35 Burst results for "American Enterprise Institute"

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Between The Lines

Between The Lines

02:27 min | Last month

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Between The Lines

"Danny always great to be with you. Oh, it's such a pleasure to talk to you, Tom. Daniel plitka is a distinguished senior fellow in foreign and defense policy studies at the American enterprise institute in Washington. And that's just about it, but in our next episode, Mary eberstadt on the threat that identity politics poses to western liberal discourse. It's on a collision course with the way

Daniel plitka Danny American enterprise institute Mary eberstadt Tom Washington
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:29 min | 2 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Up on bills and fix up her car so she could get it insured. I need a tire. I mean, I got a new windshield. I think my windshield had a big line in it. I need to get one headlight. Research shows most low income parents use the tax credit for basic needs like housing and food and to pay fees for school and sports, sharing parrot with the center for budget and policy priorities says that kind of support has long-term benefits for children. They do better in school, their health is better and they are better equipped as adults to get jobs and support their families. But those monthly payments ended last year in parrot says unless that changes the poverty rate will go back up sharply. You know, it really shows that the high rates of child poverty that this nation has had four decades is a policy choice. It is not an inevitability. The Biden administration, and many Democrats want to make the expanded child tax credit permanent, but a proposal stalled in the Senate. Several Republican senators have proposed more limited ways to expand it. What we don't know is the tradeoffs. Angela rasheed is a senior fellow at the American enterprise institute and says it's an open question how much pandemic aid and the spending from it played into the dramatic rise in inflation. There's many economists who believe that some of that transfer income contributed to the inflation problems we're seeing now. So there's inflation. And then there's other longer term outcomes that we need to be aware of. She says evidence suggests a permanent expanded child tax credit might lead some people to leave the workforce and reduce employment, another key factor in the nation's poverty rate. Jennifer London in PR news, Washington. This is NPR news. This is doubly when my sea later on morning edition, Republican senator Lindsey Graham has proposed a federal abortion ban at 15 weeks of pregnancy. At 15 weeks, pretty much strong majority of Americans believe abortion should be the exception, not the rule. But that was unwelcome news to some other Republican senators, many say abortion should be left to the states. We'll have more on that in about 15

center for budget and policy p Biden administration Angela rasheed American enterprise institute Jennifer London Senate senator Lindsey Graham NPR Washington
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

04:01 min | 3 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"People who are not in upper middle income categories who are able to get new skills and do new things pretty frequently. So that they can be fortified by learning new things without being completely identified with it. And quite frankly, some of the people who have the best relationship with their work, or people who are working hard, they're supporting their families, but they're working hard to support their families and to create value and come home from work and their home from work. And they have an extremely healthy relationship with their jobs. You've mentioned your history, and I'm seeing here that before you join Harvard, you spend a decade as president of the American enterprise institute, which is a conservative leaning think tank in Washington. Many conservatives have pushed back against the idea of raising the minimum wage, making college affordable expanding healthcare access. And I'm curious as I'm listening to this conversation, wouldn't expanding the social safety net make it easier for people to work less and define themselves less by their jobs. It could. And I think that the social safety net is truly the greatest achievement of the free enterprise system. But I think that there's a lot of ways that we can work together where iron can sharpen iron between the preference that a lot of progressives have for people in the margins of society and the way that a lot of conservatives think about an entrepreneurial economy. These shouldn't be incompatibilities in the contrary. I've tried to dedicate a lot of my career to having finding compromise and interesting solutions from both sides. Let's listen now to Peggy wren, she's a listener from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She tells us that she spent a better part of her career as a journalist in New York. She changed careers working for a startup and then she moved to Lancaster and she was laid off at the beginning of the pandemic. Here's penny. I feel like I'm Walking Dead person because I have always identified myself by my job. I've been unemployed for so long. That was also kind of leaning into my identity as a caretaker for my elderly father. And he just passed away. So now I'm left without an identity. And I really don't know where to start. I'm at a loss now. So what advice do you have for people like penny who are out of the workforce? Struggling to figure out what their identity actually is. They don't have a job. It's really tough because so many people have kind of been all in on their careers for so long. And the truth is, we're all going to be in that situation sooner or later because there is decline that comes in every career. And so we have to think about this in advance. So my guess is that what she will do. I hope that what she does in the advice that I would give her and advice I would give myself and you and all of us is to be investing in those other accounts of your faith really gives you a big philosophical adventure. Your family relationships that ties that bind that shouldn't ever break, especially, by the way, for political reasons. And then the friendship, which are the most intimate relationships that we have in our lives. And these are the ties that we choose. And focusing on those gives an entirely new sense of the answer to the question, who am I? I think about public defenders or community organizers or artists. Or doctors or individuals who express their passion and seek purpose through their careers. Isn't there some benefit to caring deeply about your career and defining yourself by it? It's important to care deeply about your career because each of us has the opportunity to answer the question, why do I do what I do? The problem is, actually, that that's not the question that we ask when we're obsessed with our careers and we objectify ourselves. That's the what do you do, questions. So people whenever you're in a conversation with a new person and you're looking for an opportunity to talk about your work or state your job title, then something exogenous has become too central to your identity. The key thing that's most important is the why, why do you do what you do? And if you find as a public defender or is an activist or advocate, if you're dedicated to the why of lifting people up and bringing them together, then there's a million ways that you can do it. You can do it at professionally you

Peggy wren Lancaster American enterprise institute Harvard Washington Pennsylvania New York
Democrats Won't Tell People to Stop Gay Orgies to Prevent Monkeypox

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Democrats Won't Tell People to Stop Gay Orgies to Prevent Monkeypox

"Who exactly really is radical in American politics? Well, my suggestion is that it is the Democrats who are significantly more radical than the Republicans, particularly when it comes to social issues. And you can see it on pretty much every social issue. So to take an example, when it comes to monkeypox, it is a source of constant amazement to me. That there is a very easy solution to monkey box. There are actually two. One is there's a vaccine. The vaccine needs to be more widely available. The FDA has prevented it from being more widely available. So that is solution number one. And the federal government's already screwing that up. Doctor Scott gottlieb former commissioner of the FDA, and a senior fellow at American enterprise institute, one of the loudest voices during COVID. He now suggests that the CDC has failed on monkeypox again. He says our country's response to monkeypox has been plagued by the same shortcomings we had with COVID. If monkeypox gains a permanent foothold in the United States and becomes an endemic virus that joins our circulating repertoire of pathogens, it will be one of the worst public health failures in modern times. Not only because of the pain and peril of the disease, but also because it was extremely avoidable. There is limited testing access, there was not enough stockpile of vaccine, even though the vaccine was widely available. Okay, but that's really not the most extreme response to monkeypox. The most extreme response to monkeypox continues to be the complete unwillingness of anyone in the media chattering class or in the Democratic Party to simply say, stop having gay orgies. I understand that this is unpopular with a particular segment of the democratic base, but you guys literally advocated for the shutdown of all of American life, all of it. Kids going to school, going to the park with your children, being able to go to work, killing hundreds of thousands of small businesses. For COVID, in airborne virus. This is a virus that has passed almost entirely between gay men having sex with one another. And you can't say, stop having sex with randos. You can't say it.

Monkeypox Scott Gottlieb Covid FDA American Enterprise Institute Federal Government CDC United States Democratic Party
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"So where was it going now if he was going completely down in the 20s? Down in the 20s? I think it would be in the 20s easily. Yeah. That's why neither side is going to give on this. It is going to take probably years in litigation to get through it. Oh, so no, I think the Twitter board does give. The question does what? Okay, well, we'll negotiate down. Oh, absolutely. Because if you well, it depends how much we're talking about. That's what I'm saying. If it's $5 billion less, I think you take that and you run for the hills. If it's $20 billion less, I think you said, you know what? I'm going to hold you to this, right? I mean, I think and I don't know where that math. It's just once you blink, then there's no going back, right? Once you say, okay, maybe it's worth less. You can't say, oh, never mind. It's not. You've got to stick to the price. That's the tricky. It kind of blinked when they accepted it. Yeah. No, I think you negotiate. You could say we were prepared to talk to you. If you come up with the right price or a price that we're willing to accept and we do that, if not, we'll go to court and we'll see you in court. And we'll take the 44 billion. I think that's how this goes. Could be. Joining us right now is the Jeep pie. He's the former FCC chairman. He's a partner at search like Capital Partners and a non resident fellow of the American enterprise institute. Good morning to you. You think this is game changing? Well, I think it's certainly a significant step by the Twitter management and assuming that there has to be more to give Elon Musk more information to stave off too, I think of the material risks the board is worried about. Number one, the risk of a renegotiation of the price. And number two, the risk of litigation and Delaware chance report over the merger agreement. When you look at this merger agreement, one of the things that everybody's been so fascinated by is that Elon Musk effectively waived diligence. And so, and early on, we should also say that he said one of the reasons he was buying Twitter was busy thought it had a bot problem. If you were going to litigate this case, do you think that Twitter's board has the better side of it right now or Elon Musk? Well, I think for starters, you put your finger on one of the things that has been very perplexing to many observers..

Twitter Capital Partners Elon Musk American enterprise institute FCC Delaware
Clarence Thomas says abortion leak has changed Supreme Court

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 7 months ago

Clarence Thomas says abortion leak has changed Supreme Court

"Justice justice justice justice Clarence Clarence Clarence Clarence Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas says says says says the the the the Supreme Supreme Supreme Supreme Court Court Court Court has has has has been been been been changed changed changed changed by by by by the the the the leak leak leak leak of of of of a a a a draft draft draft draft opinion opinion opinion opinion earlier earlier earlier earlier this this this this month month month month suggesting suggesting suggesting suggesting the the the the court court court court is is is is poised poised poised poised to to to to overturn overturn overturn overturn the the the the right right right right to to to to an an an an abortion abortion abortion abortion recognized recognized recognized recognized in in in in roe roe roe roe versus versus versus versus Wade Wade Wade Wade I'm I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas with with with with a a a a look look look look at at at at his his his his comments comments comments comments it's it's it's it's like like like like kind kind kind kind of of of of an an an an infidelity infidelity infidelity infidelity that that that that you you you you can can can can explain explain explain explain it it it it but but but but you you you you can't can't can't can't undo undo undo undo it it it it justice justice justice justice Clarence Clarence Clarence Clarence Thomas Thomas Thomas Thomas joined joined joined joined the the the the court court court court in in in in nineteen nineteen nineteen nineteen ninety ninety ninety ninety one one one one and and and and has has has has long long long long called called called called for for for for roe roe roe roe versus versus versus versus Wade Wade Wade Wade to to to to be be be be overturned overturned overturned overturned speaking speaking speaking speaking at at at at a a a a conference conference conference conference in in in in Dallas Dallas Dallas Dallas Friday Friday Friday Friday he he he he described described described described the the the the leak leak leak leak of of of of justice justice justice justice Samuel Samuel Samuel Samuel Alito's Alito's Alito's Alito's draft draft draft draft as as as as an an an an unthinkable unthinkable unthinkable unthinkable breach breach breach breach of of of of trust trust trust trust when when when when you you you you lose lose lose lose that that that that trust trust trust trust especially especially especially especially in in in in the the the the institution institution institution institution that that that that I'm I'm I'm I'm in in in in it it it it changes changes changes changes the the the the institution institution institution institution fundamentally fundamentally fundamentally fundamentally are are are are you you you you begin begin begin begin to to to to look look look look over over over over your your your your shoulder shoulder shoulder shoulder adding adding adding adding up up up up the the the the leaker leaker leaker leaker that that that that general general general general attitude attitude attitude attitude is is is is your your your your future future future future on on on on the the the the bench bench bench bench and and and you you you need need need to to to be be be concerned concerned concerned about about about that that that that that that audio audio audio Kerr Kerr Kerr to to to see see see the the the American American American enterprise enterprise enterprise institute institute institute I'm I'm I'm Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thomas

Justice Justice Justice Justic Court Court Court Court Wade Wade Wade Wade Supreme Supreme Supreme Suprem Ben Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Dallas Alito Samuel Samuel Samuel Samuel Al Kerr Kerr Kerr American American American Ent Ben Ben Ben Thomas Thomas Thom
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

Of Consuming Interest

01:55 min | 7 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Of Consuming Interest

"We don't hear that idea, we never make progress. That's a beautiful way to put it and a great way to interview to end the interview, Mark. Thank you so much for putting this into perspective for us, giving some insight into it. And I'm still waiting for the book on what is hate speech, probably have to wait a while for that. But at any rate, thank you so much for being with us. You've been listening to a consuming interest. My guest has been Mark Jameson. He's a nonresident senior fellow with the American enterprise institute, and we've been discussing an article a blog that he wrote on government and the access to the Internet and social media. Mark, thank you so much for being with us. You're listening to your listening to have consuming interest right here on the federal news network. I'm Shirley rooker. You can reach me at Shirley at call for action dot org. That's surely at call for action dot org. Thank you for being with us. I'll consuming interest as a public service program presented by W JLA 7 call for action, hosted by Shirley rooker, call for action is an international nonprofit network of hotlines, which offer free and confidential assistance. If you have a complaint, contact call for action at three O one, 6 5 two help. That's three O one 6 5 two help..

Mark Jameson Shirley rooker Mark American enterprise institute Shirley
Who Is Richard Morrison of the Competitive Enterprise Institute?

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:11 min | 8 months ago

Who Is Richard Morrison of the Competitive Enterprise Institute?

"Richard, before we get started, to sort of tell us about your background, how did you, what your involvement? How do you got with, you got to have an interesting background. I've read you're a little bit of your bio. So what did this tell us, you know, where you came from in this regard and how you just where you're at today with some of these things. Oh, thanks. So I'm a research fellow now here at the competitive enterprise institute and I've been here most of my career in Washington. I was here for a while as a communications person. I used to book interviews on radio and TV, so I've been on the other half of this as well. And then I worked for the tax foundation here in Washington, D.C.. It's just like it sounds about trying to enact good sound tax policy. And then I came back again. I'm one of CEI's boomerang employees, people who have been there left and come back. So now I focus on things like the SEC, corporate governance, what we call ESG, environmental, social, and governance, which is a lot of, I would say a lot of left wing activism coming together with business and issues like that about capitalism in general. You know, why do we have a free economy? Why is it free economy good? How can we keep it free? That sort of

CEI Washington, D.C. Richard Washington SEC
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

03:13 min | 8 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"This thing. And I said, today, today, now. How long are we going to do this? I'm not a victim. And none of the people I was watching or victimizers. How long are we going to do this? 1940, 87% of blacks live below the federally defined level of poverty. 20 years later, 1960, 47% of blacks live below the federally defined level of poverty. A 40 point drop in 20 years. Before the Civil Rights Act of 64, for the Voting Rights Act before the open housing act, before set aside, before race based preferences, that was the greatest 20 year period of economic progress for blacks in the history of this country. Why? How? Is call working hard? It's called using the greatest economic engine of prosperity. The family. Again, there are think tanks on the left, think tanks on the right. And they both the heritage foundation. And the American enterprise institute. Talked about the way one escapes poverty. In the formula is simple. Finish, high school. Don't have children until you get married. Stay married. And avoid the criminal justice system. In order to be successful in this world, what do you have to do? Well, you have to find ways to please your fellow man. You have to find what your fellow man wants that he does not have. And after you find out what he wants, that he does not have and is willing to pay for, then acquire the necessary skills education and talents to provide it. And whether people care about one another or not, I think, is largely irrelevant. So a matter of fact, I think that and the cure for poverty. Here's the cure for poverty. But four things you need to do, and it's almost a written guarantee that you will not be poor. One, graduate from high school, two, don't get don't have children until you're married, three stay married, take any kind of job, and stay out of jail..

American enterprise institute heritage foundation
Dinesh Reflects on the Teachings of Thomas Sowell

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:46 min | 8 months ago

Dinesh Reflects on the Teachings of Thomas Sowell

"I talked a day or two ago about Thomas soul and it's for me it sort of refreshing to do this in contrast with critical race theory. And of course, there's a new book out on Seoul. It's called maverick a biography of Thomas sol, it's written by The Wall Street Journal writer, a Jason Riley, and I've kind of been making my way through the book. But as I do, it also flashes my mind back to my friendship with Seoul over the years. And the way that he has been a mentor to me. Years ago, when I published my book at the end of racism, this, by the way, is my most scholarly book. If you haven't read it, it's. A giant book, several hundred pages, 2000 footnotes. And the book was a little controversial because it talked about the reason why you have group differences in academic achievement and economic performance. It attributed those differences not to race, not to biology, but the culture. Even so, Glenn Lowry, prominent black scholar who was at that time affiliated with the American enterprise institute, another guy named bob Woodson resigned from AEI, they sort of, they broke with AEI and it was a supposedly all over my horrible book, and at that time I was, you know, this was only my second book. I was a young scholar, so it was kind of a problematic for me to have these luminaries distancing themselves from AEI was causing problems for AEI, but to my defense rushed the greatest black living scholar in the country, Thomas soul, who basically said that he had read the book extremely carefully, and it was the best book on race relations written since Gunnar modals classic work in American dilemma, published several decades earlier. Over the years, I got to know soul and his wife quite well, his wife is also an economist. And I thought interesting as I would talk to them about racial discrimination and they would go, you know, dinesh when people think of race discrimination cases. They think of the sort of classic civil rights situation going back to the 50s and 60s a black guy and a white guy apply for a job, the black guy is better qualified the white guy gets the job. Hey, that's racial discrimination. And they go out of a hundred cases dinesh today, only one or two I like that. The vast majority of cases have nothing to do with that at all. They are all based upon statistical issues of underrepresentation. So a black eye applies to our job. He's actually not qualified. He doesn't get the job. But then he sues and he claims that blacks are underrepresented this corporation and because blacks are, let's say, 12% of the surrounding population in San Jose, but he wasn't hired at this Silicon Valley company. They're obviously racist. They need to implement affirmative action policies, so both soul and his wife said that is actually the normative. That's the normal case that is now fought out in

Thomas Soul American Enterprise Institute Thomas Sol Jason Riley Seoul Glenn Lowry Bob Woodson Gunnar Modals The Wall Street Journal Dinesh San Jose Silicon Valley
Conservative Enterprise Institute's Myron Ebell on Biden's Oil Plans

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:06 min | 9 months ago

Conservative Enterprise Institute's Myron Ebell on Biden's Oil Plans

"Well, let's start off here. The hot topic right now is the leadership from behind the Biden administration has finally made it to the fact that they say we're not going to take Russian oil. We're not going to buy Russian oil right now. We had already seen that happening from shale BP, Exxon and others. Tell our listeners what that really means and then we'll expand from there because I want them to understand really the effects of this right now and how the Biden administration is using that. I think there are pluses and minuses, the fact is that Russia is the world's largest exporter of oil and gas and it produces about 7, 7 and a half million barrels a day. Some of that goes by pipeline to China, but two and a half million barrels has been out on the market and shipped by tankers. So removing those two and a half million barrels from the market is that what's happening or is the U.S. just saying it's not going to buy oil from a tanker that has Russian oil in it, but we're going to buy oil that would otherwise be going someplace else, but is now being replaced by Russian oil. So there's questions about this band. If everybody bans Russian oil, then that will remove a lot of oil from the world market and it will have to be replaced or we're going to see even higher oil prices. So there are a lot of things to try to game out here about how this is going to work because there is some spare capacity in the world oil production system. Some of it's in the United States. Some of it is in Saudi Arabia, some of its United Arab Emirates. So President Biden instead of talking to the American oil industrial and saying, hey guys, I made some mistakes. Let's sit down and see what you can do to increase production. Instead he called Saudi Arabia who wouldn't take his call because they're angry about the cell up to in the Iran

Biden Administration Exxon BP Russia United States China President Biden Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Iran
CBS News: Conservative Think Tank's Exclusive Gathering Excludes Trump

Mark Levin

01:53 min | 9 months ago

CBS News: Conservative Think Tank's Exclusive Gathering Excludes Trump

"From Robert cost of CBS and his reverend costo used to be a conservative he used to write for national review he used to be at the pubic broadcasting service now he's partnered with he's sort of the new Bernstein with Woodward and Bernstein But he's over at CBS So he really can't decide where he wants to be I suppose Now all that said conservative think tanks exclusive gathering will include Biden official but not Trump This is how sick these people are Let me repeat This is how sick these people are A private off the record gathering of conservative leaders and wealthy donors will convene this week in sea isle Georgia With appearances by a Biden White House of fish won several critics of former president Donald Trump This is the American enterprise institute So all you conservatives and big donors who are giving money to the American enterprise institute you should stop Trump is not invited to the exclusive event which will be attended by some of the Republican Party's biggest donors according to two people familiar with the event who are not authorized to discuss it of course not The conservative American enterprise industry It's not really conservative It's more sort of center right Their annual world forum this year will be held at the cloister a high end hotel complex in sea island And feature invite only discussions meals and access to miles of private beach must be tough mister producer The schedule for this year's form was obtained by CBS News the center for public integrity a nonprofit watchdog that focuses on corruption abuses of Paris described the gathering as a secretive event Where industry Titans and GOP mega donors mingled with mostly Republican power players at an exclusive off the record

Costo Pubic Broadcasting Service Bernstein CBS Biden American Enterprise Institute White House Of Fish Woodward Robert Donald Trump Georgia Republican Party Sea Island Center For Public Integrity Cbs News Paris Titans
Competitive Enterprise Institute's John Berlau on George Washington

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:54 min | 10 months ago

Competitive Enterprise Institute's John Berlau on George Washington

"And we're excited today to have John burlock here with competitive enterprise institute to talk about our first president. George Washington. But we're going to do it from a little bit different perspective today. John has a great perspective on this. He's wrote a book called George Washington entrepreneur how our founding fathers, private business pursuits changed America and the world. John, welcome to the Doug Collins podcast. Thanks, dad. Congressman Collins, so good to have so good to be on. Let's go be fun. You know, look, someone's just talked about our founding fathers today. It's amazing to me how people, you know, no matter what their educational background, you know, their throw up the founding fathers is the founding fathers were this, and I believe the founding fathers were that. There's so much mistake and everything about it. I mean, I have a pastoral background. I have a religious degree. I also have a law degree. You know, it's amazing to me how sometimes today we talk about the founding fathers as if they were all pastors. Well, they were not all pastors. You know, they were, you know, they were not all lawyers. They were just a lot of common people. But George Washington, being our first president, being the leader, a lot of myths, a lot of things growing up, a lot of truisms, but also one of the things that I think your book addresses that I want to talk about with you today is he was actually a very bright guy with me. He really was. He wasn't formally educated past the age of 13, but he, because his father died when he was 11, and he was family couldn't afford to send him to college, plus he had to take care of the family. Take care of the farm, but he both learned from people. We always ask questions and he read quite a bit. He read everything from books on agriculture from Great Britain to Adam Smith's wealth of nations, which was the first book to lay out the theories of capitalism as opposed to the mercantilism that were practicing in Great Britain. So he was a very educated, well read guy, despite the lack of formal schooling.

George Washington John Burlock Congressman Collins Competitive Enterprise Institu Doug Collins John America Great Britain Adam Smith
Competitive Enterprise Institute's Ben Lieberman on Gov't Regulations in Your Home

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:06 min | 10 months ago

Competitive Enterprise Institute's Ben Lieberman on Gov't Regulations in Your Home

"Been laboring on here from competitive enterprise institute. We're excited on the college show to talk something that I get into. Maybe you don't, but you should. And that's regulatory issues. And how they affect you every day. What comes out of Washington actually matters? It actually matters not just what's in Congress and not the big fights that you always say on TV, but regulatory agencies regulatory burden and it even things that come from Congress affects you a great deal. So Ben, I mean, from working on the hill, you worked on the hill for a while. Does it surprise you how much people think the only things happen on Capitol Hill and they forget the regulatory side of this? Oh, absolutely. People just don't really know what's going on and what's particularly worrisome. And I felt this way during the Obama years and I feel this way again during the Biden years. There's just so much going on. It's impossible for people to know everything bad that's coming out of Washington and so some pretty troublesome stuff is slipping through and not getting a lot of attention, which is why I wrote the op-ed on a bad regulation for every room in the house. Homeowners have no idea what's coming their way.

Competitive Enterprise Institu Congress Washington Capitol Hill BEN Biden Barack Obama
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:36 min | 11 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTOP

"This morning remain far apart Moscow insisting on guarantees to stop NATO's eastward expansion Washington firmly rejecting the demands as a nonstarter We ask Corey shaki who directs foreign and defense policy studies at the American enterprise institute about the chances of an emotional Vladimir Putin invading Ukraine at some point In my judgment it's a 55% likelihood that Russia won't invade Ukraine but that leaves 45% likelihood that Russia will And Putin's desire to go down in history as the guy who recreated the Russian motherland as he interprets it could lead him to do a whole number of crazy things which is why it's so valuable that NATO allies have rapidly reached agreement on sanctions that would drive the cost way up to Russia of an invasion of Ukraine And why the U.S. and NATO allies having negotiations with Russia so that we better understand what Putin thinks he's doing And we keep publics in western societies supporting the policies that were advocating From your examination of the issue the smart people you're in touch with what is President Biden's best approach toward Putin and Russia in 2022 Well I think President Biden appears to be making a set of choices that concede to Russia the ability to engage in negotiations with the western powers In order to buy time And that strikes me as very useful both because talking to your adversaries is a good thing in general to do It's essential for free societies to show especially if we are going to ask western publics to bear burdens on behalf of policies It's very important that we keep western publics engaged in what's going on and appreciating that we are not stridently looking for war We're stridently looking for peace And also we may better demonstrate the solidarity of the western alliance because we're all in the same place that Russia's demands for an end to NATO expansion to no military assistance to countries outside of NATO And other things that were in the Russian proposals Are unquestioned I believe not going to be supported by NATO.

Russia NATO Ukraine President Biden Corey shaki Putin American enterprise institute Vladimir Putin Moscow Washington U.S.
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:21 min | 11 months ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WTOP

"At the talk says we have no intention to invade Ukraine National security adviser Jake Sullivan was asked about that tonight on NBC nightly news We believe that the Russians have positioned tens of thousands of troops in advanced military equipment on the border with Ukraine and that they have done so with at least the capability if not the intention to invade We believe the threat of invasion is real and we are determined through a combination of deterrence and diplomacy to avert that circumstance to defend Ukrainian territorial integrity and sovereignty and to convince the Russians that the right course to go down is a course of diplomacy rather than a course of conflict Sullivan says there will be severe sanctions if Russia rolls across the Ukrainian frontier Corey shaki directs foreign and defense policy studies of the American enterprise institute and she talks with us here on TOP about the chances of an emotional Vladimir Putin someday invading Ukraine In my judgment it's a 55% likelihood that Russia won't invade Ukraine but that leaves 45% likelihood that Russia will And Putin's desire to go down in history as the guy who recreated the Russian motherland as he interprets it could lead him to do a whole number of crazy things which is why it's so valuable that NATO allies have rapidly reached agreement on sanctions that would drive the cost way up to Russia of an invasion of Ukraine And why the U.S. and NATO allies having negotiations with Russia so that we better understand what Putin thinks he's doing And we keep Publix in western societies supporting the policies that were advocating From your examination of the issue of the smart people you're in touch with what is President Biden's best approach toward Putin and Russia in 2022 Well I think President Biden appears to be making a set of choices that can cede to Russia the ability to engage in negotiations with the western powers In order to buy time And that strikes me as very useful Both because talking to your adversaries is a good thing in general to do It's essential for free societies to show especially if we are going to ask western publics to bear burdens on behalf of policies It's very important that we keep western publics engaged in what's going on And appreciating that we are not stridently looking for war We're stridently looking for peace And also we may better demonstrate the solidarity of the western alliance because we're all in the same place that Russia's demands for an antenna expansion to no military assistance to countries outside of NATO And other things that were in the Russian proposals Our unquestionably not going to be supported by NATO allies And that's 30 countries acting in unison And I think that's a very important message to Vladimir Putin Corey shaki directs foreign and defense policy studies at the American enterprise institute She was on.

Ukraine Russia Jake Sullivan President Biden Corey shaki Putin NATO American enterprise institute NBC Vladimir Putin Sullivan Publix U.S. Vladimir Putin Corey shaki
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This weekend marks twenty years since the nine eleven terrorist attacks. One legacy of that day has been an expansion of the federal government new agencies were created own security. The tsa more money was spent on counter-terrorism but putting a number on just how much money was spent is a complicated endeavor. Here's marketplace's nancy. Marshall genzer this much. We know president biden has included about fifty two billion dollars for the department of homeland security in his twenty two budget requests. The tsa is part of dhs and generally gets a roughly ten percent slice of dhs's budget according to heidi pell tear. She's director of the twenty years of war project at boston. University the entire budget for the department of homeland security has been roughly a trillion dollars cumulative since two thousand three. It's not so easy to tell the up what the us has spent on counter-terrorism since nine eleven. The just didn't respond to my interview. Request and counter-terrorism spending extends beyond the agency mackenzie eglin defense analyst at the american enterprise institute tries to track counter-terrorism spending. But there's no simple way to do that. Partly because i think there's obfuscation partly by dysfunction and partly by design egeland says some spending by intelligence agencies is classified and there's not even a government wide definition of what counts says counter-terrorism spending so it can't be broken out of agency budgets and added up there's also less transparency now three years ago the office of management and budget stopped tallying up the counter-terror budget england's best estimate is fifteen to twenty percent of all discretionary government spending per year goes to prevent terror attacks. And if you were to look holistically back since nine. Eleven it's a number easily over three trillion dollars. Egeland says if you can't fully track an account for each of those dollars it's hard to know if the money was well spent or effective but the us hasn't had another terrorist attack in the scale of nine eleven. Eric doll is a retired naval intelligence officer now teaching at the naval postgraduate school in monterey california we have been able to keep this country much safer than we had expected ten twenty years ago although del says. Dhs needs to allocate more resources toward tracking threats from domestic terrorism and with the us withdraw from afghanistan. No one. I spoke to thinks. Overall spending on counter-terrorism will shrink anytime soon. I'm nancy marshall genzer for marketplace and. I'm sorry ashore with the marketplace morning report from apm american public media..

Dhs Marshall genzer president biden tsa heidi pell mackenzie eglin egeland federal government american enterprise institute nancy Egeland boston office of management and budge Eric doll us england
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on POLITICO Dispatch

POLITICO Dispatch

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on POLITICO Dispatch

"To advocating for the government to get more involved rather than less involved in economic policy and cass was the domestic policy adviser. He was like twenty eight years old on mitt romney's twenty twelve presidential campaign and has since developed relationships with other politicians on the right including jd. Vance in ohio. And marco rubio and florida so goes are people who i think you could call accolades or advocates for the common good capitalism view. He ask them. They'll tell you that they you. Their intellectual opponents as by members of the wall street journal editorial board which is sort of been a pillar of conservative economic policy on the right up folks like pennsylvania. Senator pat toomey. who have been. Who's been an influential economic voice. And are you know scholars at the american enterprise institute. So which side would you say has more power in the party right now. I think that the free marketeers are like. They remain majority view in the party. And i would define that you as if you talk to people like to me Or or others will say like the free market system is good in and of itself. When i talked to me for this piece you told me like capitalism is for the common good and there's a belief that gearing economic policies towards growth through tax cuts and other means is what benefits families communities and the country. Let's ivan to the politics of this which side you think is an easier sell for republicans politically. I don't actually think we know yet. Trump was a confusing figure because he talked like a common good capitalist or a populous..

Senator pat toomey marco rubio cass mitt romney Vance american enterprise institute wall street journal ohio government florida pennsylvania Trump
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Step in proving it so my guest today is a very controversial figure. Dr charles marie is the hayek chair emeritus and cultural studies at the american enterprise institute the co author of the bell curve He has been physically assaulted When he has tried to speeches by leftists They he is routinely called a white supremacist And a big and all kinds of things the difference between me and the left this is. I've actually read his books. And while i have misgivings about some of the things he says is is fine I'm convinced that he's a man of goodwill and not a big at all however his new book facing reality to truths about race in america. is really quite shocking. And so i wanted to bring him on and let him explain it to you and you can make up your own mind. Chauzy there there. All right i can. I can hear you can't see you now but hopefully they'll bring you up So you open up facing reality by saying that. You're writing the book to counter. The left's obviously ridiculous accusations of systemic racism in america. And here's one of the opening sentences in in the book you say of the many facts about race that are ignored to above all long since documented beyond reasonable doubt. Must be brought into the open. The i is that american whites. Blacks latinos and asians as groups have different means and distributions of cognitive ability. Now i read human diversity. And i have to say it sounded like a fancy way of saying that. Blacks are not as intelligent on average as as whites. So what are you saying. I'm saying that when you give mental tests whether.

Dr charles marie american enterprise institute Chauzy america
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"To harvard kennedy school and harvard. Business school professor arthur brooks happiness is a field of academic study an almost endlessly fascinating one at that. For one thing there's its universality our happiness or lack thereof is something virtually all of us think about all the time and it can have a big impact on our decision making but how do we define happiness is how we feel is an approach to life and how much control over it do. We really have. What percentage of our happiness comes from say. Our environment from genetics can government. Make us happier. Should it can corporations brooks whose career has included being classical musician. And the head of the free market. American enterprise institute is here with us to sort through some of these questions and we're happy to have him..

harvard kennedy school arthur brooks harvard brooks American enterprise institute
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on Fresh Air

"By the american enterprise institute another conservative think tank in which roughly fifty five percent of republicans said the traditional american way of life is disappearing so fast we may have to use force to save it and in that same poll. Three quarters of republicans said discrimination against whites is now a biggest problem as discrimination against minorities and this legislation that we're talking about in the state level reflects those kind of viewpoints and priorities. In the same way that trump's messaging was much more about racial identity than it was about. Tax rates was not ronald reagan. The government is the problem. This was who should be running the country. You know we are the real america and we are under assault from minorities and immigrants who threaten us and elites who disdain us and we should we should be holding the power against these forces that are trying to transform america into something unrecognizable. And i think that is what is driving the state agenda more than any kind of conventional line of division between the parties about the size and role of government. Do you think a lot of republicans have taken on the tone of trump's politics the anger the hostility the mocking absolutely look. It all goes together. I mean i think look. I think the core trump message is that democrats are fundamentally alien force that is trying to steal your america and transform it into something unrecognizable. It's what people have described since two thousand sixteen as the flight ninety three argument among conservatives referring to the passengers who crashed hijacked plane on nine eleven rather than allowing it to be flown into washington and trump offers a version of that which is that the country is at the brink. He said frequently in the twenty two thousand election. Mike pence said at the convention that this is not about whether democrats or republicans control washington. This is about whether america remains america. And so once you have put out the argument and once a substantial portion of your base has accepted the argument that any win for the other side will irrevocably disfigure and transform america into something unrecognizable an alien to its founding principles and beliefs. I mean it is a really short step. I think to convince them that. The other side is literally stealing the election or that. The consequences of allowing the other side to take power are so dangerous that it justifies a literal assault on the capital. It's all rooted in in the broad swath of the base. That is so fundamentally alienated from the way. America is changing that they are willing to support any means necessary in order to maintain power. I mean you probably saw a poll out this week from cbs. In which a majority of republicans and trump voters described the attack on the capital defending freedom and only twenty percent described it as insurrection. That's kind of where we are. And i think everything we're talking about both at the state level and the national level is flowing out of that sentiment that the deep well of alien nation among us central portion of the base. How much is trump perceived as still having in the republican party. Coz you know he's been having his rallies but he's not. He's not on social media the way he used to be..

America american enterprise institute ronald reagan trump republicans Mike pence washington cbs republican party Coz
Unemployment Benefits Coming to an End for Many

Marketplace

01:49 min | 1 year ago

Unemployment Benefits Coming to an End for Many

"Cutting off extra federal unemployment benefits, some as soon as next week. Marketplaces Meghan McCarty, Carino looks at the labor market yet to come. It's not just that extra $300 a week in federal unemployment payments, most of these states are ending. It's also benefits for gig workers, freelancers and the long term unemployed. Like Marcellus, Row in Dunwoody, Georgia, where federal benefits will end June 26. I will be receiving nothing. Unfortunately, I have no idea how I'm going to live. Day by day Row, lost his job in a public transportation agency last year and says he hasn't found work to match his previous pay of $16 an hour another. How is just not gonna put it? As economies reopen and the dangers of the virus recede. Michael strain at the American Enterprise Institute says the additional benefits are doing more harm than good. I see a labor market where employers clearly want to hire workers, but there are not enough workers there to be hired. He says Scaling back benefits could incentivize more people to return to work. But Andrew Stettner at the Century Foundation says it's not so simple. We want to believe that we can just turn the lights back on, but that's not really how it works. Industries like tourism and entertainment have been slower to bounce back, and some people face health challenges or child care issues caused by the pandemic that prevent them from finding work. Those the ones on the federal programs, those people that have the greatest barriers to work. Rising vaccination rates might make it feel like we're done with Cove it But he says Covad isn't done with the economy. I'm making McCarty Carino for marketplace on Wall Street today. Well, the major indices were

Meghan Mccarty Carino Michael Strain Dunwoody Marcellus Andrew Stettner Century Foundation American Enterprise Institute Georgia Covad Mccarty Carino
First-Time Unemployment Claims Hit a New Pandemic Low

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:05 min | 1 year ago

First-Time Unemployment Claims Hit a New Pandemic Low

"First time. Claims number four hundred and six thousand as i said the lowest since the pandemic started a pretty solid sign. The labor market is working. It's way back but a we are nowhere near labor market normal and be that first time. Claims number is a look back. What already happened and with two dozen republican governors having said they are cutting off extra federal unemployment benefits some as soon as next week marketplace would megan mccarthy carino looks at the labor market yet to come. It's not just that extra three hundred dollars a week. In federal unemployment payments. Most of these states are ending. It's also benefits for gig. Workers freelancers and the long-term unemployed like marcellus row in dunwoody georgia where federal benefits will end june twenty six. I will be receiving nothing. Unfortunately i have no idea Going through live they buy day row lost his job at a public transportation agency last year and says he hasn't found work to match his previous pay- of sixteen dollars. An hour and all album is just not going to cut it as economies reopen and the dangers of the virus recede michael strain at the american enterprise institute says the additional benefits are doing more harm than good. I see in your market. Where employers clearly want to hire workers but there are not enough workers there to be hired he says scaling back benefits could incentivize more people to return to work but andrew staedtler at the century foundation says. It's not so simple we to believe that we can just turn the lights back on But that's not really how it works. Industries like tourism and entertainment have been slower to bounce and some people face. Health challenges were childcare issues caused by the pandemic that prevent them from finding work. Those are the ones on the federal programs. Those people that have the greatest barriers to work rising vaccination rates might make it feel like. We're done with cove ed. But he says covid isn't done with the

Megan Mccarthy Carino Michael Strain Dunwoody Andrew Staedtler Century Foundation American Enterprise Institute Georgia
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Hire of the Seven reason Pal Center. Also, Tom Fitton joins us from Judicial Watch in 30 minutes. Michael Ruben from American Enterprise Institute and Labor Friends of Israel. To talk about the geopolitical aspects of what's going on with ceasefire in Israel. Bob Woodson, founder of the Woodson center, pushing back against critical race theory, and if that's not enough, five o'clock brings us Glenn Young Kin, the nominee for the Republican Party for Virginia governor. That's a lot and yeah, you and I, we've got plenty to talk about as well. For sure. But let's turn now to Rabbi Marvin Hire of the Simon Reason False Center out of Southern California. Fantastic entity. They're very similar to the Holocaust Museum here in Washington, D C. Rabbi higher where never again really means something, and that's why we need to have this conversation today. Sadly, Rabbi, Thank you for joining us. It's a pleasure to be on even though the conditions that were going to speak about is very unfortunate. Well, I'm sure you've seen the videos. Talk to me first about New York what we're seeing in New York here where we saw activists pro Hamas pro terrorists. Let's be clear Hamas as a terrorist organization, um, pro Hamas terrorists and pro terrorist Protesters deliberately went to the diamond District in New York City to target Jews for their violence. That's just the bottom line. What happened here, right? That's correct. Now. Unfortunately, uh, the person that had a concussion was severely beaten up. Woz, the grandson of one of my best friends. We went Tomo. We went to Rabbinic Seminary together on hey, was taken with the hospital with a bad concussion. Hit him over the head 10 times more than 10 times. No reason. The only reason is he was wearing a skullcap. This is outrageous. And it deserves much more coverage than the media pays attention to on the subject event. The Semitism, it's sort of hidden in the back way don't get the kind of attention that it deserves, because it's dangerous. On def We don't put a stop to it. Who knows what the end would be? Are you concerned that there hasn't been just unequivocal outrage voice from elected officials as well as from members of the media. I mean, I would think the media considering the appropriate concern about hate crimes in this country that they've reported on over the last several years that this would be you know some major coverage for this. Not only should they be major coverage. Media knows very well. During the Holocaust. Sat in silence. Didn't do anything. It would like that includes the most famous newspapers. The New York Times did nothing. And never covered the subject. We haven't learned the lesson if you do not speak out against hatred and antisemitism, but the beginning you pay a dear price at the end. Let's not forget we dealing with the Palestinians, now with Hamas. Most of the world doesn't even know the 1941 and 42. One of the greatest supporters of Adolf Hitler was the grand must be Not only did he do radio broadcasts against the Jews. Met with Hitler accompanied him Law visited concentration camps and shared the Nazis on Here we are again. Hamas, a terrorist organization. Most people do not know, for example, they think, Oh, look the way that some of the media portrays. It must be terrible, miserable living in Israel. The latest polls show the basically in terms of people wanting to live in Israel. These are the terms basically. It says that 53% Of the Palestinians. Living in Jerusalem and in that area do not want to lead. Only 32%. Wanna leave? If Israel was so bad. How come they overwhelming majority of Palestinians say we love it here? We want to stay in Israel. It's a democracy, right? Why doesn't the media cover that? Doesn't immediate say Did you know I'd love to see The New York Times The Washington Post put in the newspaper. The Palestinians do not want to leave Israel. Yeah, they know it's a democracy. They don't want to go toe from us, because if your income as you're living in the middle of a total dictatorship Is it fair to say? I mean, I've tried toe mentions, you would know better than I would. Is it fair to say that? The nation of Israel is, in fact, the freest, most Democratic, Ah, most diverse, most tolerant and provides the most direct. Representation for Arabs in the Middle East. There's no other Arab nation that provides what Israel provides abs, absolutely, including the fact Have that many members of Hamas. When their family needs to be treated for a serious medical condition. First thing they want to do is make arrangements to go to Jerusalem to Israeli hospital. Why don't they do it on their own hospital? Cause they know it. Israel is far superior. Israel is tolerant is thrilled. Treat it a democracy treated citizens equally. There is no discrimination in Israel. Yes, there are cases here there. Of course there are the same is true of the United States, The greatest democracy and the planet. We make mistakes, too. But in comparison to some US To the Iranians. Come to the Arab world. It's an insult to come to make it to make any such comparisons. With Israel and let me let me also point out That the it the media never covers the fact there's a dramatic change taking place in the Arab world. The leaders of the Arab world the U. A. E. A The Wayne They do not wanna hang out with commas. Ever interested in a relationship with Israel. They're encouraging Israeli businessman to do business in the U. A. I've met with all the leaders You know, King was saying visited the sign Regional center took out a membership card, the rulers of Divide. We've been with them feet for form for months. Had years We've visited Theo by the U. S A by rain. And the kingdom back rain they love Israel. That's the absolute truth, but it's actually from the media. So and Rabbi Marvin hires our guest is the founder and president of Simon Reason. Paul Center. I keep hearing these things in the media, and I just think that you have Ah, ah, level of of knowledge, expertise and, frankly, moral clarity on this s o. You can speak to it. I'm hearing people and politicians say, Hey, listen, I'm just criticizing the policies of the Israeli government. That doesn't necessarily mean I'm being anti Semitic. But what we're seeing here, Rabbi. This goes well beyond just criticism of the government, isn't it? Absolutely. What's what's happening is that look, the media is not telling the truth. There there is there. They just don't want to cover Israel as it should be covered. For example, I find that nobody knows, for example it in the holiest site. In the Arab world..

Bob Woodson Tom Fitton Michael Ruben Adolf Hitler Glenn Young Kin American Enterprise Institute Hitler New York Jerusalem 53% Southern California Israel 30 minutes Middle East Simon Reason False Center Hamas Republican Party 1941 42 Holocaust
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

08:40 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 600 WREC

"The pursuit can remember if it was Amazon or Netflix. Just try on both. And it's guy named Arthur Brooks, who for 10 years Was the head of American Enterprise Institute, and it's basically sort of in defense of capitalism and my wife being from India. I really liked that he went in and showed How India's move away from socialism. Into a capitalist model has really created a lot of wealth of that country. And you know, I say this a lot. But it's important economists use the term wealth wealth does not mean that you have hundreds of millions of dollars wealth is the accumulation of capital. Even at the lowest level working class. People have well particular when you talk about in an aggregate fashion, But what I loved about this documentary was that it attempted to defend promote capitalism. And with a smile, and I think we need more of that. And so today's interview is in that vein. It's with the guest who's returning to us. His name is Isaac Morehouse. He's the CEO of Crash career Launch platform in the founder of Praxis, a startup apprentice programs been little while since he's been back on, But he posted to his blogged Isaac Moorhouse dot com An essay entitled The morality of capitalism. And I love this. It's a full throated, robust promotion of why capitalism is good. And so what I'd like to do is go item by item in his essay. And talk about that and encourage you to go and read it on your own. We've also posted it to our blogger Michael Berry show dot com. Isaac Morehouse, you say to start with that capitalism is honest explained Yeah, uh, capitalism's honest in it in a couple different ways, so The first thing is Honesty about the nature of reality. So a lot of ah lot of systems or theorized systems, namely socialism. They kind of they present this idea of. Hey, here's the way that goods and resource is could be allocated and people could get along. They always have a hidden it. If people weren't so greedy if there was more abundance. If people behave differently if they were more educated citizens if they were better capitalism is honest about the fact that scarcity exists. Sickness and disease and imperfection in this, it's honest about the fact that humans are often greedy and do a lot of unsavory things if it benefits them to do it. Capitalism doesn't need to wish those away in order to work as a system. It's simply accept if you put people in an incentive structure, where doing something dishonest benefits them. And they can get away with it. They'll tend to do it, and if you put him in an incentive structure, we're being honest benefits them. And they can't get away with it very easily. They won't and that's not, you know, that doesn't demand that people be different than they are. So that's kind of the first way that capitalism is honest, I don't get it deals in a realistic way with humans and the natural world. As it is, as we experience it out there in the world. You don't you don't need the person that you buy groceries from. I mean, this is Adam Smith's famous line. It's not from the benevolence of the butcher that you get your meat, but his regard to his own self interest. Capitalism doesn't require people to like you in order for them to do things that benefit you. Then there's a second way in which capitalism is honest. And this is, I think, something that gets dramatically underappreciated. Couple of them actually promotes honesty. It tends to make people more honest because of that incentive structure. I talked about it. And when I say capitalism, I'm referring sort of do too, just in a very basic sense. The absence of government interference free exchange of any peaceful interaction in exchange being left alone two people to do as they wish in an environment like that, which is a very competitive environment, because anyone is free to sell or buy anything. People become more honest if you've ever been to, like a really, you know, really poor country that has a very corrupt government that gets involved in everything. You'll notice. If you buy something, for example, people will hold the money up to the light to make sure it's not counterfeit. Right. There's all kinds of like no one trusts anyone in inner the more capitalist countries where with markets are more free in the United States, being one of them not as much as I would like. But You don't do that, like when you go to the grocery store. When you go buy food. You don't worry if it's been poisoned, you don't worry that you don't even think about it. I mean, people in in, you know, ah, lot of places and that I've lived in different neighborhoods and things in rural areas. People aren't even particularly concerned about walking their car like in your doors. That's not because of some mission police state that's going to protect their property. That's because they understand the incentives that other people face. What's it gonna benefit someone to sell you food that's poison. What's he gonna benefit somebody in broad daylight to break in your car now that can happen sometimes, And that tends to happen in the bigger cities that are more dysfunctional and have more government overreach. But it creates a society where people are incentivized. To be honest, because capitalism is a repeat game. If I'm trying to sell something to you, I mean, even even something like eBay. My son just started selling stuff on eBay. And he's very, very concerned about making sure that he accurately described it. The good isn't in perfect condition. He doesn't want to pretend that it is because he knows what will happen if somebody gets it and they say, Wait a minute. This guy said it was in perfect condition. It's not. He lied to me. He was decided. Get bad reviews and people won't buy his stuff anymore. And so he's going out of his way to be as honest as possible, whether he wants to be or not, whether he's an honest person by nature. He's the system that the incentive structure on the market incentivizes honesty and over the long term it rewards honesty. Con men don't get away with repeat cons. You know out there in the open market, they have to keep drifting and moving around and changing because by and large businesses are incentivized, to be honest. You know it is. The concept of incentives is one of those You know, uh, I went to law school and don't practice law anymore. And I say that everyone should go to law school where they're gonna practice or not, because it teaches you a construct a vernacular a system, but I think economics does as well in the idea of incentives. So much of what we do is in response to incentives and disincentives. And this is a great example of that capitalism incentivizes behaviors because the greed of the person which is natural Is to make more money and to sell more products and with a good reputation. You tend to do that. The second is that capitalism is peaceful, you say. Yeah. Yeah, and then and this definitely gets overlooked. There's a great quote. I think it's by Boston Yacht Frederick boss beyond its at least attributed to him. If goods don't cross borders, armies will And I think that's a really interesting, pithy way to tap in on one of the ways in which capitalism is peaceful people who are interdependent who trade and exchange with each other. I don't have an incentive to go loot and burn and pillage and and go to war with each other. In fact, there's really interesting. This is something a lot of people don't know about American history. In the American West before it became formally states and had you know federal armies and things sent out there when settlers were going out there. Conflicts with the Native Americans were very, very few. Because both sides realized it's gonna hurt me. If I don't establish peaceful relations with these people. I'm way out here in the middle of nowhere on the prairies. Um you know, I'm going to get you know my life is gonna suck. I'm maybe I'll dye my family won't be will be provided for if I start Learn something If I start conflict with, you know, the people who have been living here prior to me and vice versa. It was after the government said, We're going to send soldiers out there and build forts. You protect the settlers once they were out there. The, uh you know, the settlers felt like well, now I've got an army to back this exactly. Isaac. Hold with me right there. We're talking Isaac Morehouse, the piece that he wrote. The essay is posted on our block of Michael berry show dot com. We'll continue this conversation on capitalism Coming up, Michael Bury Michael Berry show. When your baby starts to move, they never stop. You need a diaper.

Arthur Brooks Adam Smith Amazon United States Netflix American Enterprise Institute Isaac Morehouse 10 years today India two people first both Berry eBay both sides first way second one second way
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on KCRW

"Millions of people are at risk of losing pandemic related protections next month. Meanwhile, former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial continues today. House managers offering more evidence of harm and damage stemming from last month's insurrection of the U. S. Capitol. Here's Congresswoman Diane to get Their own statements before, during and after the attack, make clear the attack was done for Donald Trump. At his instructions and to fulfill his wishes. Get referencing the insurrectionists on January. 6th, one of Trump's lawyers says his team's been told by House managers that they'll wrap up by 6 P.m.. However, it's unclear if the defense will begin today. Well, about four in 10. Republicans say violent actions may be necessary in America of political leaders are not protecting the country. NPR's Tom Joltin reports that's the finding in a new survey from the American Enterprise Institute. AI survey was completed in late January after the assault in the U. S. Capitol. The results present a stark picture of political division with a high level of anger among Republicans in particular. Eight and 10 said the political system is stacked against conservatives. Foreign 10 agreed that if elected leaders won't protect America quote, the people must do it themselves, even if it requires taking violent action. Daniel Cox is the survey director. Think any time you have a significant number of the public, saying that use of force can be justified in our political system? That's pretty scary. One indication of how political extremism seems to have gotten a foothold in America. Tom Delton NPR NEWS Washington At last check on Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average was down 145 points, nearly half a percent. Since the Open at 31,292. The NASDAQ has.

Tom Delton Tom Joltin Daniel Cox Donald Trump American Enterprise Institute January. 6th 145 points Eight 6 P.m 31,292 late January next month Trump last month America Washington NPR Republicans NASDAQ Diane
More middle-class earners are struggling to get by amid COVID-19 unemployment

Nightline

05:11 min | 1 year ago

More middle-class earners are struggling to get by amid COVID-19 unemployment

"Tonight. Millions of americans are hitting a wall during the pandemic from fear of catching the virus to juggling unemployment to real fears of hunger. How one community. New jersey is reflected in pretty much every place across the country. Good john when the pandemic hit. I had to rearrange this room. I had to basically become a daycare. Now we're going to do our letter. It was an unexpected twist for this first year immigration lawyer to start with a single mom in the middle of a divorce. You already did number two lost her job last march when the court shutdown that was from that is how we first met lewis any espa in the fall struggling to stay afloat when the first round of covid relief payments of six hundred dollars a week ran out a double whammy coming right after her unemployment benefits were cancelled because of a system error it has been emotionally devastating physically overwhelming. Because i'm stressed out. I don't know if i'm going to get funds before i get addicted. Am i gonna find the job in time before everything else becomes a bigger mess. More than twenty. Two million americans lost their jobs due to covid nineteen many of them likely. Seni middle-class earners people who want saw they were beyond the reach of poverty now struggling if this is my life and i'm a lawyer i have an education. You know i'm smart. I know where to look for resources. And i'm struggling. I went from you. Know up the ladder. I'm getting there. I'm almost there and all of a sudden this happens and that's it no more money. I had to file for bankruptcy. Because i had no other choice. One of president violence top priorities. Welcome assistance for americans financially strained just days in office. He's pushing for a new kobe. Relief package around a quarter of the one point nine trillion dollar price tag includes the one time stimulus checks of fourteen hundred dollars for those eligible with bonuses for parents with children meaning. A family of two parents and three kids could receive up to forty six hundred dollars less for higher earners if approved by congress it would have become the nation's third round of payments since the pandemic began voting on. The new stimulus isn't likely to take place until march john. Yarmuth is the chairman of the house budget. Committee so congressman. Is you know nine. Hundred billion dollars was just passed and a lot of that was directed at struggling families. So why would you say just a month. Later we need a another round of stimulus checks. This plan at one point nine. Trillion is something that american people desperately need. Were having almost a million people foul for new unemployment claims every week. The need is urgent. And it's very large. Michael strain is an economist. With the american enterprise institute it does not make sense to give a direct checks to households who have a comfortable six figure income and who haven't experienced the employment loss share in. Parrot is the president of the center on budget and policy priorities. Millions of people are out of work and we have millions of hassled struggling to put food on the table and pay their rent. Mamma has to work. Senate lives in this bedroom apartment in new jersey. No four year old son issues. Now we're going to do letters. Wrangling school when you finish parenting me. I'm going to go work. And when she's lucky a few hours of legal work running her own one woman law firm from her bedroom all while looking for a full-time job wending attorney gets on the call. You have to be right you promise me eat. Food once. abundant in his home is now at times out of reach. Most of the stuff in my fridge has been given to us by either my mom or my best friend even like we do buy some of it. You know when we have money doesn't come in. And i did apply for snap improved car and that can take weeks so that's why i want to go to cancer today. Delete snap formerly known as food. Stamps is new to this family but the pantry is. I've never been to a pantry before to get food only to donate you know what a pantry is. A pantry is a special place where people who need food can go get food for free high. Why because not. Everybody has money for food. Sometimes mama doesn't have money for food. According to feeding america forty percent of people turning to food banks have never relied on them before they estimate that food insecurity could grow up to fifty million people of the three hundred thirty million. Who live in this country. Okay thank you. You look at the people in line and it's like color career class. None of it matters. i'm hungry. my kids hungry. It doesn't matter it's humbling. Really you know to know that that could be me and today it is me and yesterday it wasn't and hopefully tomorrow won't be again but today that's me. I'm one of them.

Yarmuth Michael Strain John New Jersey Lewis American Enterprise Institute Center On Budget And Policy Pr Congress Mamma Parrot House Senate Cancer America
"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"american enterprise institute" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"An immune response to to a disease now. They weren't trying to develop a vaccine. When they had that insight. They were just they were trying to understand the molecular structure of life. And in fact, this story is really a piece of abroad or Revolution really in the life sciences. The Postwar period is an enormous There's anonymous growth in our understanding of biological processes. Molecular genetics on by the whole infrastructure of scientific knowledge is what underlying this directed research to develop an M R I on a vaccine today, and you can see the same thing happening. In other other cases are History and World War two when the government directed research to develop radar or the bomb. Or computing devices, they were able to draw on scientific knowledge that have been accrued over the course of decades, really coming out of one of the most momentous scientific advances since 17th century from Blake 19 until World War two, so Who's a again It's not an entirely satisfying political lesson, because, uh, Is this kind of research takes a long time, but you know, you kind of put it globally. If you want to have more of these technological innovations, you need to have more scientific revolutions, too, because that's often what we're drawing on them when we are inventing these kinds of things, And when you when we look at big Pharma companies, you know how much of that long view and that investment in general science Is something they're willing to do as compared to trying to solve short term problems because they need to get drugs to market to make money. Yeah, it's a great It's a great point. So I think the private sector spends on enormous amount upon on research development. Um more than the federal government. Now, however, the vast majority of that, as you say, directed at the kind of applied research and development side of the spectrum, as as it should be, Um Basic science research into our basic understanding of nature, Whether it's in physics or biology, chemistry, even mathematics, although their private sector does support, that kind of research tends to shy away from it because The returns on investment or not is obvious in a meaningful time frame. Ah, lot of those discoveries will turn out to be useful. Some of them will have to be enormously useful on DSA. Oh, this is really where I think the government has an important role to play. In funding basic science, which is a public good, which is not to discount the role of philanthropic organizations or the pirate sector is no reason not to pursue a kind of all of the above strategy there, but the federal government, I think that's unique role. He is Tony Mills, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, Senior fellow at Pepperdine University School of Public Policy. Tony.

federal government Tony Mills Pepperdine University School o American Enterprise Institute resident scholar Senior fellow
What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

Morning Edition

06:53 min | 2 years ago

What Happens If The President Is Incapacitated? The 25th Amendment Charts A Course

"Greene. The story we are covering this morning was first revealed in a tweet from President Trump in the middle of the night. He and first lady Melania Trump have tested positive for the Corona virus. Many people we should say never developed serious symptoms and even if they do they recover, But Trump is 70 for an age group that is more likely to develop serious complications and to be hospitalized. The White House physician says the president is doing well as of now, but will remain in the White House residents. A White House official told NPR's Tamara Keith that the president plans to stay engaged, but that Vice President Mike Pence is ready to step in. As needed. Now, if and when a president falls ill. There are significant questions about how the nation is governed. And John 48 has studied and written about scenarios just like this. He's executive director. Of the continuity of government Commission, which was set up in the wake of the 9 11 attacks. He also runs the government studies program at the bipartisan Policy Center, and he joins us on Skype. Thanks for being here. Mary. Thanks for having me. So I mean, someone who looks at these questions so closely. How did you react when you heard that the president got a positive test? Well, given all that's happened, it was probably the one thing that might stir up some or turmoil in this, this very tumultuous election system season we've had. Look, there are some real questions. Both about a president as president having on illness, especially if it were to get worse but also in terms of a presidential candidate. Those are those are different issues about being on the balance and what happens afterwards. So I do think there are some significant concerns if If things were to worsen. Well, let's separate those things out. Let let's talk about the here and now. I mean, what sort of things are being discussed right now inside the White House and were the president's health to deteriorate. I mean, you've written that there could be confusion there. Khun B. Chaos. I mean, take us inside that building. Well, first, a zoo president, the question would be is the president at some point does he feel that he doesn't isn't able to carry out the duties of the presidency for a time? And there's a pretty clear provisioning the 25th amendment, where he can sign over the power of the presidency to the vice president. And then when recovered, take it back, and that's happened a few times in recent years, basically, for elective surgeries, That would be pretty clear. I think you know what would be a little harder is if the president got sick enough that he wasn't able to make the determination there's still a A vision in the Constitution where you can have the vice president. A majority of the Cabinet say it's time for the vice president to take over and then in the most contentious situation. We have heard about another context that if the president disagreed with that, that Diagnosis. Congress might have to decide whether to keep the president on orto keep the vice president so it could go further down the line. But that would be the more extreme version. Look, we also have The election. And how would President Be on the ballot or not be on the ballot. If it really came to the the point where the president had to withdraw. There is a very difficult procedure and trying to replace him at this time. You know what? Who makes that decision? I mean, how well determine happened earlier. I think it's pretty clear that party could have just stepped in on the party. The party still has a role of selecting a new person. Ah, And that would be the party committee could elevate Mike Pence to the presidency and pick someone else as vice president, But that's a relatively simple vote. We've actually done that once in the in the seventies with vice presidential candidate Bigger place, Tom Eagleton. But the question now that the ballots are out is much more difficult. Could the president's name be removed from the ballot? I think it would be very difficult, but one further complication is in our election of president. We're really not voting for president. But we're voting for these electors in the Electoral college. They're still there in the ballot, even if you don't see them in your states about there, behind those names, and in theory, those people could be elected and then make a choice of another person come December with some complications that have come up recently, the Supreme Court but basically that there is a possibility that that even if Donald Trump's name is still on the ballot, and he were to have withdrawn Um, that those electors could still end up voting for the Republican ticket. Whatever that is, in December, they could actually decide. I mean, you would have electors around the country making a decision that Shouldn't theory be made by health experts, but they would be actually deciding who would who would be president. Assuming if Donald Trump won the election, even though he had withdrawn then there's there's this question in November of well, who's Who of these electors gonna vote for? They're gonna vote for the Republican ticket. Whatever it is. Then again, there are some complications. But the Supreme Court has allowed some states to really bind those electors. But Basically those those electors, many of them at least have the freedom to choose another person. We assume that would be coordinated by the party. And of course, that would be great questions about the legitimacy for the American public. Usually it's possible. I mean this this obviously so so speculative ahs. You said. I mean, these are extreme circumstances we're talking about, but I wonder. I mean, this is your line of work like I wonder if you get people sometimes saying, like, Oh, why do you dedicate so much time to scenarios That might never happen? But I guess there's an argument that these air really important questions that you want answered. You have to plan for for the worst and most chaotic sin areas. You do, And off with some better plans in place for for a lot of these continuity scenarios. I mean, obviously, questions of national security might matter if if we're not absolutely sure if the president is is Well, we had cases well before the 25th amendment, Woodrow Wilson, who was essentially incapacitated for his last almost a year and a half in the White House, and you know the real is a real question as to who was really running the government, the vice president ahead and stepped in and so you know, there are these questions. We don't want uncertainty in times of trouble. And you're saying that that you're not satisfied with the plans that are that are in place that the government could do a better job planning for scenarios like this. Well in some, I do think there's a very clear transfer power to the vice president. That's the 25th amendment has made that very clear if we get into much more public ated scenarios like they're both sick or the question of how you get somebody on the ballot and how the electors were picked because it happens this close to the election. Look, I think we could have more clarity. John 48 is executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission, a nonpartisan think tanks set up by the conservative leading American Enterprise Institute and the liberal leaning Brookings Institution. Thank you so much for helping us work through some of these Something big questions that you know, we hope don't have to come up. We hope the president remains healthy, but things we have to think about. We really appreciate it. Thank you.

President Trump Vice President Melania Trump White House Mike Pence Government Commission John Executive Director Supreme Court Bipartisan Policy Center Tamara Keith Tom Eagleton Greene. Khun B. Chaos NPR Congress Official Brookings Institution
Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:20 min | 2 years ago

Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

"Survey. Oh. Good survey from taken by the American Enterprise, institute, has shown that sixty four percent of American churchgoers. Were somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable with attending in person worship. Sixty four percent sixty four percent, in fact, what they found was basically only one group is Gung Ho on going back to Church and that's why evangelical 's. Right no surprise there if you know the news. Yeah if you add up there somewhat comfortable, and they're very comfortable's. It's. Sixty one percent of them are all about. Thirty. Four percent of them are very comfortable with going back to. Yeah because they because not only do they get to engage in the worship that is so important to them, but also they get to pony lives. Show us. What idiots we are. Yeah, Yeah so apparently. Even those who reported that their congregations offer actually offered. Worship last week, Fifty, six percent of respondents said they chose not to go. Yeah, and you know. I mean obviously like one of the hotspots repeatedly everywhere this Cova. Is seems like Church's just keep popping up like that was one of the first stories coming out of South Korea right was there was a church like a crazy colty church, but nonetheless. I think that's. Probably. But that was one of the hot spots, and that that was one of the big spreaders of Covid, nineteen and obviously we're seeing that in the United States. We're we're. We're just seeing it right like this is operatives These are the kinds of places that people who care about their health and their communities health. Should, be staying away from and a lot of Christians actually do agree with that depending on their denomination if you look at Black Protestants. And add their numbers up. Sixty eight percent are. Either somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable. Well. Yeah, because it's because this thing is killing them in disproportionate numbers so. I can see why. Hispanic Catholics seventy three percent are are on the uncomfortable side. Really Yeah, yeah, that's that's. That's a number that means something. Yeah, and you're white mainline Protestants. It's sixty at three percent well. Yeah, I mean I'm you know talking to my mom hi mom, if you're listening. The other day, and she was saying that you know she. Attends, a free often attend an Anglican a Canadian Anglican Church She goes there mostly for the for the. For the free coffee I think anyway And music, doesn't she really liked the? It's the Camaraderie and the people. She loves the people there and I don't blame her for that tall any who? She said that they're not going to be going until like late in the fall at the earliest. Really. Yeah fantastic. That's not even an option, so I I mean they're. They're doing it right up there i. don't know about what what the Anglicans are doing down here, but. Well Lake. PISCOPO, here, so yeah. Definitely not Anglican. We broke off from that country. Diane exactly. Anyway. Yeah I just think it's kind of interesting. To contemplate re where people's this raises an interesting thing right like it does ask people where their priorities are right and this is something that is really supposedly really important to them going church right right and their belief in God and one of the things that they're God requires them to be active participants in their religious community. I would assume that's why they go right right and because why, like honestly, I mean God bless your mother and everything I guess friends. Get you there right like I can. But. Those people I think are trying to earn points in heaven. Right sure. And, so anyway, where was my? My point was my point. That's that's the new memoir. That's the title of your memoir now. I. Don't lose it that often. So my point is that. You know when you look at. Where these where people are putting their priorities, right? They're having to do this balancing act between their health. And God right and they're and they're and him parole needs for most people they're proving. They're proving that they are actually rational actors. They're choosing their health their choosing the tangible. They're choosing what is right in front of them over what? I mean the Evangelical. Christians there, the Rangers in this in this game right there. The good ones because they're not letting some dumb disease getting the way. They're God demand of them, and they're going in there doing yeah, and if they died they, they go to heaven and God's. Right and I heard that I've heard that quote. In meet. Why haven't I in articles I've Read I've seen that quote where people are just like like. Yeah, you know like if I get. It gets God's will. God's will be done. You know and it's like. Oh. Yeah, it's pretty. It's pretty

Church Rangers Gung Ho Canadian Anglican Church American Enterprise Cova United States South Korea Diane
The glaring loophole in U.S. virus response: Human error

Overnight re-air of day's programming

04:03 min | 2 years ago

The glaring loophole in U.S. virus response: Human error

"Joining us from New York this is Dr Scott Gottlieb he is the former head of the food and drug administration service commissioner in the trump administration from twenty seventeen to twenty nineteen a resident fellow at the American enterprise institute here to talk about their response to global coronavirus doctor good morning thanks for having me can we start with you gauging the response to date what is working and what's been done well what would you have some concerns with as far as the U. S. response well the efforts we made to implement travel restrictions and limit travel from China clearly bought us some time it it slowed the rate of new cases coming into the country I think the question then becomes what did we do at that time and we did some things well and something's not so well I think we prepare the nation we got the health care system prepared we were able to educate providers we learned more about the virus and and how it spreads and how you can combat it the one thing we didn't do that we should of was having place broader screening we should have implemented screening weeks ago and really a month ago maybe more to try to detect small outbreaks early because before they became large outbreaks we had problems rolling out a diagnostic test we took a very linear approach in my view and depended upon one task propagated by the centers for disease prevention disease control prevention rather than also working with manufacturers and academic labs to try to get in place other kinds of diagnostics when that CDC tests didn't work then we had to scramble and so we're just now getting in place the kind of screening capacity in this country that we probably should have had three four weeks ago and what that means is that there are cases in the United States probably that came in some point in mid January maybe a little earlier than that from China probably that have been spreading and we probably have at this point certainly hundreds of cases and maybe in a low thousands in certain regions there is certain going to be certain hot spots in the country this is a pervasive spread I remember it's a country of three hundred thirty million people so you several thousand cases is still a small numbers so anyone's individual risk of getting the corona virus right now is is low but the challenge is that now that there is spread in the country it's going to be make it's going to make it harder I'm not impossible but harder to contain those outbreaks and ultimately mitigate continued spread when I looked at the outbreak stands actor into those two deaths in Washington state what does that suggest as far as the concentrations of possible concentrations in the United States well parts of Washington state look like they might be a hot zone right now parts of northern California appear that way you know there's a case in New York and it's hard to believe that there isn't spread in New York City given how much travel comes through comes through New York City I think when you see cases where people are hospitalized or were there for counties that suggests that there are a lot of cases underneath those those sort of index cases but those are the ones that we're going to identify first because the ones to patients who are going to get tested first are the patients who have presented or right now in hospitals and are very sick with an undiagnosed form of pneumonia and now that doctors have the capacity to test the corona virus to start testing those patients and so the initial cases that we identify in this country are going to be skewed heavily towards more severe patients but as we've been traced back from those patients and start testing other people who might be mildly symptomatic or even a symptomatic then we're going to start to five more cases of more benign illness from corona virus because we do know that most people don't get I'm very sick from coronavirus and and a large percentage of people don't really develop any symptoms any meaningful symptoms at all it's just a small percentage that developed pneumonia and a small percentage to go on to you know have really severe illness and find themselves in

New York Dr Scott Gottlieb
Grad Students Will Receive Billions in Debt Forgiveness

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:13 min | 3 years ago

Grad Students Will Receive Billions in Debt Forgiveness

"Believe you know by now that Americans have a lot of student. Loan debt and many people are paying down. That debt was something called an income based repayment plan. That's where your payments are based on. Yes your income and you pay a percentage of that income every month and then if after twenty to twenty five years you haven't paid off those loans. The government will toss what remains of your Iou into the trash. But so how much is that? GonNa cost the government as taxpayers. The Congressional Budget Office put out a report answering that very question yesterday. And the number is around two hundred and seven billion dollars over the next decade. Wow marketplace's justin who reports it might sound like the government's issuing a get out of jail free card for all student borrowers but Justin Drager at the National Association of Student. Financial aid administrators says graduate students stand to benefit the most. There are less subsidies grants available for graduate students and there are more high cost programmes for graduate students the CBO report says Grad students on income based repayment plans. To two thousand dollars on average. Five Times what an undergraduate on the same plan over the last decade the percentage of Grad students participating in the program has grown six-fold drager says while the program was meant to be a safety net for students. The more students are needing the safety net than I. It should be a warning signal that we have a distress in the student. Loan market part of the issue. Is that a lot of graduate programs. Don't lead to higher. Earning jobs says Antoinette floor is at the Center for American progress you have people like social workers and teachers who may already have undergraduate debt and they are going into a field where the earnings are relatively low borrowers on income based repayment plans. Typically pay off their loans using ten to fifteen percent of their discretionary income each month. That's often barely enough to make a dent in what they owe says. Jason Delile the American Enterprise Institute. The payments are very low relative to what people are borrowing and relative to the term before they would have the debt forgiven the C. B. O. Estimates that by the end of the decade eighty-one percent of the government's two hundred billion in student loan. Forgiveness will go to graduate students.

Justin Drager Congressional Budget Office National Association Of Studen American Enterprise Institute Five Times Antoinette Floor Jason Delile Center For American
Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

Between The Lines

13:38 min | 3 years ago

Does killing Soleimani really change anything in the Middle East?

"For a generation Iran's May General Sulejmani he was a consequential Fica League in the Persian Gulf for the Americans in the region Sunnis? He was a terrorist mastermind for the Iranians the Assad regime in Syria Hezbollah in Lebanon. Sulejmani was a hero who protected the Shia cresent in the region. So it's no wonder the Iranian generals death via a drone attack attack in Baghdad. That was a huge news story. Earlier this month cast into the money rainy and military commander assassinated in the US drone strike on mm struggling marks a huge escalation coming just days at was revered by Iran supporters in proxies being blamed for the deaths of hundreds of Americans in the Middle East over the we took took action last night to stop a war. What comes next? What's the broader strategy? Here we did not take action to start a war. Your since the American killing of Sulejmani Tehran launched a missile strike on your spices in Iraq and in the process mistakenly shot down a Ukrainian Ilana carrying one hundred seventy six passengers something. The Mullah's had initially denied responsibility but crucially the Iranians signings avoided killing Americans. which was the red line? The president trump has drawn. US military response. So we'll this episode. Leave Iran Ryan stronger or is tyron now more isolated than ever and what is the showdown between Tehran and Washington Maine for Iraq the US military Tori prisons there and Iran's nuclear ambitions. Danny Applica- is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington and Co host of the AAAGH. Ah podcast what the Hell is going on. Making sense of the world get identity. Hey Tom and I'm in. Sokoll is author of Iran Rausing the survival and and future of the Islamic Republic and CO author of Islam beyond borders the Oma in world politics. Welcome back to Iran. How good morning now? Also Amani abetted genocide in Syria to keep the Assad regime in power. He's responsible for the deaths of many American troops. He armed Hezbollah in. Lebanon with rockets is to attack. Innocent Israelis killed many innocent Sunnis in Iraq. So I mean isn't the world better off without Sulejmani. Were president trump. I think so. And also quite a number of American allies in the region Probably I think the same way but at the same time demand was a national hero and in fact that he was the one of the top strategic brains behind Iran's overseas operations and expansion of eight onion influence in the region. I will just support related to the fair that it only leadership has about the possibility of an American attack or an Israeli attack on a combined and attack. But let me see this Tom that nobody is commendable. dimitris full of commanders. Top commanders into the Nobel Prize winners and so on General money is being replaced And I think e to the debt is a widespread view in the West. That if you bump one or two individuals isn't the situation is going to get better We duty cold in history that take for example a Prime Minister Anthony Eden go around the nineteen fifties and calling for the elimination of Jamaa Nasser as the national president of Egypt and has was that this man is removed from a then. Everything will be fine. Nothing died in nine hundred. Seventy and a situation has not improved a cold and and at the same thing was said to be so I mean the point though. Is that knocking off Salomon. He's not going to make a great deal of difference. But also can I just add to this Dani salamone and these Iranian backed Shia proxies. They did help inadvertently into why help. America Islamic state. So does it worry you that people cheering the loudest about this. Guy's death other suny jihadists in there are slighted areas in the desert and the mountains of Iraq and Syria. I don't think they're the ones who are cheering the loudest I. I think you heard pretty loud cheering from here. I think you heard some plenty of loud cheering in In Iraq and Lebanon and and elsewhere throughout throughout the region. Look you know. I think it's important to acknowledge that. That as the head of the cuts force Qassem Soleimani was a very powerful folks very influential very strategic and very effective leader and he brought that effectiveness to things. That would terrible And the arming of Hezbollah. The murderer of half million Syrians. The arming of mass. The arming of in Yemen. We could go on for a while here but but But he did all of those things but when when the challenge was from Sundays you had is. He helped set up and guide ride. The hoste. Shabby the popular mobilization units in Iraq that That that ended up being part of the battle to to defeat Isis. The problem here is that every situation in the region is is more complicated than the enemy of my enemy is my friend. Just because Stalin Fort with us to defeat Nazi Germany did not make stolen a good guy. And if you look at these anti-regime protests some and. I've been breaking out in Iran since Tehran admitted that its military military shot down. A Ukrainian passenger Ilana have the Iranians overreached because despite the Iranian successes in Iraq Syria and Lebanon on on their rule out officials sites there on stable they print across he so have the Iranians overreached. There's no doubt that many Iranians feel about the Ashim and today have protested over the last few months in order to bring about A structural reforms today as a system of governance and economy which is setting enormously under represent- trump's sanctions but has the Iran overreached. What are I pointed out earlier I mean Iran does fear a a very strongly as possible American that much Israeli combined attack and therefore what update on your the humans done his belt reasonable security and press such for itself which would really want? Shepherdess Arafat at all costs but that does not necessarily Saudi mean that Iran is only Aggressive power in the region aggressive actor in the region. I mean. Let's not forget that that that the destabilization Iraq really started the two thousand three. US invasion of that country. Okay so the. The American invasion of Iraq helped Iran on because it overturned the suny state and it created a Shia majority Stein. I saw a natural law with the Shia brethren in Tehran following following on from that Danny shortly a problem about striking at pro Iranian sheeham paramilitary groups as trump has done is the now part of the Iraqi state. So is it any wonder. Washington's increasingly modulation is part of the world. First of all. I think it's offensive talk about Shiites. As if they're all some sort of monolith. The share of Iraq are Arabs. The Shia of Iran are Persians. These these are different people this. These two countries Shia versus Shia fought a bloody war for eight years in which there were one million casualties casualties in the nineteen eighties. The notion that somehow Iraq is a natural satellite or or or or slave to Iran is wrong Iran has chosen to try to dominate that country and demonstrations throughout the central and southern part of Iraq. Over the last month have been against Iranian domination the Iranian consulate in Jeff was burned to the ground at the end of last year not by Sonny's he's not by Sunni jihadis not by Isis not by Kurds but by Shiites carrying placards yelling out to out for Iran. Get Out of our country and I think that that is absolutely right to suggest that Iran has gained more influence in Iraq since the demise of Saddam Hussein. I I guess I I'm just not that big a fan of Saddam Hussein and the and the stability that he brought to Iraq. I wish that the United States had done more in the aftermath of the wall. I think thinks that we I think that we failed miserably. In many instances I think it was absolutely fatal in two thousand eleven when at a time of genuine stability in Iraq Iraq. President Obama withdrew troops and really provided the opportunity for Isis. To rise up again. My guest Daniel Placate from the American Enterprise Institute. And I'm in Sokoll. He's the author of Iran rausing and Islam beyond borders. I mean how would you respond to all of this. Because we've got these tensions here between Tehran Iran and Washington and the Iranian backed Shia politicians released most of them in Baghdad. I support if not closer ties with Tehran. They want the the Americans out of Iraq. But don't the sooners and the Kurds fee for the Iranian intrusion in Iraqi sovereignty. I absolutely and of course sir. The APP is not only the president of the American so who'd be which are being the opposed to in Iraq but also the presence of eight onions there. No question Ah about that but at the same time if we know that the majority of the Iraqi population is made up of the Shiites and some powerful elements among the Shiites have got the value equals relationship and relationship. What they don't know in the meantime ago? The Iraqi parliament release the iranian-backed Majority Shia legislators I support the withdrawal of US troops Danny now given trump's ambivalence about the region and the fact that he was elected impact to get the US out of the so-called forever awards isn't a US military withdrawal from Iraq. Just what trump and many war-weary Americans want. Well it's kind of funny. Isn't it because we start off talking about the you know the Iranians and what they want and and of course. The number one goal is to get the Americans out of the region and that is in fact the instruction is that has gone out to all of their proxy groups. All around the region. Is You need to step up activities to get the Americans out. Then we've got the president of the United States. It's who dearest and fondest goal is to get American troops out of the region so so a couple weeks after killing Kassim Sulaimaniyah. We have this unbelievably in coherent bizarre response. Where we where we're doing exactly what the around him one let? This is what Donald Trump has to sort out. He has to sort out whether he's the president. He's the kind minded president who who leads in a forthright fashion against men like costume ceremony. Who Seek to destabilize the region and extend Iran's hegemony Germany or he is going to be the kind of president that like Bernie Sanders like Barack Obama wants to turn around and high tail fin is to the Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump's uh-huh Washington energy independent America Stein fought these endless wars danny well A? They aren't endless wars. We have lost fewer people in these. This was than than than we lost a single day in World War Two so while they are conflicts that have continued on and off to a certain extent. You know the notion Shen that we've been sold that somehow we've still got one hundred and fifty thousand troops on the ground and losing them at a rapid pace is just wrong. We lost six in Syria. I I mourn every single one of them but the Kurds lost eleven thousand in their fight against Isis. So what what. What is the reason? We'll tell you very straightforwardly woodley because every time we turn tail every time someone says let's get out of that bloody Middle East. Let's pay attention to something fun. Like Asia and you'd like that. Tom Would now but hang on your way but every time we say that we end up being dragged back because the dynamics in the region of the ones that bring us back we need. We need a long-term solution that lets us. Stay away for good rather than one where we run away. Anita did it come back every single decade I mean the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal Provided tyron with as much as apparently one hundred fifty billion dollar windfall. Aw and certainly many people who are skeptical of the deal side that the Iranian spent lavishly arming the Shia militias across the region. So what it was trump right to pull the US out of the deal and instead impose maximum Prussia built around these economic sanctions on Iran. I think he was totally wrong and and I can care. There has been a backlash president. Trump's would would you withdrawal has a basically a provoked said that on Not to really go for the for police. Speed to in order to rebuild that they have nuclear program and. I think you're going to really do that. And of course that also carries the risk of a possible confrontation from tation between the United States and Iran possibly Israeli attacks on Iran and that could easily dissolved in a regional warfare. That at the end nobody may may be able to control it Danny. Any I mean a lively debate. Thanks so much for being back on. ABC

Iran Iraq President Trump United States Donald Trump Syria Lebanon Danny Applica Hezbollah Washington TOM Tehran Baghdad Sulejmani Tehran Shia Cresent Middle East Saddam Hussein American Enterprise Institute
Mitch McConnell says there is 'zero chance' Trump is removed

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:37 min | 3 years ago

Mitch McConnell says there is 'zero chance' Trump is removed

"The impeachment trial which is expected if the house passes this impeachment of President Trump this next week senators serve as jurors and they take an oath to be impartial. That's important context for what you're about to see. The Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell Sean Hannity. Last night they everything I do during this. I'm coordinating with White House counsel. There will be no the difference between the president's position our position as to how to handle this. There's no chance the president's going to be removed from office. My my hope is that there won't be a single Republican who votes for either of these articles of impeachment have essentially the jury foreman in this very serious constitutional process announcing he's going to have the defended dictate the trial. And thus obviously if you control the rules you may control. The verdict norm Ornstein a long time measured voice in Washington responding thus quote McConnell studying and outrageous admission that he's in the tank already for trump on the trial. Rose is a flat violation of the Ot will take his jer if a jury foreman and a murder trial was founded work closely. With the defense he would be prosecuted strong words McConnell though and this is important knows what he's doing in fact he's taken this very oath administered by the Chief Justice on the Senate floor to be impartial before so he has every reason to know that what he's saying today is a public announcement that guts or even violates the OT is about to take care. It was in the impeachment trial of Clinton. We'll all senators. Now stand and raise your right hand you will do impartial justice. According to the Constitution and laws so help you God the joining us now. Is that historian or scenic attributed the Atlantic and a resident scholar at the right leaning American Enterprise Institute as well as Joyce fans for US ATTORNEY MSNBC NBC legal analysts. Tell me you're thinking norm. I smacked by this. Not that I expected. McConnell was is going to follow the facts and where they would lead which would be to remove Donald Trump from office. This is a a partisan process. It's going to be a partisan process but to basically admit before you even start the trial that it's rigged is just quite astonishing and in a way it reminds me of Donald Trump in the campaign saying Russia. If you're listening get the emails followed by just a few weeks ago. China if you're listening get me dirt on Biden. It's I'm going to say it right out in the open. And what are you going to do about

Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump President Trump Senate Foreman Norm Ornstein Sean Hannity White House Clinton American Enterprise Institute Resident Scholar Murder Rose China Washington Msnbc Biden
Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

Thom Hartmann

05:37 min | 3 years ago

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Hits Highest Level in at least 3 Million Years

"In our science fact of the day this just in according to the world meteorological association no you know flaming left wing think tank the a this is the W. ammo the literally the world meteorological association atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide CO two are now at the highest ever in three million years now that is longer than human history human history only goes back a couple hundred thousand years so atmosphere CO two levels right now are higher than when Lucy was around right the the pre human and a higher than when Lucy's ancestors were around getting Lucy was only about a million or so ago all of which means that our children and grandchildren can expect temperatures to continue to rise more extreme weather more sea level rise more destruction to marine life more destruction of land based ecosystems more death of insects and and stuff at the bottom of the food chain which then echoes up so that the birds die and and we're saying this right now you know sixty seventy percent of certain kinds of birds particularly the insect insectivorous birds drawn from our planet we're looking at at at an insect apocalypse right now and and this is just the very beginning we have not yet even hit one point five degrees Celsius increase in temperature over the bass line and the pre industrial base line I mean we're just about there but we haven't quite hit it and the bottom line what what all these climate scientists are saying is is that we have to stop it right there I can't go any farther and yet what is the industry doing right now and and in on the right wing media that is that is supportive of industry while they're making fun of the stuff I mean Michael Mann for example the the the scientist he's been a guest on this program many times as a brilliant easy university of Pennsylvania sciences he's the guy who invented the cop the hockey stick conception of the SCO to going up that Al Gore popularized bed professor of cleans climate science or atmospheric science or whatever it is add to Penn state university one of probably a top five climate scientists in the world Michael Mann me was made fun of by the competitive interest enterprise institute in their blog ran Samberg wrote that well first of all they they attacked Michael Mann they said that his science was nonsense and and that is so Penn state did an investigation because there was all this ball Rollin publicity Penn state did an investigation what they found was that he was totally stand up everything he said was true and the way he said it was fine and though he published it was in compliance with scientific rigorous scientific standards reviews stuff so the compatible devices that is one of these right wing think tanks in quotes it really just a propaganda show operation for industry guy name brand Sandburg wrote that Penn state had quote covered up one two in by Michael Mann and characterize man as quote the Jerry Sandusky of climate science because he had quote molested and tortured data in service of politicized science and then not a blog posted by hosted by the National Review online the national reviews the magazine that William F. Buckley started back in the day when he was alive the saying that the you know the National Review is supporting segregation not just in South Africa but in the United States as well apartheid the National Review still around even though he is gone and they said in the end they oppose this was mark staying he said the man was behind the fraudulent climate change study in the investigation clearing him was a cover up basically and so Michael Landon Jr mattered factions from from the competitive enterprise institute see I am from National Review and instead they naturally you published an op ed by rich Lowry their editor titled get lost well so Matt Michael Mann suit and they just tried to get the lawsuit dismissed and here's the headline this is in the Washington post's Robert Barnes a climate scientists may pursue his definition lawsuit against a magazine in a Washington think tank after the Supreme Court on Monday declined to intervene at this stage of the litigation Sam Alito dissented Sam Mr craze right wing dissented but the the Supreme Court said not spread go ahead and so on it's absolutely amazing I mean this is this is so so here we are we've got more CO two in the atmosphere than at any time in the history of the human race or even the pre human race day in other holidays mmhm more and more CO two in the air our course it takes sometimes as much as a century to that for the CO two in a holding heat and to accumulate to the point where you really start seeing the effects we're already starting to and you've got industry trying to pretend that there's not and there's nothing to see here and making fun of it ridicule and the folks and I've got real scientists were starting to fight back and say no this is real stuff and then the world meteorological organization just comes out and says CO two levels higher than they've ever been

World Meteorological Associati Hundred Thousand Years Sixty Seventy Percent Five Degrees Celsius Three Million Years