35 Burst results for "American Enterprise Institute"

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

Morning Edition

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

"Greene. The story we are covering this morning was first revealed in a tweet from President Trump in the middle of the night. He and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the Corona virus. Many people we should say never developed serious symptoms and even if they do they recover, But Trump is 70 for an age group that is more likely to develop serious complications and to be hospitalized. The White House physician says the president is doing well as of now, but will remain in the White House residents. A White House official told NPR's Tamara Keith that the president plans to stay engaged, but that Vice President Mike Pence is ready to step in. As needed. Now, if and when a president falls ill. There are significant questions about how the nation is governed. And John 48 has studied and written about scenarios just like this. He's executive director. Of the continuity of government Commission, which was set up in the wake of the 9 11 attacks. He also runs the government studies program at the bipartisan Policy Center, and he joins us on Skype. Thanks for being here. Mary. Thanks for having me. So I mean, someone who looks at these questions so closely. How did you react when you heard that the president got a positive test? Well, given all that's happened, it was probably the one thing that might stir up some or turmoil in this, this very tumultuous election system season we've had. Look, there are some real questions. Both about a president as president having on illness, especially if it were to get worse but also in terms of a presidential candidate. Those are those are different issues about being on the balance and what happens afterwards. So I do think there are some significant concerns if If things were to worsen. Well, let's separate those things out. Let let's talk about the here and now. I mean, what sort of things are being discussed right now inside the White House and were the president's health to deteriorate. I mean, you've written that there could be confusion there. Khun B. Chaos. I mean, take us inside that building. Well, first, a zoo president, the question would be is the president at some point does he feel that he doesn't isn't able to carry out the duties of the presidency for a time? And there's a pretty clear provisioning the 25th amendment, where he can sign over the power of the presidency to the vice president. And then when recovered, take it back, and that's happened a few times in recent years, basically, for elective surgeries, That would be pretty clear. I think you know what would be a little harder is if the president got sick enough that he wasn't able to make the determination there's still a A vision in the Constitution where you can have the vice president. A majority of the Cabinet say it's time for the vice president to take over and then in the most contentious situation. We have heard about another context that if the president disagreed with that, that Diagnosis. Congress might have to decide whether to keep the president on orto keep the vice president so it could go further down the line. But that would be the more extreme version. Look, we also have The election. And how would President Be on the ballot or not be on the ballot. If it really came to the the point where the president had to withdraw. There is a very difficult procedure and trying to replace him at this time. You know what? Who makes that decision? I mean, how well determine happened earlier. I think it's pretty clear that party could have just stepped in on the party. The party still has a role of selecting a new person. Ah, And that would be the party committee could elevate Mike Pence to the presidency and pick someone else as vice president, But that's a relatively simple vote. We've actually done that once in the in the seventies with vice presidential candidate Bigger place, Tom Eagleton. But the question now that the ballots are out is much more difficult. Could the president's name be removed from the ballot? I think it would be very difficult, but one further complication is in our election of president. We're really not voting for president. But we're voting for these electors in the Electoral college. They're still there in the ballot, even if you don't see them in your states about there, behind those names, and in theory, those people could be elected and then make a choice of another person come December with some complications that have come up recently, the Supreme Court but basically that there is a possibility that that even if Donald Trump's name is still on the ballot, and he were to have withdrawn Um, that those electors could still end up voting for the Republican ticket. Whatever that is, in December, they could actually decide. I mean, you would have electors around the country making a decision that Shouldn't theory be made by health experts, but they would be actually deciding who would who would be president. Assuming if Donald Trump won the election, even though he had withdrawn then there's there's this question in November of well, who's Who of these electors gonna vote for? They're gonna vote for the Republican ticket. Whatever it is. Then again, there are some complications. But the Supreme Court has allowed some states to really bind those electors. But Basically those those electors, many of them at least have the freedom to choose another person. We assume that would be coordinated by the party. And of course, that would be great questions about the legitimacy for the American public. Usually it's possible. I mean this this obviously so so speculative ahs. You said. I mean, these are extreme circumstances we're talking about, but I wonder. I mean, this is your line of work like I wonder if you get people sometimes saying, like, Oh, why do you dedicate so much time to scenarios That might never happen? But I guess there's an argument that these air really important questions that you want answered. You have to plan for for the worst and most chaotic sin areas. You do, And off with some better plans in place for for a lot of these continuity scenarios. I mean, obviously, questions of national security might matter if if we're not absolutely sure if the president is is Well, we had cases well before the 25th amendment, Woodrow Wilson, who was essentially incapacitated for his last almost a year and a half in the White House, and you know the real is a real question as to who was really running the government, the vice president ahead and stepped in and so you know, there are these questions. We don't want uncertainty in times of trouble. And you're saying that that you're not satisfied with the plans that are that are in place that the government could do a better job planning for scenarios like this. Well in some, I do think there's a very clear transfer power to the vice president. That's the 25th amendment has made that very clear if we get into much more public ated scenarios like they're both sick or the question of how you get somebody on the ballot and how the electors were picked because it happens this close to the election. Look, I think we could have more clarity. John 48 is executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a nonpartisan think tanks set up by the conservative leading American Enterprise Institute and the liberal leaning Brookings Institution. Thank you so much for helping us work through some of these Something big questions that you know, we hope don't have to come up. We hope the president remains healthy, but things we have to think about. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

President Trump Vice President Melania Trump White House Mike Pence Government Commission John Executive Director Supreme Court Bipartisan Policy Center Tamara Keith Tom Eagleton Greene. Khun B. Chaos NPR Congress Official Brookings Institution
Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:20 min | 4 months ago

Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

"Survey. Oh. Good survey from taken by the American Enterprise, institute, has shown that sixty four percent of American churchgoers. Were somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable with attending in person worship. Sixty four percent sixty four percent, in fact, what they found was basically only one group is Gung Ho on going back to Church and that's why evangelical 's. Right no surprise there if you know the news. Yeah if you add up there somewhat comfortable, and they're very comfortable's. It's. Sixty one percent of them are all about. Thirty. Four percent of them are very comfortable with going back to. Yeah because they because not only do they get to engage in the worship that is so important to them, but also they get to pony lives. Show us. What idiots we are. Yeah, Yeah so apparently. Even those who reported that their congregations offer actually offered. Worship last week, Fifty, six percent of respondents said they chose not to go. Yeah, and you know. I mean obviously like one of the hotspots repeatedly everywhere this Cova. Is seems like Church's just keep popping up like that was one of the first stories coming out of South Korea right was there was a church like a crazy colty church, but nonetheless. I think that's. Probably. But that was one of the hot spots, and that that was one of the big spreaders of Covid, nineteen and obviously we're seeing that in the United States. We're we're. We're just seeing it right like this is operatives These are the kinds of places that people who care about their health and their communities health. Should, be staying away from and a lot of Christians actually do agree with that depending on their denomination if you look at Black Protestants. And add their numbers up. Sixty eight percent are. Either somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable. Well. Yeah, because it's because this thing is killing them in disproportionate numbers so. I can see why. Hispanic Catholics seventy three percent are are on the uncomfortable side. Really Yeah, yeah, that's that's. That's a number that means something. Yeah, and you're white mainline Protestants. It's sixty at three percent well. Yeah, I mean I'm you know talking to my mom hi mom, if you're listening. The other day, and she was saying that you know she. Attends, a free often attend an Anglican a Canadian Anglican Church She goes there mostly for the for the. For the free coffee I think anyway And music, doesn't she really liked the? It's the Camaraderie and the people. She loves the people there and I don't blame her for that tall any who? She said that they're not going to be going until like late in the fall at the earliest. Really. Yeah fantastic. That's not even an option, so I I mean they're. They're doing it right up there i. don't know about what what the Anglicans are doing down here, but. Well Lake. PISCOPO, here, so yeah. Definitely not Anglican. We broke off from that country. Diane exactly. Anyway. Yeah I just think it's kind of interesting. To contemplate re where people's this raises an interesting thing right like it does ask people where their priorities are right and this is something that is really supposedly really important to them going church right right and their belief in God and one of the things that they're God requires them to be active participants in their religious community. I would assume that's why they go right right and because why, like honestly, I mean God bless your mother and everything I guess friends. Get you there right like I can. But. Those people I think are trying to earn points in heaven. Right sure. And, so anyway, where was my? My point was my point. That's that's the new memoir. That's the title of your memoir now. I. Don't lose it that often. So my point is that. You know when you look at. Where these where people are putting their priorities, right? They're having to do this balancing act between their health. And God right and they're and they're and him parole needs for most people they're proving. They're proving that they are actually rational actors. They're choosing their health their choosing the tangible. They're choosing what is right in front of them over what? I mean the Evangelical. Christians there, the Rangers in this in this game right there. The good ones because they're not letting some dumb disease getting the way. They're God demand of them, and they're going in there doing yeah, and if they died they, they go to heaven and God's. Right and I heard that I've heard that quote. In meet. Why haven't I in articles I've Read I've seen that quote where people are just like like. Yeah, you know like if I get. It gets God's will. God's will be done. You know and it's like. Oh. Yeah, it's pretty. It's pretty

Church Rangers Gung Ho Canadian Anglican Church American Enterprise Cova United States South Korea Diane
Did Covid-19 Coronavirus Escape From A Lab In Wuhan?

Mark Reardon

05:55 min | 6 months ago

Did Covid-19 Coronavirus Escape From A Lab In Wuhan?

"The house will vote today on another coronavirus relief bill right now because I I do hear from folks pretty constantly about the we have lab and investigating we have left to party right about this in the Washington examiner he's a resident fellow at the American enterprise institute the author of a book called alienated America Tim Carty welcome to candle wax our you doing well how are you doing I'm good I I approach the you know the information about the lab with caution but as you point out in the piece it would maybe be irresponsible to at least not look at this and what happened in this lab considering via the fallout globally right now so what what do we know about what happened in that lab well we know that it was a lab that investigated among other things corona viruses now did I mean that corona virus we never use the word before the spring obviously but scientists Dr is that the words for all a whole family of viruses that include the common cold and they are so this was a lab that investigated those investigated those that originated in the back as well and most scientists actually agree that the the corona virus sweeping the world right now the pandemic is one that probably originated in a bat the other thing we know about this lab is that when C. U. S. state department officials visited there because they said that the security the safety the cleanliness all of that was not what you would want from people who are handling a very contagious virus and very contagious diseases and so all of that adds up to sanction I wonder if some of the work the scientists were doing there is still some sloppy action the virus came out of that laboratory and ended up infecting somebody in will on now it in again you point out here you're not saying that it was made in this land right back right now that's that's your thing that's an easy confusion to make if you say that seem out of the lab that can sound like it was made in the lab and in our editorial when we say investigate the lab what we're suggesting is that it rather than some guy who bought a pangolin that had been cooked on buy it back that might have been how it happened but it also might have been that is the is research facility which again was noted to have so the poor safety techniques and methods that this research facility allowed it to escape why is that important because China's government has steadfastly denied it and if this is a government lab if China's government through its own sloppiness let this out and then lied to the world about it well that would tell us a whole lot more about well about a Chinese state but it might also be able to tell us something about the nature of the virus we're conducting experiments on it they might know more about it will be out to if Saddam assigned to share might be able to know more about it than we do now when you say pangolin that's the that's sort of the anti that's that's like an ant eater right that's the connection to the back that's that's that's gets worked with scientists basically say you know I think the the sort of the gas of the sort of natural way but the virus enters the human population with somebody bought either eight or touched a pangolin which is a scaly little it looks like it's an acorn and an anteater had a baby what it does here it's very prehistoric looking bizarre now it it does seem like you want to time that somebody bought something like that which is a very rare animals sold in some of these markets and in China and that bad bad bad bad tangling have probably been infected by it that that's the best gas that scientists looking at the DNA X. cetera are are making right now and this is all going to be guess work because this is our first time encountering but again there's a possibility that if that if there were experiments done on this particular strain of coronavirus if that were shared with more of the world then we would be able to better fight than we are now all right so let's let's kind of stipulate that were operating from that perspective and say yeah this is certainly worthy of an investigation but how with the Chinese in particular we move forward and get real answers that you can trust well that's that's a very good point because this is every game that is famous for covering up and so we certainly don't believe that it would be as easy as the F. B. I. showing up in you know going through the at the cash register of the a mop around troops store or something like that their ability to cover up their ability to completely deny anybody from outside their government to inspect would be pretty strong but right now the simple demands that there be an investigation trying to pressure the W. H. O. to ask for an investigation using diplomatic pressure to press on investigation board at least reveal a little bit of where the Chinese government St Thomas and it's possible that we could do an investigation and just getting bad off the hook or maybe it was not even sloppiness but just the sheer bad luck accident that had to happen and it wouldn't even be China's fault but it still could tell us something about it or if we knew we came from a particular animal that could also tell us something the closer we get the more we get in Wuhan whether it be in the wet market or the lab the more we know about it is right I mean think about all the things that are mystery about this paper saying it cannot do as well in the hot weather maybe if they're different strains of it maybe yeah a lot of I think you're right types of people and so the more we know about it the better we can

The glaring loophole in U.S. virus response: Human error

Overnight re-air of day's programming

04:03 min | 8 months ago

The glaring loophole in U.S. virus response: Human error

"Joining us from New York this is Dr Scott Gottlieb he is the former head of the food and drug administration service commissioner in the trump administration from twenty seventeen to twenty nineteen a resident fellow at the American enterprise institute here to talk about their response to global coronavirus doctor good morning thanks for having me can we start with you gauging the response to date what is working and what's been done well what would you have some concerns with as far as the U. S. response well the efforts we made to implement travel restrictions and limit travel from China clearly bought us some time it it slowed the rate of new cases coming into the country I think the question then becomes what did we do at that time and we did some things well and something's not so well I think we prepare the nation we got the health care system prepared we were able to educate providers we learned more about the virus and and how it spreads and how you can combat it the one thing we didn't do that we should of was having place broader screening we should have implemented screening weeks ago and really a month ago maybe more to try to detect small outbreaks early because before they became large outbreaks we had problems rolling out a diagnostic test we took a very linear approach in my view and depended upon one task propagated by the centers for disease prevention disease control prevention rather than also working with manufacturers and academic labs to try to get in place other kinds of diagnostics when that CDC tests didn't work then we had to scramble and so we're just now getting in place the kind of screening capacity in this country that we probably should have had three four weeks ago and what that means is that there are cases in the United States probably that came in some point in mid January maybe a little earlier than that from China probably that have been spreading and we probably have at this point certainly hundreds of cases and maybe in a low thousands in certain regions there is certain going to be certain hot spots in the country this is a pervasive spread I remember it's a country of three hundred thirty million people so you several thousand cases is still a small numbers so anyone's individual risk of getting the corona virus right now is is low but the challenge is that now that there is spread in the country it's going to be make it's going to make it harder I'm not impossible but harder to contain those outbreaks and ultimately mitigate continued spread when I looked at the outbreak stands actor into those two deaths in Washington state what does that suggest as far as the concentrations of possible concentrations in the United States well parts of Washington state look like they might be a hot zone right now parts of northern California appear that way you know there's a case in New York and it's hard to believe that there isn't spread in New York City given how much travel comes through comes through New York City I think when you see cases where people are hospitalized or were there for counties that suggests that there are a lot of cases underneath those those sort of index cases but those are the ones that we're going to identify first because the ones to patients who are going to get tested first are the patients who have presented or right now in hospitals and are very sick with an undiagnosed form of pneumonia and now that doctors have the capacity to test the corona virus to start testing those patients and so the initial cases that we identify in this country are going to be skewed heavily towards more severe patients but as we've been traced back from those patients and start testing other people who might be mildly symptomatic or even a symptomatic then we're going to start to five more cases of more benign illness from corona virus because we do know that most people don't get I'm very sick from coronavirus and and a large percentage of people don't really develop any symptoms any meaningful symptoms at all it's just a small percentage that developed pneumonia and a small percentage to go on to you know have really severe illness and find themselves in

New York Dr Scott Gottlieb
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

13:26 min | 8 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Working Experience

"How much would you say Because you know in this particular in this era and not just this administration but probably in the last. I don't know twenty years. You might say things have become very polarized that that's been kind of the mantra. I don't know how I mean that's the surface I don't know how deep that goes but This is not just in the last twenty years but it seems like an and I think you can speak to this much better than I can. How much are people actually driven by data like if you just take something like climate change? The the lament of scientists seems to constantly be. It doesn't matter what we say doesn't matter all the evidence. People will not move on climate change. And that seems very partisan in broad strokes so Is it sometimes a battle to get people to drop their used? The word ideology what their religious beliefs. Or whatever you would put and say well look here are the numbers. Yeah is it. Is it sometimes hard to break through people's like preconceived notions and things like that? I I do think that that is true. I do think that you know people. And policymakers often come at it from an ideological perspective and an often do ignore data and evidence and pulling and you can present. You know everything to them and it's and it's really like no at the end of the day. I just don't believe that I want to do this. But but you know the success that I've seen with the paid. Parental leave work is that there is a way to break through that. I do think that when you present things In a way that also sort of allows them to align those findings with what they believe. So so for instance with the paid parental leave with the paid parental leave policy. I think it's Republicans have a lot of Republicans like Senator Rubio and others have often put families at the forefront of their policy. So you do see traditionally. They've talked about expanding things like the child tax credit because they say well this is really beneficial for families. And so it's always a but when you talk about paid parental leave. At least I would say three years back. There was literally no momentum on the right to do anything on that but now With with sort of presenting the data and the evidence that look this is really a struggle for families that this is really something that would ease the burden that working parents face that this is something that we can do in a minimally costly way. And it's really about you know how we design the policy that matters. You know that would that we need to figure out. How do we do this in a way? That doesn't burden businesses but that still benefits workers. I think if you change the conversation to allow something. That isn't always bitching one side against the other. I think it's always possible to make a breakthrough and I think what what was going on with. Parental leave was there was this You know sort of feeling that will. Parental leave was all about workers and businesses. Were not deriding paid. Leave then you know the into some extent they will bad businesses and that you know they didn't care enough about workers and I think if you come in and say look. They're legitimate costs to consider for businesses and a lot of businesses want to do right by their workers. But I'm not able to do it because there. Are you know actual costs to letting employees take leave to actually may be paying for that leave and and you know other other aspects of the policy that I think you you can get both sides to talk to each other so so i. I sometimes think that you know when a policy idea comes up from certain side. There's a certain perspective that that comes with it. That is not always appealing to people on the other side. But but I think there are ways to get two sides to talk to each other. That that does breakthrough that ideological divide. That does allow people to say okay. Maybe I'm not all in but you know there is a starting point and and that's why I think it's You know it's always have fault to have the data the evidence and everything ready to go. So that RAN POLICYMAKERS. Do come on board. That's not the time to be scrambling for the evidence and the data and see that happening with the climate. The climate change too. I mean traditionally again. You know we didn't see a lot of action on the right To do more on climate change but now we are. You know we are seeing more a more People on the right policy makers set of coming on board and saying okay you know. What do we do about this so so? Let's not ignore the issue. What do we do about it? I you know whether or not I believe in. Climate change is is irrelevant. You know we Rican still do something to address pollution and You know but but if we can do it in a way that doesn't Overly Hama businesses that doesn't involve raising taxes. And maybe there's a way to define a middle ground so I think it's always about you know. Let's have the data the evidence the you know the research ready to go. But let's allow people to find a middle ground to find where they fit into the policy. And how you know how. It's often a question of how you design the policies that you can address the concerns of both sides and not just one side and I think that middle ground always does exist. So it's sort of like just to kind of boil it down my own. Had like people have their ideologies. And then you have to say like okay. You're on the left. You're on the right years this policy. We have to try to make this work. So it's palatable to both sides yes absolutely you know. What are you willing to give you know? What are you willing to come to the middle for? I mean even within the AM Brookings Working Group. You know because we had people from the left and the right. They were often huge debates. About how long should the leave policy? Should it be six months at some people wanted or should it? Just be eight six weeks four weeks as as others wanted and so we realized with you know within our working group that there were people who talked very differently. But I think we agree to come together because the overarching concern. Was that if you did nothing then. You're actually you. You're not making any headway and you're not helping anyone so rather than be stuck at the extremes. We agreed to come together on a consensus proposal. That isn't ideal for anybody on the left or the right. Even if you approach our group members they have their own idea of how bad parental leave should be done in a huge disagreements. But I think at the end of the day if you can tell yourself well. What is the larger goal that you're trying to attain and if that is relief for working families of that Israeli for Barron's thank you ha you owe it to yourself and to the country and to society to to be able to overcome those differences and to come together? You know on something that may not be your ideal plan but that still gets the ball moving the ball rolling on this issue because there are many many more people suffering But the lack of a policy And we really need to do something. something on it. And so you really do care about your constituents a you know I think you have to bridge. Those divides and you have to agree to compromise. It seems like some politicians senators congresspeople. Whoever might say And I'm kind of thinking Chris. Christie popped into my head when he said he didn't believe in climate change and for some people. I'm wondering if they would be like luck parental leave. Yep Love It. It sounds wonderful but look I. It doesn't sell to my constituency or climate change are so I'm just kinda wondering how much does sometimes it's like I gotta get reelected and this is not gonNA fly in my district. And so what he wants from me. I don't know how much like my question is like. Have you run across people who are like look I? It sounds great but I can't vote for this because it's just a Republican and that doesn't fly or I'm a Democrat and look that doesn't fly and there you go absolutely that's absolutely true and it's not just amongst congressman. I think new you know there are good. Genuine debates to be had even within organizations and even within the think tank community. You know there are conservatives who feel like the you know the the federal government has no role to play in providing bad brand to leave you that too. Yeah run against her like it but this is not. This is not our job exactly. Yeah and you know and it stems from through this conservative concern about. But do we need more government? Isn't there too much government already. And if we if we now start saying well there's yet another entitlement program that we're going to offer to people and you know the concern as that. This is just going to grow over time. And so the size of government grows and we already sort of underfunded on other entitlement programs. And so what happens if you tack on a new one and I think these are all legitimate concerns And so you always have this. You know a trade off between well. What are the costs of not having a policy? And what are the cost of having a policy and against the against the. What are the benefits of allowing people to have access to per parental leave? And so what we try to do in the report is sort of be more transparent about cost. We actually set up a cost calculator online calculator. That tells you if you design a policy a with this duration with a certain duration level with a certain wage replacement. These other costs. How do we who's going to bear the burden off of these us? You know it's going to be. The employer is going to be the employees so in our plan we actually made it an employee payroll tax because we said we don't need new taxes on businesses but I think it's always possible to sort of look at each concern and Save A. What's the right solution? You know if if we are concerned about the cost of these policies ballooning up in A. Let's get an estimate of what the cost looks like if it's you know if it's something that's palatable to people then let's move forward with it otherwise. Let's think about redesigning the policy in a way that reduces costs for them. But I think you at least have to be at the starting point way. You're willing to look at you. Know different estimates. You're willing to save. There's you know there's A. There is a cost-benefit calculation And you know and I and I want to move forward on it. You're absolutely right. There will be people who simply want to ignore the issue. And don't think that we need to you know be doing anything and it's not something that Republicans and Conservatives should do and I think you know my argument to them has always been well. If you're not going to be part of the debate you know someone else will be an and if you if you diffuse to acknowledge climate change if you refuse to acknowledge you know the the burden that a lack of paid leave. Policies is imposing on the country. Then you know Democrats are gonNA come out and say well you know then? Are we of doing these policies is the right way? And then there's no counterargument setting at least if you open your mind to the idea that look the country needs these policies. And if I if I can figure out what would work for me. As a policymaker. What proposal am I willing to put forward that addresses a lot of the concerns that I have currently with other proposals? Then I think there's a talking point and there's a way to start that conversation but you know if people don't want to engage in the debate than I think the you know that that is a much tougher Process due to have to deal with big and I do think you lose out. You know I think those policy makers and the you know the party as a whole if you're not willing to engage on the issues because then you know some of the stuff that eventually passes and Congress will not be something that you are at all happy with it so so I would rather engage with the debate and say well. I don't like the design of X Y and Z policy. Rather than saying well I choose to ignore the policy completely. Because I don't think you know the government needs to be a bottle fed do you do you think your Fr- Your message reaches the the voters I mean. Americans are famously deaf when it comes to numbers charts tax like they. Don't you know like what you're saying to me right now? It's like wow. Here's the data irritated..

federal government Senator Rubio AM Brookings Working Group congressman Congress Barron Chris Christie
Grad Students Will Receive Billions in Debt Forgiveness

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:13 min | 8 months ago

Grad Students Will Receive Billions in Debt Forgiveness

"Believe you know by now that Americans have a lot of student. Loan debt and many people are paying down. That debt was something called an income based repayment plan. That's where your payments are based on. Yes your income and you pay a percentage of that income every month and then if after twenty to twenty five years you haven't paid off those loans. The government will toss what remains of your Iou into the trash. But so how much is that? GonNa cost the government as taxpayers. The Congressional Budget Office put out a report answering that very question yesterday. And the number is around two hundred and seven billion dollars over the next decade. Wow marketplace's justin who reports it might sound like the government's issuing a get out of jail free card for all student borrowers but Justin Drager at the National Association of Student. Financial aid administrators says graduate students stand to benefit the most. There are less subsidies grants available for graduate students and there are more high cost programmes for graduate students the CBO report says Grad students on income based repayment plans. To two thousand dollars on average. Five Times what an undergraduate on the same plan over the last decade the percentage of Grad students participating in the program has grown six-fold drager says while the program was meant to be a safety net for students. The more students are needing the safety net than I. It should be a warning signal that we have a distress in the student. Loan market part of the issue. Is that a lot of graduate programs. Don't lead to higher. Earning jobs says Antoinette floor is at the Center for American progress you have people like social workers and teachers who may already have undergraduate debt and they are going into a field where the earnings are relatively low borrowers on income based repayment plans. Typically pay off their loans using ten to fifteen percent of their discretionary income each month. That's often barely enough to make a dent in what they owe says. Jason Delile the American Enterprise Institute. The payments are very low relative to what people are borrowing and relative to the term before they would have the debt forgiven the C. B. O. Estimates that by the end of the decade eighty-one percent of the government's two hundred billion in student loan. Forgiveness will go to graduate students.

Justin Drager Congressional Budget Office National Association Of Studen American Enterprise Institute Five Times Antoinette Floor Jason Delile Center For American
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 9 months ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
Mitch McConnell says there is 'zero chance' Trump is removed

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:37 min | 11 months ago

Mitch McConnell says there is 'zero chance' Trump is removed

"The impeachment trial which is expected if the house passes this impeachment of President Trump this next week senators serve as jurors and they take an oath to be impartial. That's important context for what you're about to see. The Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell Sean Hannity. Last night they everything I do during this. I'm coordinating with White House counsel. There will be no the difference between the president's position our position as to how to handle this. There's no chance the president's going to be removed from office. My my hope is that there won't be a single Republican who votes for either of these articles of impeachment have essentially the jury foreman in this very serious constitutional process announcing he's going to have the defended dictate the trial. And thus obviously if you control the rules you may control. The verdict norm Ornstein a long time measured voice in Washington responding thus quote McConnell studying and outrageous admission that he's in the tank already for trump on the trial. Rose is a flat violation of the Ot will take his jer if a jury foreman and a murder trial was founded work closely. With the defense he would be prosecuted strong words McConnell though and this is important knows what he's doing in fact he's taken this very oath administered by the Chief Justice on the Senate floor to be impartial before so he has every reason to know that what he's saying today is a public announcement that guts or even violates the OT is about to take care. It was in the impeachment trial of Clinton. We'll all senators. Now stand and raise your right hand you will do impartial justice. According to the Constitution and laws so help you God the joining us now. Is that historian or scenic attributed the Atlantic and a resident scholar at the right leaning American Enterprise Institute as well as Joyce fans for US ATTORNEY MSNBC NBC legal analysts. Tell me you're thinking norm. I smacked by this. Not that I expected. McConnell was is going to follow the facts and where they would lead which would be to remove Donald Trump from office. This is a a partisan process. It's going to be a partisan process but to basically admit before you even start the trial that it's rigged is just quite astonishing and in a way it reminds me of Donald Trump in the campaign saying Russia. If you're listening get the emails followed by just a few weeks ago. China if you're listening get me dirt on Biden. It's I'm going to say it right out in the open. And what are you going to do about

Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump President Trump Senate Foreman Norm Ornstein Sean Hannity White House Clinton American Enterprise Institute Resident Scholar Murder Rose China Washington Msnbc Biden
Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

Thom Hartmann

05:37 min | 11 months ago

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

"In our science fact of the day this just in according to the world meteorological association no you know flaming left wing think tank the a this is the W. ammo the literally the world meteorological association atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide CO two are now at the highest ever in three million years now that is longer than human history human history only goes back a couple hundred thousand years so atmosphere CO two levels right now are higher than when Lucy was around right the the pre human and a higher than when Lucy's ancestors were around getting Lucy was only about a million or so ago all of which means that our children and grandchildren can expect temperatures to continue to rise more extreme weather more sea level rise more destruction to marine life more destruction of land based ecosystems more death of insects and and stuff at the bottom of the food chain which then echoes up so that the birds die and and we're saying this right now you know sixty seventy percent of certain kinds of birds particularly the insect insectivorous birds drawn from our planet we're looking at at at an insect apocalypse right now and and this is just the very beginning we have not yet even hit one point five degrees Celsius increase in temperature over the bass line and the pre industrial base line I mean we're just about there but we haven't quite hit it and the bottom line what what all these climate scientists are saying is is that we have to stop it right there I can't go any farther and yet what is the industry doing right now and and in on the right wing media that is that is supportive of industry while they're making fun of the stuff I mean Michael Mann for example the the the scientist he's been a guest on this program many times as a brilliant easy university of Pennsylvania sciences he's the guy who invented the cop the hockey stick conception of the SCO to going up that Al Gore popularized bed professor of cleans climate science or atmospheric science or whatever it is add to Penn state university one of probably a top five climate scientists in the world Michael Mann me was made fun of by the competitive interest enterprise institute in their blog ran Samberg wrote that well first of all they they attacked Michael Mann they said that his science was nonsense and and that is so Penn state did an investigation because there was all this ball Rollin publicity Penn state did an investigation what they found was that he was totally stand up everything he said was true and the way he said it was fine and though he published it was in compliance with scientific rigorous scientific standards reviews stuff so the compatible devices that is one of these right wing think tanks in quotes it really just a propaganda show operation for industry guy name brand Sandburg wrote that Penn state had quote covered up one two in by Michael Mann and characterize man as quote the Jerry Sandusky of climate science because he had quote molested and tortured data in service of politicized science and then not a blog posted by hosted by the National Review online the national reviews the magazine that William F. Buckley started back in the day when he was alive the saying that the you know the National Review is supporting segregation not just in South Africa but in the United States as well apartheid the National Review still around even though he is gone and they said in the end they oppose this was mark staying he said the man was behind the fraudulent climate change study in the investigation clearing him was a cover up basically and so Michael Landon Jr mattered factions from from the competitive enterprise institute see I am from National Review and instead they naturally you published an op ed by rich Lowry their editor titled get lost well so Matt Michael Mann suit and they just tried to get the lawsuit dismissed and here's the headline this is in the Washington post's Robert Barnes a climate scientists may pursue his definition lawsuit against a magazine in a Washington think tank after the Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene at this stage of the litigation Sam Alito dissented Sam Mr craze right wing dissented but the the Supreme Court said not spread go ahead and so on it's absolutely amazing I mean this is this is so so here we are we've got more CO two in the atmosphere than at any time in the history of the human race or even the pre human race day in other holidays mmhm more and more CO two in the air our course it takes sometimes as much as a century to that for the CO two in a holding heat and to accumulate to the point where you really start seeing the effects we're already starting to and you've got industry trying to pretend that there's not and there's nothing to see here and making fun of it ridicule and the folks and I've got real scientists were starting to fight back and say no this is real stuff and then the world meteorological organization just comes out and says CO two levels higher than they've ever been

World Meteorological Associati Hundred Thousand Years Sixty Seventy Percent Five Degrees Celsius Three Million Years
Dean Phillips' case for a carbon fee to tackle climate change

Climate Cast

12:45 min | 1 year ago

Dean Phillips' case for a carbon fee to tackle climate change

"Support for climate cast comes from Bank of America financing clean energy, initiatives and advancements in renewable energy and spurring innovation in and the growth of environmentally focused companies markets and jobs. Bank of America NA member FDIC, Representative Phillips, let's start with the nuts and bolts of the proposed carbon dividend act. What would it accomplish will Pol it's going to accomplish what I think we need most which is to provide incentives and disincentives, and then let the market move us to where we want to go which is to reduce CO two emissions and migrate to a clean energy economy. There seems to be universal agreement on that. And the notion that I'm co-sponsoring is the energy innovation and carbon dividend act. And it would put a price on carbon which is actually a bipartisan notion, I want people to know that the Genesis is as much Republican as it is democratic and in this case, we're proposing a fifteen dollar per ton fee on. Carbon and that would be entirely returned that the proceeds which could be about eighty billion dollars in the first year. I would be returned holy to taxpayers to the tune of about a thousand dollars per year for each family, and it and and the cost of fossil fuel products would rise as a result. For example, a gallon of gasoline may go up about thirteen cents based on the fee in the first year again that money's returned in the form of a dividend to all taxpayers, and it's a way to start putting a disincentive on further fossil fuel use and migrate to clean energy. I it's a simple notion. It's a market base notion. It does not grow government, and it reduces our carbon emissions, and that is exactly the type of policy thoughtful bipartisan policy that I think we need. So here's a clip from your press release quote carbon dividend trust fund for the American people to encourage market-driven innovation clean, energy technologies and market. Efficiencies. So we create this fund is your proposal. And then the money goes into that fund. What are some examples than of how that fun would be used to drive more technology that could help lower greenhouse gas emissions? So so pollen in this case all the money in this proposal that I'm co-sponsoring all the dollars would go back to American citizens. And and that's what's unique about it. It does not grow government. And it does not provide more dollars to federal programs, for example, and and those dollar what people do with those dollars of courses up to them. I of course, I think it will spur investment, and it will create a number of millions of perhaps over two million green energy jobs, but it's not a trust fund to benefit any thing or anybody other than tax payers right now. Now, I will say I'm also giving some thought to whether or not we should modestly increase that that fee and direct some of the proceeds to an infrastructure Bill as you might know. Speaker Pelosi and mature minority leader Schumer met with President Trump in the White House this week, they agreed on a two trillion dollar infrastructure plan that right now has no funding. And I think this could be an interesting way to accomplish both because we surely need both you mentioned by partisan support. Do you think you'll get the necessary votes to get this through and perhaps make it law? We'll tell you Paul nothing as you. Well know, nothing is easy and congress, but that's a challenge that I'm taking seriously, and and very optimistic about and this is a unique Bill in that it has a number of cosponsors everyone from Barbara Lee who is one of the more progressive members of the democratic caucus to Francis Rooney the Republican from Florida, it's a notion that the American Enterprise Institute, the conservative think tank supports and even supported by George Shultz and Howard Baker former secretaries of state who devised a very similar plan with their group called the climate leadership council and it. Is it is remarkably bipartisan, and it's one that I think I think it is the most likely to generate support on both sides of the aisle. But like anything else it has to be sold. It has to be promoted, and we not just those in congress. But we in our communities have to start promoting the solution to one another. We're going to build a consensus to get it done. We've seen tremendous progress Representative Phillips in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electric power sector. We see Minnesota producing twenty five percent of our electric power from renewable 's it seems like the biggest opportunity now for further reductions is in transportation, how does America achieve similar reductions in the transportation sector over the next decade? Why favor first of all I favor. Notions li-. I think we should have a prominent very innovative high speed rail network in the United States our competitors around the world have surpassed us broadly. So doing would significantly reduce emissions and also. Provide a very high speed very connected America too many who right now don't have access to transportation. And then this this notion of pricing carbon begins it provides disincentive to consume fossil fuel. So it will in theory, reduce force both businesses and individuals to look for more efficient, modes of transportation. And this is this is a way to begin the migration. It is not a mandate. It is not an iron fist at a simply putting a price on something that has a significant cost to us now in an extraordinary cost down the road. And that's because it's market based the market should figure it out. And I'm a believer in that. And it will so ill do the same in transportation. I'm curious about the political winds in the Republican party in Washington DC, some of your colleagues in the congress, we hear some people voicing more support and more understanding that these extreme weather events. On the rise. And that that's turning costly for us. Do you sense that even behind the scenes, what will your colleagues say to you in terms of how they are viewing the current climate change situation and how we might be impacted by that going forward. We'll pollen it's becoming undeniable. And if people wish to argue the reasons why they can do so, but it is time that we acknowledged truth. We'd take some bold stands, and I can tell you in my private conversations with of course, democratic colleagues in an increasing number of my thoughtful Republican colleagues, you know, we acknowledge what's going on. And it is affecting deeply effecting American communities throughout the country from the heartland to the coasts, and it's real I'm sure that in no small part Francis, Rooney from Florida, the Republican from Florida is supporting this notion because he sees what's happening in his state with that said it takes leadership, and it takes consensus to get this done. I in and my hope is that our Republican colleagues. Start lining up to support something that again has some has Republican Genesis, and that means pricing carbon and letting the market take charge. That is actually the way we build bridges and congress and throughout this country. So I'm hopeful we're not there yet. But it's these conversations both on the airwaves in neighborhoods and called the sank. So we have to start having. Let's talk about opportunity a change even climate change can sometimes bring opportunity one example, this jobs, boom that we've seen with renewable energy could climate change solutions. Be our next economic moonshot. I think there's no question. Some studies indicate that if we pass this Bill the energy innovation and carbon dividend act that that could spur over two million new jobs. I think that will be happening anyway because we are migrating. The good news is we have thoughtful enterprises around the country. Excel energy is taking a bold stand to invest in renewables in no small part because we provided in. Enters over the last number of years for them to do the same thing. So I do I think I think we're on path. And I think there's an opportunity here that every state whether it's a red state or blue state can recognize that not only will these green energy jobs be more prevalent, but they will be high paying jobs, and if we can create a thoughtful strategy as Americans to provide the right training to young people to enter this enter these new jobs that are created everybody wins, and there is a way to do. So and I can tell you also as a new member of congress I've been very pleased with the clergy -ality between members of both sides of the aisle, especially in our freshman class. And I think there's a new ethos a new spirit, and I think over time we are going to join hands and build a better economy and most importantly, reduce our emissions and preserve our planet for children, grandchildren. We're seeing shifts in climate change opinion. Now, Yale and George Mason study says now that six in ten Americans are either concerned or alarmed. About climate change. What do you hear from Minnesotans about the desire for climate change action? I hear every day from people throughout our state. Not just in my district that this is important to them. And I'll tell you who's making the most difference in congress right now. It's young people. We see young people from middle schoolers through high school and college students in the halls of congress all the time coming to our offices and making very impassioned pleas that we do something. And that makes me optimistic you know, Minnesotans have taken have taken conservation seriously for many years, we we love our environment. It is not political. And I think Minnesota can be a real bellwether state for the rest of the country in in leading that change. But as Americans we are very good at often pointing out at least from a policy perspective where we're quite adept at pointing out problems now is the time for solutions. And I'm one who wants to listen to any solutions. I don't care what the Genesis is Minnesotans are the same way. We listened to the. Ideas, we tend to implement them. And I think we I hope the country will look to us and I wanted to be a leader. And that's my intention. We have a lot of successful fortune five hundred companies based in Minnesota, and I've interviewed several executives from those companies take a company like general mills it's been around for one hundred and fifty years and they used to produce their grain by milling with power from the Mississippi River and they're moving forward on climate solutions. We see this with a lot of companies, in fact, that momentum seems to be much stronger than the momentum in Washington. Is there a disconnect there, and do you think your colleagues that have been reluctant are seeing these corporations move forward and his that possibly an example for them. They there's a disconnect pollen and I recognize it as well. And I've spoken with a number of CEO's of our state's largest enterprises and reminded them of of not just their responsibility. But the opportunity that exists for them to influence policy makers, and that's happening. And I could the list of. American corporations and multinational corporations that support the notion of pricing carbon would surprise a lot of people, including some of the biggest energy companies. So that is a massive opportunity. And by by the way, that's part of a bigger conversation about business being the sources a source of solutions for this country and not the source of problems. And you know, I wanna see this country move to compassionate capitalism, and what a wonderful and beautiful way to start with affecting climate change policy. And I do see the day coming and I'm speaking with a number though, CEO's both here and around the country, and I'm hoping we can mobilise finally the house passed a Bill I believe this week that would keep the US in the Paris agreement. What are the chances of that given the landscape of the Senate and the White House these days while given the landscape of the Senate and the White House? Unfortunately, the answer is unlikely and it's appalling, the the United States of America should be not just at the table, Paul. We should be leading that is the America in which I grew up. It is what I aspire to. And I will say though that the the power to proceed if you will really lies in in the hands of of every American to remind the representatives, not just in Washington, but in their own state houses that this is important, and that's the that's the type of American leadership. I want to reconstitute realestate. And I I do think we're going to get there. I don't think in this congress because of the circumstances in the Senate and the White House, but over time we shall this is a statement of principles. That's the statement of the democratic party's principles that this is important, and I also see foresee that climate change and addressing it with thoughtful policy is going to be one of the big drivers of the twenty twenty election. I hope it is deserves to be because I think it's an existential threat and not just to this nation, but surely to the entire world US house district. Three Representative dean Phillips. Thank you for your perspective on climate cast today. Thank you very much.

Congress Representative Phillips Minnesota United States America White House Bank Of America Washington Francis Rooney Florida Paul Senate Republican Party CEO Fdic
U.S. Worker Productivity Advances at Best Rate Since 2010

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:24 min | 1 year ago

U.S. Worker Productivity Advances at Best Rate Since 2010

"We had best begins today. I think with the definition worker productivity is the metric of the day and in very basic terms. It is the number of widgets produced per hour worked. I mentioned it because we learned this morning in the first quarter of the year productivity rose at the fastest pace since two thousand fourteen inserts caveat here about quarterly numbers bouncing around a lot. But generally speaking, we are seeing increased productivity now that is weird because more productivity usually leads to higher wages, which really isn't happening at the Richard think, and sometimes it can lead to inflation, which is definitely not happening. So what gives marketplace's Tracey Samuelson hopped into a metaphorical boat to explain. Picture crew team. Two. One jumping eight rowers workers and a manager the Cox in on each trip. Aparna matter is an economist at the American Enterprise Institute, she says if you want the boat to go faster, the owner could maybe get those rowers some better ores or faster boat. It's the same number of people in abode, but having access to tools just makes the board go that much faster, or maybe the owner could figure out some way to improve results ro faster without a big investment. Dean Baker is at the center for economic and policy research and tight labor market. Employers have incentive to try to Condomi's on labor. They have an incentive to figure out the reorganized their workplace to be more efficient Baker says if companies can produce more with the same workers, they don't have to compete to hire new workers in a tight labor market, which often means paying more and those companies can absorb the modest wage increases. We have been seeing without raising prices, which may help explain why inflation is so low can Kutner is an economist at Williams College. We tend to even flation as. Happening when people are trying to buy more stuff than is being produced. If you get a raise, and you have extra money to spend that increased demand for goods can push prices up. But if you want to buy more stuff at the same time that the economy is making more stuff, they think it's the balance between those two that is preventing inflation from rising, but if wage gains started to really outpaced productivity growth, that's when you start to worry more about inflation.

Kutner Dean Baker Tracey Samuelson COX American Enterprise Institute Richard Williams College Condomi
William Barr, Democrats Clash Over Robert Mueller's Report

Ben Shapiro

02:09 min | 1 year ago

William Barr, Democrats Clash Over Robert Mueller's Report

"Four year here. We're going to go over William buyer attorney general in congress speaking before the Senate Judiciary committee Democrats, making fools out of themselves bars, basically running circles around the mainly because he's not adult and this entire charade where William bar. The attorney general is supposed to be some sort of corrupt actor covering for Donald Trump's guilt on obstruction of Justice. It's just asinine. The report is publicly available. There is no cover up. What the hell? Are you all talking about that in just a second? Plus a little bit later on in the show. We're going to be getting to Arthur Brooks, he's going to be joining us from the American Enterprise Institute will ask him about Venezuela. We'll ask him about the state of domestic politics as well. And we will be talking about a city Denver which now wants to give homeless folks the rights to camp anywhere in the city. Can't see how that goes wrong. But let's get direct to the actual testimony by William bar in these. Senate Judiciary committee today. So click forty-three William Barr says correctly that the intense focus on his summary of the report is mind, bending -ly. Bizarre. This is obviously true. So the fact is that if you remember the time line Muller turned in his report to William bar William bar, then a few days later issued a four page letter over the weekend, he should four page letter summarising, the findings no collusion, and he says in the letter that Muller had not said whether from should be prosecuted on obstruction. He declined to make a recommendation on prosecution, but in his view, there was no evidence sufficient to lend itself to a successful prosecution in that case. And then a few weeks later the entire report is released. And so we all see it now. And nothing bar said was a lie. Nothing bar said was untrue. And yet Democrats eager to suggest that secretly secretly. Even though Muller didn't recommend prosecution secretly Muller wanted to recommend prosecution and William bar secretly decided that he was going to question on behalf of the various from administration, and that he then released a letter that undercut the conclusions of the report, which is now publicly available, and we can all read which didn't have to do by the way, never release

William Bar Donald Trump Muller William Barr Senate Judiciary Committee Attorney Senate Judiciary Arthur Brooks American Enterprise Institute Denver Congress Venezuela Four Year
Why the 2019 Indian election feels different to 2014

Between The Lines

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Why the 2019 Indian election feels different to 2014

"Today. We chat with one of the world's leading communists about India richer Shama from Morgan Stanley. He's argument is that in rural India old class divisions. Still rule local politics which could spell trouble for Narendra Modi in my elections, plus climate change student politics, a divide between two impressive school students. Stay with us for that. Well, you might recall Narendra Modi's landslide election victory five years ago. How to believe but twenty four nine huge landslide election victory Ahmadi. Now, we lived the BJP this is the Hindu nationalist party live them to power. This was the first Indian prime minister in thirty years to govern without a coalition any Hedda rare opportunity to enact market friendly reforms that had stalled under his predecessor Manmohan Singh now until relatively recently Modi's BJP was odds on favorite to be reelected. But such as the magic politics that Modi's chances of victory. And now fifty fifty says, my guest richer Shama is chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley investment management. And he's author of a terrific new book called democracy on the road at twenty five year journey through India as just out by penguin Random House richer. Welcome back to between the lines Gregory back with your own thing. What do you think Modi's? Reelection is no longer a sure thing I think that when I wrote the book, and he was coming across a very United opposition. You just mentioned about how you wanna landslide victory in two thousand fourteen but one very important statistic. From that election was that he only or his party only got thirty one percent of the total vote share in India, and he was able to win a majority of the seats because the parliamentary democracy is so fag minted in India that the opposition is quite divided and you get a disproportionate number of seats with even thirty percent of the vote. So what was changing over the Bosnia? Is that a lot of the opposition parties in India state by state were coming together to put up a United front against that removes? That's really what was changing and why at taught is fog ability or winning the election was now much more fifty fifty than sort of hundred percent probably than most bookies were giving him. I'd say. Euro even to ago now, the only thing which has changed, and this is the changing nature of politics and any country, especially in India is the last couple of weeks they've had this escalated tension between India and Pakistan, and that's sort of please into Modi's hand. So I would say that once again, the the momentum has shifted back in his favor. Just because of the very unexpected develop in that taking place over the past few weeks, the accidents of history we've had on this program. Several times of the last five years, Richard Soudan, undo my from the American Enterprise Institute, you know, and he said that in two thousand fourteen there was an ABC mood that is anybody, but congress this is the the left of center ruling party for so long in India's history. You don't really see an anti Mody y emerging. Then do you know, I think if election is not about that his base remains pretty much intact. But I said the big difference that the opposition is coming together in many states. I'm critical battleground states such as the most populous state of India with really two hundred million people in such critical states the opposition is coming together. And when they do that, then typically the the leading party tends to be in trouble. That's the history of Indian politics. So that to me is the big dynamic at currently. Yes. So in a way, you're saying that these elections in my they more likely to shape up as a series of state contests. It's not really a nationwide contest between Mody and congress is it. That's right know, that the outside world likes to think of it that way because the two names that sort of resonate most with the outside world. I I now in the Gumby dine in but it's important to member that booties. Put together the total vote share in. India is Bailey fifty percent five zero. And so the other half is about all these regional parties in India. And that's really what I've tried to bring out in my book, which that this is the story of many India's India's less a country that our continent like the European Union with many states Funk's practically functioning like countries. And I think that that is the story of India which gets lost in translation to the outside world often. Now, this new book of yours democracy on the road. It's the result of your travels through India following election campaigns, pretty much since the lighten awning ninety south of the last twenty years, and you Rauch quote in an era when democracy is said to be in retreat worldwide, it's thriving in India. Yeah. That's the curse of the fact that when I've traveled for these elections, I find it soon remarkable that despite only advantages that the incumbent

India Narendra Modi Morgan Stanley BJP Shama Bosnia Manmohan Singh Prime Minister Gregory European Union Hedda Congress American Enterprise Institute ABC Rauch Richard Soudan Funk Pakistan
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Of Saturday NBC nightly news, among other jobs. A lot of Telemundo. Michelle said door White House correspondent for PBS NewsHour. Susan watch bureau chief of USA today and president of the American Enterprise Institute, and author of the new book love, your enemies, how decent people can save America from the culture of contempt. Good luck with that. Start today. Well, let's start you know, Arthur, I want to start with you with better rock because in some ways. Spend a lot of time this week. We about your book and he is trying to be an uplifting messenger. You try to be an uplifting messenger from a conservative point of view. But I would say this. He's a lot of optimism. But the question is is there any there there? Do you sense there there? It's hard to say. I mean, I think that he basically has ascertained that America does not want another player in the outrage industrial complex and for. He has to do one thing. He knows that for democrat to be Donald Trump. You have to be basically nice normal and not weird. So that's what he's trying to do. Now. The problem is you have to back pedal. All the time. You have to Paula Jones. Is you know, he says, yeah, I'm outta town a lot my wife has to take care of the kids when I'm gone pretty normal joke. And now he has to backpedal and apologize for it. That's a mistake for him to do that in my view, nothing. He's asking my point of view, but I actually believe that the brand of being normal and nice can be incredibly successful. Not to be outraged. Not the fire people up in the way that they hate others and treat other people's contempt. So so far so good now. He's. He's got to have some more substance going forward as you pointed out, and we'll see there's another challenge here. Susan, let me read you from the Daily Beast under the unbearable male privilege of Beto Rourke. And this is what the author writes. It's not news that women have to be at least twice as qualified and still expect at least twice as much criticism in doubt. But the battle reception points to a problem that percents specifically in presidential politics today for both Democrats, and as the current presidency, clearly illustrates Republicans we have a bias towards newness conflict and theater, by the way, the contrast between Beto and club czar, if you will in the two ways they're going about this. I think this is emblematic pretty remarkable. Of course, Amy Cobra sharp, probably could not have thought of herself as born to be president. Because when he was born women just generally could not aspire to be president. And as a matter of fact, you may have noticed we've not yet had a woman as president even today. So that's a message that may persist with some little girls. So of course, he doesn't come with that sort of confidence about her role in. The world. But what she does offer is centrism pragmatic views. Capable message. What does she want a cheap? Let's bring down healthcare costs. What does he wanna chief? Let's heal the nation. Those are very different approaches to presidential politics. I was thinking about your exchange though, with Senator Hobart chart when you thought about when you asked her about reparations, and instead of articulating all the different inequalities that come with black people and white people in this country, she pivoted to climate change he pivoted to talking about all Americans. And that's a message that of course, should be had by Democrats. But I think a Democratic Party, especially the democratic base is hungry for someone to say, I know that things aren't equal. And I'm not just gonna lift all boats. I'm gonna look at this little boat here and say African Americans have particular problems that stemmed from slavery. And let's look at them in a in a in a way where we can actually look at things not just as all people, am I think battle is going to have some issues when it comes to people receiving him in this party. Because I think we're looking at all of these candidates with two thousand nine hundred nine after the metoo movement after Ferguson, we're looking at him and saying, okay, you have. Of your wife in this three minute video, why can't you speak? So I think that there are a lot of people not to say that she should speak. But there's people that are looking at and saying the wife is going to be there. Why not have her say something? So I think that some of this might be our outrage, right? Some people might say you're being politically, correct. But I think battles going to have to have to navigate and yet better was the one that gets a Vanity Fair cover yet bento is the guy with the dog. And the pickup truck is on every cover of magazines. Why is that why is it that someone is chosen to be the poster person for what's hot and interesting at the time? Why is it that people who have deep thoughts, and and cluber had some very interesting policy positions. I'm talking about Venezuela. Which is by the way going on right now. It's a crisis that we must deal with. But why is it that he is the one the flavor of the month because he's because he's not legitimate because he's attractive? I mean, it's the truth of the matter is he somebody that people want to look at the same reason that people are talking about alexan-. Andro Kazu Cortez is because she's she's attractive people want. She's interesting. She's she's nice to look at it on television. And and that's what television does it gives you an image along with the message, magazines, what magazines huge huge opportunity, not a guarantee anything. Is. He John Edwards is he Ronald Reagan. Well, the fact is Ronald Reagan was good looking and he was fresh, and he was interesting, and he had a lot of very specific policy proposals. That he had developed over decades of thinking about them so on day, one better work doesn't need to know what he thinks about Medicare for all or have a coherent answer on impeachment on day, fifty better. I think we're gonna see a vetting of that. I think people are gonna look at Beto and say, why is he getting this this cover, and I was reading that article about the kind of the white male privilege that that writer from daily needs with writing about. And she said, well, why does he get to say that he's not exactly sure if things and gets to go on this kind of tour where he thinks about himself. I would I would say that Stacey Abrams. Someone who hasn't announced said she's still thinking about twenty twenty. She said, look, I'm still dealing. With the after effects of running for governor. And losing I think people are okay with that from a black woman. So I and somebody's would push back from the idea that only could do that. All right. There is another you brought up say San Francisco, by the way, I would Dan balls this morning. I mean, she's clearly leaning more into a presidential perhaps. And I think many people realize, but let me play that clip again from Joe Biden last night and forget the accidental slip up. Listen to the first part of what he said, very carefully here. It is. Criticized by the new left is the most progressive record of anybody running for.

Beto Rourke president America Telemundo NBC Ronald Reagan Michelle Donald Trump PBS White House correspondent Paula Jones Arthur bureau chief American Enterprise Institute Joe Biden USA Democratic Party backpedal Andro Kazu Cortez San Francisco
Politicians don't argue too much, they argue too poorly

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:58 sec | 1 year ago

Politicians don't argue too much, they argue too poorly

"Politics. These days can divide friends and family USA radio networks Timberg explorers. Why divisive? Hateful. Pundits angry campus. Activists in Twitter. Trolls today in America. There is an outrage industrial complex that prospers by setting Americans against each other. Arthur c Brooks is the president of the American Enterprise Institute, he says arguing with someone isn't wrong. But he also tells Fox News, we got know how to argue with someone. We don't argue too much are too poorly. That's the biggest problem that we have. There's a problem that we have in our society today, which is that we have as much polarization today between Democrats and Republicans there are between Israelis and Palestinians, and this causes a lot of contempt which is not anger. It's ten it's anger mixed with disgust this poll people apart one in six Americans stopped talking to a family member or close friend since two thousand sixteen election. It's the Reuters Paul Ryan, you totally it's it's catastrophic. As a matter of fact, can meet people are unhappy at worst of all they're not persuading anybody

America Paul Ryan Arthur C Brooks American Enterprise Institute USA Fox News President Trump
Trump delays increase in Chinese tariffs

The World

04:15 min | 1 year ago

Trump delays increase in Chinese tariffs

"First another day of reckoning in the US China trade war today was supposed to be the deadline for China to shape up if not the Trump administration would increase tariffs on more than six thousand types of Chinese imports. But President Trump is backing off. He's delayed new round of tariffs and says, quote substantial progress is being made in negotiations with China. Here's more from the world's Jason Margolis, the art of the deal again, or maybe not this time not with China says, economists, Derrick scissors, the idea that we're going to get the greatest deal ever, the greatest you'll ever is not going to pan out and it's going to blow up in his face. Meaning if Trump runs for president in two thousand twenty he'll have some explaining to do and a democratic candidate will be quoting candidate Trump in two thousand sixteen over and over again about how China's He actually said the words they're raping our country. We can't continue to allow China to rape our country, and that's what they're doing. And then. On sunday. He said we had the best relationship we've ever had China. It's very difficult to see how things have changed in the last two years or two and scissors focuses on the Chinese economy at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, he just doesn't see what the Trump administration has been able to get from the Chinese that other administrations haven't, for example, one major sticking point in US. China relations has been the forced transfer of technology where American companies hand over intellectual property in order to do business in China. Trump has said that's coming to an end, the Chinese, of course, have said, they've never course technology transfer. It's all voluntary. So them writing a law that says course, technology transfer. It doesn't do anything with the issue after issue. The Chinese are making the same old promises. He says as they have many times in the past. We have known for some mechanism as we have not had in the past. And none of those promises are gonna come to fruition. But let's say President Trump does turn out to be the master negotiator. He says he is can you turn the ship around for decades? U S China trade has worked this way. China builds it we buy it. It's hard to imagine all of this being resolved right away, economists, Katie Russ at the university of California Davis says if Trump really wanted to put pressure on China, if you want to have the quickest results, then joined TPP, the trans Pacific partnership that twelve nation trade agreement brokered by President Obama, Russ says, it would have shifted trade away from China to other countries that maybe we feel more. Close strategic alliances with but President Trump withdrew from that seventy two hours into his presidency and said the US would pursue bilateral trade agreements. Instead, of course, Trump wasn't the only one opposed to the TPP labor unions, and many Democrats worried that it could cost American jobs so back to China. Trump needs a deal a few days ago. He said talks are going very well and highlighted China's commitment to buy American corn corn, but a lot of it more than anyone thought possible. Welcome news in Illinois, the nation's second leading corn producer. I asked senior economist Mike Dougherty with the Illinois farm bureau, if he had any details on Trump's corn plan, we don't and it's being treated as well. It's possible. But we'll wait and see it protects happen. Illinois is also the nation's top soya producer, China is number one export market. But this season's export has been a bust in retaliation for Trump's tariffs last summer. China slap tariffs on US. Soybeans of that crop were about forty percent under where we normally would be at internal sales to China. Dorothy says more corn sales to China won't offset this. They don't sell much corn there. Many farmers do like Trump's overall economic policies, lower taxes fewer regulations still when it comes to trade. I asked dirty if Illinois farmers still believed in the president's message. We're not sure what exactly what that message is. What are we talking about in terms of long term payoff? I mean, we were a number one number two supplier out of the world to the Chinese market for supplying their soybeans. We could just get back to that. I think most of the farmers here would be pretty happy for the world. I'm Jason

President Trump China United States Illinois Jason Margolis Derrick Scissors Katie Russ American Enterprise Institute TPP Producer President Obama Illinois Farm Bureau Rape Washington Senior Economist Dorothy Mike Dougherty
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"And on the Michael Medved Show. If. If you have enthusiasm on the Trumpy veer phenomenon you can give us a call. I the reason that I think it's even relevant is there's a very interesting comment. And there's a good analysis the election done over to American Enterprise Institute, which of course, is one of the two leading conservative think tank tanks, our friend Arthur Brooks, who's a frequent guest on this show actually has been a guest host for me in the past Arthur's, just leaving as president of American Enterprise Institute. But a scholar Sam Abrams at American Enterprise Institute. Sam Abrams is a specialist and political geography. And he writes that over the last twenty years rural areas have become more and more Republican. And now, let's see source of a huge strengths for the Republican party used to be the Democrats would contest farm states and would contest farm areas not anymore. Rural areas are heavily Republican and urban centers, more and more and more democratic and you might say, well, how does that go with the gentrification of a lot of urban centers where there are people with money sometimes a lot of money moving in with a lot of those people are either older people with no children or their single people or their. Young married couples with no children. They're not your classic Republican classic Republican is somebody with who. Who's earning middle-class salaries whose middle range educational level. Most people with graduate degrees. Go democratic heavily in the past most people with college degrees went Republican slightly now it's headed in the other direction. And here's what Sam Abrams has to say, he says, the suburbs of waffled. Well, the rural voters became more Republican and urban voters became more democratic. The block moved slightly the left or right, depending on the election. These folks are flippable, and that's what we saw here. They're going to be retrospective voters. They're going to look at what's going on. And they're going to say are we happy with it? Or we comfortable with it. Making that group comfortable Abrahams said should be a goal of both parties in two thousand twenty the only really competitive territory, he says is the suburbs. Right. Let's go to your calls and two in Lubbock, Texas. Ian, you're on the Michael Medved Show. Hello, michael. Yes. I think the change in the suburbs is in part because the economy's doing so well and people were very comfortable, and it's allowed the Democrats to make make things about personalities about issues. And when they do that, they they seem to do very, well, mainly because we don't really have a great agenda, but they've got you know, positive personality. There's lots of platitudes and things that people in the suburbs. Feel good about and buy into. Positive personalities you obviously thinking of your recent Texas Phanom beta or Rourke, I I was just reading an a separate article. Do you know that the turnout in the state of Texas almost doubled? This was record turnouts for Democrats. The the Democrats were always there. There's people who've commented on this guys like Robert Pratt here in Texas. The Democrats have always been here. They just have been embarrassed to try and support bad candidates, and they they wouldn't support Lupe Valdez, but they did come out support beta really hurt down ballot. Oh, it was killed. I was just reading we have the story about the judges in Harris County in Houston who were wiped out. There are like fourteen Republican judges who were voted out of office. And and I know that the Republicans lost congressional seats and lost in the legislature in Texas as well. Here's the amazing thing in bay tos home county, which is around El Paso, voting participation. Almost tripled almost tripled. And by the way, El paso's Eighty-three percent Latino, hey, I appreciate your call. And I think you're right in other words, Democrats would rather not talk about issues. What issues works strongly for Democrats? Will they think medical care? And there's even a charge right now saying that medical care was the issue for Democrats and Republicans should blame their loss on one person. And now, it's not Trump a congressman who was defeated has that opinion. We will get to that in a moment on the Michael Medved Show. Meanwhile, this came in from Julie and Fort Worth regarding relief factor an artist, and I'm in my studio, I've got pain in my neck, and it's getting worse. I'm hearing the ads about really factors and I'm thinking, well, I'm gonna go ahead and order this two weeks later, and I've got much better range of motion. I'm able to carry these big canvases around and put stuff away and pick stuff up and move it around very very grateful that gave the to try I keep it in my purse. I keep it in my studio. Okay. And you can keep it anywhere. Just have it on hand because you have nothing to lose. But your pain in the whole world to gain relief factor is a dietary supplement that has no side effects, no chemicals. No drugs at all. Just good healthy stuff for your body. And you know what? Most people feel a real difference within five or six days. You should try it really nothing to lose and a great improvement in your quality of life to gain. Go to relieffactor dot com. That is relief factor dot com. When we come back. What about the idea that the real person who cost the Republicans control of the house of representatives wasn't Nancy Pelosi, and it wasn't Paul Ryan? And it wasn't Kevin McCarthy. It was well, we'll tell you what a defeated Republican conservative congressman has to.

Democrats Michael Medved Texas Sam Abrams Republican party American Enterprise Institute congressman Trumpy veer El Paso Arthur Brooks Lupe Valdez Lubbock Harris County Abrahams president Nancy Pelosi Fort Worth Kevin McCarthy Ian
Turkey's economy suffers amid U.S. sanctions and tariffs

KTAR Programming

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Turkey's economy suffers amid U.S. sanctions and tariffs

"Amidst a diplomatic spat between, Turkey of the US which has helped trigger a Turkish currency crisis a lawyer for the fifty year old, renewed, an appeal Tuesday for his release vice President Mike Pence made an. Appeal last month to bring sanctions against Turkey until pastor Andrew Brunson is, for now, Turkish media reports a court in Izmir has rejected an appeal for his release as Turkish officials announced heavy new tariffs on Some American products including cars alcohol and tobacco the Turkish vice president tweeting the tariffs are in response to what he. Calls the deliberate attack of the US administration on our

Turkey Nato Vice President Andrew Brunson China United States President Trump Competitive Enterprise Institu Europe Senior Fellow European Union South China Sea Yugoslavia Mike Pence Izmir Scott Carr Washington Ian Murray Ataturk
Republican Intros Bill That Would Turn Net Neutrality Into Law

Fitz and Brooks

01:52 min | 2 years ago

Republican Intros Bill That Would Turn Net Neutrality Into Law

"Me I'm still sources The atmosphere, is electric and then Likewise I think for any. Liverpool find a local team coming to, all of. This, probably similar to go and watch football good stuff well. Great place will, be this Sunday down at Levi stadium and of course the game in Michigan at the big house going to. Be expect to have about one hundred. Thousand fans there so, it'll be a lot of fun the international. Champions Cup including the, friendly, with the quakes on. Sunday we'll be down Levi's hey Dennis appreciate your time enjoy your time. Here. In the states and we'll. Talk to. You soon okay Thanks very much. Hard chairs all right good stuff from. Denis Irwin legendary man, you defender seven Premier League titles and a. European Cup among others, played, in the World Cup. As well as I get my notes straight in here here we go. Jimmy So we, do some business let's do a little bit of. Business kind. Of business and technology reporter Jason Middleton the markets. Are evening out with strong earnings reports smoothing the chop in the water from the talk of more trade tariffs it's a midterm election. Year and it seems that politics are a little strain these days the policy is where the rubber. Hits the road a building would codify net neutrality rules. At the federal level is several Republican. Sponsors away from getting a floor vote in the house the, twenty first century internet act would ban blocking rattling paid? Prioritization and eliminate all questions of jurisdiction that last one seems like it would be inherently bipartisan think it's going to eventually become law it's one of those things that will. Look back and say how is it that people were opposed, to net. Neutrality that's, a Silicon Valley congressman ro, Khanna he. Joins me on my Sunday show Technomic to talk about dragging congress into the twenty first century when it. Comes to digital policy I also have an. Author on from. The American Enterprise Institute talk about the other, side of..

Levi Stadium European Cup Liverpool Levi Denis Irwin Football American Enterprise Institute Technomic Michigan Jason Middleton Congress Jimmy Congressman Reporter Dennis
US, President Trump and China discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:32 min | 2 years ago

US, President Trump and China discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"Let's move on to the second chapter. In this week's US China chronicles President Trump today accused Beijing of manipulating it's currency. This is not a new charge. But one thing that has happened is an eight percent fall in the Chinese currency against the dollar since the trade spat began in the spring. And that does happen to help Chinese exporters which means now we not only have talk of a trade war but of a currency war as well. Marketplace's. Scott Tong are former bureau chief and Shanghai reports. In contrast to President Trump, Chinese policy makers aren't always so overt about punching back, but an eight percent drop in the currency. The Yuan. Yeah, that seems at least partially on purpose says economist, Bill Adams, with PNC financial services. It was telling me that the Chinese Yuan was appreciating against the US dollar in the first quarter of twenty eighteen and the depreciation of the UN began after the US started. To enact tariffs on Chinese imports. Here's how depreciation helps Beijing. It's about to get hit with a second round of US, tariffs, ten percent taxes on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese soya sauce, vacuum cleaners, fridges all kinds of stuff. So prices will go up but a cheaper currency pulls prices back down effectively in offsets, Brad sets are international economics fellow at the council on foreign relations. I think a week or currency is probably the easiest way for China to limit the trade impact of US tariffs. But there are risks China's weak. Currency already has President Trump threatening a broader trade war. Further, depreciation almost certainly would have been expected to have produced a political reaction in the US and a week Yuan also called the renminbi spooks investors in China says a communist Derrick scissors at the American Enterprise Institute. So the number one concern for the Chinese is they have to go slow and not alarmed people. Remember because otherwise they'll sell, they'll sell, you know, assets and the Chinese stock market. They'll sell Chinese bond holdings, etc. And they'll take the money out of the country. It's a trade off, perhaps a realistic trade in a trade war. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. Please indulge me for just a minute. We have just launched something I'm pretty excited about for all you. Alexa users. It helps you get smart about the economy, pop culture, tech and everything that's going on. I will try not to set off your acco, but all you have to do say Alexa, make me smart, and you'll get a new explainer. Every weekday from.

United States President Trump China Scott Tong Beijing Alexa Bill Adams PNC UN Brad American Enterprise Institute Renminbi Eight Percent Two Hundred Billion Dollars Ten Percent
Trump accuses China of currency manipulation

Marketplace All-in-One

02:32 min | 2 years ago

Trump accuses China of currency manipulation

"Let's move on to the second chapter. In this week's US China chronicles President Trump today accused Beijing of manipulating it's currency. This is not a new charge. But one thing that has happened is an eight percent fall in the Chinese currency against the dollar since the trade spat began in the spring. And that does happen to help Chinese exporters which means now we not only have talk of a trade war but of a currency war as well. Marketplace's. Scott Tong are former bureau chief and Shanghai reports. In contrast to President Trump, Chinese policy makers aren't always so overt about punching back, but an eight percent drop in the currency. The Yuan. Yeah, that seems at least partially on purpose says economist, Bill Adams, with PNC financial services. It was telling me that the Chinese Yuan was appreciating against the US dollar in the first quarter of twenty eighteen and the depreciation of the UN began after the US started. To enact tariffs on Chinese imports. Here's how depreciation helps Beijing. It's about to get hit with a second round of US, tariffs, ten percent taxes on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese soya sauce, vacuum cleaners, fridges all kinds of stuff. So prices will go up but a cheaper currency pulls prices back down effectively in offsets, Brad sets are international economics fellow at the council on foreign relations. I think a week or currency is probably the easiest way for China to limit the trade impact of US tariffs. But there are risks China's weak. Currency already has President Trump threatening a broader trade war. Further, depreciation almost certainly would have been expected to have produced a political reaction in the US and a week Yuan also called the renminbi spooks investors in China says a communist Derrick scissors at the American Enterprise Institute. So the number one concern for the Chinese is they have to go slow and not alarmed people. Remember because otherwise they'll sell, they'll sell, you know, assets and the Chinese stock market. They'll sell Chinese bond holdings, etc. And they'll take the money out of the country. It's a trade off, perhaps a realistic trade in a trade war. I'm Scott Tong for marketplace. Please indulge me for just a minute. We have just launched something I'm pretty excited about for all you. Alexa users. It helps you get smart about the economy, pop culture, tech and everything that's going on. I will try not to set off your acco, but all you have to do say Alexa, make me smart, and you'll get a new explainer. Every weekday from.

United States President Trump China Scott Tong Beijing Alexa Bill Adams PNC UN Brad American Enterprise Institute Renminbi Eight Percent Two Hundred Billion Dollars Ten Percent
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTMA

"Larry cudlow i folks this is steve moore of the heritage foundation filling in for the great larry cudlow who is now a serving our president is the chief economist and there is no one better in the united states that donald trump could have picked to get economic advice than larry cudlow who's been doing the show for some twenty years and so it is a privilege for me to sit in his seat and try to wear his big shoes we are now going to turn to our infamous washington and politics and wall street segment with my two dear dear friends who i've been doing this show for ten fifteen years with john mclaughlin and jimmy p of the american enterprise institute jimmy papa kuka's and by the way john mclaughlin is the is the mcintyre is the john mcintyre is the editor of real clear politics which is the best website for politics in america so gentlemen thank you for joining me you've got to bear with me i'm new to this game but i wanted to start with you jimmy p and ask you is there a is there a kudlow affect on the stock market well a couple of times when when when when he's come out on rough market days and has kind of put a different spin on what the president's been doing and saying critically with trade yeah there is because that's reinforces that there's at least a boys some boys close the president who is giving a more pro market perspective so that which which is great because if the only person the president was listening to where peter tomorrow peter navarro or wilbur ross i mean those are not going to be sort of pro market pro investor settlements so yeah if there are there are days where the market's down then it's larry went out and spoke i mean that's that's john do you have a thought on this yeah i i would agree with what with what jimmy was saying and you know i think you see it a little bit on on potential policy changes just with this tpp kind of news this week that that came out i don't know that that happens with with larry not not in there just position.

editor kudlow american enterprise institute jimmy p donald trump jimmy peter navarro america steve moore john mcintyre jimmy papa kuka john mclaughlin washington united states chief economist president larry cudlow ten fifteen years twenty years
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Connect FM

Connect FM

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Connect FM

"Cudlow i folks this is steve moore of the heritage foundation filling in for the great larry cudlow who is now serving our president is the chief economist and there is no one better in the united states that donald trump could have picked to economic advice than larry cudlow who's been doing the show for some twenty years and so it is a privilege for me to sit in his seat and try to wear his big shoes we are now going to turn to our infamous washington and politics and wall street segment with my two dear dear friends who i've been doing this show for ten fifteen years with john mclaughlin and jimmy p of the american enterprise institute jimmy papa kuka's and by the way john mclaughlin is the is the mcintyre is the john mcintyre is the editor of real clear politics which is the best website for politics in america so gentlemen thank you for joining me you've got to bear with me i'm new to this game but i wanted to start with you jimmy p and ask you is there a is there a kudlow effect on the stock market well a couple of times when when when when he's come out on rough market days and has kind of put a different spin on what the president's been doing and saying critically with trade yeah there is because that's reinforces that there's at least a boys some boys close to the president who is giving a more pro market perspective so that which which is great because if the only person the president louis listening to where peter tomorrow peter navarro or wilbur ross i mean those are not going to be sort of pro market pro investor settlements yeah so listen i if there if there are days where the market's down then it's been larry went out and spoke i mean that's that's john do you have a thought on this yeah i i would agree with what with what jimmy was saying and i think you see it a little bit on on potential policy changes just with this tpp kinda news this week that that came out i don't know that that happens with with larry not not in there disposition so.

editor louis kudlow american enterprise institute jimmy p donald trump jimmy peter navarro america steve moore john mcintyre jimmy papa kuka john mclaughlin washington united states chief economist president larry cudlow ten fifteen years
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"That lewis and clark law school shouted down quote sashes close quote conservative scholar at the american enterprise institute the miami dolphins owner has done a one 80s now says his players are in fact going to stand for the team to anthem sixteen thousand people have signed a petition to take back kobe bryant academy award but first a speech by a republican virginia lawmaker got twelve million views on facebook all about the intolerance of the other side listen to this thing michelle bigger rise for appoint a personal privilege of support so over the last several days mr speaker there's been a lot of discussion about an open and honest debate with respect to school shootings violence guncontrol exception in it open and honest debate as i understand and there's one that would rely on data fax evidence analysis reason logic etcetera etcetera and i'm certainly willing to have that debate i think if we were going to look seriously at school shootings in guncontrol we would analyse things like why do all mass shooting seemed to take place in gun bracons wanted to be reasonable to test whether or not the efficacy of gunfree zones of actually achieve what they are intended intent is we start to look at most of the shooter's come from broken homes what sort of government policies have actually encourage broken homes you can look at left wing think tanks like the brookings institute will actually say that some of it can be attributed to various cultural change the tap into the '60s to include the abortion industry you can look it up more conservative leaning organizations that will say that the welfare state contributes significantly to dismantling the family as families became more and more dependent upon the government than they were mothers and fathers in the home raising children we could look at various status with losers within the united states and around the world that have strict guncontrol measures and what they're crime whites look like whether it's chicago new york city washington dc and others that have incredibly strict gun laws and yet for some reason hasn't seem to scott the gun violence in this particular areas we can look at the analysis at a.

lewis clark law school american enterprise institute facebook guncontrol brookings institute united states dc miami dolphins kobe bryant academy virginia michelle chicago new york scott
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:57 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KKAT

"Dot com james pet the cookers jimmy p economics commerce at the american enterprise institute and a cnbc contributor and steve mort uh from the heritage foundation a senior economic analyst at cnn uh cofounder of the committee on at least prosperity latest jab at i was going to start here was maybe not even do this but the tweets coming in uh in really almost the whole show everybody's talking about uncontrolled are all talking about gun control a a lot of people say this want gun control liberals want guncontrol now that can take many forms and in fact there are two very conservative editorialists and we'll talk about it uh who who are talking about reforming gun control but not taking the guns away so i've got a whole bunch of people who want to take the guns away uh david french of the national review conservative he argues for a restraint order a gun violence restraining order wife in family law i don't know if you read his call them why weapon through this um permitted spouse parents sibling or person living with a troubled individual to petition a court for an order enabling law enforcement to temporarily take that individuals gun away that's that david national review conservative concert so a restraining or take the gone away for a temporary period of time the conservative leaning editorial page of the new york post surprised a lot of people yesterday they have a bunch of uh ideas for legislation reinstate the federal assault weapons ban raise the age to buy firearms target the bomb stocks that but should turn semiautomatics into rapidly almost as rapidly as fully automatic kill the concealed carry reciprocity all right so that's on the table versus you know the i'll call the progressive left most of the democrats basically want to take guns way i don't think that's unfair so i'm certainly this on you but i will wait i knew i wanna begin with my powell is peak liz what's your response to these conservative reforms larry i look i actually wrote a piece for fox news dot com uh the day after the shootings uh advocating much the same and and here's why i mean i gross with guns i told him in favor of being able to go out and shoot and do target practice and so forth it is i think the view of.

american enterprise institute analyst cnn new york post assault powell liz cnbc steve mort david french
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"The american enterprise institute and bloomberg view want to welcome to this programme susan davis to the broadcast she is a congressional corresponded with national public reoun peter by not it's a contributing editor at the atlantic and a cnn political commentator while that's a mouthful now that all the way susan i want to set the domestic sapa just for second because i'm fascinated by what's going on at the olympics and all of what the south koreans perceive as this unbelievable propaganda coup so far for the north koreans what should we make of it but you know they're calling at the olympic opening and at you know it's pretty striking that came john indy leader of north korea has basically decided to use the olympics as a as a way of stealing a march on the trump administration that extraordinary picture right from the other day of kim sister sitting feet away from the vice president united states whose if not scowling then something pretty close to scowling i think that uh you know it doesn't necessarily mean that kim has succeeded in dividing south korea from the united states but i would look for a lot of tension in the months and weeks ahead ensuring because the soft greens we resent the sort of overshadowing of what was supposed to be their moment or just a sense that they don't believe the north koreans are are interested in any kind of reunification that would be the biggest issue of all reeve in any decent diplomatic relations well look there's a lot of scepticism in south korea but right now they're scepticism in south korea about washington as well scepticism about the trump into hard on all this absolutely there's a new leader of south korea president moon who has decided that talks might be the way to go he's now been invited to pyonyang if that summit comes off i think you could see a real concern that the united states and japan are trying to hold the line to be tough on north korea and then the south koreans are interested in pursuing much more diplomacy and conversation action we will revisit that susan mick mulvaney the budget director said normal and reasonable this last week at the white house the feel that way because it looked at where do you think that.

budget director susan mick president vice president united states john indy cnn atlantic susan davis bloomberg white house american enterprise institute japan washington united states south korea kim north korea olympics contributing editor
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WGTK

"Of speaking with christina half summers of the american enterprise institute she has written a powerful piece about the risk of overreaction to of the current hysteria and yes there is a hysterical aspect to this uh about sexual harassment in the workplace you mentioned in your piece and a lot of people forgotten above this back in the 1980s there was this national panic about satanic child abuse a day they care centers and how many actual cases were there of the satanic child abuse a daycare centres were actually we put all kinds of people in jail riot and yet threat and none of them actually were true were they none of them were true and and the uh at the time people were told will believe the children children don't lie and in fact we now know that therapist were using some sort of manipulative techniques to plant memories in in the minds of the kids and now you you have uh we've had this on the campus with a fait believe women and they never live well you know when their victims they're telling the truth well of course people lie sometimes not because they're women because they're human beings in people are sellable and you know i think anybody who comes in and says they've been the victims of crime deserves a crime deserves sympathy and understanding but no one has the right to be believed an you know until the evidence uh you know warrants belief at one of the things that's happened recently and then i think you and i am i agree that this is healthy is a lot of people revisiting the clinton administration and recognizing that the left was wrong to give clinton a complete pass an authorisation to some of his dishonesty and his three in fact uh about a pattern of behaviour that was predatory and destructive do remember that well when 'extraordinary and i remember very well what everything that happened because the left didn't just look the other way you had sending it's like gloria steinem uh descending him and everyone uh around him sort of acting like these women were out of control and they were liars and.

american enterprise institute harassment clinton administration gloria steinem christina clinton
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"But he cautions there are also republican congressman in those states that the gop will wanna keep on board to pass the spell allen the art is a resident scholar at the american enterprise institute the republicans have defended cutting back on the deduction for state and local taxes and cutting back on the mortgage deduction on the grounds that those deductions primarily benefit higherincome taxpayers there are certainly a considerable element of truth to that of course there may be indirect effects lake it makes raising revenue at the state and local level more difficult carl davis the research director at the institute on taxation and economic policy says federal deductions can blunt high steve taxes that repealing those deductions would generate significant revenue revenue that can be put towards any variety of causes in this case the cause happens to be mainly tax cuts her corporations and other business owners as well as from artist states so how you feel about this tax bill may well depend on where he left i'm tracy samuelsen for marketplace tax reform is something that concerns me mainly because i'm one of the people that would benefit from it but i know that there are so many others that would suffer from that i feel like lee and sold a bill of goods on online at uh as to the middle class benefiting i don't see that happening in this particular plan they say were broke and all these taxes are or this issue or another but in reality i don't know where money's going.

congressman gop resident scholar american enterprise institute research director lee allen carl davis tracy samuelsen
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A resident scholar at the american enterprise institute the republicans have defended cutting back on the deduction for state and local taxes and cutting back on the mortgage deduction on the grounds that those deductions primarily benefit higherincome taxpayers there is certainly a considerable element of truth to that of course there may be indirect effects lake it makes raising revenue and local level more difficult carl davis the research director at the institute on taxation and i can on a policy says federal deductions can blind hi steve taxes but repealing those deductions we'll generate significant revenue revenue that can be put toward any variety of causes in this case the call it happens to be mainly tax cuts for corporations and other business owners as well as from artist state so how you feel that this textile may well depend on where he live tasty samuelsen for marketplace tax reform is something that concerns me a mainly because i'm one of the people that would benefit from it but i know that there are so many others that would suffer from that i feel like then sold a bill of goods on on buying it uh as to the middle class benefiting i don't see that happening in this particular plan they say were broke m all these taxes are for this issue or another but in reality i don't know where money's going those war bordeaux from atlanta also fernando were bladel from los angeles i dunno if you've noticed but just a change is subject to a little bit oil has been on something of a ride lately almost fifty five dollars a barrel today at the close in new york that's a thirty percent bumped melo's the crude hit this past summer i mention that because those rising prices in the way that capitalism has bring with them more drilling an economic reality that's plan and the politics.

resident scholar american enterprise institute research director atlanta los angeles new york melo carl davis steve taxes fernando fifty five dollars thirty percent
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The generous support of al the national airlines of israel we're very pleased to welcome danielle plata senior vice president for foreign and defence policies at the american enterprise institute daniel most recently the president much in the news decertifying the jcpoa and then what your measure and i'm following i have a piece for up by un the the american enterprise institute website your measure is that the president is not going fast enough and not going ugh ambitiously enough to push back against iran's predation in the region is there a time line that makes sense that you've discern from the trump administration do they have this in mind or he has fencing over the jcpoa the extent of their policy good evening to you good evening to you vote nice to be back this show is that of that peace is actually in the new york times a couple of weeks ago and my and you know uncomfortable feeling is that while i think there are people in the administration who are very serious about doing much more i think the president is very focused tom embolism endless show turn and that the decertification under the socalled corker carton bill that that he cared my redick to my mind almost meaningless unfortunately did you think as they failed to show why this is really in america's national interest that the president will be able to get broader support if we were to the to see if he were to communicate a broader message in on the other hand do you think his unpredictability is an asset in in the getting others to get behind is because they fear that he might actually walk away from if his unpredictability were a strategy and not a character law i think that but i don't and uh you know here's the issue the issue is that that i think the american people are actually would be behind the president i think that the larr your issue here is that he has not managed to persuade the congres that more needs to be done but worth yet he is not kirch waded himself that he needs a goal for actual strategy against iran that involves more than planning pieces of paper relating to the pla now frankly speaking the.

israel senior vice president daniel president iran new york times redick america danielle plata american enterprise institute kirch
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTVN

"Cover of darkness is also not going to be able to get their hands on a gun then we might have something a talk about but mr dinosaur the only you're going to do if you succeed is take guns out of the hands of innocent people who defend themselves with them and you're not going to solve anything you're going to make people more at risk more vulnerable the danger will increase and in fact luxury pete this these are stats from the american enterprise institute from 1994 the percentage change in number of firearms versus gun homicides the number of firearms since 1994 has increased fifty six percent that's pretty substantial that's a pretty whatever the number is it substantial lot of guns have been purchased 1994 fifty six percent increase over what it was a 1994 but what about the gun murder rate we'll guess what the percentage of murders the gun homicide rate is down forty nine percent in the same time frame now the left says more guns equals more crime more guns equals more may him more guns equals more dead people more guns equals more murdered no it doesn't fifty six percent increase gun ownership 1994 forty nine percent decline in gun homicide rates at the same time you could say that having more guns has reduced the number of gun how homicides quick time out back after.

american enterprise institute murder fifty six percent 1994 forty nine percent 1994 fifty six percent forty nine percent
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Out as seems like a nice lady who won it i heard her comments and ymt sympathetic and and of course it's not really seven hundred fifty nine million because the government takes a huge cut but uh and also she chose to take lump sum so it's a little bit less all right that the point about this is arthur brooks are go friend from american enterprise institute wrote a piece that's an analysis of the lottery for the wall street journal any rights it might strike it was bizarre that the government spends billions on nutrition and housing programs for the poor while simultaneously encouraging poor people to move their own money away from these necessities and then signing them up for welfare programs that make them financially dependent on the government but here's the worst part in arthur alludes to that is that the model that you set up for people is that success in life has nothing to do with virtue and that's part of the problem also with the the two kings with the mcgregor versus mayweather fight at anyone think that either of these two guys was virtuous uh i mean they were willing to take a certain amount of punishment they certainly worked out they were in good shape but really let's go to uh to your calls to richard in los angeles richard you're on the medved show mike i love your show i oman especially now arkham practice you offer up on furnao anti euro are increase truth ingram your can i think the people in a moment crash with for the current anc on crime call her we came back or comic i'm calling i know i can rocky noory all over again you've got pork you have even mentioned on the irony of our time i welcome at one point and then you've got apollon prefigure and mary weather randall park and you've got guys like mcgregor on come at you like mike tyson and you did not disappoint up on it with a very interesting evening work are not remanded aggressive yeah i've heard there and there are.

arthur brooks american enterprise institute wall street journal mcgregor los angeles randall park mike tyson mayweather richard medved
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Katherine zimmerman is a research fellow at the american enterprise institute specializing in yemen their particular expertise that al qaeda ranks the table as an innovative bombmaking scale that has not really been replicated elsewhere even the recent threats from the islamic state with laptops aboard planes comes from the minds of al qaeda and its the bombmaker ibrahima siri he's still at large he still very much wanted and he is the sort of evil genius that was willing to build a bomb to place in a cat a body cavity of his brother and you know that is something that we cannot replicate of war in syria the stood at a mosque portal coders up to them from the fall northwest of the countries it has a number of expert planners with years of operational experience when the syrian conflict eventually pizzas out it's feared they'll turn the full attention to targeting the west katherine zimmerman a game alqaeda's the more dangerous longterm because of what he's doing on the ground in the muslim world it is embedding itself within populations and it is building up the capability such that when the time comes it will be poised with popular support to conduct offensive attacks against the united states in europe isis does not have thought it sounds extraordinary to sir with love yet the organisation the mood of nearly three thousand people in washington a new york on september eleven two thousand one could not be seen by some judges has been rumors madrid compared to isis a solid bin laden was who to appeal to his broadest possible a community of muslims.

Katherine zimmerman research fellow american enterprise institute yemen al qaeda syria katherine zimmerman united states new york europe washington laden
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"If we do that maybe just maybe we'll all realize that are big differences aren't really that big after all thank you arthur bricks he runs the american enterprise institute and you can see his entire tack at ted dot com on the show today ideas for moving beyond tolerance g think that it's hard for most people to talk about race i know a bunch of people dug by race pretty constantly lay almost every minute of the day right so it got it depends on who you are is it harmful white people to talk about some of them absolutely least favorite subject but that's exactly what vernay myers tries to get people to do she goes into companies and she gets people to talk about the things that make them most uncomfortable ethnicity religion gender race and she does is so they can work better together even though a lot of us grew up thinking that tolerating someone of a different race meant trying not to notice the race in some ways it was a great idea because a long time ago when we noticed color we were doing bad things so i think that's what people i don't notice color but i also think people misunderstood i think we were to say don't use your color people's color against it out don't think of their color as less than but it didn't mean like don't pay attention to whatever race or ethnicity that you're from and so i think we can have gone as far as we can go with.

american enterprise institute vernay myers
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 1A

"Because if you had a job i think you be healthier and better off financially we'll continue our conversation about poverty and policy in america interest moment with robert door fellow in poverty studies at the american enterprise institute assistant professor joan maya mozelle us teaches sociology at rutgers university camden professor michelle gilman of university of baltimore school of law and terrance mccoy of the washington post phillips support for this podcast comes from simply safe and award winning home security company their system uses an arsenal of wireless sensors and has twenty four seven professional monitoring plus you pay by month and never get tricked into a longterm contract simply safe has no installation costs and no hidden fees so you can protect your home and family the smart way right now listeners of this podcast can get ten percent off any home security system only if you go simply safe npr dot com back now to our conversation about poverty in america and what to do to help people get out of poverty with university of baltimore law professor michelle gilman robert door of the american enterprise institute rutgers university camden sociologist joan maya mozelle us and washington post reporter terrence mccoy thank you all for sharing your stories of dealing with poverty in america we know this is uncomfortable to talk about so to everyone who sent stories whether we read them on the air or not thank you for being willing to talk to us about this larry tweeted steinbeck opined that americans view themselves as temporarily embarrassed millionaires poverty as a moral failing is the core problem professor mozelle as i wonder about that this idea that were all just kinda millionaires awaiting an apology is just kind of this little thing than going to shake off one of these days how much do you think our conversation in our culture about wealth affects the way we talk about poverty.

michelle gilman phillips america american enterprise institute terrence mccoy steinbeck robert assistant professor joan maya professor university of baltimore school terrance mccoy washington post university of baltimore reporter larry ten percent