35 Burst results for "American Food"

Show #55 Interview with Scott's Dad & Comedy Set by Pat Paulsen  - burst 2

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

02:12 min | 11 hrs ago

Show #55 Interview with Scott's Dad & Comedy Set by Pat Paulsen - burst 2

"Television had started but it was not A household thing yet oh no and still black and white and small and only rich people had him. I think that's one of the reasons. I married maryland because she had a television. So you married my mom. Because she had a tv a coach we got to watch Thrill funded jewish guy. Milton berle milton. Berle close merle mill now. That's good milton. Berle was Huge and radio and then he can. He was one of the successful people. Him and red skelton and a few others that were able to. Bob hope to convert over to tv right. That was the reason america but it was a poll. So now you're in junior college. Where'd you go after that. Well that's when the army wanted me. Oh and you drafted no. They wanted to draft us. Well i said we'll we'll gonna go somewhere and i said let's go to sit the navy. I mean i really love the ocean trucks odor. Wral get seasick so we had a lot of friends that were in the eighty second between wars they had the training gliders was was a much fun plus jumping and they said you know the food was pretty good and being then you know the nation's top branch of the service. It was fun. You get the martian a lot of parades so we went down and join the army specifying go in the airborne and then at monday we were in fort ord getting processed the draft board called and wanted to know where the hell i where the hell we were and the school one all wheel also enrolled in west contra costa the so we be in school right make. The transfer were my mother support. He's in the army. He can't be the army yet. Been in for two days and beat. You beat them to the punch. Yeah and which is really

Milton Berle Milton Merle Mill Berle Red Skelton Milton Maryland Army BOB Navy America Fort Ord West Contra Costa
Boston's Bridgewater State University Using Robots To Deliver Food To Students

KYW 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Boston's Bridgewater State University Using Robots To Deliver Food To Students

"For college students pizza delivering robots, Rachel Holt reports from Bridgewater, Massachusetts, a new addition to the campus at Bridgewater State University. A robot delivering meals to students, everything from pizza to coffee. I love him like I'm like flip flops and everything. I'm lazy and it's very easy. Just order food whatever you want. When you get those cold, windy days, students don't really want to go outside. Do they enjoy the opportunity of being able to have a robot delivered for them? Bs? You is the first school in the Northeast to use the robots, and it comes at a good time. That's something different. It's something totally new. And you know, in the time period of the pandemic, you know, it really worked out really well makes the students feel even safer. And it's all done in the A starship happy You pick your campus, your vendor and the robot delivers. Senate's

Rachel Holt Bridgewater State University Bridgewater Massachusetts Senate
More Former Aides Accuse New York Governor Cuomo Of Sexual Harassment

On the Media

11:01 min | 1 d ago

More Former Aides Accuse New York Governor Cuomo Of Sexual Harassment

"The pandemic, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo transformed into a fully fledged TV star. Let's remember some basic context and fax society functions. Everything works. There's going to be food in the grocery stores. Propelled into the firmament by his daily Corona virus, free things that reassured an anxious, leaderless public hears Ellen de generous and Trevor. Noah. You call yourself a Cuomo sexual and I e. I agree with you. I feel like I'm a homosexual to it genuinely has been very inspiring and refreshing to see. A leader Like Cuomo, new fans declared their adoration in Tic tac videos, Means and song, the Great Randy Rainbow Stranded in my bedroom. Then there he give you an update as to where we are today. Mature me treatment of the governor, of course, extended to many news networks like CNN, where Chris Cuomo asked the tough questions Now you know, I've seen you referred to a little bit recently as the love governed. I'm wondering if that's bleeding into your demeanor. It all making you a little soft on the president. Love girl. I've always I've always been a soft guy. I am the love government. Cool, dude and loose mood. You know that. But in the past few weeks, Cuomo's TV persona has faltered. Report from the state attorney general and a court order found that the official count of deaths of nursing home residents due to the virus was nearly doubled The figure first reported by the Cuomo administration. Plus, as I write this three women have accused the governor of sexual harassment, some in awkward, geeky detail, including two former aides. Alex Preen Stuff writer. The New Republic recently wrote the article. The Andrew Cuomo Show has lost the plot. Welcome back to the show. Thank you so much. I'm glad to be here. You know, two people who have closely read about the governor in the newspapers over the years as opposed to TV. This version of Cuomo, this bully in cynical operator isn't Knew How have the media changed the message? If you are a long time consumer of mainly print news about state politics, you had untiring chronology of Cuomo scandals even if you forgot some of the details. That didn't necessarily get a lot of play on TV news. Keeping up with Cuomo news over the last decade, has also required being familiar with reporters from The Albany Times Union or or newspapers and Rochester. You know these places where the Albany bureau is still really important and a big part of their beat. And a lot of that news, the complexity of it and specifically, the way it fit. A pattern of behavior with Cuomo was usually too difficult to get across, and especially in like a short television segment. I know a lot about this because I actually listened to the local radio station that produces the show. That's how come I know about the Moreland Commission. But you said this story never made it to prime time because it's too complicated. Absolutely, Yeah. All of the past. Few governors have gotten in trouble. Cuomo was running as the guy is going to come clean it up. And so he sets up a commission called Moreland Commission. He says they have the authority to investigate corruption and all of its forms here in Albany and they will be independent. I will not meddle. I will not interfere. He's shuts them down less than a year later because they start going after people too connected to him essentially and people who worked on the commission. They went to The New York Times, and they said Cuomo was meddling. He stopped us and we were getting too close to his allies, so that stuff was out there. But when the story made it toe TV news, it was stripped of the level of detail necessary to understand what had happened and why I like in this interview with Charlie rose months after it came out that Cuomo's office Had hobbled the aforementioned Moreland Commission governor Andrew Cuomo is reestablishing a family dynasty in New York politics, though he's had to get used to criticism. Of his leadership style. You micromanage. They say that delegate more right and you're not transparent. They say then. And they say you don't suffer fools and you know, Yeah. And you're not You push too hard. Yeah. You micromanage? Yes. All of that. You plead guilty or not guilty. You can't have one without the other. I plead guilty like not only was was Rose asking and easily Dodge question. He was almost ventriloquism. The answer's four Andrew Cuomo, right. It's like the old job interview joke. What's your biggest flaw? You know, I'm too hard on myself. You take issue with the defenders of Cuomo who say that Hey, His most important audience. New Yorkers always have known about the governor's bullying quality. That sharp operator with the even sharper elbows and all of that. And they like it third, this idea that he has cruise to reelection twice. They must know who this guy is and support him. And that's why I draw that distinction between corn on the TV character and new favorite Cuomo's, Because if we have listened to a few clips of him on television He's not berating anyone. He's joking around with his brother. He's performing empathy for victims of Covert 19 or Hurricane Sandy. Is Daddy complete with the dad each exactly. He's New York's dad now. It seems that Cuomo has been able to keep his TV persona and his newspapers persona separate. Why are they colliding? Now? For a few reasons, one important one is that people Do not want to go on the record attacking Andrew Cuomo because of the power he holds in the state, especially elected Democrats. What happened this time is that Ron Kim and Assembly member Received a bullying call from Andrew Cuomo for speaking to the New York Post about the nursing home situation. Kim had been at a briefing where a top Cuomo aide said Yeah, This looks bad that we reported the wrong number of people who had died in nursing homes. But you have to understand, like we need didn't want it to become a story basically, like they were like Trump Trump DOJ is gonna make a thing of it Trumps could make a thing about that's why we covered it up. So anyway, Ron Kim went to the post and gave it on the record quote to the post about that meeting. That was the subject of the call where Cuomo allegedly sat. According to Kim, I'll destroy you. In normal Albany affairs. What happens next is either Kim shuts up. Kim goes on background to The New York Post again because Cuomo as in other cases, finds an irregularity in Kim's background. And implies that that could be used against him. And what he would end up doing is at a press conference Bring up Ah, years old story about how Kim had flip flopped on Is Bill about nail salons, and he would outright say Kim was crooked right after Cuomo does that press conference. There's a story on CNN about how Cuomo had made this phone call to Kim the day before, and that's not the kind of thing that legislators and Albany usually do when they get Implicitly or explicitly threatened by Cuomo. They don't call CNN and go on the record and say the governor threatened me. I think that Cuomo got away with it for so long because no one wanted to put their name. To descriptions of his behavior. But Kim, he knows well, I have a story. Now I have a compelling narrative in which I'm the hero in the governor's The villain and TV likes stories like that. And he ends up on the view. Tell us what happened after he called you or when he called you? Yeah, it was last Thursday night. I was about to bait my three kids when I received the call from the governor. He spent 10 minutes threatening my career and ordering me to issue a statement. They will be used to cover for the states that you wrote quote. If a politician acts as if he believes his voters experience politics is a television show, the best way to harm him is to make yourself a compelling character.

Cuomo Moreland Commission Andrew Cuomo Governor Andrew Cuomo Ellen De Generous Like Cuomo Chris Cuomo Cuomo Administration Alex Preen The Albany Times Union Albany Bureau KIM Ron Kim New York CNN New Republic Trevor Noah Albany Hurricane Sandy
Reverend Senator Warnock Discusses the Covid-19 Relief Bill

All In with Chris Hayes

03:25 min | 1 d ago

Reverend Senator Warnock Discusses the Covid-19 Relief Bill

"Democratic. Senator reverend walt rafeal warnock push for a comprehensive code rescue bill during his upset bid for george senate seat and he joins me now reverend senator. I want to ask about the sort of details here. But i want want to ask. Is you know every time. I talked to people in the us senate. I say feel like. I'm talking to a you know a culture from another planet right like it's a very strange institution all cruiser too weird traditions. That are hard to explain your your new there. What is it like to go through this. How strange does the institution seem to you or does it. Not what was great to be here with you tonight chris. We're going you know through the sausage making of legislation but the good news is that after months of waiting and when you think about the long period we're nothing happened under the previous administration. Relief is right around. The corner is on the way. And we'll be here for a little while but we're there and i'm confident that we're going to pass the relief that americans need and deserve this moment. We're about to pass. I think a historic piece of legislation. That for one thing. We'll cut child poverty in have think about that. We will cut child poverty in half fourteen hundred dollar relief payments to people that are go directly in their pockets and we know that when poor people when working class people receive relief. They buy food. They buy medicine. That's needed. They buy baby diapers a coat for their kid. It helps them and it stimulates the economy. We're going to get this virus under control and get the american economy warring again. I'm proud to be a part of that process. You are you are you. Were just elected in that special election in january. Obviously a closely divided swing state the state of georgia. Now we'll be up again in two years because it was a special election. So i think it's you could say that you're you have the most frontline position of any senator in that caucus so from the position of your political life. What what do you want to tell your fellow democrats about what you need to deliver back to your constituents in georgia. Well we've been fighting that that good fight from day one for me but for the people i was sent here to represent you. You know that. I come into this job as a pastor someone who is used to walking with people through their pain. I've seen firsthand. The ways in which people are suffering through this pandemic that has literally taken their loved ones. Half a million americans has devastated our economy and the good news again is. Relief is right around the corner. Help is on the way we're about to pass a historic piece of legislation that will cut child poverty and half we'll give workers the relief and the support that they need in this bill. We have five billion dollars of debt. Relief that will To farmers of color. And we're gonna get this virus under control so that we can safely reopen our schools and our economy. That's the good news. And i couldn't think of a better sermon for free to preaching on this weekend.

Senator Reverend Walt Rafeal W George Senate Senate Chris Georgia United States
Biden's First U.S. Jobs Report Shows Challenges Ahead

C-SPAN Programming

02:03 min | 1 d ago

Biden's First U.S. Jobs Report Shows Challenges Ahead

"Graham spoke, President Joe Biden got an economic briefing from Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and other top administration officials. President spoke about the aid bill being considered by the Senate and also the Labor Department's February jobs. Report. 379,000 Jobs added the unemployment rate down a tick to 6.2%. They job report shows that the American rescue plan is urgently needed. In our view, our economy still has 9.5 million fewer jobs had this time last year. At that rate, it would take two years to get us back on track. We have one million fewer educators, one million fewer educators that we did this time last year, we've lost 400,000 small business. This is all those empty storefronts. Aren't you shattered dreams? There are warning lights that's going off the state local budgets better beans stretched because lack of tax revenue and some last month job growth is result of the December relief package without a rescue plan. These games are going to slow. You can't afford one step forward and two steps backward. We need to be Virus provided essential relief and build an inclusive recovered. People need help. Now, unless than two weeks enhanced unemployment benefits will begin to expire for 11 million people. At least seven million kids don't have enough food to eat regular basis. 13 million people are behind in the rent on the rescue plan is absolutely essential for turning this around. Getting kids back to school, safely getting old. Lifeline, a small business and getting the upper hand. I'm covert 19. That's we're gonna be talking about now. So I thank you all for coming on in. Thank you.

President Joe Biden Janet Yellen Labor Department Graham Treasury Senate
U.S. added 379,000 jobs in February as unemployment rate ticks down to 6.2%

KYW 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 d ago

U.S. added 379,000 jobs in February as unemployment rate ticks down to 6.2%

"February. 2021 Jobs report adding 379,000 jobs blew past expectations thanks to a sharp rebound in restaurant and food service hiring. They're part of the leisure and hospitality sector, which accounted for 355,000 of the jobs added The unemployment rate dropped 1/10 of a percentage 0.26 point 2%. Better. Reserve chair Jerome Powell said recently that the real unemployment rate is probably closer to 10% over, although the economy still has 9.5 million fewer jobs than it did Just before the

Jerome Powell Jobs
Biden’s FDA looks to tackle heavy metals in baby food

Sean Hannity

00:37 sec | 2 d ago

Biden’s FDA looks to tackle heavy metals in baby food

"Threat in baby food gets the FDA is attention. The FDA says it will do more inspections, take enforcement actions and boost food sampling in an effort to reassure customers that baby food is safe. It comes a day after Democrats in the House and Senate pushed the FDA to put limits on the content of toxic metals and foods for babies and small Children. Last month, the House Oversight and Reform Committee released the results of a 15 month investigation into toxic metals and baby food, finding that some had high levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury accessed on EJ powers, a group of Nevada parents already suing manufacturers, accusing them of a cover up.

FDA House Oversight And Reform Com Senate House Nevada
Caroline Giuliani, daughter of Rudy, opens up about being polyamorous

Daily Pop

02:26 min | 2 d ago

Caroline Giuliani, daughter of Rudy, opens up about being polyamorous

"Right rudy. Giuliani's daughter caroline rose says she finds strength and being a unicorn and we're not talking about the mythical creature carolina reveals in vanity fair that she takes pleasure and pride in being the third and a sexual relationship with a couple so she is very open in this letter. She is unapologetic. She is very happy and proud and she said it took her awhile to get to this point but she is super happy to spread awareness. I would like to hear your thoughts. The guest our guest stars always the role. That wanna have. If you're going to do this. Explain to the people first of all unicorn. This first of all unicorn is a mystical creature. Obviously the third person in a relationship Go ahead i'm more like a goat. I come in food. I rummaged leave. You don't want me there. Because i'm digging. I'm asking you questions about your relationship. Okay oh yeah you're involved. Enjoy the moment. Have a nice night. So maybe we can do this again sometime. It's going to be sexy but then it turns into dr phil. It's like a whole connection here. What can we do to bring you back to get an older home doing nothing. One hundred days to the unicorn mad that the even using this word unicorn is the mystical creatures. A word my son would use the unicorn and now that it's this person who's in a relationship with a couple. I never use that word again. May mommy and were beautiful. I bet you do see this. Is that bronco unicorn. We normally call that person. Frankie freak frigging day game. Get with the couple all. It's a thing i gotta say. What is now the thing because you're also unattached. You know unicorn side piece. yes that's what is normally called. you are they. Are we committed. No there's no people with papers der together a unicorn. The definition of a person comes into a razor. They cannot interfere with the couple mainstays. You're just to come and go

Caroline Rose Giuliani Rudy Carolina Dr Phil Frankie
U.S. added 379,000 jobs in February as unemployment rate ticks down to 6.2%

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

00:25 sec | 2 d ago

U.S. added 379,000 jobs in February as unemployment rate ticks down to 6.2%

"Morning. February's jobs number is much better than expected. The Labor Department says the U. S added 379,000 jobs. While the unemployment rate fell slightly to 6.2% last month number surprised many economists who had been expecting about two 100,000 jobs to be added. Most of the job gains happened in the leisure and hospitality industry as the pandemic restrictions ease in some parts of the country. Food services and bars lead the way, followed by gambling in

Labor Department
'Coming 2 America' Goes Heavy On Nostalgia

Morning Edition

03:07 min | 2 d ago

'Coming 2 America' Goes Heavy On Nostalgia

"Too heavily on nostalgia. Unless you're a huge fan of Eddie Murphy's classic 1988 film coming to America, and lots of people are there's not going to be a lot for you, and it's less than inspired sequel Coming to America. We celebrated her 30 years absolute and prosperity. 30 Years of service. Well, great nation on 30 Years off Delicious fast food. The new film begins with Murphy's Prince Akeem Joe Fair, opening a fast food restaurant called McDowell's in the African Country of Amanda Devote ease of the first movie. No. This chain is owned by Akin's American father in law, played by John Amos, who denies his business is in any way a rip off of another well known burger joint. They've got egg mcmuffins way that a mixed up in this way are also celebrating my new beyond big mix burger, So there's no meat. There's no meat. Maybe we're getting much better with Pepsi Call Max here are subtle as a sledgehammer. This scene mostly gives us an excuse to see Amos and Louie Anderson, who also appeared in the first film, The Story of the original movie was a black centered fairytale. Murphy's a keen came to America, Queens, New York, of course, tow avoid an arranged marriage and find true love in the new movie. After the death of his father, King Akeem discovered he fathered a son unknowingly in America. Teams return to Queens brings one of the Sequels funniest moments when he revisits a local barber shop where movie magic allows Murphy and costar Arsenio Hall to play multiple parts. Just like in the first film can't be both famine and blood. Damn, Nelson Mandela and Winnie just discovered that I may have a bastard son here in this land conceived during my last visit. How much data supports you getting from the King pays no child support. No time for 30 years and you came back. You're the damn it. Comic Jermaine Fowler plays the sun. Lovell Johnson, who brings King a came home to meet his mother marry played by Saturday night Live alum Leslie Jones. My African I told you he was gonna come back. So you know this man. I definitely know this man. I know this man all the way live much as I love Leslie Jones, she and levels. Other American relatives, including Tracy Morgan, as his uncle Come off is uncomfortable stereotypes as King Akeem introduces his son to the moonda and pressures him into an arranged marriage. Comedy gets clunkier and more predictable, like a Mel Brooks style parody of the Black Panther of The Lion King and the first coming to America. Ultimately, this coming to America is mostly an excuse to bask in the glow of characters who's shown so much brighter and distinctively. 33 years ago. I'm Eric Deggans. The Los Angeles Philharmonic is launching a new season of streaming concerts today called

America Prince Akeem Joe Fair Amanda Devote Murphy John Amos King Akeem Eddie Murphy Leslie Jones Queens Louie Anderson Mcdowell Akin Jermaine Fowler Lovell Johnson Pepsi Arsenio Hall Amos Nelson Mandela Winnie Moonda
Most Unpopular (MM #3635)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Most Unpopular (MM #3635)

"The minute with kevin mason came across an article the other day on the website. Best life that we'll just. The title made me curious. It talked about the most unpopular soda. And it's not in terms of. That's out there that nobody buys. They took the most popular sodas in this case. Thirteen top sodas and determined the most unpopular. Course they got some algorithm they threw together and some stats and some data and figured out a way to create the most unpopular soda shirt. Could it be coke pepsi. The most unpopular diet coke. It's not something that people don't drink. It's something that people drink but don't like the most unpopular. I've never heard it phrased that way before but it kind of makes sense when you take the most popular things in the world. What's most unpopular. What's the most unpopular fast food franchise. Mcdonald's everybody eats there but nobody really likes it. It's more about convenience. It's more about necessity than it is about liking it most unpopular something. That's popular yet. Really is unpopular kind of a weird stat.

Kevin Mason Coke Pepsi Mcdonald
Most Unpopular (MM #3635)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 2 d ago

Most Unpopular (MM #3635)

"The minute with kevin mason came across an article the other day on the website. Best life that we'll just. The title made me curious. It talked about the most unpopular soda. And it's not in terms of. That's out there that nobody buys. They took the most popular sodas in this case. Thirteen top sodas and determined the most unpopular. Course they got some algorithm they threw together and some stats and some data and figured out a way to create the most unpopular soda shirt. Could it be coke pepsi. The most unpopular diet coke. It's not something that people don't drink. It's something that people drink but don't like the most unpopular. I've never heard it phrased that way before but it kind of makes sense when you take the most popular things in the world. What's most unpopular. What's the most unpopular fast food franchise. Mcdonald's everybody eats there but nobody really likes it. It's more about convenience. It's more about necessity than it is about liking it most unpopular something. That's popular yet. Really is unpopular kind of a weird stat.

Kevin Mason Coke Pepsi Mcdonald
Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

Short Wave

07:46 min | 2 d ago

Is The Sperm Race A Fairy Tale?

"Tell me a little bit about what you learned way back when about how conception works well. They showed us this video that described conception as a kind of obstacle course where the sperm little tadpole looking things and when they enter the vagina during this hostile environment. And they've done fight their way through all these obstacles and make it to the egg and the sperm. That reaches the egg wins. Kind of how it was told. Yeah that's pretty standard. It's similar to what i was taught to. And i spoke to lisa campbell angle stein. She's a reproductive bioethicist and she pointed out that we use really gendered language to describe this biology. She calls it a fertilization tale. So the sperm is this shining knight. Who's there to save the aig damsel in distress. And the sperm has all the agency the sperm is on a mission the sperm is fighting off other sperm to be the one to conquer the egg. Where's the egg is just sort of passively floating around waiting for the night and doesn't do anything itself. How does exactly what they told us. Yeah and lisa examined tons of textbooks at all levels from middle school to medical school for this kind of bias and she found some pretty wild stuff. For example sperm had this little hat like structure called the acronym textbooks described it as a motorcycle. Mean they could have called. It did horseback riding home at a ski how they could call the any type of helmets motorcycle helmet rights and that conjures up images of masculinity islanders. Tough guy weathers well clearly once again. The patriarchy finds a way but in this case. Isn't the story. exactly what happens. Biologically how it all goes down. Actually not at all. Oh no right. I am ready to go back to school. I want this post talk. Talk ariella let's do it. Only while buckle up today on the show go back to school to revisit the sperm race narrative and look at the ways that the edge and the reproductive tract plan active role in this process. I'm ariella zabidi. And i'm emily kwong. You are listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from npr. Alright classes in session. We're going back to school shortwave. School the best kind of school yes to learn about conception yeah and just to be clear. Today we're talking about this process as it plays out internally but a lot of folks conceived through the reproductive technologies like ibf. Yeah which are very cool. Okay just to recap. When i was taught conception in school it was basically described as a survivor style. Sperm race but ariella. You're telling me that this is a lie. yes yes. There are a few really big problems with this narrative when sperm i arrive in the vagina. They can't really race. I talked to jimmy heison. She's a biology professor at smith college. They don't have enough energy to make it to the side of conception. They don't have enough directional but isn't that what the cute little tales or for like don't the sperm use them to swim yet. Details do give sperm some swimming ability. But that's not a complete picture. The sperm are getting there faster than they could all on their own. And we've seen in rats and other mammals that even dead sperm can reach the lopion tubes so it seems like sperm. Don't rely that much on their own mobility. So are they getting their. The reproductive tract is bringing them along. Oh that is amazing. Okay how is the reproductive tract. Doing that so i talked to kristen hook. She's an evolutionary biologist. And she told me it's doing this tons of ways by changing the thickness of the reproductive tract fluid. Just like if we were swimming in a swimming pool with water versus a swimming pool of honey. You're gonna move differently in these different fluids or with contractions summer to contractions in your stomach after you've had a big meal or whatnot to move your food through your intestines so it's like the sperm are on one of those moving sidewalks y-yeah they're being transported along eventually reaching the philippian tubes. Okay and what happens after that. So the sperm. Start to move their tails more intensely. Which makes those pretty useless movements. We talked about earlier. More powerful research just that fluids in the reproductive tract kind of give the spur more energy. Think of it like taking a bath in coffee one. That's dreamy to the idea that the reproductive tract literally gives the sperm. Their strike is giving me strength right now. That is fantastic. I know emily. The official name for this process is hyper activation. Though that's riveting and there's even more the reproductive tract also has to prepare the sperm for one. It eventually meets the egg right now. The sperm is a little overdressed for the occasion. It's got a layer of stuff on that prevents it from binding the egg and molecules in the reproductive tract helps strip off layer so that the sperm is ready to bind. Ooh la la naked sperm. Okay and emily remember the sperm. Don't have is they have no idea where the heck they're going so the egg provides them with a gps it releases these super attractive chemicals that show the sperm where to go. Oh so it's like leaving breadcrumbs for them to follow. Yeah and you have to realize that philippian tubes aren't this straightforward path. It's really complex and winding there. There are tons of little crevices so without those crumbs. The sperm probably wouldn't know where to go. We were taught to think of it as a racetrack. Right but kristen. We know better now if you wanna go with a racetrack idea at least recognized that it's a dynamic race track so it's not like the german audubon. It's more like You know like more like a rainbow road where you have twists and turns and places to fall off and there are checkpoints that you get ask for your license registration and proof of insurance. I'm sorry proof of insurance. What does that mean honestly. That's not too far off from reality. And this brings me to may be the coolest part of all of this. Remember that hostile environment you described earlier. Yeah but you know. I was brainwashed back then in health class and i and i regret saying that because it sounds like the reproductive tract is actually far more helpful than hostile here. You totally but it is true that there are tons of obstacles along the way that seemed to be counterproductive. Like at one point these big immune cells surround the sperm and literally. Eat them. No that's terrifying. Yeah you don't want to be the sperm in that face off so it makes sense that you and me and teachers everywhere described this as a hostile environment but now starting to realize that these obstacles the actually have a purpose. It works to separate sperm. That are dysfunctional. From those that are functional works to separate debris that enters into the reproductive track with quotas and it separates the wheat from the chaff. Shall we say and then it takes what it needs or wants to the site of

Lisa Campbell Angle Stein Ariella Ariella Zabidi Emily Kwong Swimming Jimmy Heison Kristen Hook AIG Smith College Middle School NPR Lisa Emily Kristen
The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

The 3:59

05:19 min | 3 d ago

The inventor of the cellphone calls on carriers to focus more on closing broadband gap

"Following. It's the second part of our four part interview with martin cooper inventor the phone. I'm roger chang and this is your daily charge or one of the issues. I've talked a lot about on this podcast and seen that in general the issue of the digital divide. I know you talked about that near the tail. Ender near the second part of your books. I'd love to get your perspective on really the deserve holistic impact of the cell phone and whether or not it's been a force for good in how it's been a force for good in closing that broadband gap that digital divide. We'll just think about this routers The whole educational system has been challenged today because the teacher gets up and gives a lecture and he's talking to a bunch of students if they're connected if they have smartphones they have access to all the knowledge the world the shakers not gonna give them information that they can find words so the whole nature of what a teacher is changes. The teacher now teaches people how to reach out for of religion. How to handle it. Taylor's educative process to individuals that having a lecturer to talk a people each different girl every other person. So we discover that what the result of this is that people's minds the challenge borden. They did before and the result of that. Is it their brains. Get bigger thinking smarter. Just think about that. Now that in this country one of the most advanced countries not in the world but in history forty percent of the students in this country do not have access to broadband wireless forty percent. Just imagine what that means over long term when the educational process chain that we end up with forty percent of the population with bigger brains. They're smarter or sixty percent and forty percent are dummies unacceptable with Broadband wireless now as essential to people as water food. So somehow that problems got to get fixed at the moment. The government is not digging right approaches. The only way to do that is through a first of all accept the fact this is essential and go to the carriers people have exclusive use of a spectrum and tell them either. You service all of the public or we're going to allow other people to do it. The technology exists to provide students with robin wireless whereas littlest cyber ten dollars a month. At that level everybody can have access to the but semi were we have to remove moves us exit seventy two big guys t verizon d mobile. They're doing a great job for the dense areas for the city's suburbs. They are not to have good job for the rural areas. They are after a good job for the people that can't afford a sixty dollars a month for a cellphone. The technology exists to do the both of those legs to handle people that can't afford into the rural areas and it's up to the government now to do figure out ways for business to provide those two kinds of services. We have to have one hundred percent accessibility for students and ultimately for everybody. Because i i'm so delighted you read the book because you know that it's not just education it's healthcare we're all going to be ultimately connected have have our bodily characteristics measured continually. There is the potential that we can anticipate diseases in people before they happen. Just because we're measuring things continually so healthcare is going to be a revolution. You can't provide after one segment of the public but public and keep it from other people so between those two issues education healthier and then you get the most important wall in. That's what your profession is is. Collaboration is getting people to talk to each other to generate ideas to people who are always more creative corporate than one person but of you got people talking to each other groups independent of time independent of where they are the potential for improving the productivity of people will be such that the idea of poverty will disappear. There's going to be enough for everybody. There is no reason why everybody can't be wealthy announced. Never worry about food or housing and everybody can't downs. The education served there.

Roger Chang Martin Cooper Ender Robin Wireless Borden Taylor Verizon
Alex Lieberman and Austin Rief Discuss the Origins of Their Company Morning Brew

How I Built This

03:35 min | 3 d ago

Alex Lieberman and Austin Rief Discuss the Origins of Their Company Morning Brew

"Year was quite easy me. Because i didn't have to re- recruit for any jobs. I only take two classes and two other than playing a lot of fi fi. nhl and other video games. I was like. I need to do something to pass the time and keep myself sharp for my job. All right so started helping other students prepare for job interviews and i would always start my mock interviews by asking the question. How do you keep up with the business world and the answer to that question was typically something along the lines of the wall street journal or cnbc etc. And i would dig a little bit deeper. I say why. Do you read these things and the students would say something along the lines of you know. I read it because that's what my parents told me to do. Because it's a prerequisite saying while reading business but it's dense and dry and i don't have enough time in my day to read the journal cover to cover and so at some point i was like this is crazy. These kids are working their asses off to have careers in business yet. They don't have content. That story tells the business world in a fun. And engaging way right and so i started writing a daily newsletter at the time was called market corner. It was a pdf that i'd put together using microsoft word and then exported into a pdf. The logo was bearable in a bullfighting literally. Took it off google. It had the watermark going across and send it out to a serve every day over email. One of the early readers. Was this guy named austin reef and austin revealed me and was like. Hey i have some ideas for how we can make market corner better. Can we chat wow. We met up for a conversation and quickly. I didn't think to myself. Wow this is my co-founder because it wasn't even a business. It was lobby. Yeah i thought to myself is. Everyone is really good at telling me. I'm doing a great job with this thing. Edit is wildly unhelpful. To actually make it better. Austin was the only person that i had spoken to who actually gave constructive feedback on. How market corner could get better. Yeah that's when i knew. It was a complementary brain to mind somebody who thought linearly objectively and so. I brought him on his. Let's call it like a partner at the time and one thing led to another and we ended up launching morning brew together in march of twenty fifteen. I think austin. You're also a student right at of michigan. Both you guys were there right. Yeah so most people initially reading this right university of michigan and you were just alex. You're just writing short newsletter linking bigger articles about the specific topic basically. Yeah it was. It was basically like fifty one hundred fifty word blurbs with link out to the full story and then kind of this other brain food related to business right like investor of the day stock pitch of the day. That's what it wasn't the beginning. And austin you come aboard near like hey you can really do this a lot better. And here's how so. When did you decide. Like how did you get to the point where the two were like. You know what forget about our jobs. Let's jump into this newsletter thing. It wasn't an easy decision. So alex had the job lined up at morgan stanley. I was interning at molson and company. Which is a investment bank in new york city and very quickly. I realized that that wasn't the path for me. And so we wanted to be entrepreneurs we had an idea and so we thought why not give it a chance and we saw growth. We saw this grow from michigan to other big ten schools to ivy league schools to i think the big inflection point is when we soul older people reading. We thought there's something for college students when we realized this could actually be read by anyone. That was a big moment for us when we thought wow. This has potential to be read by tens of thousands but a

Austin Reef Austin Cnbc NHL The Wall Street Journal Microsoft Google University Of Michigan Michigan Molson Morgan Stanley Alex New York City Ivy League
Catherine Coleman Flowers Addresses The Lack Of Basic Sanitation In The United States

Solvable

05:16 min | 4 d ago

Catherine Coleman Flowers Addresses The Lack Of Basic Sanitation In The United States

"Catherine you grew up in lowndes county alabama. Can you tell me a little bit about it. And what it was like growing up there yes lowndes. County is seven hundred and fourteen square miles very rule. When i grew up we could actually pick plums and apples off trees and our walk through cornfields and actually pick up in ear corn off stock and could sink my teeth in. Actually you know life the way. It tastes is supported by the alabama river there. Lots of creeks and streams there. It was a kind of community. Where people were self reliant and everybody had a garden and when you went to visit someone it was not unusual for them to talk about with a hickman. A garden need to give you something to take home and that is to the black belt is where cotton was historically ground in the country. It's got the very rich soil. We've got to keep in mind that lowndes county was very agriculture Plantations their allowance. Kenny also has a history of activism. That goes back really to after the civil war Were african americans which make a majority of the county our fighting not only for the right to vote but the right to control their own labor and because of the type of racial trauma and violence that was inlands can gain the name bloody lowndes so i grew up at a time when it was great. Change a lot of people are coming to visit primarily students that were part of the su nonviolent coordinating committee. There were organizing people for the right to vote because allows carries between the selma montgomery area in most of the march for the right to vote actually goes through lowndes county. You've highlighted this statistic that eighty percent. I think people live in las county or not on a municipal sewer system which means when you flush the toilet. It doesn't go in the sewer system. Because somewhere else is that. Is that the the situation. Yes the situation. In but of those eighty percent will of the twenty percents that are on a municipal system. Some of them are pana wastewater treatment. A emanate flush system instead of just going into the lagoon is coming back into their homes. They the yards so we not only see failing onsite septic systems or lack of septic systems. Will we also see failures. Their current with the wastewater treatment plants wale kevin. Can you explain to me. How septic fifteen works The simplest well quite simply what a in does sledge it goes into it. Jeremy looks like a concrete container. It goes into that container disciplines be natural processes that take place breakdown the fluent that goes there and then it goes through feel is once it goes to those field lies is supposed to come out to almost like drinking water quality but when it when it fails that's not what happens it get clogged up. Once it gets clogged up or eighties gets waterlog. It comes back into the home when it comes back into the home. The fluent that we thought would get treated with not get treated actually end up inside the house so even if you're system your get you don't necessarily have effective sewage presumably. If you have no septic system or inadequate septic system it depends on what you define this worse Inadequate septa system is probably worse than not having a septic system because of their straight pipe. They're taking away from the house. That's just a pipe that dumps the sewage outside the house right they often connect. Pvc pipe to a connection there at the mobile home. So when a flush the toilet in go go-to their pvc pipe. And wherever it is it extends. Sometimes i've seen it go into a appeared outside of the home. I've seen go into a pastor. I've seen it go into the woods when you have a septic system fails or you. Part of a treatment system failed. It comes back into the home quite easily and that usually comes back sometimes. It could flood the homes. I've been in homes where you can see their lands along the walls where was flooded with raw sewage. You can still smell it or come back into a person's bath to whatever the lowest point of entry is gonna come back into the home. These failures can create serious health consequences. What are some of the health consequences that you see in lowndes county but in other places where there is inadequate sewage or a total lack of food system in two thousand seventeen we found evidence of hookworm in other tropical parasites that a journal related to be exposed to raw sewage. We found that allowance karen. We haven't done those type studies in other places however we have collected soil samples in this study is currently being period viewed with samples collected in five states. In those five states. We also found parasites associated with raw sewage.

Lowndes County Lowndes Su Nonviolent Coordinating Com Selma Montgomery Las County Alabama River Wale Kevin Catherine Alabama Kenny Jeremy Karen
Can You Be Addicted to Love?

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 3 weeks ago

Can You Be Addicted to Love?

"Nicotine. Chocolate alcohol opioids work gambling. Sex food you might as well face it. Life is basically a gauntlet of substances and behaviors. That humans can become obsessed with and dependent on. But what about love not just sex but the deep interpersonal attachment we call love can be addictive. The notion of obsessive all consuming and even addictive love goes back literally thousands of years the ancient greek poet. Sappho wrote about watching her lover mary. Someone else and she describes being seized trembling drenched in cold sweat and feeling nearly dead she might as well be describing opium withdrawals or singing aversive addicted to love romantic. Love does have a lot of external features in common with drug addiction initial feelings of bliss and euphoria and obsessive fixated behavior often leading to poor potentially life ruining decisions. Two thousand ten paper from the new york academy of sciences points out that common criteria for diagnosing dependence include life interference tolerance withdrawal and repeated attempts to quit. Sound anything. like your relationship with your ex if so you're certainly not alone. But is there any more measurable basis for thinking. Love can be considered an addiction in the brain. Actually yes. let's talk brain imaging one way. That addiction hijacks the human brain is by taking advantage of a million reward and motivation systems. Like the mess olympic dopamine system which includes the ventral tag mental area and the nucleus accumbens. This is part of the nervous system that gives us internal rewards when we do something with an evolutionary benefits like eating or having sex essentially how the brain tells itself. Hey what you just did do that again. And again and again whether it's eating nutritious meal or unfortunately snorting cocaine back in two thousand five. A study in the journal of neurophysiologist used fm. Are i look at the brains of test subjects. Who self reported that they were intensely in love with someone else. When these lovebirds were showing pictures of the people. They adored there was activation in sections at that. Same mammalian reward and motivation system for example the right ventral mental area. But that's not all a follow up study in two thousand ten looked at what happened to the brains of men and women who had been rejected but reported that they were still deeply in love. It wasn't pretty when heartbroken. Lovers were forced to look at pictures of their exes. There was elevated activity in our old friends. The ventral take mental area and the nucleus accumbens researchers pointed out that the rejected lovers showed several neural correlates in common with the brain activity of cocaine addicts craving their drug so at the level of brain chemistry. Romantic love can be kind of like substance addiction but there are reasons why you might not want to refer to your latest crush as a full on addiction just yet. For example the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders does not officially recognize love addiction and while cravings for love can be devastating when their unrequited or self destructive they can also be deeply fulfilling in a way that no drug habit ever could be.

Sappho New York Academy Of Sciences Journal Of Neurophysiologist Mary
Healing Your Body After Alcohol With Bryan Bradford

Recovery Happy Hour

04:25 min | 2 months ago

Healing Your Body After Alcohol With Bryan Bradford

"Hi brian how are you doing good tricia. Thanks so much for inviting me tonight. Of course i'm so happy to have you. I know we go back a long long way. Known your family for almost thirty years and talk. Yeah your sister definitely started working for you guys twenty years ago. I miss you guys all the time. But after knowing you guys for so long and hot in for shopping at this flower shop for so long i know you are the guy to go to when it comes to talking about like more natural solutions for for repair essentially and for just for overall health. So what i did was like crowd sourced. And i got all the best questions from everybody and they are dying to pick your brain how they can recover in sobriety so i have won the honor of being the biggest erred so yes definitely be happy to answer those well. Let's get the party. Started the number. One thing that people want to know about is sugar cravings eliminate alcohol and then all of a sudden. We're dying for sugar. How can people deal with this in a healthier way. It's a great question. Tricia in is not just for alcohol. I mean this is type. Two diabetes is probably such fast growing disease in our country. Right now and so really. It's blood sugar. Prominent everybody is happy and so when it comes to that question. I always like to talk about the chemistry of the body a little bit and some people get bored with chemistry. But it's important understand our body a little bit more so you can understand why we do this and not that and so i like to talk about the hormone cortisol. Most people heard this hormone. Because it's your stress hormone so when you're under stress your body produces more cortisol. The problem is actually to other things that drive cortisol to go high in the body beside stress. The second thing that drives cortisol is is inflammation. And we know that alcohol can be one of the contributors of inflammation and the third thing that tribes cortisol up is drops in blood sugar. So when we were going through drinking binges or maybe eating too many carbs sugars you were just causing your your sugar to spike and crash throughout the day and this also made this hormone cortisol do the same thing so when this cortisol mechanism gets engaged. You're basically engaging most people know asked the fight or flight syndrome we talk about fight or flight all the time in recovery for sure. That's right. Because i like to talk about it on the chemistry level because we all heard the term stress did no one knows what that really means to the body. So i'm gonna put it in trying to pitch this through our audio here. What cortisol is that fight or flight hormone which means you were designed to run away from danger but you really weren't meant to eat and run at the same time so what the body does particularly what cortisol does is that when cortisol goes high is suppressed Digestive function. so this is a lot of people are not hungry when their cortisol is. Hi how many of you are waking up in the morning and you're not hungry till eleven twelve clock. That is not normal. We've most of us should be hungry as soon as we wake up. Because we've been fasting through the night but that's not way most of america's going right now so this is leading to an issue really of this sugar dysregulation so maybe night we had too many carbs. We are chocolate and popcorn and glass of wine percent people then basically. We spiked her blood. Sugar up in when that blood sugar starts to crash. Cortisol starts to go up so when we are suppressing our digestive system with this cortisol hormone. And now you decide to eat that piece of chicken or that hamburger whatever it is that protein yours. Your digestion has an acid in your stomach called. Hcl that's supposed to break down these proteins but when it's under suppression. The food sits in the stomach. Too long inserts to ferment. And so a lot of people start experiencing some bloating or belching or more gas sometimes. If it goes on long enough it turns no heartburn indigestion and then these undigested proteins that undigested piece of chicken that did not break down very well starts to go into your small intestines and now your small tested that proteins too big to be absorbed properly so your immune system starts to attack that piece of

Tricia Brian Diabetes America
"american food" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:56 min | 5 months ago

"american food" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Of African American food history. But almost every time I read about it, I see references to black caterers even more so than black chefs. If I know why that might be. I turned to someone who is immersed in African American food history. The author Michael Twitty, Mr Michael 20. Thank you for joining us today. Quite welcome. I'm glad to be here. So I have always always had the impression that catering In some ways more than restaurant chef ING has had maybe a special place in African American food history. Is that right? It is because during the late 18 through the majority of the 19th century Black cater is men and women. We're a kind of cultural elite. They had access to the upper classes among White society. They represented the core opera, mental class and wealthy class of black society. And the time when We didn't quite have a whole lot of rites of power. It's incredible that these cooks of renown Held the kind of sway over the lifeblood of their community. I mean the employ people in that community, and they reached across the bridge to the white world in the time when You know, we were just beginning to explore the idea. Of social segregation. And they transcended all of that. And so the caterer was one the most important figures. In urban life. Don't forget. We weren't people think of us, Malia say a rural people which we were When it came to black urban life in urban life period. These folks were transformative. Okay? And you said in the 18th and early 19th century, so you're talking about during their of enslavement. Okay, So this is interesting because this is before they were really restaurants, right? In the sense that we know right today, Right back then you would have taverns hotels, where the sight of some of the earliest quote unquote restaurants. But not the restaurant. Like we knew it and contemporary America right, meaning those places were places where you would have something to eat, but it wasn't about culinary artistry. What a caterer for Ah High society function. It's probably asked to do more of culinary high flying things. Yeah. So what people need to understand is that, um Especially when it comes to Early American Black cooks. They had a skill set. You know, working with British and French and Afro Atlantic, so effort landed to define for listeners really represents the cuisines and culture ideas about food. That were floating between British, mainly in North America, African American Africa Arabian after Phoenix I'm using very contemporary terms out of respect, but basically Caribbean Latin world. And black in North America. Black America across the Americas. There were people individuals, ideas recipes. Going back and forth. To the point where you know we were a multicultural People. And we were influenced by the people who we cooked for. So black cooks and black haters were familiar with German cuisine. You know, you could. How could you not be if you were in you know the Midlands of America? How could you not be made with Irish food or British food or Even Sephardic Jewish food they put upon where you were who you worked for on DH who we were around so They came with all of that, on top of this incredible heritage from West Africa that filtered and trickled down in certain ways, And then they took the dishes that they learned. With native ingredients like Terrapin and corn and other things, which were already a part of the landscape on DH. There was this thiss incredible, unceasing exploration. Of the food. That you know, most people were quite happy to Source out to their servants. You know this was this was it's not like today, where we indulge in every everyday person's ability to be a food is not the same kind of outsourced that creativity outsource that talent. Hat's What else do it for you and these folks were extraordinary and they were and it wasn't just that Francis. It was that they were the character is always mentioned. And nine times out of 10. It's extremely glowingly positive, like there's a gentleman named Ah, a fellow fellow Pollard strong name. Yes, I mean, we had the names back on. He's from Boston, and they call him the polite ist man in Boston. He was. He was a polished piece of ebony. That's how he was described. Yeah. Which is like sort of weird and racist sounding to my years now, But back then I imagine you know, but to describe someone in that era was whatever we're describing a black person in like you said, glowing, positive terms, which was, you know. Unusual. Yeah, but they were always but you know they were seeing is I don't like to use the word, Danny, because that, you know, but they were seen in that light because They have such self respect in terms of the address their manners. You had to be right. You had to be to convince people that you were just is good, if not better. And you were equal in society. You know. One time I ran into some descendants of a well known DC caterer whose name escapes me at the moment. And he lived there. A great great great grandfather was born the late 18th century. Died. Roughly the time of the civil war, maybe right before it and they sent me an article about him. And when he was memorialized This claim to fame was he's a free man of color. Living in Washington, D C. Then a major market of enslaved people and the Spanish ambassador of somebody that somebody from Spain Comes over ship lands in the middle of the night. They go to his house. Think about this. You're a free man of color. Here. Let me and watched in D C. In the border right between slavery and freedom, and then they wake you up in the middle of the night. Come on. You got to get up with.

America North America ING White society Boston Michael Twitty African American Africa Arabia Afro Atlantic Malia Washington Mr Michael Spain West Africa Pollard Francis Danny DC
"american food" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

The Dave Chang Show

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dave Chang Show

"Out on a high note..

"american food" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

12:02 min | 1 year ago

"american food" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"American food today I love this are you in your kitchen making strudel for the weekend then you're you're doing some some American cooking get in some apple pies I think apples come from Afghanistan's lack slash Kazak a stand part of the world and so Gabrielle Lange holds is here with us today she's been talking to us about her her very interesting career kind of deep diving into what is American food and this is sort of as a a run up to the main course around me talk about here her new book is called a place at the table new American recipe is from the nation's top foreign born chefs it's a product of brought to us by the ville check foundation which I did not know about but they've been giving out awards to foreign born people of different in different cultural this plans for a long time unbeknownst to me ends ends with though the chefs the holding of food culture was awarded recently and of course I mean just American food has so many important foreign born chefs of it you really couldn't you couldn't even begin to count them move you know from all a great French chef suka started our restaurant culture I mean just so much all right so Gabrielle tell me about this so you have this background of really thinking about American food in American recipes and then you got involved with the they'll check foundation kind helping about the bill check foundation they are amazing I had the founders Jana more it's a bill shack for twenty years now and I Hobbes so March of respect and admiration for their work so young Richard themselves came to this country as penniless refugees with one suitcase between the two of them and made their fortune here Jana the biomedical sciences and was a professor at NYU for decades and with the is an art historian at the metropolitan museum of art and they have given away over a hundred million dollars now to ours and culture for you're in the country major museums etcetera and one of their real passion points and specific mission the messages of their foundation is to honor the contributions of immigrants to this country and to help pay for the little that they say they found really welcoming community and sort of opportunities here when they came with nothing and out about strangers who were very friendly to them and they sort of pay it forward and and on her fellow immigrants now with their annual old prices so the animal print prizes are presented in a rotating category of the arts so went down was the category Baryshnikov wonder when music was a category yo yo ma one and it I'm friends with them and we said Hey you know you should do the culinary arts one year so I think it was two thousand ten I worked with them on the price that year and shuffle them grant an immigrant from Spain won the first bill check price that year and he used the prize money two thousand world central kitchen which you may know does using was that the start up money for only yeah did not know I needed the prod the prize money is on restricted so you can do whatever you want with it and that what Jose did with the money he is a hero I just did a big cover story for my other job which is a rate for delta sky the airplane and we just had a big cover on him and he is just a fascinating figure so yeah so what awful and a hero down and you don't he often where the keys are that the immigrants and the key to we've got our nation's leaders all the time and is such a a passionate person about opportunity in this country so he was the first culinary award winner from a double check price and this past April we presented the foundation presented Paula at our pride again and it was amazing to work with the jury which had people from national restaurant critic trombone at the cheese would wind up your sound ation and the main price per thousand dollar price went to chef Marcus Samuelsson who's born in Ethiopia adopted as I think a three year old he and his sister by a family in Sweden where he grew up came to New York in his twenties and is now really world class choppy cook I think to the first African American chef to cook a White House state dinner remember this correctly he can't because I will not know him in Minneapolis because he had a restaurant here he ended the the first outpost of aquavit that west New York and then it didn't didn't succeed when he was he was in and out of Minneapolis for awhile because there was a knock of you here in the idea center and the long story that one was a thing god yes it is clean right all my yeah I'd love dog would be I still do yes no I never look location yeah and then a bunch shafts that kind of training there are trying to that many apples aquavit still are here so there is market Samuelson influence all over the twin city is yeah there's anybody listening mood she is which is our like famous fried pizza restaurant that cram kind of came out of I'll because he then different find the defining Russian anyway so it's a it's a funny funny funny cross foundation of the world but yeah so Marcus is a is a amazing chef and then I when I was going through the book you have just chefs from all over the country you have a young Kim our beloved yeah yeah yeah so we featured on the market on the main pride and then we have three prizes the foundation has three prizes for rising stars that includes I'm a woman a night John who had the Cambodian rescue with a Cambodian refugee came as hundreds refugee other restaurant in Oakland after we won the prize you after we have a price you went on to be named one of bought up Bob Woodbine that new shaft that and get a ton of attention the last year also Fabian von how to how the restaurant in Manhattan on Larry tight you born in Mexico City so in the process of researching these prices considering different candidates for the price we realized we had a list of a hundred and forty top candidate that we said okay we're only gonna have poor prize winners we've got to make a Buck and right now to be honest there's so much the the phobia in this country and we thought it was just such an opportunity beyond the prizes to shine a light on people from coast to coast to have come here from around the world and there is a stereo type that immigrants in restaurants are low skill no skill washing dishes jump ahead of I mean that exist certainly like everything about the American could be earlier as part of the story is very incomplete part of the story and then a lot of people who kind of start dishwashing you work your way up I was a thirteen year old dishwasher in my own life so nana ending point in this book our devotion in that they come from around the world but they're open to burst in the past that they took I mean we have shopped brought from Turkey and Sweden and Colombia well being like jury Thailand to New Zealand go back to Argentina I mean I could go on France are done our beloved Dominique cretin the yeah shaft in San Francisco we had a town a couple years ago and and she just blew us away and you she is the craziest recipe in there so good for you for for fact checking now on there was no there was not make them aware that you could possibly do so there are two shops in the folk who have three Michelin stars here she basically said you know she could not have had the career that she has had in France she needed to be here because it's kind of closed to women there you know and so there's a bunch of of parts of this okay so I'm talking to Gabrielle Lang hold her book is a place at the table new American recipes from the nation's top foreign born chefs this is her third book kind of exploring the essence like what is America who is America what we eat and this is what I really mean Dolly leading up to this question Gabrielle what did working on this new book teach you about American chefs and American cooking an American food all I would say the biggest our farm moment for me he Hey when I was on a panel and someone said what is the future of American food and I would like I don't know I'm not studying the fee I don't have a crystal ball and another panelist said she talked out you know you give the two word answer and I was like oh my god that is so perfect keep cheap tacos because like if you said a moment ago atomic print you couldn't have had this career in France the other shops in this book could have had this career in Guatemala Colombia Ethiopia for ray film the blank Argentina because people don't necessarily just moved here and they hear the exact recipe that my great great grandmother made in my homeland sure there's some of that in there I love having quote unquote authentic which is such a challenge chap charge word now cuisine but people in the United States yeah I mean unless it's not to say that that doesn't happen anywhere else but it is so American I think this kind of creativity out V. boundary is at the at the forefront in front here melding a new cuisine and making American food more delicious I mean for the most part the shop in this book are not making the oak and the doc recipe that you would find in there homelands like I have a Japanese born shop to cook in Austin Texas and he makes like this Japanese barbecue that doesn't exist anywhere else you know I've got at like right here in Minnesota we got in him who's who's putting Kim Chee Ahn popped up we've got at least who's in Louisville who's who's putting kimchi on Quayle what he's doing this like southern food with a mix of Asian flavors and he grew up in Brooklyn but you know born in Korea but or I've got a shop who's from Asia but but cloaked in Louisiana under Leah chase you know the like icon of African American cuisine and she's resting and and cross pollinating and and putting things together so for me that that notion or even probably about how my show from Mexico City he doesn't cook Mexican food I mean he cooked food if you were to say what is that you might say I don't Israeli is that is the Japanese I mean depending on what course you either global it's just some of the best food in the world I mean you go to France to come from Asia and he cloaked and you know he's a grown up in Mexico City so and and and study of the CIA at the at the color is to the New York which is what he came for so I.

"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"Made over the weekend was the the macho banias green tiba news which were so good awesome and you didn't even bring me any you just we believe me the producers that's the first thing i said was well where are they you can't talk about food unless us we ate them okay but what is your dividing line for what is a good to fuse men not you know it's a personal choice and i think the beauty of of america's that you you can you can reinvent yourself you can be whatever you want and you can listen one person's attack is another person's treasure right i it's it's all i was in chicago recently and someone introduced me to a bebop burrito been bup is like a korean rice bowl but wrapped in in a burrito which is not even a mexican food it's like a fake mexican food and then like like panfried and every ounce of my body wanted to hate this thing this is just culturally everything's wrong about it and it took a bite and i was like his isn't bad it it that that you every single person out there listening has to create their own threshold for what they decide is acceptable or not and then guess what we debate it and that's what makes us americans we we can have this very passionate debate about what is american food and we'll never we'll never have an answer for i mean my my definition is that it is the diversity of our country and our food and all these cultural mashups that make the best like like putting clams on pizza you know which you clearly love love that i can eat my weight and clamp he said it's so good and and that's so it's not only american it's it's just new haven connecticut like it's a very specific regional thing it's an could only have been invented there because of the proximity to the clams and the italian immigrants it's an incredible thing that to me is the ideal of american food and when we sort of embrace that more when we embrace the versity when we allow foods to sort of aimlessly journey into each other space and we kind of mashed up and see what comes out of it sometimes we get chili spaghetti sometimes we have claimed pizza you know sometimes can challenge frozen tweet sometimes you do that but maybe you take the frozen kim the frozen twinkie and put some like you know mexican camel on it and then makes it better who knows interesting we only have a minute left so what what location do you want to go to next where did you not get to there was a ton of locales i didn't get to there's huge somali population main that just ran out of time in energy because i have this thing called a deadline so i can't tha that they're they're wonderful immigrants doing crazy things in nashville of all places and every around the country we are celebrating this diversity so.

"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"Like those things are part of your identity whether whether they're good for you or not it's other debate but as we move forward in our sort of you know maturation of american cuisine we also can't forget where we came from and yet it's not just about the food right i remember the chapter where you go to montgomery and there's tons of korean restaurants because the hyundai plant is is there and has been for quite some time and i want to read what you right here because you leave montgomery and you end up at a waffle house and you say quote i wish i hadn't found this intimacy sitting in a chain restaurant next wish shell station and across from donald's but maybe this is the culture as it stands right now is this part of the teenager nece that you're talking about it isn't it's also part of who you oil in and you know we can't always pretend to be fancy and educated and and elitist you know like like food is if there's one thing about food that i love is it crosses all boundaries across all ethnic racial economic you know you go to you go waffle house there's rich people poor people black people white people asian people they're everywhere and they're coming for this communal experience and listen as much as i love waffle house isn't that necessarily about the food in an all that great is nice reliable greasy diner food but there's something about sitting in a waffle house that makes you feel like you belong and and there is a inclusiveness about it and listen i've been to a lot of waffle houses and it's not just that one and there's something about this culture that that that is fascinating to me you know i when i traveled to different cities i usually do this and i don't know if any of your listeners can empathize with me but i i go to like one i have one meal like a trendy kind of zag it's michelin restaurant right and it's very fancy and then the next meal like i'll spend like eight dollars and and try and find sort of an obscure mom and pop store that that you can only find by talking to the locals and i find both restaurants both meals to be equally engaging satisfying and deeply comforting just.

montgomery donald hyundai michelin eight dollars
"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"Melting pot cuisine and i wanna take you back to that comment from our listener mark who said that american food is thought of as being fattening and fried is that true when you go to other countries when you say american food do they think american food is unhealthy yeah and it is unhealthy and it's delicious and it's fatty and you should eat a lot of it and is greece should be dripping from your chen when you eat fried chicken like there's no there's no shame in that what what what i do think we were experiencing it so i think people have to put it in perspective american cuisine is in its infancy you know you compared to chinese food italian food south american food mexican food we're in its infancy so we don't have a mature or aged food culture right we're we're kind of like a americans are like teenagers at at a free buffet right we're just going forward and we're just shoveling food in our mouth and whatever tastes good and and in this progression yeah we're we're we're at you know listen we came out of industrial food complex we came out of a lot of negative food service oc that were still sort of grappling with and so yeah we'd love fatty food we love you know we love white bread you know we love starch we love candy and ice cream and and all those things are part of our identity now we need to adjust those things we're all going to get diabetes but in that we also can't forget that this is part of our identity listen i i i love you know candy bars and fast much as the next guy in tv dinners i grew up on swanson's tv dinners.

greece swanson
"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"You really serving fintech tuscan food right you're serving american food through a tuscan lens and that's fine but we anytime we start to cook an improvise and us farmers and agriculture in debate about what is this is authentic that's the the american experience of trying to serve encapsulate our own immigrant experience through food and it's a fascinating journey when you start taking that new start listening to everyone else's unique story about how they do that and what they do and and i i met some really incredible people through writing this book and foods that i you know admittedly didn't know a lot about you know like nigerian food and cambodian food which just opened my eyes to to not only the food but also the stories behind the people who are making this food that are trying to preserve this food for generations speaking of nigerian you point out that even in nigeria there's an argument over what is nigerian food and you seem to have this you mentioned a word fusion that you seem to have a lot of sort of wouldn't say negative feelings about what you're pretty snarky about it and there's another word that you don't particularly like offensive is one of them and the other one is appearance if all those things don't belong in food you know all of food is a collective matchup right so my problem with fusion is all that's fusion cuisine i'm like what name me a cuisine that isn't right so if uson is is amalgam of different cultures that influence a food the name me one cuisine that's not influenced by its neighbors and it's not influenced by its cultural surroundings all food is fusion all food is a is a cultural mash up so to say that one thing is more correct as as a mash up another thing is fused to me it's it's very it has cultural claims that i don't like and it's the same thing with authentic right in pure it's like what's often people always ask me oh is this thing to korean food and saying i don't know what what what timeline are you talking about you know in one hundred years ago there were no chili peppers two hundred years ago there was no beef in korea so when you talk about kimchi and you know korean barbecue if you're going back to hundred years those are not offensive korean foods so really authentic is just a question of what time period in the history of this culture are you referring to and that's the only thing that there isn't authenticity when i look at you know the american south which i collect a lot of vintage southern cookbooks well there's there's depending on what time period you are you are looking at very very european food or food that's very very influenced by african american heritage or foods that are very paula deen esque if you will and right now in the south you're experiencing this explosion of sort of what we call the immigrant south or global foods influencing southern cuisine all of these relevant it's just what what you talk about when.

fintech tuscan one hundred years two hundred years hundred years
"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"Map of of edward least travels for us how did you pick your so some of it you know obviously along the way in the south of just encountered so many different stories in one of the things i tell people's like food is is nothing without people right and people are nothing without stories and so every where i travel people in because i'm chef and i right people are always trying to recommend places for me to eat or or you know recommend chest to meet and so i despite what people may think actually do listen and catalog these things and i keep him ahead and so i have this like log of all these places that i want to visit and it's not always the fancy places and so what was interesting is when i wrote a cookbook for years is the first cookbook that i wrote and while i was on smoking pickles yes smoking pickles while i was on tour for that i ate a lot right and what's interesting being on bookstore which is different from sort of normal traveling is that you're in a different city every day and so you really see the stark differences in cultures of different cities right so i could be i could be in minneapolis one day in new orleans the next in seattle you know day from from there so one of the things that occurred to me was as i'm eating all this regional food and sort of looking at american culture i mean people in new orleans do not eat the way people in minneapolis do or people in southern california do or upstate new york or denver and so i started to think and asked myself this question like from from cuisine standpoint what binds us together as americans would what's american food because there's nothing there's nothing in the food and the spices that binds seattle to to austin right so what is it that that i can come up with that mix one definition one category to say hey this is why this is all american food and that question kind of just started eating away at me and that's really that was the seed of writing this book was was as i was traveling through all these cities and getting all these collecting all these stories and recommendation i started eating all these places and i don't know if there are other listeners out there that eat the way i do but judging from what you wrote in this book i can't imagine anyone eating i mean you eat enormous amounts of food that this isn't a hobby for me this is like this is the death sport you know i i have to eat until that that belt buckle starts to pop like there's no i don't stop when i'm full so was impressive i mean respect yeah it's it's a lot of you know it's the worst thing about it is actually not finishing something that you find absolutely delicious because you know you have three meals ahead of you like that's the hardest part of of the kind of eating than i do that's rough roughly heart bleeds for you but you do essence we're on this story of what is american you ask in them quoting here what do we lose when we become americans does everything have to be assimilated to be american can we learn to respect the distinct lines of culture that does not want to be us did you get answers to that yes or no i have no answers i'm just i'm just showing stories but i will say yeah we lose something the longer we stay here as as you know newcomers to this country right i always tell the story of my my mom came here from from korean and we moved to brooklyn so it wasn't a very crew neighbor and she had to go to a jamaican spice store to get the chili flakes that she wanted for her kimchi because that was the closest thing to occur intially flake and you know in that little moment you know she was improvising right it wasn't traditional or wasn't authentic and i always like to tease my mom and say hey mom you were the first fusion chef you never know it backhands me but but that's what we do right we come here and we try and mimic the food from our homeland but we can't quite find ingredients where we can't quite have the the pots pans panzer the queant that we want temperatures different agriculture's different so we improvise so we do what we can and along the way we meet people we marry other people and we start.

edward one day
"american food" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"american food" Discussed on 1A

"The npr one app or wherever you get your podcasts chef edward lee welcome to one a thanks for having me we should begin with the title right because it needs some explaining the title is buttermilk graffiti why you gotta read the book but it's so basically i have two identities right i grew up in brooklyn new york in canarsie and i grew up the son of korean immigrants and i grew up a city kid and i that's where i started cooking in all my earliest jobs were in restaurants in new york city and i was i was the quintessential new york city cool kid and then i decided to move to the south and i you know i have no connection to the south i knew no one there except one of my business partners and i decided to take over a restaurant louisville kentucky and i did it on a whim i guess when you're young you kind of do things like that without thinking too much and i and i love country music and i loved fried chicken but i didn't really know a lot about southern food and so i went down there and and i fell in love with kentucky and i fell in love with southern food and i fell in love with a woman who's now my wife from there and and to me that sort of completed my journey or my identity and so the the the book is although a travel log of food it's also part memoir and so the buttermilk sort of is the iconic southern part of me and the graffiti is is the other part of me that grew up in brooklyn but it sounds like you used to at least dabble in graffiti and at one point you say you exchange your spray paint spray paint cans for kitchen knives this that was a terrible graffiti artist you mean that you are terrible at it i was yes i was terrible at it you have to have a certain set of artistic skills which i didn't know but but you know when i was thirteen right like being a poor kid in brooklyn you didn't have many options right i didn't have a paint set so so to me this thing that was underground and derelict and dangerous and artistic was fascinating to me and for a kid like that it was the first contact that i had with something creative with something you know with with a bond with people that were different right these were my first friends outside of you know my parents relatives and so that was a very important formative time for me when i realized that i could really go to serious jail for doing it is there an serious jail find something else to do in life and i was fifteen and i got my first job as a busboy in a busy fancy new york city restaurant and you know the the waiters were rock musicians on the side and the witcher were all trying to be models and the cooks were all you know speaking foreign languages and everyone was a bad ass and i just thought you know and my second day on the job i made a cappuccino for michelle pfeiffer who you know back then was was at the pinnacle and unrealized like this is all i ever wanted to do in life and and that was it and i never looked back so this is a part memoir how did you choose where you went to one of our producers made a.

npr
"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"All of them based on surreal concepts in his oscarnominated film the lobster single people are given forty five days to find a mate and if they failed they are turned into an animal of their choosing his latest movie the killing of a sacred dear a doctor play by colin farrell is confronted by the son of a former patient who tells them each of the doctor's family members will die a slow mysterious death unless the doctor kills one of them the effect on the movie gore as you can imagine is occasional queasiness when i spoke with your goes i asked him if that was his intention the uneasiness you're describing it i think it's one of the most interesting conditions in situations to being when you're watching something or listening to something that you're not really sure if you're supposed to be laughing about something if it's inappropriate trying to recognize the the limits to how far you can go if it's something you've never thought of before i find that quite engaging in sex but he keeps you alerts about things here only chanced in bali hou jie attached he's which thoroughfares how long does it take for the hair to go back at all a month equals you sent me that you've got lots of hair on your arms three times more than idea and that guy very harry back in very harry valley i probably do have a little more hair than you do because a motivating.

colin farrell harry valley forty five days
"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"Welcome back the dinner party download the arts and leisure section of public radio i'm brendan france's newnham i'm rico gagliano in a few minutes director yiorgos lengthy most talks about his new film starring colin farrell nicole kidman and a whole lot of privy music and very uncomfortable situations sounds like a dream but first speaking of other uncomfortable situations this time to learn how to resolve them vr our weekly etiquette segment yes each week you said in your questions about how to behave sometimes we ask them to wildly unqualified celebrities but once a month or so we are joined by to people who've got manners in their very marrow busy posted daniel knows sending are the great great grandkids of emily post they are also coauthors of emily posts etiquette the 19th addition and they host the podcast awesome etiquette and some of our listeners know by now we're going to be airing the final episode of the show later this year lizzy and dan welcome back for a final go round we were doing the math it's been six years since we first hand you want it's realm my gosh i thought it had only been no now we're all older than that it turns out i'm said i wanted to say that we love our our time with you has been a really special thing both for dan in me as experts at one brand talking to a couple hosts said another and also just personally we have loved getting to know you your audience the day that we've heard the first email that said can you save this for the posts we were so honored all i feel like roberto the you are all part of the family although i was a little offended when we've got the first email asking for the post advice mike reid you can't find their address on the internet maybe you've already answered the question that we wanted opposed you which.

brendan france rico gagliano nicole kidman daniel lizzy dan mike reid director colin farrell emily roberto six years
"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"Awesome look at them all right hello can you tell us your name and i'm beth delay and i work with sean i'm a writer i worked with china on the cut book all right exa well that's what we're talking about here it's a beautiful book congratulations thank you very much where did these come from should i tell him or your whole foods they did all right bill we were just at the culinary institute of arts in hyde park and we did a lot of forging around the river valley there on there's a lot of obviously beautiful fresh plants out there so there's a lot of there was a lot of cool stuff to grab and beth just came from their smells amazing you brought the cedar for the oaks do but also you brought some other bounty can you tell us what you have i i found this beautiful main seaweed and some of it comes from massachusetts along the coast in from new hampshire so we have dolce we have dose flakes we have noory and then we have larger dulce these are at the pumpkin seeds all right does the tail wag the dog here sometimes in that you find a group of ingredients that you like and then you're like all right while work backwards to figure out a menu we're just really interested in all the cool flavors around so sensor on the east coast and we're doing this dinner at the james beard house where we're featuring the indigenous flavors of manhattan we were really just trying to find foods of around eur so not only the wild foods that are all over in the ocean foods and i'm also the you know looking for some of these seeds that have been in these regions for thousands of years to so no hot dogs though for the men had no high dogs knowhow dog water.

writer china hyde park river valley massachusetts new hampshire manhattan sean culinary institute of arts beth james beard house eur
"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"While the bigger ones that people can identify that we removed are the dairy though wheat flour the process sugar the beef the pork the chicken so you know just understanding indigenous food systems research where two people get salts where the people what kind of fats are people using so we're lucky to have pieces like these ones yeah so let's look at what we have laid out here this is a beautiful orange squashes at a squash yup so this is called a buffalo creek squash and this is probably like a 25 pounds squash and there's some really cool varieties in this is just one example and we have these which are white corns and his yeah they look like um they don't like your classic corn colonel there's less colonels on the cob there are they dried yup these are dryden you can always tell the native stocks because the indigenous corn varieties have much less rose you know you look at the gmo crops and the monsanto crops and they have like up to 26 rosa coroner something insane and and these look more like british teeth then article or yellow and there's dark suit between this basis i'm not going there but i can i i've i represent the english tribe pera and now we're moving over to the protein here so i know this is not beef we got elk so elk used to flourish share but it became extinct in the east coast probably in the late 1800s what are you marinade this elkan m so we have some rose cepsa some of the stuff that we have so we have made people have rose dipped suit got some of the sun pharisees you've got some of the dried corn we're gonna actually put some cedar bows in there to organise slows through this for a long time so it's going to cook for probably eighteen hours that are really low temperature.

monsanto eighteen hours 25 pounds
"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

The Dinner Party Download

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The Dinner Party Download

"I just chose to be straight right now i was talking to you i as a choice so no longer less town i love man and i can't wait to kiss a big harry bearded man now may have my stepfather's are in place i am not steve well i disagree masing in again coming from a place of of real pain you know me about the genesis of that same where does it come from well stephanie my wife and i we go to mississippi a lot and from my father's memorial we were getting a hotel room outside of any sort of major city in this little tiny area town and when we were checking in lear really having that realization that we had no rights and we could be kicked out of our hotel room and there have been no place to go we it's not like he could go to the police and complain about this you really are unsafe and i also thought about how interesting it is once you are gay or realize that you are in you've acted on it and you've come out or maybe you haven't even come out people have heard that you are i i used to think about that all the time i go people no i'm gay somehow nobody saw it happen that they they know they now i'm gay word is out there are with spares and then it's like i can just go oh i'm not gave right now right this minute i'm just decided not to do it it it amuses me that halfway through a conversation acting like you know what i'm not gonna in.

steve mississippi lear
"american food" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

The World of Phil Hendrie

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on The World of Phil Hendrie

"But african american food and we're cabin uh your leyla cloma a getty what is chila by mexican uh being you mean chile boy a julie chu leila is actually the way that you're you're from my honour from my understanding and what else are you say spaghetti i'm sorry i i learn how to the general giving you don't general you think other sympathize with it people want to show a picture you want to what your you probably called dacuda gutty well i did but instead of your business well it make it on my bed but all right guys making at your business all right chris tell us about that you're working on right now it also this thing the film that you're doing giving have to let people know it was based on your your inspired by the football game and the buckeye pakorn about other in a book i was playing that i went height band at all like i could think about it and they go yeah we'll the book i swear you know the book i swam the corner and i'm like are you serious what did you think that senator filthy young black a really good name adult film no i'm not trying to go abroad to it'll but but cleric lambda let's watch with the blood pirate thing okay i'm sorry are you saying because the called cornhuskers that somehow you you're going to get suit on not going to get the food i'm trying i'm trying to determine and or the corner you could call their athletic department say hey are you guys in the anal sex oh my god you're going to be suit well this is what this guys isn't that what you get met i'm not to to get it nothing with their henry one trying to figure in the corner.

chris cornhuskers chile football senator henry
"american food" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Welcome back to america in the morning in new york city nathan's hot dog eating contest is always a crowdpleaser on the fourth are steve cast inbound spoke with the reigning champ on tuesday thousands of people will head to cody island to celebrate the nation's birthday with the quintessential american food the hot dog the gather on surf avenue in front of nathan's famous to watch a group of men and women stuff their faces with dozens of hot dogs and buttons i'm in a weird state of like a constant earnestness honda that's joey jaws chest none the ninth time and current reigning champion of nathan's annual fourth of july hotdog eating contest he holds the record of seventy hot dogs in bonds in ten minutes it may seem like a completely ridiculous and disgusting competition but it's serious business for chest none he and the other committees editors work out their jaws stomachs throughout the year by practising consuming massive quantities of food in short bursts of time i love it i love the preparation i look wish my body the new limits and empanel tension in what's working and and what let's not to followers of competitive eating joey is the great american hero that's because in 2009 he became a legend by beating takehiro kobayashi of japan he brought the mustardyellow championship belt back to america as amazing i never imagined that i would have fares but chest nut is not invincible george shea is the comical host of the contest let's all remember noone thought kobayashi could be beaten noone except for joey and in two thousand and seven he beat him then he beat him again and he beat him again he beat him like the bear beats leonardo dicaprio and the revenue he beat him bat chest not lost the belt wants to mets doni who will also be on the stage on tuesday she says this contest is a true test of estelle fortitude view think and let me throw this out there that with the nation as divided as it is today that joey chestnut can bring the left and right together on the fourth of july i will say this joey chestnut is a hero to both the left and the right to conservatives progressives to protrump anti trump this that the other he is a hero to everybody on the.

america nathan cody island takehiro kobayashi japan george shea leonardo dicaprio joey chestnut new york steve ten minutes
"american food" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"american food" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"1040 who out of give you a quick tour of the draft which to give me an idea of the lights that we go through to keep you safe and save you valuable time on the roads there are a lot of electronic computer monitors scanners microphones wires and switches i listen to the scanners constantly to get information and warned police and fire polk county sheriff the iowa state the in law enforcement all over central i four video monitors in front of me give me access to over sixty traffic cameras just in the metro along so i can give you a heads up slowdowns but i think the most valuable tool in here is this if the traffic tip line who listeners call a summit to fly with information about problem areas many times before i ever hear about it on the skin view our our secret weapon so if you see a problem palming on the tip life through four four to eight thick and remember for traffic and weather on the fives every morning and afternoon leave it right here on news radio 1040 who who jio welcome back to america in the morning in new york city nathan's hotdog eating contest is always a crowdpleaser on the fourth are steve cast inbound spoke with the reigning champ on tuesday thousands of people will head to coney island to celebrate the nation's birthday with the quintessential american food the hotdog gather on surface avenue in front of nathan's famous to watch a group of men and women their faces with dozens of hot dogs and buttons i'm in a weird state of like a concert nervousness in ready on us that's joey jaws chest none the ninth time in current reigning champion of nathan's annual fourth of july hotdog eating contest he holds the record of seventy hot dogs in bonds in ten minutes it may seem like a completely ridiculous and disgusting competition but it's serious business for chest none he and the other competitors workout their jaws and stomachs throughout the year by practising consuming massive quantities of food in short bursts of time i love it i love the preparation i look wish my body to the new limits and and paying attention and i've audiences in with working and and with with not to followers of.

america nathan polk county iowa law enforcement new york steve coney island ten minutes