, from sustainability to civil rights. Yes, sustainable design, but also figuring out how we can bring an ever more Inclusive community of people together. She believes this is why she was awarded the grant make it work in an even exchange of energy and effort and love right, and they were just using fashion as a vehicle. The big Good Foundation has awarded several grants each up to $10,000

Kimberly Mcglone Grant Boulevard Good Foundation Beyonce Sharon Howard Big Good Foundation
Delayed Deliverances: A Devotion

Solid Joys Daily Devotional

02:25 min | 2 d ago

Delayed Deliverances: A Devotion

"Delivery nces immediately. All doors were opened and everyone's bonds were on fastened x sixteen twenty six in this age. God rescues his people from some harm. Not all harm. That's comforting to know because otherwise we might conclude from our harm that he has forgotten us or rejected us so be encouraged by the simple reminder that in acts sixteen nineteen to twenty four. Paul and silas were not delivered but in verses twenty five to twenty six they were. i know deliverance. They seized paul and silas and dragged them into the marketplace verse. Nineteen the magistrates tore the garments off of them verse. Twenty two they inflicted many blows on them. Verse twenty three. The jailer fastened their feet in stocks. Verse twenty four then deliverance about midnight. Paul and silas were praying and singing hymns to god and suddenly there was a great earthquake. So that the foundations of the prison were shaken and immediately doors were and and everyone's bonds were unfashionable versus twenty five and twenty six. God could have stepped in sooner. He didn't he has his reasons. He loves paul and silas question for you. If you plot your life along this continuum of paul's initial suffering and later deliverance. Where are you are you in the stripped and beaten stage or the unshackled door flung open stage. Both are gods stages of care for you. He has not left you or forsaken you. Hebrews thirteen five. If you are in the fettered stage don't despair sing. Freedom is on the way it is only a matter of time even if it comes through death unto death i will give you the crown of life revelation to

Silas Paul
Guest Teacher Janel Dyan on How to Invest in Womens Leadership in Your Company

The $100 MBA Show

07:07 min | 2 d ago

Guest Teacher Janel Dyan on How to Invest in Womens Leadership in Your Company

"Today. We'll be talking about why in these unprecedented times. Women in leadership are essential to your company. Short-term growth and long term survival gender and racial equality are certainly hot topics of conversation right now but there are some organizations that are ahead of the curve and like me have been focusing on the equality of women and women of color for years and these are my clients women in leadership women on the rise women entrepreneurs and women at the helm of fortune five hundred companies today such so what lincoln and ford motor company and helping them grow as leaders. What i do best over the past seven years. I've worked with females of all colors and varied backgrounds from the bay area to new york. They are not only having a huge impact today but they are paving the way for all future female leaders industries historically dominated by men. And here's what i see. The companies who have made it a part of their core tenants to support an invest in diversity programs for the leadership development of women are the companies who are now today's industry leaders and it's not only for the products and services they provide but more importantly as a brand that people want to work for by from remained loyal to the shifted their measurable for success to include strong corporate culture of innovation employed growth customer loyalty and diverse leadership team who focus on purpose. And not just on the bottom line. They understand that their greatest assets are their employees and they have dedicated their efforts to be a brand that is people focused and purpose driven during our time together. Today we will focus on three lessons. You can walk away with first because women are. Today's largest and fastest growing global consumer companies need to shift their brand strategy to recognize the powerful role that women in leadership play driving economic growth. Next we'll take a look at why the greatest leaders are master storytellers and how powerful story can be and finally will cover some tips for building a culture with equality in its foundation including ways to establish promote an invest in fema leadership. So let's get started less than one. Women are the fastest growing global consumer and it's imperative that companies adjust according to. Brigitte brennan author. Why she buys and winning her business. Women make or heavily influence. Seventy to eighty percent of all purchases across all industries which means women are every company's largest target customer to truly capitalize on this customer trend companies. Must do a better job creating products and services with female buyers in mind. Companies must create a brand that women will buy from advocate foreign remain loyal to the companies who are most equipped to connect with women are led by other women and their leadership results have a positive impact. On company performance. The profits higher margins add more returns for investors leaders such as saffir cats of oracle and mary barra of general motors. it seems like commonsense. But it's actually not common practice. Facts are that only. Eighteen percent of global firms are led by women and according to this year's forbes annual report the number of women. Ceo's running fortune five hundred companies since it just seven point four percent so clearly. There are strong logical ethical and financial reasons to put more women at the helm according to study by mackenzie if we can close the gender gap by twenty twenty five twenty. Eight trillion dollars would be added to the global economy and to put that in perspective that is the size of the economies of the united states in china combined. Right now during covid and racial injustices at the forefront we find ourselves in a global economy with the future unknown. These challenges are now calling for new leadership no longer one of command and control but one of collaboration community one of the biggest actions that any leader can do right now is be transparent and empathetic to their team members and customers because anxiety and uncertainty are heightened during this time of crisis emotional connection on a basic human level between the leader and employee has never been more important than right now a recent study done in two thousand nineteen by mit sought to determine the makeup of the most effective leadership teams and those are the teams with the most women especially women of color as they are leaders who bring a deeper understanding of resilience. Women are also more likely to have empathy for those struggling to deal with change or lack of inclusion become role models for the change that they seek and are willing to share inspirational stories to motivate to embrace change they are in general more inclusive and collaborative making in leadership style which is a combination that continues to prove to be effective in getting companies to move faster in times of change lesson to the power of story. Why greatest leaders are master storytellers. We all love stories. In fact stories are what differentiates us as human beings. It is highly forged connections among each other and they'll trust as a community each stories an emotional journey that reinforces shared beliefs values and vision that we can all relate to from drawings on the walls of cave with stories of heroism folktales. That are full of more lessons to generational family tales. That remind us of our roots. Human beings need to feel that we are part of something greater than ourselves stories. Reminders that through tough times we will come out to the other side stronger wiser and more unified than ever stories. Bring us back to the beginning and remind us of who we are and what we do in stories creek clarity in our purpose and vision to get their. The greatest leaders are master storytellers. Simon sinek author of the power of y in infinite game says beautifully leaders aren't responsible for the results. Leaders are responsible for the people who are responsible for the results. It is during these times of crisis that provide an excellent opportunity for leaders to communicate stories of incredible vision for the future showing empathy advising with humility and providing optimism. For what lies ahead. They also understand marketing at its core is simply about storytelling. and it is the stories. They choose to tell that can differentiate brand as an industry leader communicating the values of the brand with the product and services they sell. I mean who wasn't choked up watching google's tearjerking super bowl ad of a love story that began with a simple question how not to forget. So tying back to what we learn in less than one about women being the largest and fastest growing global consumer with the understanding that stories have power companies must give their products and services a story that women now can relate to and what better way to do that than with women at the helm leading the way finally lesson three building corporate culture with gender equality in its foundation companies with strong female leadership such as new york stock exchange. Pwg and google are continuing to create more equitable inclusive and fulfilling workplaces for all women and the investments are already proving to return tenfold to their bottom line.

Ford Motor Brigitte Brennan Mary Barra Bay Area Lincoln Fema General Motors New York Mackenzie Oracle CEO MIT China United States Simon Sinek Google
Elon Musk is donating a $100 million prize for carbon capture technology

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:16 sec | 5 d ago

Elon Musk is donating a $100 million prize for carbon capture technology

"$100 million towards a prize for the best carbon capture technology. The test in space like CEO, making that announcement in a tweet TechCrunch reported month. Musk's donation will be connected to the X Prize Foundation, the nonprofit those competitions that encouraged technological innovation and development and Dolly Parton,

Techcrunch Musk X Prize Foundation Dolly Parton
E.U. leaders consider travel bans, faster vaccine rollout to contain coronavirus variants

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:02 min | 5 d ago

E.U. leaders consider travel bans, faster vaccine rollout to contain coronavirus variants

"And good afternoon from rather balmy zurich. For this time of year we begin. Today's program in this part of the world where you leaders have been holding late night. Talks in a bid to coordinate their response to the spread of virus. Brussels has stopped just short of an outright ban on non essential travel between member states but warned tougher restrictions could come within days if efforts to curb the virus fail. Well i'm joined on this topic right here in zurich by monocle twenty four security correspondent beds banners. Also at the center for security studies at eight hundred are good afternoon. Beco- can often entirely Surprises out of this. But maybe before we get to surprises. Maybe just bring us up to speed what happened amongst all of those same samsung screens. That you leaders had to look into the hours this morning. Indeed was a four hour online summit as one does these days the ninth. Eu summit actually since the pandemic has broken out and well. Let's say we had a fairly good picture even beforehand. What they will discuss. And what the actual positions of countries are we had a number of statements for example by the german leadership chancellor merkel but also her chief of staff saying that they may be forced to close borders even though this is a measure they they will not really want to take. It should be a drastic measure Dustbin luxembourg's prime minister. Probably most outspoken. Saying closing the borders in two thousand and twenty was a mistake. It would be a mistake to now so these were the positions hence also know very clear decisions. It's fairly vague at this stage. What was decided that indeed non essential travel across borders should be restricted. But it's not clear to what extent by what measures where exactly was on the lion. Eu commission president only made one thing. Clear that at this stage but that may change. That should not be blanket closure of borders at least that okay. So what you're saying. The distillation of that is no no no great surprises. We knew or this is going to go Now we also seen other other measures which have of course now been adopted by member. States individually France announcing off the back of this. That they're now going to expect that people will have to have a cronut s going into the country Can't be older than seventy two hours. Of course something which almost seems to be coming standard these days as much as they want to threaten. They were talking in the language of over the next days. But we know that this is kind of a grip on on the virus with the spread of it in the next few days So was this a little bit of. I don't want to say An exercise in pr to be seen to be doing something because the eu stands for sharing the who's built Really the foundations of its brand around the notion of open borders. There is certainly an element of pr in that and understandably so because we all remember last spring when countries unilaterally without coordinating with very neighbors Closed their borders full. Well sometimes even essential travels it was. It was quite strict at times We all remember that and now obviously the eu is trying to to appear that. They've learned from that that they want to coordinate on this. And that's why this summit has the border issue on agendas strongly to actually prevent countries from implementing measures. But as you just hinted these national measures are still really important where the france opposes the requirement to have a negative. Pcr tests for covid. That actually makes a huge difference. For whether belgians or luxembourg ins spanish people across the border to go grocery shopping or apply for jobs and so on so we still have these national measures. They have to be national also. Make sense it's it cannot all be e you wide but certainly there was a political push to appear like there's coordination. We're only seeing that in coming few days of an all. These suggestions that have been made will actually be put into detail and so it all comes down to the detail how this will be implemented.

Zurich Center For Security Studies Eu Commission Brussels Luxembourg Merkel Samsung EU France
Gratta Market And Wines

Voices of the Community

05:00 min | 6 d ago

Gratta Market And Wines

"This episode is part of our series exploring covid nineteen impact on nonprofits and small businesses in the san francisco bay area back in april of twenty twenty when we decided to create this ongoing series on covid nineteen impact i or nonprofits and then on small businesses in the san francisco bay area. We like you had no idea how long the pandemic would go on. And what the health and economic impact would be in our community going into twenty twenty one. The pandemic is now killing more people shutting down more nonprofits and small businesses on with wiping out the livelihoods of families neighborhoods and communities. We will continue to shine a spotlight on the nonprofits and small businesses that make up the fabric of our community along with the founders and staff who are struggling to deal with the impact of the covid nineteen pandemic on their operations services is an ability until we can all get to the other side of the pandemic along the way we will also share with you all the amazing solutions that are nonprofits. Small businesses foundations and government leaders are working on to help us all get to the other side of the pandemic and come together to rebuild our communities with more economic social and environmental equality really opened up the tasting room back in twenty fifteen it sort of evolved into this community hub provided a safe place for people of all backgrounds to gather in need and actually friends. We've become friends with water. Our customer base here in the community. And it's sort of looked on as as a community hub people gather here and that's one thing that i'm not seen as a result of covert not being able to see people in the way that we could get together prior and i think there's a lot of our customers that are also missing that ability to just get together casually with people in the community. This is winemaker and entrepreneur barbara grata of grat or winery and market in the bayview district of san francisco. We've been sharing stories about economic development and small business incubation in the bayview hunters point communities since two thousand fifteen for more context to our interview with barbara grata. Please go to our archive section and take a listen to our two part series doing business in the bayview in part two of that series. We introduce you to barbara. And she shares more about her background and her love of making wine along with her efforts to work with the community. In the neighborhood. I'm joined remotely via zoom by barbara grata. The owner of grata market and ryan ori. Thanks for being here barbara. Thank you thanks for having me church. Barbara and i had talked many years ago on voices of the community when she first started the broader winery. And i'm here today to just touch base with her and have her bring us up to speed and she's been and how she's expanded her business and how she's surviving with covid nineteen so or provide us a little update on where you've been and where you're going. Thank you well. We are the garage. Winery here in bayview and we started that back in two thousand six. We opened up a tasting room on the third street merchant corridor here in bay view in twenty fifteen and that business is still in existence. Were still working with the winery. But unfortunately during the whole cova things or closed down in march and we inverted that space to a mini market. Because we had a plan to expand the last several years we took over another retail space in the same building. Where chasing remez. And we've been building that out since two thousand eighteen so the pandemic actually fortunately did not close us down but it offered us an opportunity to introduce some of the market items that we plan to have in the new comedy. So we did that. Conversion back in april may june july kind of kept that going to the summer providing essentials for the community and also some of the italian specialty items that we plan to carry in the now current market september we shifted and participated on these shared spaces program with the city of san francisco and opened up outdoor seating on the back side of our business on lane street and that was going pretty good and catching on a little bit worse until this current shut down a couple of weeks ago with everyone in the city is experiencing a shutdown of outdoor dining throughout the city. And it has been this Roller coaster from the get our march and constant transitions shifts and changes and adjustments. And how we run our business but we feel fortunate that we've not had to close down. We've been working throughout the so. That's a little background right there.

Barbara Grata San Francisco Bay Grat Or Winery Bayview Grata Market Ryan Ori Barbara Remez San Francisco
Chester County nonprofit takes on new role in feeding the hungry

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 6 d ago

Chester County nonprofit takes on new role in feeding the hungry

"Nonprofit known for serving at risk Children and Families recently launched a program to feed the hungry and in doing so. Went about his Paul Kurtz tells US help save a restaurant on the verge of collapse. Kris Lucas was ready to close down his West Chester restaurant pens table after Governor Wolf ordered another round of dining restrictions in November. Then a group of friends and customers stepped in to help. They donated money to the believe and achieve foundation, which was about to roll out its 1st 100 meal campaign. DNA's Kate McGee says the foundation provided funding to Lucas to cover the cost of the meals and help keep his restaurant afloat. And we're going to do it for five times with Crest on, But he's been more than generous and the meals are delicious. Lucas is no stranger to feeding the hungry but says This is the first time he has ever been in need. I'm not one to take handouts. But if I can work for it, and it helps my people, it got me right through the next five weeks here, which has been tremendous believe and achieve is accepting donations and nominations for additional partners through its website and Facebook page. I'm Paul

Risk Children And Families Kris Lucas Governor Wolf Paul Kurtz Kate Mcgee West Chester Lucas Facebook Paul
Woods has 5th back surgery, to miss Torrey Pines and Riviera

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | Last week

Woods has 5th back surgery, to miss Torrey Pines and Riviera

"Tiger Woods has had another back surgery his fifth and he will miss the PGA towards west coast swing including the farmers insurance open at Torrey pines which woods has won seven times Torrey pines will also host the U. S. open in June the surgery was disclosed in a statement released by his TGR foundation that woods also tweeted the micro disconnected me surgery was to remove a pressurized to disk fragment that was giving woods nerve pain during the P. and C. championship last month that he played with his eleven year old son Charlie according to the statement doctors called the operation a success and predicted a full recovery hi Mike Rossio

Tgr Foundation Tiger Woods Woods Torrey Pines PGA West Coast Charlie Mike Rossio
President Biden Has Promises To Keep

Latino USA

03:59 min | Last week

President Biden Has Promises To Keep

"Back in november latina and latino voters helped deliver the presidency to joe biden in key swing states like georgia and especially arizona. Let the next. Voters helped turn former red states. Blue and during the campaign biden made a long list of commitments to our communities on day. One i'm sending to the united states. Congress a immigration bill. We're gonna find those kids. We're going to unite them with their parents. The opening school safely will be a national priority for the biden harris administration. Reverse trump's rollbacks of one hunter public health and environmental rules biden has said he'll invest in education and healthcare for letting us he said he'll stop border wall construction and that he'll work with congress to create a path to citizenship for undocumented people but in also said he'll crackdown pollution in communities of color and reduce incarceration so in the lead up to the inauguration that usa reached out to young denness and latinos around the country to your what promises they're hoping biden will keep and what they want biden to do that he hasn't committed to yet plus we're going to speak with these young people about how the changes they wanna see would actually impact their own lives. We're going to start this very non. Comprehensive survey by speaking with virginia. Blasio's virginia's a ninth generation daytona who up near a city on the texas mexico border were in the south texas. Brush country so a lot of trees and prickly pear cactus virginia is also an environmental science and policy consultant that usa producer. Scarsi spoke with virginia. And she's going to pick up the story from here. Virginia lives in a rural area on a fourth generation. Cattle ranch that been her family of for close to one hundred and twenty years. We inherited it from my great uncle. Who was a grand champion calf roper. During the great depression he traveled the radio circuit with his brother. You know they were fortunate enough to be born into families that had a lot of land and so they were able to run cattle and support their families. That way and my dad was enamored with that history of cowboy culture. He virginia and her brother on the land. She remembers running around as a little kid watching her. Dad moved these huge cows from field to field and she thinks growing up this way set the foundation for a love of nature that eventually led her to go to grad school to study climate change. And that's where she was. When in two thousand eleven he had still all the cattle on the ranch because the drought guy particularly bad and There was a national study. That came out shortly after that drought showing bet Climate change me the heat waves longer and temperatures more intense that year and so we know that climate change has already been impacting us. There had always been droughts in south texas though. Virginia says they got worse and worse over time. It meant the grass wouldn't grow. Which meant virginia's dad had to start buying a lot of food to keep his cattle alive so much so that he wasn't making money off his ranch anymore. You know it's kind of funny. Because i was always kinda hassling. My dad was like dad counts. Produce methane and methane is really bad for the climate but when it came to the point where he had to sell them because he realized a drought was so bad. It put things into a different perspective for me. Because i realized that he really didn't have a choice. I realized that we had kind of gotten into this plane. With climate change where it wasn't theoretical. It wasn't something far off in the future that could happen. It was it was happening now

Biden Virginia Biden Harris Administration USA Blasio Scarsi Congress Joe Biden South Texas Georgia Arizona Daytona Roper Mexico Texas Depression
No AAPI Cabinet Secretary!? (With Madalene Mielke)

Model Majority Podcast

04:54 min | Last week

No AAPI Cabinet Secretary!? (With Madalene Mielke)

"Madly milk. Welcome back to the motto. Majority podcast today. Thanks so much. Appreciate having a having having you have me. Yeah absolutely well. We love our previous conversation back in episode. One one to talking about your career your life story from the very beginning you know your political career dating back to al gore's presidential campaign. I believe so. I encourage everybody to listen to episode one until after this episode to get to know your personal story a little bit better but today we are going to focus on. You know some current topics. Niger say before we get into that. You are the president and ceo of the organization. Asian pacific american institute for congressional studies or apec. Could you give us a quick overview of the mission and the goal of this organization. You're leading which. I think actually is a good background and foundation for other stuff. We're gonna talk about later on in this interview. Well absolutely so apex down at twenty. Six years ago by former secretary norm annetta when he was a member of congress. He founded it alongside on the congressional asian pacific american caucus k. pack which comprise of the api members of the us house and senate and so apex mission is to increase a representation at all levels of government From community service to elected office and have them participate at all levels of the electoral process. Gotcha so it's interesting that you mention norman. Mineta who i think is one of the first cabinet secretaries of asia-american designed in our country. I don't know the first night check on that. The first right okay. So yeah. I think he was transportation secretary. He was actually commerce. Secretary and president clinton's administration got it and then went to transportation under the bush administration. Gotcha gotcha he has this. Unique history of serving the first cabinet secretary serving both administrations both parties administrations. And really i think started in important. I guess trend of representation that is about to end with the incoming biden administration. And we're talking about as we are a few days before job and becomes president to be inaugurated. This will be the first time in close more than twenty years that they will not be in asia. American or pacific islander as a cabinet secretary in an administration whether it's democrat or republican for the first time. And you as the leader of a pack which is a nonprofit has spoken out quite a bit about a lack of representation. Could you share with us. What is your view of what is about to happen with this. Lack of representation in the incoming administration sure dodge. Obviously we have an incoming vice president. Who is a pi asian american. She south asian descent black vice president-elect kamla harris and also to cabinet level positions. They don't head up an executive department of which there are fifteen. And that's catherine tie. Vr and near attendant. You know the to cabinet. Level positions obviously have a lot of influence and i will just use the word sides the congressional hispanic caucus and the congressional black caucus as well as k. Pack when they sent a joint letter over a hundred and fifteen members of congress to the by the administration saying close to equal equal. And so that is that those were their words and so And so you know. I cabinet secretary heads of an executive department. And there's only fifteen of them and so when you think about that fifteen how's that diversity including asian americans. It doesn't because there isn't one of the fifteen a. I applaud the administration for their work in trying to expand diversity in having openly. Lgbtq individual leading agency And native american woman of half of the cabinet will be women so all those great things. So if you wanted to find diversity and not include asians in the fifteen than i need to ask you. What is your definition of diversity. Because we seem we've seen this play out and other places where the state of washington. I think they're department of education. Basically categorized asian americans as white so obviously a different definition of diversity.

Cabinet Asian Pacific American Institu Norm Annetta Biden Administration Apec Al Gore Niger Mineta Us House Asia Elect Kamla Harris Congress President Clinton Norman Senate Bush Administration Dodge Department Of Education Washington
How To Use Your Brand As A Sales Tool

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:31 min | Last week

How To Use Your Brand As A Sales Tool

"My guest is laura reese. Laura teaches entrepreneurs and small businesses had a used. Their brand is a powerful sales tool and as a way to accelerate the sales cycle over the past twenty years she's worked as brand strategist happy writer and creative director. Supporting some of the world's most recognizable brands some of the world's smallest companies and lots of organizations in between. Thanks so much for joining me today. Laura thank you diana. I'm so glad to be here. I'm thrilled to have you here. We're gonna be talking about Using your brand is a sales tool. And so i think i'd like to start with asking you to define what a brand as well. I hear a lot of people say no well. We have a logo. So we're good as far as branding. But i think that a brand is about a lot more than that. It's about the total experience that your customers have with you with your business. Lagos definitely part of that because it ideally should represent an reflect that that experience. But it's just a really small piece so at a base level and especially for small businesses. Your brand is going to boil down to two things. The first thing is how your company serves customers. So that's how you solve their problems. How you meet their needs how you help them achieve their dreams goals and then the second thing is how you express that externally. Let me think about a big brands like nike. I love that example. Because they're so ubiquitous and everyone so familiar. What their swoosh and their tagline the way that they really serve customers is they provide shoes in athletic. Wear that's designed to enhance performance on. It gives you confidence to play at a high level. Let's not very sexy to stay right. So even though that's the foundation of what they do the way they express that is by showing you ask needs and by saying. Just do it okay. So let's talk about like the. Are there similarities between like the nike brand and a brand for a small business. Are there differences. The tana's definitely so when you think about a brand for any size of business you're going to have a set of foundational things. That are the same so nike knows. Its customer nike knows. What messages resonate. It knows its personality. It has a set visual and verbal tools that it follows in every execution of its brand same holds true for a small business that these are the same foundational elements that i teach my clients. When we go through my branding framework. you know. It's the same thing to finding your customer knowing your messages knowing your personality in how you execute that the biggest differences that you're going to see is the scale at which you can execute your marketing tactics so nike can. We're lebron jeans and serena williams that you probably don't have that kind budget as business. Great okay so that makes so much sense to me now. Oh shoot. I just had a question totally left my head Oh i know what it was when you were talking about defining your client. I find that companies are reluctant. I will stay that business. Owners are sometimes reluctant to engage in that sort of definition. Because they're afraid they're going to leave people out or leave you know companies out customers out that that they wanna be pretty broad. It's so common. And i think that that fear is real. I faced it myself as i've defined my brand for my own business. You wanna make sure that you can help a lot of different people but what you're really doing when you are talking in generalities is you're saying things that are kind of the noah and no one is going to pay attention to so the more tightly you can zero in on your target customer the more you can know that person to know their their pains. Pablo what it's gonna look like for them. If those problems are solved the more that you were gonna stand out to that person and you know if you think about one target client. It sounds crazy because of course you need more than one client business running but when you create your brand and then the marketing that follows from that if you have one specific person in mind that you are talking to. It's just going to be so much more concrete and so much more real have so much more emotion and passion that is going to be communicated to everyone is going to be so much more effective for you Right 'cause the messaging is so specifically targeted to that audience.

Nike Laura Reese Laura Lagos Lebron Jeans Diana Tana Serena Williams Pablo
The US needs a radical revolution of values

TED Talks Daily

05:32 min | Last week

The US needs a radical revolution of values

"Five years my father was assassinated and he did change the world but the tragedy is that we didn't hear what he was saying to us as a prophet to his this nation in his words river. Reverberating back to us change. We all know is necessary right now. It's not easy. But i wanna talk about america's choice and a greater level. The prophet said to us. We still have a choice today. Nonviolent coexistence or violent coalition literally in the streets of our nation people who have been following the path non violent protests and people who have been hailed bent on destruction. Those choices are now at us and we have to make a choice. History of this nation was founded in violets. My father said america is the greatest purveyor of violence and the only way forward is if we repent for being a nation built on violence. And i'm not just talking about physical violence. I'm talking about systemic violence. I'm talking about policy. Violence i'm talking about what he spoke of the triple eagles of poverty. Racism and militarism all violent albert einstein. Stein said something to us. You said we cannot solve problems on the same level of thinking in which they were created and so if we are going to move forward we are going to have to deconstruct these systems of violence that we have seven america. And we're going to have to reconstruct on a not a foundation that foundation happens to be love and nonviolence and saw as we move forward weaken correct course if we make better choice that daddy said nonviolent coexistence and that continue on the pathway of violent cornell elation does that look like that that looks like some deconstruction work in order to get to the construction. We have to deconstruct are thinking. We've got to deconstruct the way in which we see people and deconstruct the way in which we operate practice and engage in policy and so i believe that there's a lot of heart a t. a. r. to work to do in the midst of all the h. a. r. d. hard work to do because heart work is hard work. One of the things we have to do is we have to ensure that everyone especially my white brothers and sisters after engaged in bihar work. The anti racism work in our hearts zapped from this especially in my white community. We must do that work in our hearts the anti racism work. The second thing is that. I encourage people to look at but mom violence training that we the kings of the kingston about or so that we learned the foundation of understanding our interrelatedness and interconnectedness. That we understand our loyalties and commitments and our policy-making can no longer be devoted to one group of people but has to be devoted to the the greater good of all people we all have to change and have to make a choice. It is a choice to change the direction that we have been going. We need a revolution of values in this country. That's what my daddy said you changed the world change hearts and now what has happened over the last seven eight years history. We have to change course and we all have to participate in changing america with a true revolution values where people are at the center and not profit. When morality is at the center and that our military might america does have a choice. We can even choose to go down. Continually that path of destruction or we can choose nonviolent coexistence and as my mother said struggle is a never ending process. Freedom is never really one in every generation

America Albert Einstein Stein Foundation Of Understanding Ou Bihar Kingston
Build Your Personal Search Engine With Datasette

Talk Python To Me

04:13 min | Last week

Build Your Personal Search Engine With Datasette

"Let's start at the foundation of this recent work you've been doing and in some sense it's sort of a natural progression writes in the journalism side of things where the origin came from. So tell us about dataset data set. Is i on its website. I call it an a multi tool for exploring in publishing data. Basically it's a web application which you can point at a sequel light relational database and it gives you pages where you can browse the tables and one queries lets you want like type in custom sequel queries and one them again. Not die tobias lets you custom templates and out things ten. Let's you could have been back out as jason be so you can use it for. Api integrations and it. Lets you publish the whole thing on the internet really easily. So it's it's a loss and one of the biggest challenges i had is. How do i turn this into a bite size description that really helps people understand what the software does the point now. Where if i can get somebody on a video chance. I can a fifteen minute demo but at the end of it going. I totally get this. This is amazing but that's not not sliding software. It doesn't scale well. Yeah well let me see if i can with my limited exposure to it in knowing some some what we're going you have this data source that's pretty ubiquitous or can become ubiquitous in terms of like some sort of etl with sequel light. Right ziegler. light is everywhere. What's beautiful about it is. There's no please set up the server and make it not run as root and then put it on your network and sell the magic sequel light sequel. I it boasts the most widely distributed database in the world which it is because it runs on every phone. My watch a sequel light tracking my steps every iphone app every android app every laptop. That old running the down here your phone. That's crazy it's a file formats it's a sequel database is a singled dot d. Be biden's on disk. Which like you said makes it so convenient. Because i didn't have to ask kasit happened to set me up post schema or anything like that. I just create a file on my laptop and and that's my database. Yeah and it's even built into python right. It just comes with python. Yeah exactly so. That's super cool. And it's great that we have this data format that if we have data in there or you could do like an api call and then jam the data and they're right like something to get it into that format which is great. But you can explore that with like beekeeper studio or some data. Visualization sequel management studio. But that doesn't work for journalists. That doesn't work for getting it on the internet. That doesn't give like The transformations in some sense. I kind of see it almost like as a really advanced web based like data. Id but user friendly earned a year with an but the emphasis is absolutely on on publishing getting it online. And then it's on being web nights it like everything and data set can be good on his jason as well as html it can get. Beat you e-content csv to you. It uses you pasta sequel query and get in a query string. C can bookmark queries all of that kind of stuff. Yeah i think the key. That's really the key idea is how do you take relational databases and make them as web to this possible and cheap and inexpensive to to host into run as possible so you can take any data that fits in a sequel database which is almost everything and stick it online and that people can both explore it and stop like integrating with it as well on the another key idea. Indict set his dates plug in system. I've actually written over fifty four it now that add all sorts of different things different output formats to get your database out as an atom feed when i cal- the'd of play against visualizations that plot the daytona map will give you charts line graphs. And so on. I just this morning released a authentication plug in that. Supports the indy off with indication mechanism. So you can use india with logan to to password. Protect your room your data all of these different things and honestly having a plugin system is so much baden. 'cause i can come up with a terrible day for feature and i can build it to plug in and it doesn't matter that's just an awful idea that nobody should ever have implemented because i'm not causing any harm to that core project.

Kasit Tobias Jason Ziegler Biden Logan India
NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:35 min | 2 weeks ago

NRDC's Dr. Vijay Limaye Discusses Measuring the Health-Related Costs of the Climate Crisis

"To the healthcare policy. Podcast i'm the host. David intra cosso with me today to discuss the climate crisis related health. Costs is dr. vj lemay climate and health scientists at the national resources. Defense council center. Dr lemay welcome to the program. Thank you dr maze by is of course posted on the podcast website on background. Twenty twenty set another global warming record this past year tight twenty sixteen as the hottest record year and strikingly warmer than twenty nineteen. For example average temperatures in some parts of the arctic last year were more than six degrees celsius higher than the twenty one thousand nine hundred eighty one to two thousand ten baseline average per no at twenty twenty seven. Us record with twenty two one billion dollar plus climate disasters. The previous record was sixteen and twenty seventeen toiling in some ninety. Five billion dollars in damages are more than double the forty one year average of forty five billion seventy events were linked to hurricanes and tropical storms concerning wildfires california suffered over ten million acres burned more than double the previous record set in twenty eighteen at four million acres adverse health effects caused by climate crisis. Events are on bounce well known for example in two thousand sixteen. The government published the impacts of climate change on human health in the us. And i recently cited lance and twenty twenty countdown on health report that concluded in part quote the world has already warned by one point. Two degrees celsius resulting in profound immediate and worsening health effects close quote nevertheless response. By thorough policymakers. Along with the health care industry remains far beyond inadequate. The best the recent congress recently concluded congress can do as produce a five hundred fifty page climate crisis report that drew no connection between the climate crisis and related effects. Imposed on medicare medicaid beneficiaries. Do likely in part to the fact. That neither med pack or mac. Pack independent gresham commissions given broad authority to address issues affecting. These programs has never addressed much less mentioned the climate crisis with me again to discuss climate crisis related. Health costs is the national resource. Defense counsels dr. vj lemay so at that As background vj. Let me begin by asking. If you can briefly describe the nrdc signed centers work shirt and. Thank you david for the invitation to speak with you and your listeners. I work at nbc. The natural resources defense council we are a profit organization working really to stay guard the earth. it's people plants animals and the natural systems on which we all rely. We combine the power of more than three million at rdc members across the country with the expertise of about seven hundred staffers that scientists like me but also lawyers policy advocates who are working together to protect clean air clean water and the natural systems on which we all depend so i work in the science center at entity see and science release the foundation of our work to protect people in the environment. We worked to understand environmental and human health problems working in interdisciplinary spaces in some of the work that we'll talk about today. In terms of connecting the dots between climate change in house is really the focus of my work. And i just have to say you know this period unprecedented on the scientific enterprise. It's more important than ever that we recognize the value that science brings to society and helping us to confront respond to some of these. Really urgent threats thank you. I appreciate that last point As we are well aware. Let me go to you recently. Published an article To your credit in health affairs Last month last month december issue was a theme issue on the climate crisis. I should say a health affairs polishes. Nineteen eighty-three had never previously addressed. Or excuse me. Nineteen one had never previously addressed this subject So again a -gratulations. Your article with your colleagues was titled estimating the cost of action and the economic benefits of addressing. The health harms of climate. Change But i wanna ask you specifically about that because you wrote in this essay quote unquote. There is currently a knowledge gap that must be addressed for more complete understanding of climate change related exposure response relationship. So explain to me what this knowledge gap is. Sure you know in your setup remarks. You mentioned the huge toll that climate and weather disasters inflicted on the united states last year. About ninety five billion dollars by the federal governments fresh estimate and well that's a staggering number as a health scientist. I'm an epidemiologist. I look at that figure and i wonder what's not included and the truth is that when our federal government is tracking the damage the climate change in reports like the billion dollar disaster list. It's actually not accounting for tremendous profound and sometimes irreversible damage to human house so there is a huge missing component. We think about the continuing and mounting costs of inaction on the climate crisis

Vj Lemay David Intra Defense Council Center Dr Lemay Dr Maze Natural Resources Defense Coun Gresham Commissions Given Broa Congress Arctic United States Lance RDC Medicare Drew
Lisa Raymond on setting her own agenda

The Tennis.com Podcast

05:58 min | Last month

Lisa Raymond on setting her own agenda

"All right lisa. Raymond welcomed tennis dot com podcasts. It is awesome to have you. Thank you guys for having me so much. Where in the world are you. Let's let's start with that hotel room. I know that shocking to people but Actually in baton rouge louisiana right now been working for the past year with alec and My old coach Andy brandy is the head men's tennis co-chair lsu and kinda long story but We're actually bringing them on To be part of the team so we're here Doing some training with him and he he's going to be a part of our team moving forward and It's been awesome. Been here almost two weeks now. And it's going to be one of our training bases now rally which is going to be great so So yeah that's why we're in baton rouge andy brandy the andy brandy as andy brandy. Yes very familiar to me names. There's only one. Andy randy will ever be one handy brandy so you love them or hate him and i've always loved them. It's true you either have these. Andy it's either. You have this unreal relationship with andy or you. Don't you know and he'd be the first to admit that he. Andy me the iranian. You know he'd be the first to be like you know. It just isn't working or at works and andy. I hit it off from the time. I was seventeen when i went to school. Went to florida and You know if there's one person in my career that i have. I owe pretty much everything to because of that foundation he built. It's handy so yeah absolutely. Oh that's amazing. You don't really hear very often. I guess sometimes you can hear about a player that can just have a very. That's i mean that's a lifelong relationship. Lifelong yeah but yeah. I mean he Again i mean he. I coached he coach me throughout my pro career on and off the end And then like. I said i mean he's family. I mean him and his wife and his son i mean we were just over there the other night for dinner and and hadn't seen them forever haven't seen as whites and it was just like yesterday. I mean they're just near and dear and Just really really special people. Were you always gonna jump into coaching. I think he finished up in two thousand fifteen th us open with madison keys as your last partner and then she would have been your first pupil in a way is that was that. Always the plan when you're playing. No it wasn't at all. I'm just kinda just happened Very good friends with lindsay davenport. And so lindsey was coaching mass in at the time and lindsay still playing two thousand fifteen and lindsay was just like look. I just. I can't really do this fulltime. Would you be interested in of coming on You know traveling with her some weeks if it didn't interfere with your doubles. Maybe you guys could place in doubles. It'd be great for her. And and so i was like yeah sure like you know it just. I hadn't really ever really thought about it. And then i did. I did think about it. And and i loved it. I love I love coaching. And i love just kind of Being part of a team in our party why. I probably did so well in doubles because i love being out there with somebody but So for me it was like a great segue from retiring. Because i literally went from the us open finishing my last match to five days later. I was in quebec city with madison. So it was like. I never really like had to put my rackets down and sit and be like oh my god. I'm retired here so see us do. That's kind of how just kinda leads dad. And and then. I took a break from coaching. And then allie. Approach me with this opportunity and jumped out. I mean least technically. You're not retired. You played last year. This is true this is true. This is true. Technically twenty thirteen was not your last match to good point and i plan on the i. I've got a few goals out there. That i still wanna possibly achieve so i So yeah so. I just to get in better shape. Get my butt out there and hitting a little bit more and But yeah no. I'm not totally retired. I guess you could say the one thing. I do want to bring to light. You said that you wanna get in better shape You went through a phenomenal transformation last year. And you still looked incredible. So thank you. Tell us about that. Because i remember kind of last year in colorado was the first time that being you kind of really got to know each other news mean from the last time i had seen. It's a different person. Well thank you. Thank you for saying that and Know it was. Just i have to i truly i hate to say it but i so much. Unit to allie. You know what. When i got to the upper take with her just kind of really took a look in the mirror and realize that you know i was just not happy with me how i was feeling and what i was doing and And as a coach. I just felt like too. It's like i need. I wanted her to be able to look at me and be like okay. We'll look what she's doing or look how good she looks. You know as far as fitness. And she's working her butt off you know and and I basically said you know. Look my fitness. 'cause she's a man you know i mean she's a she's unreal shape and under athlete and she loves her fitness. I was like help me with my fitness in my eating and unger out take care of your tennis and she was on raw the program she put me on. You know she was tough on me too. And i needed i needed to be pushed. I needed to know somebody to kind of guide me a little bit with my eating and and whatnot. And i mean she just she'd Her support was everything. And and then you know it was like i like how you just you see like little changes and you want more you want more and you start feeling good and i had goals and yeah i mean it was just one of the best things i've ever done and i just feel that still healthier and she'll good about myself you know so. So yeah i mean. I allies boot camp

Andy Brandy Andy Randy Tennis Andy Lindsay Baton Rouge Alec LSU Raymond Madison Baton Lindsay Davenport Lisa Louisiana Allie Lindsey Florida Quebec City
"american foundation" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:34 min | 4 months ago

"american foundation" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Is the ninth Tropical Storm to hit the continental United States this year. That hasn't happened since 2016. Five of the largest wildfires in California's history are still burning, California Governor Gavin Newsom says So far this year 3.6 million acres have burned in the state, most of those in several lightning strikes in mid August. Currently 27 large fires are burning and 23,000 people remain evacuated from their homes. Monsters Jessica Rosen fall 26 people have died in the California wildfires in 6400 Structures of bird. Federal government but turning to execute a condemned killer. On Wednesday, William Emmett Lacroix scheduled to be lethal, Lee, injected for the murder of a Georgia nurse in 2000 won. His attorneys are trying to stop the execution with several legal appeals. Another federal execution is set for Thursday. NFL football has arrived in Las Vegas. The Raiders roll the dice and score a victory in their Vegas debut. There's car looking for Waller never scored easier touchdown. All courtesy of ESPN. Derek Carr connects with Darren Waller on fourth and goal for the go ahead touchdown in the third quarter. Part of 24 unanswered points for the Raiders car would finish with three touchdown passes on the night Waller with 103 receiving yards as the Las Vegas Raiders when their inaugural home game in a Legion stadium over the New Orleans Saints 34 to 20 for the Raiders, now to an O on the season, while the Saints dropped one and one man Napolitano Fox named Jack Callahan. This is now the American Foundation for suicide. Mentions mission is to save lives and bring hope to those.

Raiders Darren Waller Las Vegas Raiders California Las Vegas Governor Gavin Newsom New Orleans Saints Federal government William Emmett Lacroix United States Jessica Rosen Derek Carr Napolitano Fox NFL ESPN American Foundation murder Jack Callahan Lee football
"american foundation" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"American foundation for suicide prevention and the Jed foundation the commission society of Minnesota weather center partly cloudy across the mature this evening with lows tonight in the late teens then tomorrow morning the clouds for the afternoon and highs in the upper twenties a light snow is possible tomorrow night into Friday I'm meteorologist Ashley o'connor on Twin Cities news talk able and thirty year currently it's twenty Thursday morning on justice Andrew will get you the latest numbers out of Iowa as the caucus results continue to trickle in I will tell you why the Minnesota state fair fired all of its police officers plus Katie Pavlich from fox news at eight thirty five justice injure live in local six to nine Twin Cities news talk you are entering the freedom the state of the union is stronger than it has ever been according to trump last night in one of the best speeches of his presidency will break all of it down for you and also and expected acquittal in the Senate from the sham impeachment plus huge job numbers for trump and no results yet from Iomega lines Tigers and bears oh my coming up on the Buck Sexton show he is the second show your mission is to really matters intelligence make no mistake box six and show began he's a great now I am thrilled to report to you tonight that our economy is the best it has ever been.

American foundation Jed foundation Ashley o'connor Andrew Iowa Katie Pavlich Senate Tigers Minnesota Twin Cities Iomega Buck Sexton
"american foundation" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

Wash FM 97.1

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Wash FM 97.1

"But if there if it doesn't seem like there's an immediate risk or crisis moment you can always encourage someone who may be struggling to seek out mental health treatment there is no shame in taking care of your mental health and seeing a mental health care professional here just says if we weren't feeling good physically we would call a doctor go and take care of our physical health and we want to make sure that we're creating a culture and supporting one another in a way that we encourage others when they may not be feeling their best mentally to also be comfortable enough to go out and seek treatment for their mental health and be proactive in taking care of oneself yeah and and by the way a follow up this was a little more than a year ago this person's doing fine alcohol that's so good to hear still check up if I haven't seen them in awhile I still check up and it's it's all it's all good now all that's great that's good and then and I said I sent a recording of our last interview as well. I heard that they listened to it. also a little bit about A. F. S. P. the American foundation for suicide prevention absolutely so we are the leaders in the fight against suicide we are a national organization we have representation in chapters in all fifty states we are fast growing and we are here with a mission to save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide and there are four key areas of interest I'd that we really focus on in order to achieve our mission and that is one that we are the largest private funder of suicide prevention research which is so incredibly vital Hey and finding out you know why do people die by suicide because of we can answer that question we know that we can intervene and save lives on the front end and from that research we also develop suicide prevention educational programming that we deliver through our chapter level at no cost to the community and that's really and thanks to you he's out of the darkness walk that I know that we're going to talk about but we bring educational programs resources as well as loss in healing services to the community as well because we know that survivors of suicide lost they need caring and support it's a very complicated type of grief so we definitely want to show support to that community and then the fourth area of interest that we work on is also advocacy efforts where we work with our legislators at the national state and local levels to pass laws that we believe will save lives I'm Bernie Lucas we're talking with Ellen Shannon director of the national capital every chapter of the American foundation for suicide prevention and bodhi from big one hundred is here were we're talking about events that are coming up he's part of it that's an incredible statistic that we started with that suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the US get more than war right it is a more them war natural disasters and homicides combined. which when I first learned that statistic I was in complete shock Jonathan kidding me right in buying. so what can we do about it and one of the things is the out of the darkness walks so you've got one coming up and bowed he's going to be part of this we do we have we've got a few coming up we actually had to already in September we've had our Manassas and loud and walks but still to come we've got the Fairfax out of the darkness walk which is going to be October fifth of veterans amphitheater insanity that is a Saturday and thirty will be there with us with his walk team and it's going to be a great day it's a beautiful event beautiful vango lots to do not you can learn about a ton of resources in the community that can help you can connect with other walkers learn other people's stories of why they walk because so many people are affected by suicide in so many different ways it's a great opportunity just to bring this issue out of the darkness and into the light and create that community of support and a culture that smart about mental health we're gonna be at the veterans amphitheater in Fairfax yeah this is gonna be my first time at one of these events Allen can you explain the framework of the day what's the day look like lot of people ask that question because they don't know what to expect when you go to a suicide prevention walk and it's actually a day filled with lots of hope lots of people lots of things to do when you first arrive you'll check in at our registration area and then you can get your T. shirts are your honor beads all of.

American foundation
"american foundation" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on KGO 810

"You by harmless harvesting the American foundation for suicide prevention now more of their stint on KGO eight good afternoon I'm Pat thirst and well as promised I do you want to return us to the conversation we were having in the last hour it has to do with our children the way we're rearing our children and their mental health the fact the kids don't get outside they're not allowed to play on their own they're constantly supervised it seems and I know there are exceptions and I also know the parents care about this that we want to be able to do the best thing for our kids what were freaked out we're so afraid that there is danger of foot everywhere they may go by themselves that we imagine in our heads the very worst scenarios possible and then we want to protect them from those scenarios in the process of doing that though we may be hurting our kids we're not allowing them to grow we're not allowing them to be on their own to gain independence day you can't give them independence when they're two years old obviously but as they grow and as they show responsibility we should be broadening the parameters that we've established for them and that happens in a variety of ways but one of the ways it happens is to let him go outside to let him go down to see their friends without you taking them there let them walk let them walk to school let them walk home from school you know I always think that it's better to have kids in groups I do think that there's much more safety in numbers but to let them do this to let them go to the park and play with their friends but parks in the bay area the ones that I've experienced lately I don't feel like they're safe places for kids to go they're supposed to be you know parks are established to for our benefit but they've been taken over by others who want to control the turf there they want to be there it could be people were calling from Oakland and San Leandro telling me that there's a gang presence at at parks well I don't want my kids to be in the vicinity where there's gang activity especially if it's violent gangs or gangs that are and then dealing drugs I don't want them to be in a place where there's drug use that's going on and that's what I've seen in the part closest to the station here I've seen people actually shooting up in the park themselves and then nodding off maybe sleeping there I also do see a large homeless presence in the park and that makes it an unsuitable place for our children to go and to play to engage in the activities that we think are going to be helpful to them so we're going to be where we go where's it going to happen there may be a solution of that there's a couple of organizations there are a couple of organizations here in the bay area that have cropped up to address some of this concern we also have problems that we may be able to address within the schools that our kids are attending so when we come back I'll tell you what's going on in the schools even as school is beginning now in the bay area my kids start school tomorrow most of you your kids have already gone back to school which I think is way too early but let me tell you what's up what has been reported to me by some listeners about new policies at the schools that I think are contributing to the problems that we've been talking about eighty eighty a tennis our telephone number will get your calls and I'll give you this new information as soon as we come back you're listening to KGO their stint on KGO eight ten.

American foundation Pat thirst two years
"american foundation" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"American foundation for suicide prevention believes everyone deserves treatment and successful care for any mental health challenge July's minority mental health awareness month you can learn more it A. F. S. P. dot org slash NJ walks that's A. F. S. P. dot org slash NJ walks right now you can get both sprint unlimited plan and the all new Samsung galaxy S. Tenney included for just thirty five dollars per month per line for five lines all you need is approved credit and an eighteen month lease no trade in required business prince doors dot com or call eight hundred sprint one fifty dollars a month after sixty twenty five with ready to play with the two bills are canceled really to me about some of the basic after six thirty twenty thirty two dollars a month for one one of eighty two keepers Asian traditions becomes usual restrictions by Hey it's Dennis Malloy you heard me talk about Trinity rehab have you been bothered by something that's been hurting you for some time then fix what's wrong and go out and enjoy the nice weather Trinity rehab can help you are just a number or worse you don't just get exercises and the therapist walks away Trinity we have is interested in your recovery and works with you as a team they have the key pad machine which most places don't even happy Pat is acoustic pressure wave therapy it helps break down scar tissue and get rid of information quicker it worked on my back and worked on my shoulder it's used for neck pain tennis elbow lower back pain you name it problem solved after only three five minute sessions no prescription needed to get started so give yourself the gift of finally being pain free to it now so you can go out and enjoy the nice weather Trinity rehab with locations in east Brunswick Hamilton Howell Marlton Matawan Middletown Somerville Somerset Toms River whiting clock me touching me now open now open in Livingston and their brick location has relocated to.

American foundation S. Tenney Dennis Malloy Pat Somerset Toms River Livingston A. F. S. Samsung neck pain tennis elbow Brunswick Hamilton Howell Marl six thirty twenty thirty two d thirty five dollars one fifty dollars three five minute eighteen month
"american foundation" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on KGO 810

"Ten and the American Foundation for suicide prevention are proud to present the overnight lock in San Francisco Saturday, June eighth. Save lives and bring hope to those affected by suicide. Each year, suicide claims more lives than warmer, and natural disasters combined yet, suicide prevention doesn't receive anywhere near the funding other leading causes of death. Together, we can change the coversation about mental health and put a stop to this tragic loss of life. Get details about the San Francisco, walk cagey, aradio dot com. You're listening to the John Batchelor show. Now, more of the John Batchelor show bachelor cagey eight ten. I'm John Batchelor. This is the John Batchelor. Show pipeline politics dominating our European allies.

american foundation
"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"So just by the way, all it's all on the CDC website centers for disease control consult that there's a whole measles section there. And so you can read about what I was saying here about what what you're what can. Gory you're in and whether you should go get your immunity checked or take the vaccine. So we have a call. And also I want to circle back after we take the call because I think we should address veterans as sort of a special topic, if you don't mind. Yup. With that. Sure. Yeah. Okay. So this is Ben Benson Alabama ban. Go ahead. Oh, I always call him in because I've thought it was a big thing for me. I'll had an accident about four years ago. And I was a fool, you know, adult males. It was housing. And then and one not I became a pair of please and re mental Pol that can take on the person, you know, there's a lot of exterior things will marriage is all because I came a pair of placing and the process they go through a traumatic experience having to them a lot of times, they're not very vocal. And they don't know how to come out and say, I'm going to this struggle. But what I was hoping to do is maybe health and some topics way. And I don't know about my subdue that that's what I was telling the gentlemen before is that kinda wanna do my part. I express it people who have like a major injury or something traumatic happens to them. I think. Not not one hundred percent. Correct. What else hold this participate prepare play the exist? How like in the forties or fifties suicide, and I felt like that was too high. So I'll call this is not no. Though apologize. I think aside from a certain Jay has something for you. But once you get a website together and start pumping it on social media C, see who, you know, somebody something you guys will find each other. It's you know, bales. What's that buddy? He's asking me to put my information out. I don't mind I try to offer as many people who are something similar obvious. Kind of just let them know that it does get better. Building community around something like that could be extremely powerful. But Dr J taco head. I totally agree with you, Dr drew, you know, what we're seeing is. And thank you for sharing your story. Tune so sorry about the trauma you've been through that that kind of thing obviously happen to you and happens to so many people, and there is a shared bond when you can find community, even if it's not the exact same type of injury, but at trauma that is life changing like that. And and coming together is is truly empowering it's one of the mazing things about social media. And there's a lot of downside, but the ability to connect, and you know, when you see these these blogs and posts where people are actually rather than turning into haters. They are supporting each other and encouraging other congratulating each other for for taking that step for sharing. I mean, it's a really incredible thing. I I find that community American Foundation for suicide prevention for him. Well, definitely I mean, you can find your local chapter of Athas P, and they would welcome you in and find a way for you to contribute possibly to speak about your experiences. You know to volunteer at a community walk. If you go to FSP dot org. You can find.

CDC Athas P Ben Benson Alabama Dr drew Dr J taco American Foundation Jay one hundred percent four years
"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Brought up measles on my last podcast. And I just want to just break down a couple of things that we should be reminding everyone, of course, children should get to live attenuated vaccines. If you kids have had those vaccines and they've been available since the nineties, essentially, you're fine prior to that seventies and eighties. You probably ought to have the immunity documented with a blood test. If that's sort of a you talk to your doctor about that. If you were born seventies sixties late fifties. You really must get your immunity documented with a blood test. I personally was born in that fifty seven to sixty three window when we didn't get adequate the kind of XI's really wasn't designed to last a lifespan release. It hasn't turned out that way. So I. Retook the vaccine three days ago, and I may get a second ones on the healthcare provider healthcare providers supposed to get to vaccines. He and any question will get the vaccine, it's harmless. It doesn't hurt obviously pregnant women to be careful people on steroids immune diseases, those things talk to your doctor, no matter what talk to your physician, but we need to be vaccinated because although people can look at these outbreaks that were having recently and say, oh, just five cases. Just twenty cases. It's localized. Yes. An outbreak is defined by a change in the distribution of disease in location, and temporarily mean all of a sudden change in one location over its specified period of time. Could be three cases could be five cases could be five thousand cases. It's the change that we jump on outta democ. It's an outbreak. Measles is so contagious. You literally somewhat means can walk through the produce department of the grocery store, you could walk through a couple of hours later, you will get it. You will get it. If you're not properly immunized by greatest fear is that's gonna get into the homeless popular. Action. If it does this is going to be a massive massive problem and as the viral load in the community rises, even people with partial immunity will not be able to keep off this disease..

Measles democ three days
"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You know, speaking their their voice and their experience, and and providing insights into this major public health crisis of suicide, but over the last few years people with their own what's called lived experience of suicide attempts or any kind of mental health struggle really are coming to the fore, and you know, we're hosting panels of the voices of people with lived experience on Capitol Hill, and in the White House and all over the place for clinicians and researchers for policymakers, and that's. That's really a game changer. If you think about every other kind of major shifts that happened with an especially with stigmatized health issues, you know, aids HIV even cancer back in the day required that kind of advocacy, and so, you know, one of the thing I want to mention is that we have something that goes on every year that anyone can come out and check check out and kind of join the sort of advocacy movement, or at least just see what's going on. And these are are overnight walks. We also have community out of the darkness walks. But the overnight walk is special and they're actually coming up. One is in San Francisco was in Boston. Third and Boston June eight the night in San Francisco, I alerted the the the audience to that. So great. There's still time to register at the overnight dot org, and that that is an awesome way to if you're just wanna cut a dip, your tone, the water and see what it's all about. And feel the empowerment there's this incredible freedom and and shared bond that you get when you're around people who are willing to come out and really like literally step out of the darkness and into the light about these issues that are so common. They're really I mean, they're just part of the human experience truly these are all words that use a lot and reducing stigma empowerment contact advocacy, self efficacy. And and they just happen to be good things for your mental health. Also. Two. Show your love. Now, what would just graph podcast one? And right now, the former winner of the amazing race is getting all the details of this season by calling up players that get eliminated each week for some juicy. Many interviews. Download new episodes of.

San Francisco Boston HIV White House
"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"You know, you can of course, if you're the parent, you're going to want to lead them than to mental health professional at least to their pediatrician at that point, depending on the relationship, you can at least encourage them that take the stigma out of seeking help especially from a mental health professional talk about it. If you've had there before things like that. We're doing a pretty good job with Stig. My no one's very concerned about that. But in most particular people, anyway, I think that the celebrities talking about their own therapies and naming their traditions and things I think about a long lot the when I started practicing medicine, it's a lot different now. But there are certain populations. It's still resist resist resist. Yeah. And and you know, there's kind of layers to it as well. I totally agree. And it's it's an amazing thing that like stigma has gone down so much and attitudes have opened up. We did a Harris poll at the American Foundation for suicide prevention found that ninety four percent of Americans feel that mental health is equally or more important in their lives than their physical health. So all these things, but what what I'm seeing is that that doesn't necessarily translate into knowing what to do kind of like, the finer points of mental health literacy, and how to live it out and really kind of walk the walk. Let's talk about the. Well, how do you wanna proceed? My next story instinct is going to the. Conditions associated with suicide. I can't I don't think we can avoid that. Yeah. Go ahead. You start that topic? Sure. Well, we know that they're a number of risk factors that are pretty prominent and sort of the most common ones, the the key. Takeaway with suicide risk is that there isn't any one cause for suicide it you could say that mental health conditions or mental health struggles are sort of a necessary but insufficient risk factor. Because of course, thank goodness there. One in four Americans have a mental health condition, and the vast majority don't die by suicide. Don't even attempt, you know, may never struggle with suicidal thoughts. So there have to be other conditions that come into play. I mean among the mental health condition. Genetics play significant. Absolutely. Oh my goodness. Yes. I mean, there are more. The science is really shining a light on genetics not only for mental health problems. But even for suicides the civically. Yep. And certain medication or even certain conditions there things that can be associated with suicidality. We don't think about as being associated with with that. Well, that's right. I mean, for example, chronic pain, and even just general chronic medical conditions win that when the person begins to suffer, you know, with depression with hopelessness, the heart disease, chronic pain, autoimmune condition, many of the person's mental health down, whether they have, you know, genetic.

depression Harris American Foundation ninety four percent
"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Sleep, chronic pain. You know, all and and also the shifting things that are going on in our lives at all times. All of that actually has to do with and feeds into a suicide risk assessments to the average person to if they're around someone who is heavy suicidal thoughts. Right. Well, you know, a lot of education now is going on as you probably know with things like mental health first-aid at the American Foundation for suicide prevention, we have a program called talk saves lives that in a thirty sixty minute impersonal program. We actually teach people the basics of what is the science. Tell us that that risk warning signs what constitutes preventive actions. And then we say every person has a role to play in preventing suicide. So it's not just relegated to mental health professionals or even just the health system period. Go that looks like. Yeah. Well, okay. So let's say that I mean, you can think of any any type of relationship, but let's say that you're a parent, and you're worried about a teen child in your home. You know mean that's a very very specific situation and one where I think a lot of us with teenagers pr-. Probably have have felt like, you know, how do we tell the difference between normal teenage angst and win something becomes much more serious in terms of suicide risk. And of course, with the teen rate of suicide going up, we do need to be much more vigilant. But you know, the main thing is to open up a caring conversation where the person is allowed to talk and to talk about what they're actually experiencing inside. So sometimes as parents and whatever role, you know, spouse sibling, co worker friend. It's not we haven't necessarily been trained with active listening skills about how to create that safe space and encourage the person to open up and explain what it is. They're viewing experiencing and they're not going to put it in mental health terms necessarily. They're going to be talking about the the feelings the stressors there under the situation. You know, we live our lives in. It's always pinned to the situation that we're in whether it's work stress or financial. Dress or relationships, but the key thing is really getting them to talk. Listening carefully for indications that again, they're not gonna put it out on a silver platter for you. But if they start talking about feeling overwhelmed trapped or especially like their feeling like a burden on other people. That's one of the great cognitive distortions of the suicidal mind. Is that people actually believe that their loved ones in the world would be better off without them. And again, they're not gonna put it that way necessarily. But you might get little glimpses that that's how they're feeling to that point. That's what I know. You very serious trouble. Yes. Exactly. And you know, so at that point, I think it is fine for people to ask their loved ones does use their language. You're telling me about the stress going on, you know, at school or with that situation with the bully at work, whatever it is. Does it ever get so bad that you think of ending your life? And if they say. Yes. That had I have had that thought. Then again, don't shut it down and call nine one one unless they are in the act of harming themselves. Let them talk probe it further realized that suicidal thoughts are actually fairly common like as in one in five high school students in a twelve month period is having pretty serious suicidal thoughts. Most of them do not go on to act and to attempt but them being able to talk about it may actually help them feel a sense of hope feel that somebody now knows and cares about them..

American Foundation thirty sixty minute twelve month
"american foundation" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

MeatEater Podcast

03:10 min | 2 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on MeatEater Podcast

"There's plenty of weight nine there's plenty of ways for families defined a system that works for them. And I think just the simple fact that you're aware of the issue and thinking about it is a step in the right direction to the great irony recently that we've seen with with. I guess. Flattery is what does that say about any of them? Imitation is the greatest form of flattery. What we have sent us. Not really this isn't really imitation. But what we've seen is gun control groups like moms demand action getting project child safe locks from the local police department, and then like packaging them with their anti-gun, literature and distributing those. And like taking pictures and being proud of it and we've had to go back to our love. We're sparring to say, you know, that's not really what this is about. Right. Like, we we appreciate that. They care about safety. And it's pretty ironic because here's a group that's funded by a multi-billionaire. And we say all the time, you know, the the gun control groups, I don't have any programs. They just you know, they don't they don't actually do anything. They don't have a gun say any gun safety initiatives, and one of the reasons child safe is I think so successful. And why this American Foundation for suicide prevention is approached us is you know, as the industry, we have we have licensed to talk to gun owners. Right. They'll listen to us. Right. Many. If if a gun control group, you know, hands out a lock it's going to, you know, they don't they don't want to lock on a gun. They don't want the gun. Right. Like, they say get the gun. They should be guns in the house. But. The American Foundation for suicide prevention like, you know. You know, we need you got we need your help to communicate to gun owners. How do we communicate to gun owners? How do we get? This message across without offending them. Or turning them off, you know? So that they will listen to the message, you know. And so that's why I think that program is acceptable. And we'll be successful. It's a good one. We've taken up Tony your time. That's all right. We have a thing called concludes. Tiverton the conclusion you wanna throw it. It's not mandatory. You don't need to do it concluded that was good conversations could spend time with you. We got to visit very briefly in New Hampshire at that conference. But. But that's the first time we've really had a chance to have a conversation. So I welcome spun does your concluded. Yeah. I'm gonna reciprocate with mica, computer. A really glad you were able to take time walk through a lot of the stuff. I think we've covered a lot of things that are probably pretty unfamiliar. Yeah. That's all. We ain't nobody nobody knows the tenth or they know a tenth of what you guys do and the other nine there's also the problem with this stuff. You think you know? And you realize there's a little more to it. Yeah. Yeah. And we have a great great group of people that work at the national shooting sports foundation really passionate about what we do. And dedicated to serving our members, and we're really proud of our.

American Foundation shooting sports New Hampshire Tony
"american foundation" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And American Foundation for suicide prevention and United survivors to help create the nation's first set of national guidelines for workplace suicide prevention, there's no escaping the fact anymore that workplaces are impacted clearly by mental health issues. I think that's been on the table for a while. But even within the conversations of mental health suicide is often skipped over because it's so daunting to people, but people can't deny any more that. It's working people primarily that are dying by suicide. Many of these people are working or were just recently terminated or have a family member who's working so workplaces can make a huge difference in this area of public health approaches to suicide prevention, so we're just starting that we've been doing a summer of listening and gathering resources and information strategy and again that'll happen. That'll come out later this year. So we all players to get on board. It sounds good. The you mentioned earlier that you know, when you were talking about the international aspect of things are you taking leads from other countries what they're doing. Absolutely. So when it comes to the workplace guidelines, for example, Canada has had a set of psychological safety standards, which is encompassed suicide prevention and goes beyond they've had those for almost a decade now. Australia also has huge leader in innovation around where play suicide prevention they have a program called mates in construction has been operating for upwards of of. Twenty years, and they have return on investment studies. They have you know, infiltrated a good Tunc of the population of their whole country. I mean, they're just doing remarkable work. And so they really are models for us when I look at some of the Asian countries that have had decreases and their suicide rates hardly any work at all is being done around the house. They're focused almost entirely on reducing access to lethal means in some of the countries it's pesticide and some of the other countries. It's charcoal. Do sing access to leap a means. And the second strategy that they've found hugely successful is partnering with the media and having the media, Sarah, different types of stories around aside, less glamorizing romanticizing and far less talking about the means and those two strategies together have produced some significant drops. And right interesting. How very Sally. Thank you again for joining us..

American Foundation Sarah Canada Australia Twenty years
"american foundation" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

08:15 min | 2 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on WRVA

"Guide mining its cat Simon. What's going on around Richmond, always wonderful things and wonderful guest. Hi, guys, everybody who you are. And who you're with my name is Shirley Ramsey. And I am the founding board member of the Virginia chapter of the American Foundation for suicide prevention of welcome and Sarah. And I'm Kevin skeleton. I'm with the field suicide awareness and prevention coalition. Wow. You guys have teamed up together doing some great things. And you know, we it's very top of mind right now, this whole subject, and I think it's really a good time to get some more information because more and more people seem to be affected by suicide or thoughts of suicide. I thank you for your work itself. Important. So tell me what you guys do. Well, how I got here today is I also serve on the coalition for the Chesterfield suicide. Prevention? Coalition, and I we partner with them. Right. And we actually worked together on an event that is sponsored by the American Foundation for suicide prevention sore, okay, and the coalition really gathered together in Chesterfield to kind of bring a lot of the different resources that were trying to raise awareness for suicide on their own and brought them together as a coalition so he can team together to try to raise that awareness in a much more powerful way. Well, I think that's a great idea. Now, what are you guys doing right now? What's going on? We've got survivor day, which is the international survivors of suicide loss day coming up on November seventeenth. Mound occasions that that will happen at and show. He's got some history about about that day. Yes. Please. Please. Let me know what that's about. That is Saturday November seventeenth is that correct? That's correct. Okay. And it's actually international. Wow. And it's a day that we hold once a year when people are affected by suicide gather around the world and events in their local communities to try to find comfort for suicide from suicide loss and gain an understanding as they share stories of healing and hope. Wow, that's amazing. And that it's going on all across the world at the same time. And what are your locations for this? We have one in in Chesterfield at Saint Mark's United Methodist Church unluck slain, and that's going to happen on that Saturday from ten to one. All right. And then you said is there? Another location locally. Yes. We have another one at Bon air Baptist church at the village, which is a pilot church of Bon air Baptist. It is actually held in the West End of Henrico on Paterson avenue. Wow. And boy about the times for that that will be from eleven to two thirty. So what happens? At the event. Tell me what people can expect that show up. Generally, we'll have a couple of speakers someone who has experienced loss and kind of talk about their story. We also may have someone who talks about grief. So they can address the griefs perspective as well. Then the the American Foundation for suicide prevention has a documentary and will view that then we'll break up into small groups where we can talk a little bit more and let each of the individuals talk about their story of loss. And it's really in that time where we it's really powerful to to see how people realize that they're not alone in to just by talking about their situation or their loved one. It really really helps to heal begin that healing process. And and the fact that they're not alone that there's others there that are going through that loss. I think it's it's healthy to be able to be in a safe environment to talk about that grief. And maybe that guilt. I mean, all those emotions stem you. Absolutely. Yes. I you know, started the survivor day in Richmond. I guess five years ago, and it was one of the things that we were pretty much required to do. Order to form the Virginia chapter for AFS AFSPC. And I found it personally personally to be very life changing because I lost my son in two thousand ten he was sixteen years old and setting up this event was so well supported by AFSPC, they gave us all the things to do to get it sat up and what I found out that bringing people together who've been through that particular loss. It's a loss that surrounded by stigma, right? And it's difficult for pill to be able to share their feelings or talk about it, and whatever I have experiences the more. I share my story the more. I talk about it. It helps other people because it brings connections to the loss, and it provides support for one another and do you feel like that that helps you continue your healing process? Yes. Absolutely. We call it a grief journey, right? And it's been eight years since I lost my son. And it's amazing how being a part of this program in some of the other programs that we do have really helped me to heal and to find hope, and I'm sure it's a process it just doesn't go away overnight. I am sorry for your lies about you. And then I lost my son seven years ago. One is Mark. I I'd come to one of these events three years ago. I'd seen it advertised in a I went to to help because I received a lot of help myself and. Shown to be there with other parents or other loved ones just to kind of provide some support. And that's where I met those from the coalition event some of the coalition members there, and that's how I got connected to the coalition itself. And so this will be my fourth one of these events and just really looking forward to it again just to provide that support that that people are looking for. They just need a place to talk in place that safe. So it's helped you as well as you've gone to your Turney. Yes. Oh, definitely. And you guys can definitely speak from experience that I mean, so people don't definitely aren't gonna fill loan because you know, what you're talking about. And how they're feeling. Absolutely. It's amazing how you can come full circle in that journey journey and to be able to help others because some people just close off, you know, I find that so sad. I do you guys discuss warning signs and things like that to families or is this mainly for the survivors. To come to our can anybody come if they may be are just worried about it, maybe in their own family, and and want to be prepared. Well, what we have found out that is when people have lost someone to suicide it it can bring feelings. You know to them that are difficult to deal with when you're dealing with grief and loss, and it just really does help those people that too may become at risk. Okay. And it gives them the support and a fellowship of knowing that they're not alone. And it it really it does I've seen so many people say this is something I've had a very hard time talking about and being able to be in a room with a group of people who've been through the same thing is very comforting. So it is open to the public though, definitely is open to the public mainly for people who have suffered a small loss. The the most relevant for them. And then we have other events where we could talk about prevention and awareness in things as well. So okay. So if somebody wants to get more information or perhaps join your cause there to help out in any way. How would they go about doing that? Well, you can.

American Foundation Chesterfield Richmond Virginia Bon air Baptist church Shirley Ramsey Kevin skeleton Simon founding board member AFSPC Sarah partner Henrico Turney Mark United Methodist Church AFS sixteen years eight years
"american foundation" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

12:42 min | 2 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on WRVA

"And who your wet my name is Shirley Ramsey. And I am the founding board member of the Virginia chapter of the American Foundation for suicide prevention of welcome and Sarah. And I'm Kevin skeleton. I'm with Chesterfield suicide awareness and prevention coalition. Wow. You guys have teamed up together doing great things, and you know, we it's very top of mind right now, this whole subject, and I think it's really a good time to get some more information because more and more people seem to be affected by suicide or thoughts of suicide. So I thank you for your work itself. Important. So tell me what you guys do. Well, how I got here today is I also serve on the coalition for the Chesterfield suicide prevention. Coalition, and I we partner with them. Right. And we actually worked together on an event that is sponsored by the American Foundation for suicide prevention. Sure, okay. And the coalition gathered together in Chesterfield to kind of bring a lot of the different resources that were trying to raise awareness for suicide on their own and brought them together as a coalition so he can team together to try to raise that awareness in a much more powerful way. Well, I think that's a great idea. Now, what are you guys doing right now? What's going on? We've got survivor day, which is the international survivors of suicide loss day coming up on November seventeenth. Wow, notifications that that that will happen at and show. He's got some history about about that day. Yes. Please. Please. Let me know what that's about. That is Saturday November seventeenth is that correct? That's correct. Okay. And it's actually international. Wow. Okay. And it's a day that we hold once a year when people are affected by suicide gather around the world and events in their local communities to try to find comfort for suicide from suicide loss and gain an understanding is they share stories of healing and hope. Wow, that's amazing. And that is going on all across the world at the same time. And what is your locations for this? We have one in Chesterfield at Saint Mark's United Methodist Church unluck slain, and that's going to happen on that Saturday from ten to one. All right. And then you said is there? Another location locally. Yes. We have another one at Bon air Baptist church at the village, which is a pilot shirts of Bon air Baptist. It is actually held in the West End of Henrico on Paterson avenue. Wow. And what about the times for that that will be from eleven to two thirty. So what happens at the event? Tell me. What people can expect that show up. Generally will have a couple of speakers someone who has experienced loss and kind of talk about their story. We also may have someone who talks about grief. So they can address the griefs perspective as well. Then. The the American Foundation for suicide prevention has usually documentary, and we'll view that. Then we'll break up into small groups where we can talk a little bit more and let each of the individuals talk about their story of loss. And it's really in that time where we it's really powerful to to see how people one realized that they're not alone and to just by talking about their situation or their loved one. It really really helps to heal you begin that healing process. And and the fact that they're not alone that there's others there that are going through that loss. I think it's it's healthy to be able to be in a safe environment to talk about that grief. And maybe that guilt. I mean, all those emotions stem you. Absolutely. Yes. I you know, started the survivor day in Richmond. I guess five years ago, and it was one of the things that we were pretty much required to do in order to form the Virginia chapter for AFS P, and I found it personally personally to be very life changing. Because I lost my son in two thousand ten he was sixteen years old and setting up this event was so well supported by FSP, they gave us all the things to do to get it set up, and what I found out that bringing people together who have been through that particular loss. It's a loss that surrounded by stigma, right? And it's difficult for pill to be able to share their feelings or talk about it. And what have I I have experiences? The more. I share my story. The more talk about it. It helps other people because it brings connections to the loss, and it provides support for one another and do you feel like that helps you continue your healing process? Yes. Absolutely. We call it a grief journey, right? And it's been eight years since I lost my son. And it's amazing how being a part of this program in some of the other programs that we do have really helped me to heal. And to find hope, and I'm sure it's a process it just doesn't go away overnight. And I am sorry for your loss. Now, how about you? And then I lost my son seven years ago. Twenty one in Mark. I I'd come to one of these events three years ago. I'd seen it advertised in a I went to go to help because I received a lot of help myself, and I was going to be there with other parents are other loved ones just to kind of provide some support. And what I that's where I met those from the coalition that some of the coalition members there, and that's how I got connected to the coalition itself. And so this'll be my fourth one of these events and just really looking forward to it again just to provide that support that that people are looking for. They just need a place to talk in place that safe. So it's helped you as well as you've gone through your Turney. Yes. Oh, definitely. And you guys can definitely speak from experience. I mean, so people don't they definitely aren't gonna fill alone because you know, what you're talking about. And how they're feeling absolutely doesn't mazing how you can come full circle. In that journey journey and to be able to help others because some people just close off, you know, I find that. So sad. Do you guys discuss warning signs and things like that to families or is this mainly for the survivors to come to or can anybody come if they may be just worried about it, maybe in their own family, and and want to be prepared. Well, what we have found out is when people have lost someone to suicide it it to bring feelings. You know to them that are difficult to deal with when you're dealing with grief and loss, and it just really does help those people that too may become at risk. Okay. And it gives them the support and a fellowship of knowing that they're not alone. And it it really does I've seen so many people say this is something I've had a very hard time talking about and being able to be in a room with a group of people who've been through the same thing is very comforting. So it is open to the public of definitely is open to the public mainly for people who have suffered a loss. The most most relevant for them. And then we have other events where we could talk about prevention and awareness in things as well. So okay. So if somebody wants to get more information or perhaps join your cause her to help out in any way. How would they go about doing that? Well, you can go on our website AFS p dot org. And there are tabs at the top. There is one for support. And that will lead you to our survivor day events. You can actually find events all over the country on that website. You put in your locality. And there will they the events will pop up as to where you can find them. What the locations are and the times so that she can try to find one that's nearest you. Well, okay, survivors day again is what day is November seventeenth in. You have two locations. So that's convenient for everybody. And I just think it'd be a great. It's a great opportunity for folks who may need that help to come out you start right at worked. It's worked for you. Absolutely. And you guys can be commended on being able to turn one of the worst experiences in your life around to help others. Thank you so much. Thank you. Well, she just wrapped up the Cattlemen's ball at helping out kids your back. What are you doing girlfriend? Hey, kat. It's good to be back this morning. Thanks so much for having us. I am here today to talk about the Hanover crew foundation. The crew foundation is the crisis relief for emergency workers pan ever county. And I think that is so important and so timely, and I mean our hearts have been broken all of us because of the story in the laws. I can't imagine, you know, it's a band of brothers and your neighbors your family, but you guys are always they're doing good stuff. Torbert your name to you. By the way. Sure, I'm Dan Hodges and on the board of directors for the handover crew foundation. And the foundation was started about ten years ago. I'm in an effort to provide aid at Tom's a financial crisis hardships and emergency situations to Hanover county's first responders. It's the kind of foundation that you never wanna use. Right. But it's a great backup. When we when we need it. Well, and so is this been going on for a long time? I mean, this organization absolutely the organization we were founded eight exactly eight years ago, but we are five oh one C three organization, we do accept charitable contributions, and we have four primary focuses, of course, the crisis relief fund that we provide assistance to emergency responders who are facing financial hardships due to injuries or illness at have they've occurred on the job. We also have our educational assistance. We provide scholarships and grants to students and children of Hanover county's emergency responders. We do. We also provide physical and mental health wellness as you can imagine. After an incident that we had much like we had last couple of weeks ago on October eleventh following the death of Lieutenant Clark. We we needed those wellness services. For our first responders, certainly. And then, of course, our memorial remembrances that we provide for line of duty deaths that occur for first responders. So you guys are there for the family. We are there for the family. And that's exactly what this. This foundation was was built on. Of course, most of your listeners know that we did unfortunately have a tragic loss on October eleventh when Brad Clark ultimately lost his life in an accident on interstate ninety five, but you know, we we don't want to memorialize his death. We want to celebrate and honor the life that he lived the work. He did in Hanover county. And also keep in mind that there were three other firefighters that were involved in that accident. Yes to have been released, and and our home one is still in serious, but stable condition and MTV so we're here to support all of those families and moving forward and the other firefighters that responded to the scene that evening. Sure. Sure. Because I mean, I can't even imagine. What that was like that. You're right. We've got to celebrate his life. We have all seen all the images so loved a giving man now survivors, they've got a long ways to go. We need to help them as well. There's a lot of healing that needs to take place. Absolutely. And we've got several fundraising events that are coming up that that will help help us raise funds to support these families. And so we hope your listeners will come out in support. Some of those one really fun event is coming up in just a couple of weeks. That is our barbecue fundraising event. It's going to take place on Saturday November third from ten AM until five pm at the seminary church of Christ. Of course, Lieutenant Clark was a member of guests Emily's church, and I.

American Foundation Chesterfield Hanover county Lieutenant Clark Virginia Shirley Ramsey Kevin skeleton Bon air Baptist church partner Hanover crew foundation founding board member Bon air Baptist Sarah Henrico Richmond Turney AFS P MTV Mark
"american foundation" Discussed on Messages of Biblical Treasures

Messages of Biblical Treasures

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on Messages of Biblical Treasures

"To the american foundation for suicide prevention the online statistics show the following suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the united states this doesn't clued the other countries each year forty four thousand nine hundred sixty five americans die by suicide so heartbreaking on average there one hundred twenty three suicides per day for every suicide twentyfive attempt to take their lives which means around one million one hundred and twenty four thousand one hundred twenty five americans attempt suicide men die by suicide three point five times more often than women these numbers are truly heartbreaking in fact just doing the research for this message grieves my heart deeply life should never get so bad that you have to get to the point where you feel the only way out is to harm yourself sadly some of you including me have either lost a friend or loved one to suicide in fact some of you out there have had suicidal thoughts and i'm glad you're still here to be able to hear this message it is such a terrible act for the individual as well as for the friends and family that are left behind to pick up the pieces the sadness emptiness loneliness and even the questions of wondering why their loved one had to do this to themselves will be with many of them for the rest of their lives so how do we make a change to the cycle it starts by speaking up men you have got to find someone to talk to you cannot handle this battle on your own no one was ever meant to carry burdens to the point of our bodies being stressed out we all need someone that we can speak with when times are rough or better yet don't wait guys don't wait until the times a rough find a friend build a relationship build a strong relationship with someone so in the rough times you won't have to go through them alone the apostle paul wrote these powerful verses and cleese iast four nine through twelve two people are better off than one for they can help each other succeed if one person falls the other can reach out and help but someone who falls alone is in real trouble likewise to people lined together can keep each other warm but how can one be warm loan a person standing alone can be attacked and defeated but to stand back to back and conquer three are even better for a triple braided cord is not easily broken so on the same note if someone does come to you to ask for help be sure that you listen to them and be careful not to talk their era off show them that you are sincerely interested in what they have to share also we must keep in mind that some men have a hard time sharing with others and i understand that but if you are depressed and stressed and can't seem to find the right answers to get your life back then you need to speak up please guys don't go it alone satan wants you to be silent he wants to bombard your mind with mixed feelings he wants you to believe.

american foundation
"american foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"american foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Thank you that was great i would like to thank ted johnson of course and also the brennan center and the new american foundation for uh this invitation on the opportunity to speak to all of you and i really appreciate your coming it's how high of 73 today a really appreciated that i loved the outside so i know you have that choice okay so i'd like to address the connections between political communication social identity and political psychology and by that i mean that hal american elites and american citizens talked about politics reflects how they think and feel about society and the place of different groups within that including both the social groups to which they belong and those that they see as the other as the outsiders that largely symbolic discourse in that thinking shapes political behaviour it shapes the policies and politicians that we support and those that we oppose media discourse in media framing should be seen as one component of that although an important component so i see two themes related to national identity as dominating our political discourse right now and therefore also the american psyche in this moment so first as we've heard many times we have america's changing demographics rate the much discussed idea that america is changing rapidly and that white americans will soon be outnumbered rights of that is framed first of all as a problem the second theme is closely rule later to that and it's that white americans sense that they are under threat that they will lose dominance that they'll lose status and their place in american society the way that the media frame certain public policy issues associating both societal problems and their potential solutions with particular racial groups both reflects and contributes to that sense of threat it pits different groups against one another in competition this media framing certainly helps to exacerbate divisions but it was not created in a vacuum if you look at the 1990s bill clinton for example talked about how progress help every single advancement that has been made has been made on the backs.

ted johnson brennan center american foundation america bill clinton