35 Burst results for "American Express"

North Korea Suggests ‘Alien Things’ From the South Brought Covid

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

North Korea Suggests ‘Alien Things’ From the South Brought Covid

"North Korea is offering a new explanation for how COVID-19 might have gotten there I'm Ben Thomas with this story North Korean state media is suggesting its COVID-19 outbreak began in people who had contact with balloons flown from South Korea activists have flown balloons across the border for years to distribute propaganda leaflets in North Korea has expressed fury at South Korea's leadership for not stopping them Global health authorities of course say the virus is spread by people in close contact who

North Korea Ben Thomas South Korea
Uvalde officials and parents are frustrated by the lack of information

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

Uvalde officials and parents are frustrated by the lack of information

"Parents and local officials expressed their frustration with the blackout on information about the investigation into the school shooting in uvalde Texas I've got nothing Mayor Don McLaughlin and the uvalde town council met Thursday evening with angry townsfolk who have not been kept informed by state investigators or the district attorney about the May 24th shooting that left 19 students to teachers and the 18 year old gunman dead inside rob elementary school Know exactly what happened in there but they have a gag order to keep their mouth shut But what about us What about us I agree You should know before anybody In this also from KSA team McLaughlin says I can't even tell you with anybody now and here and tell you who's in charge of the investigation because I don't know I'm Tim

Mayor Don Mclaughlin Uvalde Town Council Uvalde Rob Elementary School Texas Mclaughlin TIM
SCOTUS Rules the EPA Can No Longer Dictate Environmental Policy

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:13 min | 3 d ago

SCOTUS Rules the EPA Can No Longer Dictate Environmental Policy

"News is that the Supreme Court has ruled 6 to three. That the EPA has overstepped its authority. The Supreme Court limits the power of the EPA environmental protection association or agency, sorry, and other regulatory agencies. High court says agency overstepped its authority and restricting greenhouse gas emissions in a ruling with ramifications for other regulators. From The Wall Street Journal. The Supreme Court on Thursday that's today curtailed the Environmental Protection Agency's powers to restrict greenhouse gas emissions from power plants in a decision that could limit the authority of government agencies to address major policy questions without congressional approval. The Supreme Court doesn't believe that the government can do whatever it wants without the will of the people as expressed through Congress. That is a radical idea to the left, the left and if you don't understand this, then you don't understand the great battle of the last 100 years.

Supreme Court Epa Environmental Protection A Environmental Protection Agenc Authority Of Government High Court The Wall Street Journal Government Congress
Why Dennis Was Very Moved at a Recent Daily Wire Event

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:04 min | 3 d ago

Why Dennis Was Very Moved at a Recent Daily Wire Event

"Last night, 3000 people, the vast majority of whom were young. In other words, I would say under 35. Certainly under 40. To the great credit of daily wire that sponsored the event that's the Ben Shapiro organization. 3000 people. Again, mostly young. And Ben and his daily wire are associates all terrific guys, many of whom have been guests on my show, had a dialog. Then there was intermission. Then I was introduced, we Ben and I spoke, then we had Jordan Peterson, he was introduced. The people did not expect the people did not expect me, and they did not, they did not expect Jordan, so there was a real eruption of sentiment that applause. It was very, I was very moved in both cases for myself and for Jordan. So then Candace Owens was a Candace Owens. I forgot to mention, was there from the beginning. So yeah, I'm going to ask a good question, Sean asks if there's a video you can watch. You would love it. You would truly love it. I mean, Jordan Peterson Ben Shapiro, Candace Owens, myself, and three, four of his top people at daily wire. It was one of those moments where one of my personal attitudes was expressed itself. And that is, there are two types of temperaments, those who people who want to be stars from those who want to be on an all star team. My own temperament is I want to be on an all star team. So I felt that I was on one last night, and it was, it was a wonderful experience

Candace Owens Jordan Peterson Ben Shapiro Organization BEN Jordan Ben Shapiro Sean
Brit Hume Rips January 6 'TV Production' Hearing

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

02:26 min | 3 d ago

Brit Hume Rips January 6 'TV Production' Hearing

"Let's start with Britt Hume. Last night on Fox News with Brett bear, I said grab this because he is slamming the Nancy Pelosi one 6 committee after the hearsay testimony of miss Hutchinson cutting them 11. What it did do now that the testimony is being challenged is it shows why it's not a good idea to put witnesses on that without any cross examination or any viewpoints expressed from the other side of the issue when there is another side and certainly it is in this case. This is what the committee has decided it will do. It will put on a TV production, which is what it has done. And it seems to have tripped itself up on that because the testimony is now being disputed openly by the Secret Service. First of all, I said the beast, but it was the smaller Secret Service SUV, but either way, how does this happen in a committee that's that scripted and that laying all of this methodically out, they call this surprise hearing and then they trip on this and it opens the door to critics of the committee from the beginning. Well, I think it's consistently what the committee has done though. When you think about it, they'll call witnesses before the committee and the witness will be sitting there and then the committee will proceed to play excerpts from the deposition, the video deposition of the same witness. It's a very peculiar way to proceed. You know, I've been around Washington a while. I covered the hill for a long time. I don't remember any committee where all the members were chosen by one party, even the minority parties representatives. And they're all on the same page. They all agree. Well, if you don't have any dissenting voices, this is the kind of thing going to happen. Some mistake. After two of the congressmen were turned down, then the minority leader walked away, but it still does not have any pushback. And where does it go from here? No, you need that to have credibility. You need that. And so does it have credibility at the end, do you think? Well, if this blows up, this sensational testimony, which I don't think advanced the ball on the committee's main thesis. But this testimony which everybody was in rhapsody is over yesterday, blows up and has found to be seriously contested and in doubt, I think that will damage the credibility of the committee and his final work product, whatever that may be. Of course, always right

Britt Hume Brett Bear Miss Hutchinson Nancy Pelosi Fox News Secret Service Washington
Russia and China slam NATO after alliance raises alarm

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 3 d ago

Russia and China slam NATO after alliance raises alarm

"China's expressed major concerns over NATO's tenure strategic concept seeing it wrongly defines China as a threat to global stability Speaking to reporters in Beijing the Chinese government spokesman says the strategic concept smears China's foreign policy makes irresponsible remarks on China's normal military development and defense policy and his site's confrontation and antagonism describing NATO as a systemic challenge warns of the blocks attempt to export the Cold War mentality and replicate block confrontation in the Asia Pacific region I'm Charles De

China Chinese Government Nato Beijing Asia Pacific Charles De
Capitol riot commitee and former Vice President Mike Pence

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 d ago

Capitol riot commitee and former Vice President Mike Pence

"The House committee investigating the January 6th attack on the U.S. capitol may push to get former vice president Mike Pence to testify In her testimony to the January 6th committee Cassidy Hutchinson former top aide to then White House chief of staff Mark Meadows talked about preparation to block the certification of electoral votes for now president Joe Biden She recalled a conversation she had with Meadows days before the 6th in which he expressed his concerns Things might get real real bad on January 6th Hutchinson also talked to president Trump's apparent disregard for vice president Mike Pence's safety as rioters stormed the building Committee chair representative Benny Thompson Will know that some people in The White House actually knew that there were people breaking into the capitol who wanted to do physical harm to him Thompson says he hopes that information could help Pence decide to meet with the committee Tim McGuire Washington

Cassidy Hutchinson Mike Pence Mark Meadows House Committee President Trump White House Joe Biden Benny Thompson U.S. Meadows Hutchinson Thompson Pence Tim Mcguire Washington
Naomi Osaka Offends Swahili Speakers

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:45 min | 6 d ago

Naomi Osaka Offends Swahili Speakers

"Naomi Osaka, the kind of player who is just a real big pain in the ass. I like to fire up cross court shot of her face, Naomi Osaka announced last week that she's partnered with LeBron James company Spring Hill to start a new media company. A media company from the girl who doesn't want to talk to the media. And you explain that to me? Naomi Osaka expressed the hope that it would produce TV shows and documentaries and branded content. Again, this is the fraud who doesn't like attention thrust on her. This is the woman who had to step away from competitive tennis for her mental health sake. She said, and then she went on to do a few magazine covers and went to the Met ball in New York City, dressed like a fucking peacock with feathers in her hair. Don't believe anything she says. Now get this, the name of a new venture, she called it Hannah kuma, what she said means flower bear in Japanese. Hold that, hold it because it didn't take long for the Japanese Haitian Osaka to discover, oh, that phrase has another meaning in Swahili in Swahili. I'm not even sure why we care about this Swahili content, but it's why Healy it translates to women with that of a giant. Let's not forget there are 200 million people who speak Swahili, which is the majority of East Africa. So dozens of losers on Twitter in Africa piled on her and they begged her, they urged Osaka to this reconsider that name. They called it offensive. Of course they did. Of course they did. Everybody's offended now by something.

Naomi Osaka Spring Hill Lebron James Hannah Kuma Tennis Osaka New York City Healy East Africa Twitter Africa
Confusion on Why Officers Didn't Breach Uvalde Classroom

The Dan Bongino Show

01:12 min | Last week

Confusion on Why Officers Didn't Breach Uvalde Classroom

"Here's another takeaway from this Texas tribune article Multiple DPS officers up to 8 at one point entered the building at various times where the shooter was hold up Many quickly left to pursue other duties Including evacuating children after seeing the number of officers already there At least one of the officers expressed confusion and frustration about why the officers weren't breaching the classroom But he was told that no water to do so had been given Folks you don't have any other duty When there is an active shooter in a targeted violence scenario you're only duty is to take that shooter out That is your duty Second and third comes all of the other stuff They're all important evacuating people triage taking care of victims trying to save lives your number one job Based on standard training right now is to take that threat out not wait for an order to do so Time equals death A more time they're on that scene Death will result That's why they changed everything after

Texas Tribune DPS Confusion
Washington Commanders' Coach Fined $100K for Asking a Question!

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Washington Commanders' Coach Fined $100K for Asking a Question!

"You see the story over the weekend? Of the Washington commanders head coach. Is that the, that's the new Redskins name, right? I don't even keep, who cares? They're so woke. They can't call themselves the Redskins anymore. So now they're the Washington commanders. So they have a defensive coordinator named Jack Del Rio. He said, in a tweet, he compared. I mean, let me read to you what this guy said and what he got in trouble over. The coach, the assistant coach responded to a story on Twitter about the January 6th committee hearings, and he wrote, would love to understand the whole story about why the summer of riots looting, burning, and the destruction of personal property is never discussed, but this is. And then the next day, reporters asked him about it, and he said, I asked a simple question, let's get right down to it. What did I ask? A simple question. Why are we not looking into those things? If we're not going to talk about it, why are we not looking into those things? People's livelihoods are being destroyed, businesses are being burned down. No problem. Now these are points that everybody makes, right? Do you know he got fined a $100,000 for saying that? Do you know that the head coach of the Washington commanders Ron Rivera proudly announced yesterday or two days ago or Friday? That Jack Del Rio had been fined 100 thousand dollars for expressing a belief that if we're going to be fixated on January 6th, how about we talk about all the riots that engulfed American cities after George Floyd?

Redskins Jack Del Rio Washington Twitter Ron Rivera George Floyd
Democrats Have Pivoted to Talking About Trump's 'Big Lie'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:55 sec | 2 weeks ago

Democrats Have Pivoted to Talking About Trump's 'Big Lie'

"Bill Maher makes it about what they call the big lie. And this is something that they've sort of pivoted to. They've gone from he incited the insurrection, first of all, some insurrection, the coup, the violence, the riot. And there's no doubt there was lots of violence that day. But they've gone from, I think, more and more people realize, wait a minute, he said, go peacefully protest. He didn't incite them with that. So now they're moving on to, since he continues to deny that Biden is the legitimate winner, that's criminal. Well, listen, in their world, you're not allowed to express opinions that they don't like. That is criminal in their mind. They'd like to lock you up.

Bill Maher Biden
Washington Commanders' Jack Del Rio Fined for Jan. 6 Comments

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Washington Commanders' Jack Del Rio Fined for Jan. 6 Comments

"The head coach of the Washington commanders of course they command nothing Put out a statement today that's Ron Rivera About coach Del Rio Del Rio was a fantastic football player He was a coach in his own right It's a very good man as a matter of fact So they need to destroy him So he says at a press conference Something he's not allowed to say He went against the mouse program I believe in equity I believe in social justice I believe in environmental justice I'm a white supremacist I agree with everything they tell me to say January 6th was worse Than the Attack on Pearl Harbor So the head coach the Washington commanders Ron Rivera puts out the following statement This morning I met with coach Del Rio to express how disappointed I am in his comments on Wednesday His comets do not reflect the organization's views and are extremely hurtful to our great community here in the DMV That would be Washington Maryland and Virginia More like the DMZ As we saw last night in the hearings is this guy a football coach As we saw last night in the hearings what did we see last night coach Rivera What happened on the capitol on January 6th was an act of domestic terrorism

Ron Rivera Del Rio Del Rio Washington Football Pearl Harbor Del Rio DMV Maryland Virginia Rivera
Maj Toure Analyzes Matthew McConaughey's Visit to the White House

The Dan Bongino Show

01:45 min | 3 weeks ago

Maj Toure Analyzes Matthew McConaughey's Visit to the White House

"Yeah I'm not with it at all And it's smart of the opposition It's smart McConaughey I think is from Yuval day if I'm not mistaken I think he's from that part of Texas Nonetheless it's a smart move by the opposition to get a charming guy a convincing guy to do this thing There's a movie called the devil's advocate with Al Pacino And Keanu Reeves are on a train And he's telling him like oh you're like southern slick They see you coming And he's like me you know I'm the hand under the dress of the Mona Lisa They never see me coming These guys like Matthew McConaughey Bill Gates These types of guys they're like the super nerd that you oh man he's not a threat Or he is super charming Actors generally not all because I have friends that are actors and actresses Generally there's a certain level of Hollywood like sociopathic thing here Like your ability to act as a character he's the same guy that was in free state of Jones somehow that means that we have to listen to you and your intelligence or acting ability translates into intelligence And it doesn't And he is allowed to be as charming and cool and witty and all of that is he wants to be in The White House is allowed to I don't know why but have this actor in there this prescribing what our policy should be but while he's free to do that that has absolutely no bearing on my life and my ability to defend myself my family and my community And I think people need to remind that the left has the right to be as dumb and foolish as they want to be They can express themselves that way They can hire paid guys with armed security details to do to say that we shouldn't have firearms and we are free to completely ignore them and hopefully catch their next movie where they're pretending all over again

Yuval Mcconaughey Al Pacino Keanu Reeves Matthew Mcconaughey Mona Lisa Bill Gates Texas Hollywood Jones White House
 3 dead in Bulgaria as passenger train hits truck at crossing

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 3 weeks ago

3 dead in Bulgaria as passenger train hits truck at crossing

"State police say the people who died range in age from 19 to 73 and that the crash happened when the van driver failed to yield while crossing U.S. 65 about a hundred miles southeast of Little Rock the truck at collided with was hauling cooking oil Both the van driver and the truck driver were injured the van belonged to CB king memorial school which services people with developmental delays or disabilities in a statement the school said we don't have the words right now to express our pain I'm Julie

State Police Cb King Memorial School Little Rock U.S. Julie
Dr. Chris Martenson Shares an Update on Monkeypox

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:25 min | 3 weeks ago

Dr. Chris Martenson Shares an Update on Monkeypox

"Doctor Chris Martin is a toxicologist, pathologist, and founder of peak prosperity, a great website, and strategic advisory council member at the unity project, doctor martinson, welcome back to the program. Charlie, it's so good to be back here with you today. I enjoy your website. I want to ask you a little about economics too later in our conversation. But kind of off the bat here, what is going on with this monkeypox deal? Why is the media all up in arms over it? And what should we know that the media is not telling us about monkeypox? Well, this is a big manufactured sort of fear hysteria thing. They're just riding on the wave of the last virus and the turn in the same crank, I think. From an actual health standpoint, what do we know about this? There's 1100 cases worldwide, but looks like it might have been circulating for a while and it looks like it mostly only transmits between humans who have very close contact, which they've chased us down to a couple of raves in as well. It looks like gay sex seems to be a strong way to get this passed along. So it's not expressing itself like we saw with a respiratory virus, which passes easily in asymptomatically somewhat between people with a very high what's called an R nought. This thing doesn't transmit all that easily. In fact, it seems like it should be not that hard to avoid. Because it only passes with people who are symptomatic, hopefully in this day and age we know not to engage in close behaviors with people or

Peak Prosperity Monkeypox Chris Martin Martinson Charlie
A highlight from Who Loves Who First?

Live Behind The Veil

11:55 min | Last month

A highlight from Who Loves Who First?

"Welcome to live behind the veil and atmosphere where men and women of God speak his word to this age and bring his kingdom to this earth. Do you have ears to hear and eyes to see what God is doing in this hour? Let us join our host and the family's conversation as the Holy Spirit is unfolding. There were behind the veil. God so loved the world. That he gave his only begotten son. I'm Ron your host, and today we bring back to our awareness. That it was our heavenly father who loved us first. And then did something about it. I have a niece, who was adopted from China, and she spent the first ten years ten months of her life in a crib with 7 other kids. Actually, she wouldn't even be allowed to sit up. She was attached to the crib. It took my sister about four years to get her to accept people. It wasn't a mental thing. It was an emotional thing. Where when she went through something, she would just close off, she wouldn't cry. Even as a, as a baby, she wouldn't cry, she just closed up. And when there were too many people around her, she would close up. What happened is, every time she went into this kind of thing, my sister was told, just to put her on her lap on her lap and hug her, really tightly, until she started relating again, and talked to her. That's how she got her out of it, and now she's a normal person. But it was very, very hard. I think what sandy was talking about is very important to realize what was happening to her. Would this be your niece, sandy? Yes, my niece. Because what she was being denied of was communication. Right. And not only was she being denied communication, she was being denied the communication that she needed. You take a little baby like that, they don't know what they need. Their needs are so simple. That they will accept, pretty much whatever you give them. If you give them love, they'll accept it, and they'll return it. If you feed them, they have that need to be fed, but they really don't understand it. They just know if I cry, somebody will come and feed me, or they'll change me. That simple needs that they have, are brought about by communication. And those simple needs need to be conveyed with love. For that child to learn love, because they don't know what love is. And love starts out being oh boy, I feel much better now. I'm not wet. Oh, wow. This pain that I have here in my body, it disappeared from that wonderful stuff. That they gave me. And pretty soon, the child begins to formulate in their mind what love is. Love is something that makes me feel good. Love is something I can return. They can smile, whether it's gas or not believe what you want. The fact that they see you walk up to the crib, or you talk to them or something, they do the best they can to return, and they wiggle and do all kinds of stuff, and they're trying to return the love to you. Pretty soon, a relationship is formed. Right. And that relationship is very precious to a little child. The only one they got. His mom or dad, or the one who comes and feeds them. The one who changes them, the one who comes and gives them attention. I love sandy's story of the success. The success of just loving and finding ways to love the child. You know, another thing that's really cool is she and my sister, she's 24 years old now, and she and my sister have a really, really good relationship. It was established back then. When my sister just held her. What kind of a relationship do they have? As a mother daughter relationship, but it's also a friend relationship. Is it a love relationship? Oh, yes, very much. That's what I was looking for. Okay. I mean, you can be mother and daughter, father and son. Yeah. You can be friends, but there's one step further. Your sister chose to love that little girl. Sister's heart is so big that she was easily imparted to that little girl. Had a little baby knew what she wanted. She wanted to be loved. That's the way our walk with God is. That's a way. That's why God overlooks all the crap we throw up. You know? Yeah. Isn't that the truth? Can we count on his love? Yeah. That's true. It's really good. You know, you get into actual scripture and kind of a description of what John three 16 is really talking about here in the fact that God so loved us. That he did something about it. Your sister, sandy, could have neglected that child. And God could have neglected us. You know, and just let us go by our wayside. Right. But he loved us so much, that he provided a way for us to be connected with him. You know, it was him giving his son, his only son. To die for us, may sound like something you've heard a 100,000 times, which is really true, it really is the heart of the father and how much he loves us. What I love also is James talks about you can not love without loving from the father. The love that you expressed that your sister had towards your niece is exactly that love of the lord. Your niece has a relationship with your sister. You can't ask for anything else. If you look at galatians 5, it talks about the two sides of things. How the works of the flesh, and then the gifts of the spirit. Well, if you read through those, every one of those the good and bad of it is somebody has to do something in order to make those function. Spirit of the spirit is kindness. You just can't hang on to it. You have to give it to somebody. You have to be kind. Or if you're going to be jealous, you're jealous because of something or some one. You can't just sit here and go, I'm going to be jealous today. That's true. You have to have an expression to somebody else. Right. God did it for us. So it behooves us to do the same for someone else. I really love the examples. The example that you have with your sister because it's a reality and it's something that somebody else can relate to. You know, there are atrocities going on in other parts of the world. Where babies are not treated well, you know, we lose a real revelation of the love that the lord has for these children, for all of us. I mean, I don't care if you're a 102 years old or still a child in God's sight. Yeah. And I lose the revelation of the love that he has for each and every individual. So much soul that his son suffered so that we could have access to loving him. Right. Right. There's one thing that sandy was talking about that were all very much aware of and a lot of times people don't want to think about it. And that's who loved to first. And in sandy's case, her sister showed that little girl love first. That's right. You mentioned sandy, the very unique relationship they have now on how strong it is. Mother daughter. They are all bet you best of Friends. Yes, sir. That's because your sister took the initiative to love first. And believe it or not, sports fans, that's what happened to us. God loved us first. I don't think there's anybody that can say, oh yeah, I woke up one morning. I was 6 years old, and I said, you know, God, I really love you. Well, he loved you a long time before you were 6 years old. Yep. He loved us at the foundation of the earth. When we were created. How much time has passed? Till we begin to realize that relationship. And I think that happens when we realize and accept, adoption, the sons. That is part of what your niece experienced from her mother. And little child doesn't know she's adopted, or he's adopted. They just know this person loves me. And as we acknowledge that, we're starting to return to our father what he wants. He wants to be loved because he loved us. Right. And that's called worship. That's how the foundation of our worship is saying God. I receive your love and I give it back to you. Well, today we've seen that our heavenly father was our example on how to love. Let's return his love to him and follow his example by putting into action our love for one another. Experiencing the impartation of God's word through his family is life. As this time in his presence blessed you, then please subscribe to our podcast at live behind the veil dot com. If you would like to contact the family with questions or topics that you would like to discuss, you can email them to living epistles at live behind the veil dot com. Stay connected, tuned in and grow with the family as the lord unveils his word to us live. Behind the video.

Love GOD Relationship Sandy RON China Sister Foundation Of The Earth James John
The story about how the Uvalde gunman entered the school is shifting

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

The story about how the Uvalde gunman entered the school is shifting

"Information is emerging about the unlocked door the gunman walked through to gain access to the school in the shooting and uvalde Texas Law enforcement had initially said that a teacher at rob elementary school propped open an exterior door and that was how the shooter got inside a spokesman for the Texas Department of Public Safety says investigators have now determined that the teacher who has not been identified propped the door open with a rock but then remove The Rock and close the door when she realized there was a shooter on campus but the closed door did not lock The details were confirmed by video surveillance San Antonio attorney Don Flannery told the San Antonio express news She saw him jump the fence with a gun kicked The Rock away and remembers pulling the door closed while telling 9-1-1 that he was shooting

Rob Elementary School Uvalde Texas Department Of Public Saf Texas Don Flannery San Antonio Express News San Antonio
Where Will the Senate Go on Guns?

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:22 min | Last month

Where Will the Senate Go on Guns?

"I got to say on special report last night with Mike Emanuel after then Dominic praised the selection of John cornyn and expressed doubt that anything could happen. I got to say this cut number 11. Hugh, what are your expectations as lawmakers get together to discuss a possible path forward? Well, I want to agree and disagree with Ben Mike. I think John cornyn is the perfect person having served on the state Supreme Court of Texas. I think he also at the consult with Rick Scott, who is governor of Florida. He's now senator from Florida. Passed legislation in the sunshine state in the aftermath of the Parkland massacre. But I do think there is a path forward if expectations center on how do we protect the innocent children like those and you've all against monsters like those that came. And that usually means armed police who are well trained on the campus before the monster arrives. And I think if they follow the model from mad back in the days when the drinking age went to 21, federal dollars in exchange for state legislation, those federal dollars for the police on the campuses, would I think get some states to study seriously. The Florida model and others. But I've got to say, President Biden took us all backwards today by bringing 9 millimeter handguns into the discussion because there is simply no consistent anywhere for denying people the right don't hand that. It doesn't exist.

John Cornyn Mike Emanuel Ben Mike Supreme Court Of Texas Rick Scott Dominic Florida Hugh President Biden
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

17:27 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Begin to face like many if not all companies certainly financial companies, enormous challenges during the financial crisis. Right. This is going to be I have to assume that this was your first not real test as a leader because you had had 9 11 and obviously others before, but this was going to be probably the most challenging business headwinds that you had ever faced. Right. I think for 9 11, it was the emotional challenge for an organization and the world obviously to come to grips with what had happened. But everyone was going through some form of challenge as a result of 9 11. In the financial crisis, that to your point guy was the most significant business challenge because as with some other financial services companies, we could have gone under. But I believe in a crisis you need to look for opportunity because most people panic in a crisis. And you clearly have to focus on the situation at hand because you got to get through that, but what you also need to do is to say, what are the opportunities as a result of the crisis? And what I was committed to was that we were going to selectively invest. And I think what was very, very important is that we were in a situation where we were one of the few financial services companies that did not cut their dividend because I believe that we have an obligation. To our shareholders and our investors. Right. And so we were able to come out of the financial crisis with terrific momentum. There's a narrative that I know that you are aware of. And the story is something like this, oversimplification, but MX comes out of the financial crisis and just guns blazing. Around 2015, the stock is trading at an all time high, $95 a share. You at this point in your career are starting to think about moving on, you've got a potential executive you're grooming to take over Edward Gilligan and this is a year that begins a difficult two year period for American Express for you stock price falls by almost half. You separate with Costco, which was a huge partnership. I mean, they were making big demands, and you said, forget it, we're not going to accommodate these demands. So this partnership is over. And I think it accounted for 8% of Costco's sales. It was a huge, which is yours. And of course, Edward Gilligan, the heir apparent he dies. He has a blood clot in any dies. Talk to me a little bit about that period, 2015 to 2017. Here's how I would characterize it first, most importantly, Ed was a terrific executive and a terrific person. And we'd worked together for 30 years. And we were very, very good friends. And I would not underestimate the shock and the impact of that. But then we had also the Department of Justice. We had a lawsuit there. The Department of Justice had filed against AmEx for violating federal antitrust laws you lose that. Meanwhile, Visa and Mastercard had settled with the Justice Department and AmEx continues to fight. I mean, it's like everything coming at you from different directions at this two year period. On the Justice Department case, we thought we were right. I felt strongly about that. You did not want to settle. I did not want to settle and then fortunately we wanted the Supreme Court level. And I was I feel terrific that we were vindicated. On Costco, I really thought about. I will tell you a guy I could have done a deal with Costco. I could have positioned it very well inside the company and to our investors, but American Express would have felt the impact of that probably 5 years after I left. And I could have said, look, I don't know what happened, my success or just wasn't doing the right thing as far as moving the business forward, and I in fact set to our board exactly that. We could do this deal. to you, but you know me, that is not operating with integrity. I'm not going to do that. And so the important thing on Costco is people begin to see signs of the progress. The stock stabilized began to recover as you know it got back to where it was. And in fact, a little bit above, right before I left. And I think probably there are plenty of people who are kicking themselves that they did not buy the stock at $51. 2015. You got it. You got it. That's why I kept mine. And then, what was very important, we had chase sapphire, which, of course, was a competing premium car to I guess kind of rival that rivaled your premium card, so they were coming at your premium product. That's right. And the reality is people have always been coming after the premium segment. But one of the things that I had a lot of confidence in was our platinum centurion products. And we study our competitors. But one of the things we did, which I think is an important lesson in a values driven business meaning that you understand what your value is to the customer. We actually further increase the value, and as we've done periodically, we increase the fee. What do most people do when they have a competitive incursion with particularly a product that tries to imitate the existing key lower the fee? They lower the rate. No, if you are really a value driven company, focus on building and enduring relationship and you have a differentiated value proposition, that's the power of a brand and a brand is a cluster of values both rational and emotional. And that's what is very important about American expresses are commitment to providing real value and so we were able to increase our fee a $100 from $450 to $550 and produce tremendous results. During that two year period, you did three things that I think many other leaders would not have done. They would have done the opposite. And you could make the argument that that would have been the right decision at the time. You didn't negotiate with Costco. You said, we're not going to settle with the Department of Justice. We're going to fight it. The other company settled, that would have made sense. And the third thing was the chase sapphire card comes out and the competitors come out. Instead of lowering the price on the platinum card, the AmEx, you increase the price, which is actually in some ways a smart psychological tactic is a suggest that there's greater value to it. So always not suggest there was all three of these things are almost counterintuitive, right? They don't seem to come from the traditional playbook of what you do in a crisis. You have proven right in all three of the cases. But I'm wondering, were there people around you who said, you know, Ken, are you sure, you know, we shouldn't negotiate with Costco? Are you sure we shouldn't settle with the DoJ? Are you sure we should raise prices on this card? Sure. I think the reality is in a leadership position, you want to make sure that you have the followership, but what you shouldn't do is, in fact, say, let me make a decision. That is the popular one, or will keep most people happy. That's not your role as a leader. You've got to do what is best for the company. And on Costco, what was very, very clear to me is I would have saddled the company with an uneconomic deal. That would have had real impacts. So the question was and we talked about this very directly with my management team and with the board is that the balance here is taking an expedient way out, which sometimes is the right course of action, but what we recognized is that it would only be a temporary benefit and it would foreclose us very importantly from investing in some very attractive growth opportunities for the company. And so that goes to the importance of courage that I think a leader needs to have. And let me be clear, we were very fortunate. I feel vindicated by the Supreme Court and the DoJ case. But let's be clear, it could have gone the other way. Sure. And so you've got to say, what's the principle and we're going to stand for that principle. But I had more confidence in the fact that we would get through Costco because that was more an hour control. So as challenging as Costco was personally and for the company, one of the points that I made inside the company is we have control of our destiny. Ken, as you know, we're living at a time now where folks like you, CEO, swarmer CEOs, wealthy business leaders and entrepreneurs are less popular. For a variety of reasons. And some well founded, right? There's incredible wealth inequality, despite things like corporate social responsibility and the things that corporations do. And the fact that they employ a lot of people, there are reasons, I think. Legitimate reasons for people to be angry, big companies and Fortune 500. And I wonder in your opinion, you must think about this. You must read oh, absolutely read about this and sort of reflect on your own, where you come from, because you come from a really modest background, and you went on to lead one of the biggest companies in the world. And I wonder how you sort of think about that and what you think needs to sort of be done differently and happen differently. Corporations are paying lower taxes now under the new regime and so on. So I just wonder what do you think about these times where we're kind of living in? From a corporation standpoint, it goes to the philosophy that I think people need to have is if you really want to build an enduring company, you want a stronger society and I really believe and part of it maybe is my aspirations growing up in the 50 60s and 70s, but I really believe that corporations exist because society allows us to exist. There's no entitlement that corporations should be able to operate. So if that's the case, I think we all have a responsibility and an obligation to help improve society and so companies need to determine what their responsibility is, and I think one of the things that needs to take place is a reframing of responsibility. Look, this is not just an issue for technology companies. Technology clearly is changing the world and I think we need a reframing of what the responsibilities are of companies and I think here's my view. Every company has values that they want their people. To adhere to and strive for. No one's perfect. Mistakes will be made, but the reality is, I would say simply hold the president to the same standards that you would hold someone who is on your board, someone who is in your top management or someone who was an employee at your company. If we tolerate and we all know in any organization if you tolerate people who don't operate with core values, that will damage the fabric of your organization. One of the things guy be useful to talk about general catalyst. Yeah, please, please do so. And I guess I should mention Joe kettles of venture capital firm that you began working for after leaving American Express. That's right. And one of the things that I was very excited about in my next chapter is I really wanted to be on the forefront with people who are going to change the world. Through technology and services and I was fortunate that the two founders of general catalysts who I've known for over 20 years, they also shared we were very aligned in our values. And we've developed a mission for general catalyst, which is to invest in positive powerful change that endures for Trump and war founders are investors or people and society. And I've loved it. I've also feel very strongly that diversity for technology companies and in the VC sector has been very, very poor and that's something I'm very focused on. And I also believe that most founders want to build enduring companies and so I really like working with founders right at the beginning of what are the values you want to put in your company as well as what the value proposition is that really is going to be a powerful one that's going to drive tremendous growth. And I've seen a high level of receptivity to that. And there's one company that we recently invested in called Guild Education that I think has the potential to transform workforce education. And so just as I believe a company, one of the things I always said at AmEx was innovator die. There's really not a choice. I'm now that's what I'm doing. And it is absolutely fantastic. So I mean, you get to AmEx, what is it that you were able to do? I mean, do you if you were sort of step on a balcony and look down at all of the executives, what are some of the qualities that you developed that helped you in the confidence of the team around you to put you at the top of the company? I really do think first and foremost is people really believe that I care about them. And I want to make a positive difference in their life, and that I want to win. And I want to win with values and what was very, very important is to be able to build trust. One of the things I always say to leaders is a real leader, shares the credit, but takes the blame. But I would say guy the underlying attributes are people need to believe that you can take them there. You have to offer a compelling vision, but the reality is they have to be able to trust you unreservedly, but at the same time, have the freedom to question you and challenge you. Because as a leader, you need to understand that you're not perfect and you need to create a level of vulnerability and strength. And one of the things I believe in leadership in general is part of what you're doing is you're managing contradictions. So.

Costco Edward Gilligan Department of Justice AmEx American Express Justice Department DoJ Supreme Court swarmer CEOs Ken Mastercard Visa Ed Joe kettles venture capital
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

08:14 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Express our deepest sympathies to the families of our colleagues that perished. Yeah. And what I said to them is American Express was really not about the building. It was about our people. And our people were really dedicated and committed to service and I was confident with them that we would overcome the challenges. Which, you know, obviously, you did. In the period after 9 11, there were some economic headwinds. Right. You sort of really begin to face like many if not all companies certainly financial companies, enormous challenges during the financial crisis. Right. This is going to be I have to assume that this was your first not real test as a leader because you had had 9 11 and obviously others before, but this was going to be probably the most challenging business headwinds that you had ever faced. Right. I think for 9 11, it was the emotional challenge for an organization and the world obviously to come to grips with what had happened. But everyone was going through some form of challenge as a result of 9 11. In the financial crisis, that to your point guy was the most significant business challenge because as with some other financial services companies, we could have gone under. But I believe in a crisis you need to look for opportunity because most people panic in a crisis. And you clearly have to focus on the situation at hand because you got to get through that, but what you also need to do is to say, what are the opportunities as a result of the crisis? And what I was committed to was that we were going to selectively invest. And I think what was very, very important is that we were in a situation where we were one of the few financial services companies that did not cut their dividend because I believe that we have an obligation. To our shareholders and our investors. Right. And so we were able to come out of the financial crisis with terrific momentum. There's a narrative that I know that you are aware of. And the story is something like this, oversimplification, but MX comes out of the financial crisis and just guns blazing. Around 2015, the stock is trading at an all time high, $95 a share. You at this point in your career are starting to think about moving on, you've got a potential executive you're grooming to take over Edward Gilligan and this is a year that begins a difficult two year period for American Express for you stock price falls by almost half. You separate with Costco, which was a huge partnership. I mean, they were making big demands, and you said, forget it, we're not going to accommodate these demands. So this partnership is over. And I think it accounted for 8% of Costco's sales. It was a huge, which is yours. And of course, Edward Gilligan, the heir apparent he dies. He has a blood clot in any dies. Talk to me a little bit about that period, 2015 to 2017. Here's how I would characterize it first, most importantly, Ed was a terrific executive and a terrific person. And we'd worked together for 30 years. And we were very, very good friends. And I would not underestimate the shock and the impact of that. But then we had also the Department of Justice. We had a lawsuit there. The Department of Justice had filed against AmEx for violating federal antitrust laws you lose that. Meanwhile, Visa and Mastercard had settled with the Justice Department and AmEx continues to fight. I mean, it's like everything coming at you from different directions at this two year period. On the Justice Department case, we thought we were right. I felt strongly about that. You did not want to settle. I did not want to settle and then fortunately we wanted the Supreme Court level. And I was I feel terrific that we were vindicated. On Costco, I really thought about. I will tell you a guy I could have done a deal with Costco. I could have positioned it very well inside the company and to our investors, but American Express would have felt the impact of that probably 5 years after I left. And I could have said, look, I don't know what happened, my success or just wasn't doing the right thing as far as moving the business forward, and I in fact set to our board exactly that. We could do this deal. to you, but you know me, that is not operating with integrity. I'm not going to do that. And so the important thing on Costco is people begin to see signs of the progress. The stock stabilized began to recover as you know it got back to where it was. And in fact, a little bit above, right before I left. And I think probably there are plenty of people who are kicking themselves that they did not buy the stock at $51. 2015. You got it. You got it. That's why I kept mine. And then, what was very important, we had chase sapphire, which, of course, was a competing premium car to I guess kind of rival that rivaled your premium card, so they were coming at your premium product. That's right. And the reality is people have always been coming after the premium segment. But one of the things that I had a lot of confidence in was our platinum centurion products. And we study our competitors. But one of the things we did, which I think is an important lesson in a values driven business meaning that you understand what your value is to the customer. We actually further increase the value, and as we've done periodically, we increase the fee. What do most people do when they have a competitive incursion with particularly a product that tries to imitate the existing key lower the fee? They lower the rate. No, if you are really a value driven company, focus on building and enduring relationship and you have a differentiated value proposition, that's the power of a brand and a brand is a cluster of values both rational and emotional. And that's what is very important about American expresses are commitment to providing real value and so we were able to increase our fee a $100 from $450 to $550 and produce tremendous results. During that two year period, you did three things that I think many other leaders would not have done. They would have done the opposite. And you could make the argument that that would have been the right decision at the time. You didn't negotiate with Costco. You said, we're not going to settle with the Department of Justice. We're going to fight it. The other company settled, that would have made sense. And the third thing was the chase sapphire card comes out and the competitors come out..

Edward Gilligan Costco American Express Department of Justice AmEx Justice Department Mastercard Ed Visa Supreme Court
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

25:55 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"So you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. When you graduated from law school, was it your intention still at that point to do civil rights work? 'cause I know you went right to a law firm in New York, but was your idea? Well, let me do this for a couple of years and then I'll go do the thing that really that's really meaningful to me. Yeah, what I thought as I looked at the path of lawyers who went into civil rights law, I saw that they went to and established law firm for two or three years. And then they entered the public service world. So I went to a law firm and actually it was going fine. I had some friends who were at Bain and company. My wife, Kathy and I went up to Boston, we were newly married and it was a free weekend. And what impressed me was I really felt this energy in the place, and the firm had had a real startup feel because it in fact was a startup on a relative basis in the consulting world. And I went there more because of a feeling that these were really dynamic, exciting people and then I had started to think about what was the next frontier of the civil rights movement and for me what I started to feel was that business and law had to go through more dramatic change because the reality is that the presence of African Americans in business was minimum and I also felt businesses really impact people's lives in pretty fundamental ways. And what I thought in going to Bain is I would learn about business, but I would actually focus on starting my own business or acquiring a company, so the last thought in my mind was that I would go to a large company. I just thought that a large company would really not be accepting of me. And then I was contacted by an executive recruiter who told me that American Express was looking for two or three people in strategic planning. And I had just read an article about American Express doing a joint venture with Warner cable. And that was viewed as a new frontier. And the person who I interviewed with who was forming the group was Luke gerstner. Went on to become CEO of IBM and that's right. And Lou became a mentor to me and someone that I've stayed close to and I'm close to this day, but one of the things that Lou said to me that was really impactful is I want a few catalytic agents of change. And that phrase has always stuck with me because being a catalytic agent of change was really important to me, and the other thing that Lou said to me is I said to Lou, I'm not sure I really will fit in a large company. And Lou said to me, you should come here and if you're really good, I will recommend you for any opportunity you want to pursue. Why did you think that you wouldn't fit into a bigger organization? So I think the reality is American Express as with many blue chip companies was a predominantly white company and the question for me was would I be given the opportunity to accept? Because I certainly didn't have many role models that I could point to in large companies who look like me who, in fact, had excelled. There were no African Americans at that time who were CEOs or CFOs or CMOs. So it was it was a new environment. That said from the history of the civil rights movement, what I started to realize is this was an opportunity and an obstacle that was meant to be overcome. And one of my favorite quotes from Nelson Mandela is that it always seems impossible until it's done. And that's from a man who it was impossible to conceive that he would go from jail cell to president of South Africa. So I think that was a motivation to me that it was a challenge to be overcome. Did you say that to Liu? I mean, were you able to be that right with him at the time? No. I didn't phrase it in racial terms. I just said, I just don't know how I would do in a large company. And what was interesting, my first day first morning, I came in to a position above an entry level position of someone coming out of business school. Because of my experience at Bain, they had me as a director. So I was clearly in lower middle management. But I remember sitting in the lobby waiting for someone to come out and a senior person came over and said to me in pretty menacing terms, what are you doing here? Wow. And I said, this is my first day at American Express. And he said really let me check. Wow. So that was my introduction. But all that said, what I think is very important is I had as it turned out a tremendous set of opportunities at American Express and luster was viewed incredibly positively, but he was also viewed as a very tough and demanding boss and the fact that I did well with him enhance my credibility, but I would say it'd be very clear that I know that Lou and others had to intervene with other senior people at times who clearly would not have advanced me because of my race. So 1981, you don't I mean, how do you remember kind of just coping with that personally? Because for anybody, especially a young person because you are still a young man, you're in your late 20s and starting a career and that can be rattling for anyone and here you are facing that more than just on the rare occasion. How did you internalize that and cope with it and just keep moving forward? I was very fortunate that I had parents who overcame obstacles went to college and so my experience is not different from literally hundreds of thousands of African Americans that have had to break a barrier and that's one of the things we call it. It's the black tack. And that's not something we should accept. But at the end of the day, what I was not prepared to do was to allow those obstacles to hold me back. But because of Brown V board, because of the civil rights laws, I was being given the opportunity and I will tell you, I don't know how I would have handled psychologically the environment pre Brown V board of education. Those are incredible heroes that need to be even more celebrated. So you get to AmEx, obviously see something in you and sees in you a pretty successful future there. But meantime, there are other executives who don't who don't see that. Did you feel in those first few years when you were there that I don't know, you weren't going to be included in the gulf rounds or included in the lunches or was there like a click of your cohort that you didn't make you feel like you were part of them? Here's the deal. I was not trying to become CEO of the company. Remember, I thought, after ten years, I said, I guess I'm going to be here for a while. But the first few years, I thought I'm going to be here for a few years and then I'm going to do my own thing. You did not see yourself as a life or when you got there in 1981. I didn't see myself as a life or I didn't have an aspiration to be CEO of the company. And in retrospect, that gave me a level of comfort that my life wasn't tied into it. And what I would say is the majority of people in top management were very receptive to me. There were a few who were not, but what was important is I really focused on driving outcomes on developing people and frankly, I didn't socialize that much outside the office. So 1981, you don't imagine yourself making this your life's career. No. But at some point, obviously, you must have woken up and realized that you were you were being promoted to various positions of authority higher and higher taking on more responsibility. At what point did you realize, well, maybe actually I could be CEO, this place one day. Well, it's interesting, one of the first businesses I ran was a business selling merchandise to the mail that we were able to grow into a very substantial way. And just to be clear, you were selling like luggage tags and clocks. Well, luggage tags luggage, electronics, jewelry. Card holders, through catalog toys, absolutely. And card holder would get a catalog from American expression. And that's amazing, but that was a business because it's not a problem. And statement stuffers, we actually grew it to over $600 million in sales. And in two and a half years we say statement stuffers like advertising from an offer's inside the statements oh yeah, wow. Yeah. It was one of the most successful direct marketing businesses and I in fact tried to buy the business from the company. You wanted to buy as you thought, I could spin this off and then I ran my own business. Yeah. You think about not that I would necessarily have the vision of Amazon, but yeah. If that had moved with the Internet, I think it could have business. A great business. Things worked out all right for me. I'm not complaining. But I was able to put together a very, very attractive proposal and I got it through most of the levels and then it came to Lou gerstner and he turned me down. And I was really upset. He turned you down for he said I'm not gonna allow you to buy the company. The proposal that I'd gotten people to agree to is I would be able to use the American Express brand for ten years. And I would have access to the list. The list of AmEx card holders. That's right. And Lou said, you know, that's a strategic asset. I'm not going to let you have it. And I was really, really upset. Yeah. And then he said, on top of that, can I'm moving you into the card business? And I said, look, I don't want to go in the courtroom business. And he said, well, let me sort of explain, this is what I want you to do. And Lou also said to me, I think you can really rise in this company. And I think you could one day run this company and there's no way you're going to be able to do that without coming into the card business. It's really interesting how failure and what seems like a bad luck at the time was actually a hidden blessing, right? Because you wanted to buy that company and spin it out. And I'm sure you were really frustrated and upset about it at the time, but I will tell you, I was emotionally devastated. And I was a pretty resilient person. But it took me a month or two to really get out of a funk, because I saw my whole world was I really had this vision that I could create this direct marketing powerhouse. And this was a dream and Lou and the company were taking away this dream. And I just saw that I'd be stifled. And I think the important point here is that you have to deal with setbacks, but you also have to step back and really analyze the opportunity. And then the person or persons extending you the opportunity, do you trust them, do they have your best interests at heart? And what I felt is that Lou, I could understand you got to put yourself in the other person's position as much as I wanted this. I had to admit that lose focus on the assets, the brand, which is incredibly valuable. And the data and the card member access, I had to admit intellectually, he had a valid argument. And at the same time, I trusted that he had my best interest from a career standpoint. life and your career is generally not a straight line and sometimes for people if it's too straight a line, they have a pretty steep fall. I'm guy raz, and you're listening to wisdom from the top. We'll be right back. This message comes from NPR sponsor, the American Express business platinum card. Packed with features, like 1.5 times membership rewards points on big purchases and in select business categories, over $1000 in statement credits per year with select business partners and 5 times membership rewards points on flights and prepaid hotels, booked through AmEx travel dot com. Get the card built for business by American Express, terms and point cap apply. Learn more at American Express dot com slash B platinum. Support for this podcast comes from good Rx, thinking about breaking some bad habits. Start with this one. Overpaying for prescriptions to do that always check good Rx. They instantly find discounts and compare prices at all the pharmacies in your neighborhood. Good Rx is free easy to use and could instantly save you up to 80%. Learn more at good Rx dot com slash XXX. Good Rx is not insurance but can be used instead of insurance. In 2021, good Rx users saved an average of 79% on retail prescription prices. This is wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. Okay, so one of fast forward a little bit because I know you've been involved in the travel business and then that became a huge part of AmEx and we tend to think of, of course, of AmEx is a credit card company, but really the travel services were huge, and then you get into the card business. And then 2001, you are named CEO, but I think it was like three or four months later that 9 11 happened. It wasn't just 9 11, but AmEx headquarters were directly across the street from the World Trade Center. Were you there that day in the building? I was not in the building. I was actually in Salt Lake City. I was visiting one of our service centers. I was in my hotel room and I was on a conference call with a team of American Express people who were in a conference room on the 51st floor overlooking the World Trade Center. And I had the TV on the sound off and I saw the plane hit the building and the screams on the phone from the conference room. And it was, and then obviously everyone scattered. And we lost 11 of our colleagues who were in the north tower of the World Trade Center. Which I did not know that at the time, I didn't know what was happening. I couldn't communicate with the team for a few hours. And then fortunately, I was able to get some of my top leadership team together and I instructed people, one, two, find out the whereabouts of all of our people in the tri state area to account for their safety and to help them out, second was to make sure we were helping our customers as well as our non customers all over the world. Because we got to report, obviously, of what was happening from a travel standpoint. And third, very practically, to start looking for temporary real estate space because it looked like we were going to be out of our building for several months. You were building was badly damaged. We had 11 floors of the building were damaged, we could not inhabit the building because of the damage. And I was able to go back to New York within two days. But as you might know guy, the impact on the travel industry and the card business was very severe. Travel volumes dropped significantly or billings dropped significantly, then we obviously had our 11 colleagues who perished and so one of the first things I did was to visit with as many of the families as I could and try to offer some comfort to them. And then after two weeks, I realized that and felt I needed to speak to as many people in person. I did a number of video conferences and teleconferences, but we rented out Madison Square Garden and had, frankly, there was no script. I just spoke from the heart of one trying to communicate how much I cared about them..

Lou American Express NPR Mastercard Warner cable Luke gerstner Bain bowdoin college bowden Brown V board of education FDIC Maine Vietnam Lou gerstner Nelson Mandela Kathy Liu
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Welcome back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. When you graduated from law school, was it your intention still at that point to do civil rights work? 'cause I know you went right to a law firm in New York, but was your idea? Well, let me do this for a couple of years and then I'll go do the thing that really that's really meaningful to me. Yeah, what I thought as I looked at the path of lawyers who went into civil rights law, I saw that they went to and established law firm for two or three years. And then they entered the public service world. So I went to a law firm and actually it was going fine. I had some friends who were at Bain and company. My wife, Kathy and I went up to Boston, we were newly married and it was a free weekend. And what impressed me was I really felt this energy in the place, and the firm had had a real startup feel because it in fact was a startup on a relative basis in the consulting world. And I went there more because of a feeling that these were really dynamic, exciting people and then I had started to think about what was the next frontier of the civil rights movement and for me what I started to feel was that business and law had to go through more dramatic change because the reality is that the presence of African Americans in business was minimum and I also felt businesses really impact people's lives in pretty fundamental ways. And what I thought in going to Bain is I would learn about business, but I would actually focus on starting my own business or acquiring a company, so the last thought in my mind was that I would go to a large company. I just thought that a large company would really not be accepting of me. And then I was contacted by an executive recruiter who told me that American Express was looking for two or three people in strategic planning. And I had just read an article about American Express doing a joint venture with Warner cable. And that was viewed as a new frontier. And the person who I interviewed with who was forming the group was Luke gerstner. Went on to become CEO of IBM and that's right. And Lou became a mentor to me and someone that I've stayed close to and I'm close to this day, but one of the things that Lou said to me that was really impactful is I want a few catalytic agents of change. And that phrase has always stuck with me because being a catalytic agent of change was really important to me, and the other thing that Lou said to me is I said to Lou, I'm not sure I really will fit in a large company. And Lou said to me, you should come here and if you're really good, I will recommend you for any opportunity you want to pursue. Why did you think that you wouldn't fit into a bigger organization? So I think the reality is American Express as with many blue chip companies was a predominantly white company and the question for me was would I be given the opportunity to accept? Because I certainly didn't have many role models that I could point to in large companies who look like me who, in fact, had excelled. There were no African Americans at that time who were CEOs or CFOs or CMOs. So it was it was a new environment. That said from the history of the civil rights movement, what I started to realize is this was an opportunity and an obstacle that was meant to be overcome. And one of my favorite quotes from Nelson Mandela is that it always seems impossible until it's done. And that's from a man who it was impossible to conceive that he would go from jail cell to president of South Africa. So I think that was a motivation to me that it was a challenge to be overcome. Did you say that to Liu? I mean, were you able to be that right with him at the time? No. I didn't phrase it in racial terms. I just said, I just don't know how I would do in a large company. And what was interesting, my first day first morning, I came in to a position above an entry level position of someone coming out of business school. Because of my experience at Bain, they had me as a director. So I was clearly in lower middle management. But I remember sitting in the lobby waiting for someone to come out and a senior person came over and said to me in pretty menacing terms, what are you doing here? Wow. And I said, this is my first day at American Express. And he said really let me check. Wow. So that was my introduction. But all that said, what I think is very important is I had as it turned out a tremendous set of opportunities at American Express and luster was viewed incredibly positively, but he was also viewed as a very tough and demanding boss and the fact that I did well with him enhance my credibility, but I would say it'd be very clear that I know that Lou and others had to intervene with other senior people at times who clearly would not have advanced me because.

Lou American Express Warner cable Luke gerstner Bain Kathy Boston New York IBM Nelson Mandela Liu South Africa
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:59 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Back to wisdom from the top. I'm guy raz. When you graduated from law school, was it your intention still at that point to do civil rights work? 'cause I know you went right to a law firm in New York, but was your idea? Well, let me do this for a couple of years and then I'll go do the thing that really that's really meaningful to me. Yeah, what I thought as I looked at the path of lawyers who went into civil rights law, I saw that they went to and established law firm for two or three years. And then they entered the public service world. So I went to a law firm and actually it was going fine. I had some friends who were at Bain and company. My wife, Kathy and I went up to Boston, we were newly married and it was a free weekend. And what impressed me was I really felt this energy in the place, and the firm had had a real startup feel because it in fact was a startup on a relative basis in the consulting world. And I went there more because of a feeling that these were really dynamic, exciting people and then I had started to think about what was the next frontier of the civil rights movement and for me what I started to feel was that business and law had to go through more dramatic change because the reality is that the presence of African Americans in business was minimum and I also felt businesses really impact people's lives in pretty fundamental ways. And what I thought in going to Bain is I would learn about business, but I would actually focus on starting my own business or acquiring a company, so the last thought in my mind was that I would go to a large company. I just thought that a large company would really not be accepting of me. And then I was contacted by an executive recruiter who told me that American Express was looking for two or three people in strategic planning. And I had just read an article about American Express doing a joint venture with Warner cable. And that was viewed as a new frontier. And the person who I interviewed with who was forming the group was Luke gerstner. Went on to become CEO of IBM and that's right. And Lou became a mentor to me and someone that I've stayed close to and I'm close to this day, but one of the things that Lou said to me that was really impactful is I want a few catalytic agents of change. And that phrase has always stuck with me because being a catalytic agent of change was really important to me, and the other thing that Lou said to me is I said to Lou, I'm not sure I really will fit in a large company. And Lou said to me, you should come here and if you're really good, I will recommend you for any opportunity you want to pursue. Why did you think that you wouldn't fit into a bigger organization? So I think the reality is American Express as with many blue chip companies was a predominantly white company and the question for me was would I be given the opportunity to accept? Because I certainly didn't have many role models that I could point to in large companies who look like me who, in fact, had excelled. There were no African Americans at that time who were CEOs or CFOs or CMOs. So it was it was a new environment. That said from the history of the civil rights movement, what I started to realize is this was an opportunity and an obstacle that was meant to be overcome. And one of my favorite quotes from Nelson Mandela is that it always seems impossible until it's done. And that's from a man who it was impossible to conceive that he would go from jail cell to president of South Africa. So I think that was a motivation to me that it was a challenge to be overcome. Did you say that to Liu? I mean, were you able to be that right with him at the time? No. I didn't phrase it in racial terms. I just said, I just don't know how I would do in a large company. And what was interesting, my first day first morning, I came in to a position above an entry level position of someone coming out of business school. Because of my experience at Bain, they had me as a director. So I was clearly in lower middle management. But I remember sitting in the lobby waiting for someone to come out and a senior person came over and said to me in pretty menacing terms, what are you doing here? Wow. And I said, this is my first day at American Express. And he said really let me check. Wow. So that was my introduction. But all that said, what I think is very important is I had as it turned out a tremendous set of opportunities at American Express and luster was viewed incredibly positively, but he was also viewed as a very tough and demanding boss and the fact that I did well with him enhance my credibility, but I would say it'd be very clear that I know that Lou and others had to intervene with other senior people at times who clearly would not have advanced me because.

Lou American Express Warner cable Luke gerstner Bain Kathy Boston New York IBM Nelson Mandela Liu South Africa
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

02:12 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:20 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard FDIC
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

06:40 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated. Welcome.

bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard international incor FDIC
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:53 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"Wells. Often talked about the fact that we were brown babies, meaning we were beneficiaries of brown V board of education. I was born in 1951, Ted, I think was born in 1949 and we were able to have opportunities that, frankly, had been denied people who had gone before us. And one of the things that my parents really focused on was that we need to be very, very aware of racism. Very proud of our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix dot com. If you're ready to build a successful business online, go to Wix dot com and start by creating your website. You can choose from over 800 designer made website templates to showcase your brand the way you want and with advanced SEO and marketing tools you can expand online. Join millions of people running and growing their businesses with Wix. This message comes from NPR sponsor, aspiration. Now you can help combat climate change with aspiration zero, the credit card that rewards you for going, carbon neutral. Plan a tree every time you swipe and earn 1% cash back every month that you reach carbon zero. Aspiration zero, one card zero carbon footprint. Visit aspiration dot com slash credit to learn more. The aspiration zero Mastercard is issued by beneficial state bank, member FDIC, pursuant to license by Mastercard international incorporated..

Wells Ted bowdoin college bowden America Maine Vietnam NPR Mastercard FDIC
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:21 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"In 2001. He wasn't just the first African American CEO at AmEx, Ken was also one of the very few African American CEOs among the Fortune 500. Ken Chanel grew up in NASA county on Long Island. His dad was a dentist and his mom was a dental hygienist. He was born just a few years before the landmark Brown versus board of education case that outlawed racial segregation in public schools across the U.S.. Well, I think what was very important for me at that time, one of my close friends, Ted wells. Often talked about the fact that we were brown babies, meaning we were beneficiaries of brown V board of education. I was born in 1951, Ted, I think was born in 1949 and we were able to have opportunities that, frankly, had been denied people who had gone before us. And one of the things that my parents really focused on was that we need to be very, very aware of racism. Very proud of our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was what you were hoping to do with your life. It was that I had actually an interest in politics and I thought that was a place where I could have an impact, the headmaster of my school took a very strong interest in me and he was one who my freshman year. He said, I think you're really bright. I think you're very talented. I think you could be an incredible leader, but you've got to really apply yourself consistently. And not at what you just like to do. And he started talking to me about the fact that I could be a leader. And then that evolved to you could go into politics. And the key thing there for me was this awakening to the fact that people thought I had the attributes and the capabilities to be a leader that was incredibly fortifying for me. And gave me something to aspire to, and I think that's critical for anyone is that you need aspirations, much bigger than day to today objectives that you might set. Stay with us. We're going to take a quick break. I'm guy raz and you're listening to wisdom from the top..

Ken Chanel Brown versus board of educatio Ted wells AmEx America Long Island NASA Ken Ted bowdoin college bowden Maine Vietnam
"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

Wisdom From The Top

07:05 min | 5 months ago

"american express" Discussed on Wisdom From The Top

"American Express got its name from the nature of its business. Back in 1850, when it was launched, it was an express mail service. The guys who started it were Henry wells and William Fargo, and if that sounds familiar, it should. They also created Wells Fargo. But it wasn't until 1891 when American Express transformed into a financial services company. That year, they introduced travelers checks to the world. And that single innovation turned the company into a powerhouse. Travelers checks made it much easier for people to travel abroad without cash. And for most of the 20th century, travelers checks were the company's core business. But by the late 1970s, credit cards started to gain a lot of traction. And Ken Chan was one of the early disruptors of the company who pushed for a pivot away from travelers checks to double down, on cards. And for much of the 1980s, and even 1990s, Ken spent his career expanding the company's global reach until he himself became its top leader in 2001. He wasn't just the first African American CEO at AmEx, Ken was also one of the very few African American CEOs among the Fortune 500. Ken Chanel grew up in NASA county on Long Island. His dad was a dentist and his mom was a dental hygienist. He was born just a few years before the landmark Brown versus board of education case that outlawed racial segregation in public schools across the U.S.. Well, I think what was very important for me at that time, one of my close friends, Ted wells. Often talked about the fact that we were brown babies, meaning we were beneficiaries of brown V board of education. I was born in 1951, Ted, I think was born in 1949 and we were able to have opportunities that, frankly, had been denied people who had gone before us. And one of the things that my parents really focused on was that we need to be very, very aware of racism. Very proud of our heritage, we should absolutely fight for our rights. And fight for the rights of other people who were disadvantaged. And one of the mantras of my father was focus on what you can control and the one thing you can control is your performance. That was something that I think about all the time. I think you clearly have to fight against things you can't control. But I really do believe in self empowerment and the power of an individual being focused. However, growing up as a black person in America in the 50s and the 60s, there were countless incidents that I faced personally and my family faced. Fortunately, I had two parents who could really counsel me. I'll give you one example. I was on a bus, going to school. I was probably 9 years old. I was talking to a few other students on the bus. And a student came over to me and said, so you're a nigger. And I just froze. And I said, well, you're a white cracker. One of the things my parents had said is you want to treat everyone with respect, but if someone tries to belittle you, analyze the situation which I had to do very quickly, but sometimes you respond in like kind. And this little boy was totally mortified. He actually broke out in tears. As a parent of a child of color, you have to educate them to the challenges that they're going to face. And how they need to act in different situations. Well, I mean, it sounds like the way your parents talk to you about conflict was there are things you can control and things you can't, but one thing you can control is your reaction. Correct. And what was important is, is the importance of having self control. And self control doesn't mean you don't evidence anger that you simply accept what you are handed, but it does mean that as much as possible, you really want to be in control of the situation. And what I found in my personal life and business life, having that self control is very, very important and is in fact something that gives you a major advantage. You went on to study at bowdoin college in Maine and then I guess you went, you went pretty much right into law school after that. Yeah, bowden was a terrific experience going to college in the 70s, obviously with the Vietnam War with the civil rights movement with the emergence of black power. That was an incredible time for me. And similar to many African Americans who were in college at that time, we were amongst the first relatively large group that was attending a majority white college. So that experience, I think, was a very powerful experience. Those were tumultuous times. But I think going through the 70s gave me a sensibility and an understanding of the importance of addressing social issues and my impetus to go to law school was really to be a civil rights lawyer. And the farthest thing from my mind was that I would go into business. Your kind of early academic push and I guess direction was to become a civil rights attorney. That was.

Henry wells William Fargo American Express Ken Chan Ken Chanel Brown versus board of educatio Ted wells Ken Wells Fargo AmEx America Long Island NASA Ted bowdoin college bowden Maine Vietnam
"american express" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

02:58 min | 11 months ago

"american express" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Non white person can have his job is jeff campbell. The chief financial officer going to step down. So a non white person can have this job stevens query on a white person going to step down so a non white person can have. This job is pyrrhic becker. The president of the global network services for amex going to step down so a non white person can have this job because it's a whole lot of white dudes in charge of american express and they're teaching their white employees that their oppressors and need to not talk over black. Now one of the boss. You have black employee who is speaking garbage and the white white boss was correct. Them is the white boss racist or is the white boss a good steward of the company according to critical theories racist if he dogs over the black employee. who's oppressed. This isn't sustainable stuff. This is actual insanity runamuck and yet american express is paying the shakedown. Now why is american express paying the shake down to local her on to the woke terrorist. Why are they paying them because they're overwhelmingly white in top management and they know the wilkes are coming for them. They know the woke are coming from. The wilkes will start buying shares in the company and try to force local haram to the company. They're negotiating with terrorists. That's what all of these companies are doing. They are negotiating with terrorists. American express is just the latest raytheon kroger american express target. You name it. They're all negotiating with the terrorists of local haram. But here's the thing which the number one rule with terrorists you do not negotiate with terrorists. Now why don't you negotiate with terrorists. Because they're always going to come back for more. It's only a matter of time before they come back and they say stephen square. You're the ceo of amex and you're surrounded by a bunch of white dude's leadership you better get rid of some of those white dudes and leadership or we're going to get rid of you and he'll do it because he wants to keep his job screw screw pure beckett the president of global network services and jeff campbell the cfo. They're just a bunch of crackers can go get jobs elsewhere. He's got to protect himself. It's only a matter of time before the walks. Shake them down further. You negotiate with the terrorists now. The terrorists are going to come back and escalate even further because they know they gotta they know you've invested and you know what's the reality here is most your employees. No this is crap. There are some some who will buy into it because they're already insane to begin with but most of know it's crap you're just wasting their time. You're totally wasted their time. You're you're you're breeding hostility to this but keep in mind people are profiting from it. Probably someone at amex got some money under the table to bring in this country and all the other companies to doing this stuff. But i mean. Racism makes money these days. We live in a day and age where there are fewer and fewer racists..

jeff campbell raytheon kroger stephen square stevens American express amex
"american express" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

The Erick Erickson Show

04:39 min | 11 months ago

"american express" Discussed on The Erick Erickson Show

"Here's the thing. I'll stop there. This is christopher rufo reporting and his slide charts are actually bat poop crazy including what you're finding more and more is The resources One of the resources is about getting rid of prisons. Another ed tries to indoctrinate employees on the need for reparations and giving back so these are the microaggressions instead of asking people If you say where are you from your racial ethnic ambiguity confuses me you are not american. You are foreign. that's what it implies. You're so articulate. It's unusual for someone of your race to be intelligent. Is what it may imply. I don't see color or we're all human beings might imply the denial of a person's racial ethnic experiences including barriers. I'm not racist. I have black. Friends is suggest immunity to racism and unconscious bias. Oh my goodness gracious Here we are. Now i gotta i gotta this is important here. This is probably the most important thing by getting rid of people's intentions. What you do is impute to them. Badness based on how they affect other people that's not the way our system is set up to operate. Now the woke will tell you. That's because our system is typically racist but if your entire way of living is not based on your intentions but on how others may interpret what you're saying you are letting others control you. And that ultimately gives away the game. Here they want the wo- cts want to control you. According to whistleblower documents american express executives and their anti-racism institute what to teach their employees about systemic racism white privilege in intersection analogy and they want their white employees to shut up. Does this relate to the senior management at american express does it relate to their senior leadership does it relate to their board of directors the executive committee at american express. The chairman and ceo is stevens query. Who's a white dude. What about the rest of them. The vice chairman and group president is a white dude. The chief strategy officer is muhammed body. Phd he's not. The president of the global network services is a white dude. The chief financial officers will white dude the credit card officer. Well he's andrei espinosa but he looks white izzy white hispanic or black hispanic. The executive vice president is alan gallo. White dude the executive vice president and chief information officer white dude. The chief colleague experience officer white woman. Well maybe hispanic marina monica arena. But it's it's mostly mostly white. You want to get to the first black guy on the executive committee. You get down to the chief executive officer for the american express national bank and group president express services. He's at the very bottom although it does go in alphabetical order with the exception of the ceo. But it's a whole bunch of white people and then they're board. Directors got a lot of white people there as well got a whole lot of white people there and so what are they doing. They're tried to tell their employees that white people need to be quiet and let the non white people rule them and yet they themselves are pretty top down white organization. Are the question here. The question here is amec. Serious is american express going to force out it's ceo and its other white executives and let non white people take their places is mark. Gordon the chief information officer at american express gonna step down so eight..

christopher rufo american express andrei espinosa alan gallo marina monica arena muhammed american express national bank stevens White amec Gordon
"american express" Discussed on This Old Marketing

This Old Marketing

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"american express" Discussed on This Old Marketing

"It's it's it's it's it's just a different kind of experience and and to your point losing that engagement and the data associated with that is you know just seems like a bad idea. It's seems like a bad idea. I mean i understand that meredith. The original publisher. We go back to the flight airline magazine. Kind of thing and mayor was the publisher. The outsourced by the way creator of this so it's not like they're just discovering outsourcing their with american express his agency they had outsourced to meredith before that and then now meriden says now. We're not going to publish it anymore. There may have been many reasons for that. You know as part of their acquisition reorganization. they may have said you know. It's not the business models not working for us anymore. So american express goes okay instead of doubling down on it to your point they went Let's not make it. W let's not make it better. Let's make a debt to that point in fairness to american express if time purchase which this has happened time purchase. The magazine for american express time was purchased by meredith so right in theoretically if time owns the rights to the print. Publication of departures meredith could have made the decision all on their own and didn't get didn't need any kind of permission American yet right. That's a fair now if that exact truth then if you're american express you purchase the rights back and you're able to dash it because that's the thing we've talked about it forever media companies have. They don't need to do this anymore. But they historically only judge a media property by revenue and profits that's content marketing comes in and it's a wonderful because you can judge it by direct profit on the magazine itself or the media property itself. You can judge it by creating better customers. Maybe they spend more. You can judge by loyalty because maybe they stay longer as customers. You can judge by cross. Selling i mean i think we did a little chart in our book killing marketing. That talks about all these things. So that's where the opportunity is for a brand over media company because you don't have to judge it by just one. Kpi yes so. That's where i'm american express. If that whoever. If american express somebody knows american express and their marketing department go by the rights. Back if you don't have the rights and look and i bet you you could republish this thing and by the way you only need to to break even. They don't make money. As far as i know from their century and club but it is of course not great member is a great experience. It's yeah it's why it's one of the major reasons that you pay the five hundred dollars a year that you to have a platinum card you know so. Yeah the other thing. I mentioned quickly. Because i want to move onto our last story here. But the the. If you're not american express it i you know what i would love to see..

american express meriden five hundred dollars a year one meredith express american American
"american express" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"american express" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"We need to stay on top of the recover. You know what that means. It means following the money by which i mean the payment companies and when it comes to payments it really doesn't get much better than americans breast their tremendous insight into what's happened with consumers and small businesses earlier today. We got a chance to venture out in the studio for fully vaccinated. Sit down with steve. Scary the chairman. Ceo of american express at barcelona. Miguel by spo plate mexican restaurant in carroll gardens brooklyn. Take look steve. You have the pulse that anyone this country. I'm starting to get the feel that there's a bit of a fabulous twenty s going on as the mccanns. Yeah well. I the pleasure to be here with you today. You know you're in your restaurant which is just recently reopened. Look when you look at the us economy right now. I think it's really starting to come back. I mean you've got vaccinations where everybody's you know. More and more people are getting vaccinated. We had tremendous support from the government from a perspective stimulus credit numbers or not like anybody thought they were going to be when i look at my credit numbers might delinquency numbers. They're lower than they've been in years and you know then personal savings personal savings or doubled. So what does that mean. That means people have money to spend. They have discretionary money to spend. What did the consumers do consumers consume and so they will spend in the last thing that i'll say which really gives me hope here when we look at our travel numbers ought travel bookings in may were ninety five percent of what they were in may of twenty nineteen without international with. Yeah that's us. It's the us bookings without international but that's extraordinary. It's unbelievable and restaurants. Doing well restaurants are doing. Great restaurants are probably about eighty five percent of where they weren't twenty nine nineteen but the people that are really spending a lot. Restaurants millennials hundred thirty percent in april of what they spent back in twenty nine thousand nine and so we believe that. That's going to continue to to move forward. We also believe that by the end of the year in the us we will have a full consumer recovery from a travel perspective and overall the ended. I think globally. We'll probably about eighty percent of twenty nine thousand i will. That's amazing because the defaults are so low. But second the millennials. You've got a line on younger. People like everyone wants. American express is soon as they're old enough. How did that happen well. I think that happened from experiences. I think what happened was as we looked at what people wanted. What my kids want your kids wanted. I mean we live with millennials. You know what they want is access..

steve twenty nine thousand barcelona april hundred thirty percent today Miguel ninety five percent twenty nine thousand nine American express twenty nine nineteen american express about eighty five percent spo plate eighty percent mexican brooklyn earlier today Ceo carroll gardens
"american express" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"american express" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"I purchased Was see w.h. Purchases it around forty four since Tank a little. And i had to stop out at thirty nine eighty eight now with every one wanting to venture outdoors you know endemic is. It seems that there would be a pent up demand for camping supplies by the on the margin squeeze due to hurry. Of course. I think it's the margins. I also think the stock had a big move off the bottom. I do think that thor which is only up sixteen percent now and had a great quarterback was down five. Today makes more sense for what to buy and thank you for the climate. I like t h. The s&p could hit a rough patch next nibble enough to swap in and out the index. I actually recommend using the wings is talked about at the top of the show. You some by some very high quality stocks which were man money head omitting bar gail with the e. over expressed the why have a copy is supporting small businesses. Like that one then. I'm talking the new kid on the block. Walk chain this. Don't miss my sit down with the salona. Find out how. It's giving bitcoin theory of a run for the money and forget ago man. Why the pushers memes docs are sticking it to them cells. So stay with. Kramer gotta take a listen. Listen swap pot that's right. Cnbc's flagship business. News show is a podcast squawk pot control to it is not just the show folks might even better. Because.

Today Kramer sixteen percent Cnbc five forty four nine thirty eighty eight around
"american express" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"american express" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Got so mad. I couldn't see. Got home my wife. She should leave me. I got so mad. I couldn't see. I was ready to go to Jacksonville Florida to the little collection. Department there and kick somebody's butt, right? I've got so mad. I was so illogical paid the Bill. Are you start food money because a page stupid American Express? But you know, what I did that was a stupid thing. I did the positive thing was I did I said we're never doing business with American Express again rest of our lives any company that would have someone on their employees that acts that way I'm going to do business with American Express who's thirty years ago. How much business I've done with American Express in any form. Not. Period. Discover car call with a single mom. I was coaching. She was in the bathroom getting ready for work. Her child five years picked up the phone and the collector told the child at discover card was gonna come take his toys because his mama hadn't paid the Bill. These are the kind of scum the work at these places. You have to have a moment where you say. I've. Putting up with this anymore? When you have that moment, you'll change your life until then you're just going to be mediocre half. But people wandering around broke looking like, you're not. Your goal. This year is to get rid of your debt. But here's.

American Express Jacksonville Florida thirty years five years