35 Burst results for "American Dream"

Five Minutes Too Costly

Joseyphina's World

02:02 min | 8 hrs ago

Five Minutes Too Costly

"Free to her nearest future sorted out out of school then with national service retained the company for her impressive work ethics a marriage proposal from her university sweetheart. Her life was running smooth and to make her white wedding dream come true her mother's best friend. Living in the states invited her over to spend some time with her so they could shop for big day. What else could she ask for kevin. Her fiance wasn't amused about the fact that they would be apart for some months but frida was able to convince him that it was just an effort to make sure they had a memorable ceremony and besides she was the one paying for the dress and the accessories. Who is he to complain so up in the air. She went her brain cataloging everything she had to do and get to sparkle her big day. She was on cloud nine. We're building castles. In the air was allowed. She met her auntie's yeah. Every friend of the parents automatically becomes an anti and uncle son at the airport. He was a gentleman by all standards and made her feel welcome instantly. They had had a brief encounter when his mother brought him along many years ago for the holidays they were both very young and the memories. Were quite faint. But they hit it off as if they had been in touch since then she arrived at her auntie's home and then she was received warmly. The three of them chatted for a long while. Catching up cacho. Can you believe fritos about to get married. You should sit up. You're not getting any younger you know. She said in a lighthearted tone but her message was loud and clear. He laughed it off but he excused himself to his room. Not too long after when free to retire to the guest room. She quickly contacted her parents and then her husband to be. They chatted till she does off the next day cut. You drove his mother and freed around town as they went window. Shopping free noticed that he kept stealing glances her in the rear view mirror. She thought his actions to be flattering in the beginning but when he winked at her a red flag waved in her mind. The gesture was harmless in itself. But what she sensed behind. The wink made her cringe.

National Service Frida Cacho Kevin
Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror

02:11 min | 12 hrs ago

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

"So i'm very pleased to welcome on the program today crystal vero and i'm going to hand it over to crystal with the typical open ended question. Who exactly is crystal aveiro. I think you saw for having me market so pleasure to be here So who am i. Let's say well. I am an actor. A model of producer martial artist acting is my first and most passionate love in terms of what i consider myself and what i do. I grew up in binghamton new york. Which is upstate our south of syracuse. For those weren't super familiar with new york city so i started my career In college in psychology. That's why like super excited to be here because psychology is also huge huge. Love of mine sweitzer. Before i decided chase my dreams an actor so Yeah i got i. I went to courtland It's also in upstate. New york kind of a small town. Not a lot of people know about. But i there for year For psychology and then i transferred to binghamton university. Which is from my hometown on. And i switched over to neuro science. And i ended up graduating with a bachelor's of science and neuroscience. While i was there i did a lot of research on parkinson's disease. Actually the shirt. I'm wearing worked for the podcast. It's big brain. I got it from science twenty-six teen which is awesome neuroscience convention We were in san diego so after i graduated My thoughts words to go to med school to either be neurologist or cardiology list but you know as much as i love medicine and i was an emt and loved. The i loved the field. I didn't find myself very fulfilled. Feel like it was what i was destined to do

Sweitzer Binghamton Syracuse Parkinson's Disease Binghamton University New York City Upstate New York San Diego
Episode 161: Exactly what a murderer would say

Dispatches from the Multiverse

26:31 min | 14 hrs ago

Episode 161: Exactly what a murderer would say

"To so max seriously on your recorder for you now you were late. You've got patriot. Supporters to keep happy now man. You can't just like skip a week or anything like that. you know. this doesn't go out live right. i know i know but This is money we're talking about. I don't fool around here you go. Here's a quarter quartering you. What were you doing out in the yard or just sending a few stakes down a little bit landscaping done. Well i mean i'm gonna do the landscaping i look at the time. I enjoy operating the machinery. Speaking of that. I do have a delivery coming. Does this involve some sort of trick to get me to go outside and do some yard work. Because i'm not on board. no. I'm doing the work myself because i enjoy it in between visits to other dimensions can be out there just doing a little landscaping operating little mini excavator. It's gonna be fun. Oh you're having an excavator delivered. Yes that's right. I'm renting one. Oh just for the week okay. So with that comes. While i'm away you can decide point. Just tell them to swinging around back rights okay. There were set up here in the lab. I'm gonna do my whole thing. I high i max. I'm an engineer and inventor and thing here is the bagel trying to thousand which i'm not gonna turn on just yet the bagel trying two thousand opens up portals to other dimensions have been traveling through these portals for over three years visited a hundred and fifty plus different dimensions. I want to say at this point. my log cured so there's been a few duplicates and Yeah it's somewhere in that ballpark. Something different worlds and yet. I'm sure i've just barely scratched the surface of all the different presumably infant dimensions. There are out there jack. Strobe here my roommate is actually from one of these other dimensions. As a the whole thing you can go back and listen to how that happened. But he's here now. And i'm looking up the on list here look right like why haven't turned the biggest two thousand yet the next patron that we want to give a shoutout to is somebody named fluker. Yes pflueger as an interesting name. It is rather unique. I hope you think nice thoughts about him. Because some of these haven't gone so well no they haven't. We did try the whole reverse psychology thinking. That went really poorly. So don't do that again. Nice thoughts so as i turn on the bagel. trying two thousand here in a minute. We're going to be saying out loud. Pflueger had thinking about our patron flu generous patron and hopefully the dimension that we go to somehow involve something good about that sound think. Someone's here. I'm gonna go check it all back in bit. Good luck on your trip. All right i'm going to turn sing on get going. We'll see when i get back. So turning on the battlefront two thousand. While i think about pflueger i'm saying pflueger and thinking good about the good things lugar googlers. Great lugar is the best. Amac's your bob. Cat is here. i'm just going to have him. Put it on the side yard. Oh yeah yeah. that's great. thanks all right. Two thousand is warming up again. He took pflueger. Puerto looks stable. All the rings the machine or nominal ready. I'm going through. Oh gosh wow okay hang on let me show my puerto here and then i'm gonna describe outdoors. Any birds die. You know. I do hear some mangy senate dogs in the distance but i appear to be in a very disgusting looking trailer park as a whole row of single wides laid out here in front of me in various states of extreme disrepair. I'm standing right in front of one heinous off. The roof is sagging a windows. I don't know if they've ever been cleaned. There's nobody around outside here. So i guess i'm just gonna head up to this closest one here and given a knock and see somebody's around you can learn a little bit about this dimension. Hopefully this whole dimension isn't like this. I don't know steps here and knock on the. Oh just just swung open okay. Anybody home hello There's no answer peaked. My head in. Here oh i think oh oh he hit it. Just hit me as a really not a great smell okay. But i'm looking inside. I think i see jack stroke. But he's is he. Hey are you. Okay hey oh. I think something may be wrong here. Okay the stroh sauce lifeless body. that's a still feels a little warm. Were where did it's not war. Remain alive but you should know. Kill them several days. Okay hollow graham jack strobe. I didn't hear you activate. No that wasn't shown. I watch the the crime. I read newer tech novels that the murderer often returns zia the crime. Not okay i for the first person i think back now. Okay therefore you are okay. And i called the rate first off not a murderer. I have never set foot in this trailer nor this entire trailer park before today before moments ago all those as our exactly whatever say. I'm sure it is okay. This is also. You appear to be strobe are you. Some kind of artificial. Intelligence officials don't l. k Are you actually gesture jober. Do you just look and sound exactly like Been hologram many of his memories as his last checkpoint which unfortunately was a month ago. But i do have most of his time doubt for mary's face plus knowledge thing. That's great. what should i call you. You can call me jack. Strove find jack strobe. I'm just gonna head out I don't think there's anything i can do here. Her the knock on the door opened up now if you ever year murderer i don't think this guy here even got murdered. Well then first of all. I'm going to need some facts first of all you name effects your name. What's your name name is max. Max max was that show for max. Essential for anything. Your names just. Max max can be bothered with more syllables. That's fine you over that one. The call yes. Jack strove the whole graham gastro as natural checks out. That's right. he's not. Actually jackson object strobe. Is this guy here. the right. So here's the thing. I was going to ask you if you had any sort of connection to the deceased but it would appear that you already. At least his name. How do you know the deceased name. Sir what'd you say. Your name was max. What's that short for. Max wait now. we did. This dance already. Haven't we the charles the hotel coup. You see what i'm saying. Pal is it. Max how do you know this. Man right yeah. How do i know this guy. When i did say earlier that i've never set foot on this trailer park nor in this very strong for yourself. That's what i told. Jester polygram here. So obviously i met jetro outside of the trailer park somewhere else. We used to work together was we were. Coworkers workers bud me first of all. Where am i. Man is second of all my name actually. This is probably seventh of all. Because i've done a few things. But since i came in here but regardless of what number it is the name is dirk dirk pflueger. Oh excellent detective pflueger perfect yet. Detective works too friendly thing. But you know what i can be bad cop. It's alright this is great a respected member of the local community. I'm so glad you're here because obviously what's happened here is this hologram has confused me for somebody else. I've never been in here before. I was coming here to meet the locals and to check out the local scene and i knocked on the door and it was open and this guy was just here unfortunately deceased so blessed with all of the deceased memories up to about a month ago it's loosely. Drew that max of jack. That's lease a lot onset. They were in a sales. I should say we were stable organization together and jack myself basically stole a bunch of clients from match max mad thing not a theft investigator or fraud investigator. Really a good thing. I'm not any of those. I only specified justin murder. So even if you confess to like any number of crimes today doesn't matter anyway. You're dead continue. So in addition to seal the number of max clients the best terms. Well nothing illegal about that. Last part i did not murder him though. Listen archie gonna like look for evidence or something. I think you'll find that. There's no evidence here that i committed any crime. Well first of all sunny. I wanna let you now something you probably already as everybody knows the first three rules of motor investigation. That's right location. Location location those the rules of real estate and your in the location that i'm in right now which means you're on the location of the dead body. I just wanted to touch base with everyone in my location before i started investigating my location. That's right rule number two location now. We'll get to number three. After i finished examining the location. Is this murder investigation. Is this real estate. It'd be surprised. I often the crossover. Now here's the thing sunny boy. I'm gonna need you to give the facts. Jack. that's right. the facts two of 'em specifically on facts. I wanted to give me something. That's not if that that's something that delight. i want to give me true truths. I don't wanna give me lie. Doesn't have to necessarily be in that order. In fact it's a lot more fun if it's not hanging you said santa boy and you also said jack are you talking. Which one of us were you talking to all right jack in the colloquial sense your jack. Not jack okay. It's also a little confusing because he keeps popping his hologram around the room. Kind of just seemingly randomly chevy stranded like throw me off balance. I appears you are armed straight. I on on low point a gun at your right now. Hey click sound that. We all heard just now wasn't enough to see new. Don't as me bro. listen. I'm gonna slowly take off my backpack through and weapons. What i would add. Is there for self defense. Only i'm setting it down. You can see had no other weapons. I'm not holes during anything we lift up my shirt. Oh wow in fact. I would've asked feed and not do that actually. Wow that's okay. well. I don't really need to see the bag now. Obviously not a threat out law to facts and in fact that's right son sunny boy sunny jack sunny. Just sorry i'll stop saying can fusing because he's jaclyn. You're jack you know what i'm saying. Third base. i'll call you jeremy. You okay with that max Short sounds great. Go ahead jeff. Okay sure fact number one. I am from the city of seattle. Sounders made up but go on fact or maybe not fact number two. I'm recording this whole conversation. That's felony Fact or possibly not fact number three is that i am a professional wrestler right. Now i'm not gonna guess which one of those is alive. Make sure that's clear. I'm just entering all of these into evidence. Now if any of this ends up being used in court and proving a detriment to the prosecution case you'll be fine and prison basically ally investigate that age. Old tactic called entrapment background. Check him and find the wasn't special wrestler. Say wow boylans like honestly can be any number of those. He's real good at this game. But here's what i wanna know maxi boy. That's right. jeremy. Mr travis boy. Here's the thing. What is that hold on the refrigerator. Handle this yeah. I see it as a smudge. A duck smudge looks like some kind of greece on the inside of the refrigerator handle jack but you know anything about this snow. I literally just walked in. Jack jack jack. The one that goes and i can see i around paper. Well that's is that it's not gonna happen any then let me just skirt that different part of the handle it all right Listen to him just showed up here. Maybe we should like. I dunno go to the neighbors and see if any of them saw anything well i was going to make a bit of a more thorough investigation. The contents of this fridge but a pretty much everything. I need to know by now. This cottage cheese shouldn't be this keller. I'm interested in knowing the neighbors of scene because they saw you coming. Maybe they saw going. You know what. I'm saying you probably. That's all right well. I'm just going to walk out the front door here. It's important to get a good smell surroundings. Hey wait a minute. That dollar game. Follow us out of the trailer. Whatever did you like activate upon his death. You knew how long he's been dead for would add as two and a half days. Couldn't have been meek. Because i just showed up. Well can you prove your absence grooving negative. That's another classic law enforcement technique. Ask him to prove a negative. They never can just like you can't right now. Say what's up nope. That's a raccoon. That's just the shoe. i think that's i'm sure that if you speak to the neighbors and the other surrounding trailers none of them will have seen me lough our next door. Who don't mind me interrupting you sir. But obviously you're man coming in and out of your neighbors house recently in the last couple of days does he have. Is this your watch. What i don't know know. I've never seen this guy before my wait a minute. You kind of millions. Talk hussein. sucks out that you look like this guy here. It's hologram year. You look a lot like him for like old wrinkly and gray suspicion seems a little suspicious itself them at. Can't you see that man in there. Who seems to be slightly transparent. It's probably just the drapes obviously has long. Yeah okay so you noticed. I think that's another hologram. Oh i just madrid. Give people the benefit of the third a bother. You say you need to your. He's a fraudster. What's reported to the landscaping crimes. Yeah that's right. This guy only does murder so there. We should be back with you in about a month now to the business at hand. This particular grizzly marta. The man inside that trailer right there. He's dead. I know crazy right now. She's still watching us through the window. I mean it's a big window. I you don't usually see bay-windows like that on mobile homes you do you. Hey you seem like you're living your best life. I don't think he's living any life. I'm telling you he's a hologram. There you can do it. Sturdy admits that he is allah. Graham who's gonna take me flesh and blood human or these holograms whole auster. That's right also. Have you taken a look at this long. It really does look needs mode does not my problem. That's landscaping crafts departments problem. Now i want you to really grasp and just take in the gravity situation. Meant that gentleman is dead. His goose is cooked. Yeah i understand. Ganders been pandered i understand. I'm the one who discovered the body. Now you just you discover the body. That is a real fun way to say it's not fun. It wasn't fun it's reached in there. I don't understand how you didn't seem to notice it at all just walked right in there. Listen here sonny. I've smelled death more times than you could ever dream okay. It's dark and it's changed me as a person. Listen we got to get ourselves back into that trailer right now and investigate the premises just a little bit more. Okay fine now really wreaks it yet. You heard mashed always gets his man and you sir. Are that man. Unless as i suspect you yourselves are in fact another hologram chest. Why why have. I just like that. Oh well that's the easy part of police works on terminating. Whether or not a person standing right in front of you is or is not a hologram. Listen i didn't murder. This guy doesn't look like he's been murdered. I don't see any evidence of actual trump shoot. I should look at the body lipstick on his collar. On my caller. What kind of color lipstick do you wear. I wear lipstick This trailer is packed to the gills with holographic projectors apparently surely there's also like some kind of cameras recording system like surveillance footage. You could just access and see what exactly what happened at good league jack here myself. Change the password since the last check was the face for this. This this this this right here. He can see that says my secret crush thoughts. I thought at every crush. I've ever had as jack in there. Were a lot of and none of them were the right answer. Well let me This is when the deductive powers that i developed over many years of training. Come into play. Hang on let me try something go that was it. Oh what do i. It was orange crush. That's not even secret. That's like the most popular flavor gone with grape strawberry. Those are secret. No one knows about those terrible hen. Man i mean i know it. Wasn't you technically orange crush. Well all right now time. For the moment of truth we're going to hit that play button and watch. That was the wrong button. That does that well the fact that you were the one who pointed me to this file tells me some you you're on the right value. Hit the wrong button. All right five like little. Try mother mom. That's a lady. I mean that's your mom or lady than you'll ever be what is happening now. Did you get the wrong file again. Somehow i guess that's our trailer jetro. I really need to call more often. Looks real excited to see jack. Oh wow oh they're just going right into it right into it. Oh berkeley i thought standards were a bit high o. k. o. But everyone seems to stop moving. She fall asleep well on top of him kissing and then moving to see my flesh twitching. I can barely see that. Most of your body is covered by mrs lugar. There ever got a romantic as. I'm starting to think not hit fast forward. Just hours of detective. Luger's mom laying on top of jack strove. She is a heavy sleeper. She moves she so slow down. Look or well. I mean how do those count is usually an presumably. They don't usually end with him. Being smothered to death. We stopped short death now. I'll be honest. I probably should have recognized that purview. When i first walked in here i've never known another woman to wear. How would you. How did you make a perfume smell in this place. I've got the nose of links or a similar creature. Obviously i did not murder this man. I reluctantly agree that this is probably go well. You would be. If i hadn't cut you in a blatant bald faced lie directly to law enforcement's that's right earlier on you told me. This whole conversation was being recorded. And i know that's a felony and you don't seem like you got the guts to actually do that sir. Unfortunately i'm going to have to take you in downtown ri- right okay. When are we just step outside. Probably yeah that's where my car is. Okay i'm good. I trust you on that. No need to restrain you. Well i guess we'll see. I'll see you later. Probably not hologram. Jack strobe justice system that Sorry about your untimely demise. But alex honestly it's kinda beautiful when you think about it not when you watch it but when you think about it sure to see active considering get your own mother. I should call him anyway. Maxima all right all right all right guys over there. It's that black and white one all pretty lights sometime all right all right here. I'll let me get in the back from the shut. That door on your there all right you be there right. There have gone one again. They're all gone. Jack leisurely stroll around to the driver's side door. Well anyway here i am. Just oh here. Is that a podcast. Podcast boy is he. I think he may be my mother to raise standards. Okay exit this seeings. That's probably a good idea to push the button on my remote here puerto goes to another dimension. Which is where i'm from. I guess i could have mentioned earlier. Would have been a pretty solid alibi anyway. I'm gonna head back to my own dimension a bit of a mess. Sorry about that. Yes i am. You've got a lot on your shoe. What was screaming allah right. You can hear that's right. Yeah you the audio portal connection there. So no how right is a porta was opening up. You told me that my excavator was here right. Uh-huh and what did you call it about. Gatt yeah i mean that is that is what it is but You shouldn't have said that as the portal was opening. Oh what did you have to fight off a giant bob cat or something. Unfortunately in the other dimension pflueger met his demise at the very large pause of a seemingly. Rabid bob cat. Oh my wow. I think we'll have to be a little more careful when we're opening the portal. You think wow yeah. I feel bad about this. You should feel bad. It was distressing. Also by the way you were dead in that other dimension. So why bob cat killed me to no. No no no. I'll tell you later anyway. Everything's all shutdown. Hopefully things go a little bit better next week. Patrons from the multi is produced by by tim. Ellis starring. jerry are willing as jack. But just the bloating strobe and tim ellis as memphis with special guest. Peter ellis as detective. Dirk pflueger the music by lv logo by age. Mit enjoying this podcast. Notice how it doesn't have any ads want to help keep it that way. Support us on patriots where you'll get exclusive. Bonus content like brainstorming sessions peaks behind the scenes sweet birch and extended additions of the show. Also be sure to follow us on twitter at dispatches at them and visit us online at dispatches dot Hello yes sorry right. Sounds like you sick call back later. How much aside. I only have so many voices see it. Sound like we've got you dead to rights and also sounds like i'm getting increasingly southern dialed outback. Orange eighties jokes. That belinda hold on now. That raccoon is back. I swear it eight that whole shoe earlier but it really seems to be eating the exact same shoe and not just like the left version of like the right shoe eight early. I swear that raccoons just fully devouring the same shoe at already. You know what maybe. There's a lot of the same shoe in the neighborhood. I'm not going to get too involved with it. Let's go back in the trailer.

Pflueger Jack Max Max Fluker Great Lugar Amac Jack Stroke Graham Jack Strobe Jober Jack Strobe Jester Polygram Dirk Dirk Pflueger Max Mad Archie Gonna Jack Okay Jack Sunny Max Short MAX Lugar
Gordon Chu Analyzes How Chat Bot Strategy Can Optimize Customer Service

VOICE Global 2021

02:58 min | 22 hrs ago

Gordon Chu Analyzes How Chat Bot Strategy Can Optimize Customer Service

"Regards to interfacing with customers out there If i'm i'm looking for a flight or maybe i want a book light and i want to use my off. The shelf assistant Let's talk a little bit about that interface and the the end customer. Okay i would say like What we kurt. We have a chat bot in sitting cafe. Kathy pacific talking musical variety. It is also Mobile app so away. Business to ultimately like a frequently asked questions Crushes related to check in change booking and baggage allowance even a even Load the operations related question such as like sparring airline miles you name it and and but i think what i want to share or abou- easter i think it gives a chat bots strategy. I think this is something that could be useful. Awful other corporates absolutely definitely. Let's talk about that. Yeah yeah so we're talking about won't talk about how we occurred positioning chat bots coronation that you i and so what we is. What the chad does that objectives. First of all because we won't talk about automation white. So we wanna be able to lower operating costs of our contact centers right. How can we not talk about reducing agents. How can we juice the unnecessary contact with customers. So that the agent can handle more complicated cases malkani hacks case right right not to provide that to a satisfaction could agents so they're actually doing jobs and also provide a service quality and the second objective is how can we move on any obstacle in the customer journey at preflight and posts so that the customer can can get converted faster and So though so in terms in terms of strategic planning we have created this servicing funnel concept. pham south surgeries the mobile app and also website. Where debate where people actually like a search for flights and do check in a managed at brookings two in the lowest dream The human agents the actual call so imagine like before chat bot defunding goes from the south surfaces and live chat and the contact center agent Handling the car right and the low what gets in the funnel the higher the cost of resolution so the outcome that we are looking at chief by placing a i in the middle of funnel is not about that we want to cannibalize our feature. I mean i mean kim busted features in our digital platforms each properties or to replace the agents the angle they were looking at. How can we create hominy liking the fundamental That when we put a chat bot in the middle what what we want you to do that. Too at the edge point that determines would issue can be resolved effectively

Kathy Pacific Malkani Kurt Pham South KIM
California Adds Vacation Incentive to Spur Vaccinations

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

California Adds Vacation Incentive to Spur Vaccinations

"California lips it's coronavirus restrictions starting Tuesday governor Gavin Newsom says the state reach this point because of the work of Californians no more physical distancing requirements known more caps on occupancy moving beyond the blueprint aligning with the CDC on masks mandates but the governor points out the virus is still out there we're not done to get more people vaccinated the state is offering dream vacations and cash prizes ten individuals will receive a million and a half dollars each those that have been vaccinated with at least one dose are eligible the dream vacation giveaways are a way to boost California's tourism industry I'm a Donahue

Gavin Newsom California CDC
China's Lost Civilization "Sanxingdui" Meets Ufology with Ufologist Shao Ma

Truth Be Told

02:16 min | 1 d ago

China's Lost Civilization "Sanxingdui" Meets Ufology with Ufologist Shao Ma

"Well. I'm excited. Because i was telling you before that i've i've never had anybody that from china or even anybody to talk about Chinese ancient civilizations and mixed in with ufology. So this is exciting for me. So i really appreciate it I was telling you before everybody has their own ufo stories. You know myself you know. Many of my guest people on the streets they well. I don't really believe. But i did see something or i've saw a spacecraft or i saw an. You're an alien or extraterrestrial so but you've had sounds like quite a few encounters. Could you talk about your your own personal encounters before we get into anything else show. Thanks so my experience. Back in two thousand twelve before dow every joke. Low working at defy. What when i was you know traveled to brazen office and i saw a ufo crop hovering outside of the sky in a window. So look at him. Some my gosh. That is silver in color round voice shape just hovering sky midway through so that really challenged might hurt on so starches think there might be something beyond what we know and Off the guards. It's just here for a minute of a threat is a kind of panic connection between me and cross Dot crop radiate much love. You know war really so our start to won't digging a home. I decided to the further in order to on a youtube channels trying to know what is saying. Is that really man. May or ufo craft so after that incident happened back in two thousand twelve. Of course none of my colleague believe me. I saw this out of my office. So nobody believes me so i my experience. Just that to picking up. You know all those very intense auto body experience Meeting with various different each e. beams some benevolent Most of them have been neverland. The new true you know business life just here to see what your dream basically

China Youtube
What Does Allyship in the Workplace Look Like?

Status Go

01:54 min | 1 d ago

What Does Allyship in the Workplace Look Like?

"Welcome to the show melinda. Thank you great to be here. I am so looking forward to our conversation today. This is a subject that i know is on the top of a lot of people's minds in learning how to be a better ally is something that i think we can all use but before we get to that. I mentioned several of the organizations. You are involved in but could you give us a bit of your background. And what led you to where you are today. Yeah well. Let's see i by focused. My whole life has been on creating social and environmental change really making a difference in the world making the world a better place and so a started doing that Well i studied cultural anthropology. And then art and i started actually is a as an artist new york and As a visual artist installation artist and quickly moved from that into filmmaking. Sue moved from new york to la when to usc film school and And then worked in the film industry for about ten years Mostly documentary filmmaking. Also did some more means dream work like worked on the west wing and some other products like that and what really using the power of storytelling to create change and from there. I continue to do that but realized that i could do that. In a corporate setting as well really helping companies social enterprises nonprofits and Governments to greet changed through storytelling. Him behavior change campaigns Worked for a number of years doing that with different clients and ended up taking a role with my clients as the chief. Experience officer at an engineering firm in san

Melinda New York USC SUE LA SAN
Djokovic Defeats Tsitsipas in Five Sets to Claim 19th Grand Slam Title

BBC Newsday

00:51 sec | 1 d ago

Djokovic Defeats Tsitsipas in Five Sets to Claim 19th Grand Slam Title

"And Novak Djokovic now has 19 Grand Slam titles. The Serbian putting an incredible performance yesterday to come from two sets down to beast, the final CityPass and when the French Open at Roland Garros It was the Greek player 60 passes First Grand Slam final. He was so close to winning it, but what happened started playing really shorts. I felt like my rhythm was self. I really wish I couldn't understand why things like this happened and evolved. But I was trying to figure it out during my game. It was difficult to come up with something. It's It's very unfortunate dream. Very sad and in the same way because it was it was a good opportunity. I was doing good. I was feeling good not to be four CityPass in Paris as we mentioned that is now. 19 Grand Slams for Novak Djokovic. He's just one behind Roger Federer. And Rafael Nadal now who both have 20

Novak Djokovic Paris Roger Federer Rafael Nadal
"In the Heights": A Joyous Return to the Movies

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 2 d ago

"In the Heights": A Joyous Return to the Movies

"T o P News Well before Hamilton Lin Manuel Miranda won best musical for in the Heights. The hotly anticipated movie version is now showing in movie theaters and streaming on HBO. Max, Who's Na'vi de la Vega runs a bodega in one Washington Heights, New York, Dreaming of returning to the Dominican Republic. Anthony Ramos inherits the Royal from Lin Manuel Miranda, but it won't be jarring to D C audiences who already saw him in the part of the Kennedy Center. We root for his romance with Melissa Barrera, just as we do, Allegedly Grace and Corey Hawkins, all four of which get character arts, dreaming of starting a tiki bar. Becoming hairstyle is fighting for immigrants and running a taxi dispatch director John Chu proves you can do things on screen that you can on stage, choreographing dance numbers in swimming pools, surreal subway tunnels, even sides of buildings. A tough pandemic year. It's the feel good movie we need right now for a

Hamilton Lin Manuel Miranda Anthony Ramos Lin Manuel Miranda De La Vega Melissa Barrera Washington Heights Corey Hawkins HBO Dominican Republic Kennedy Center MAX John Chu New York Grace Swimming
The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:35 min | 4 d ago

The Life of Lynn Conway: Computer Scientist and Transgender Activist

"Lynn conway was born on january. Second nineteen thirty eight in mount vernon new york initially assigned male at birth. She experienced a disconnect between her gender identity and assigned sex from a young age. Lynn new she identified as girl due to the limited knowledge around gender fauria in the nineteen forties and fifties. Lynn was raised as a boy. Lynn was a shy and reserved high school student. She excelled academically specifically in math and science. Her grades earned her spot at mit at the age of seventeen at mit. Lynn studied physics for two years before dropping out as a result of psychological distress with her gender identity. A few years later in nineteen sixty one linen rolled at columbia university. She earned her bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering during this time. Lynn married a woman and the couple had two daughters together. Violet columbia limbs work caught the attention of professor who is a senior leader at ibm. He offered her a job on the ibm research team. That was covertly developing the world's fastest supercomputer. Lynn had secured her dream job. Then in nineteen sixty seven. Lind learned doctor named harry. Benjamin the leading researcher on transgender people and sex reassignment surgery after counseling and hormone treatments lynn decided to undergo gender reassignment surgery. To ease your transition at work lin planned for ibm to change her name on company records and transfer her to a different lab. No one would have to know but ibm corporate disagreed. They feared employees would be upset. If limb secret got out some instead of honoring their promise of finding her a new department. Ibm quietly fired her. On top of losing her job wins wife left her and banned her from having any contact with their daughters. Fourteen years would pass before. Lynn saw her children again despite being ostracized by her company and family. Lynn moved forward with the surgery and completed her transition in nineteen sixty eight.

Lynn Lynn Conway IBM Violet Columbia Mount Vernon MIT Columbia University New York Lind Benjamin Harry LIN
Bootstrap Your Dream With Mukesh Alex Vaidya

Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:25 min | 4 d ago

Bootstrap Your Dream With Mukesh Alex Vaidya

"Mckay. Sh- alex say what's up to fire nation and share something that you believe about becoming successful that most people disagree with thank you so much jerry. Having mean this amazing podcast furnish s agus emigrate. This podcast. and you're one of the true inspirational stories which i follow early. Disley hanky frankly frankly speaking. This is a chill factor moment. No coming to one thing. I believe about becoming successfully. Is that if you're good at something and if you are genuinely ready to share that knowledge with the world you will become massively successful. This era where information is at everybody's fingertips yet it is misinformation and lies which is reading fast. We need more knowledge angeles to spread through knowledge across the world. Even if you study history you can find that this is true. Ancient civilizations flourished when their knowledge evangelizing this authority like mesopotamia civilization or roman civilisational vedic india or this civilization flourished when their culture of sharing knowledge but unfortunately obstructionism started creeping into the society. All these civilizations declined so this is a fact. I think a b. Everybody agreeing with but this really makes people massively

Disley Mckay Alex Jerry Angeles India
'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

Filmspotting

00:57 sec | 4 d ago

'In the Heights' and the New Golden Age of Musicals

"Early word about in the heights has been effusively positive in general and praising of star anthony ramos as a screen presence in particular if you get the film spotty newsletter. You already know that. This week producers. Sam wrote about seeing hints of ramos's potential in the filmed version of hamilton. So i thought we might want to start there atom to ask if this potential was realized for you in this screen adaptation of lin-manuel miranda's pre hamilton stage. Musical ramos plays whose navy de la vega twenty something new yorker. Who's taken over corner. Bodega from his late parents. But dreams of moving back to his native dominican republic. There two other main characters whom will get to but it's it's navy who introduces us to. His washington heights neighborhood in the movies. Bravura pre title sequence. Which is a chance for ramose to showcase his skills as a singer. Slash rapper as a dancer and just general screen presence

Anthony Ramos Ramos Manuel Miranda Hamilton SAM Navy LIN Bodega Dominican Republic Washington Heights Ramose
More Than Writing Code With Dr.Neeta Trivedi

Software People Stories

02:00 min | 5 d ago

More Than Writing Code With Dr.Neeta Trivedi

"If we can start with your origin story how did you get into though you hi. I'm really excited to be part of this and allows me to also to fresh lots upward memories and so i was disciplined by the back end reflecting. I come from a very very modest background. Lower middle class family and the video all down. Even the dreams are modest because nineteen eighty-four The was not so much there was no internet not division netflix's nor discovery channels in salon. So they didn't know too much outside world end Across a small town. So maybe you just one thing has shown that i wanted to do something like it should be different. Should be big. What is that big. That clarity was not bad so we talked about maybe we can become college professors or maybe not engineering college professors. That was largely a dreams. One thing for sure bet. You should study a lot of maths and physics because that's when you'll be essential that's on. I knew and we grew up. Got very good teachers. From primary school onwards they were passionate about building human resources not not just teaching and making many. Thanks the very fortunate in rhode small incidents that when my parents started the would not afford the fee and they wanted to would mean a government. School leaders came to my house. And saying you can pay the fee later. Don't take her out. I mean that's unheard of in general so grew up in that environment really nine thousand people in ninety nine hundred seven whenever completing busy in physics chemistry math because we didn't have engineering college in the town and i don't think my parents would have sent me outside at that age then even financially. Maybe they could not so of. I was finishing my own. That fame be heard about this diario program

Netflix Rhode
The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

TED Talks Daily

01:54 min | 5 d ago

The Real-Life Superheroes Helping Syrian Refugees

"A. Let me tell you a different story my story. I'm a filmmaker and reveal g from a small village in northern syria in our village growing up there was no stable supply. We spend most of our nights are on gas lanterns and build stories about syrian mythological super beings that protected. The vulnerable was a boy who loved stories of superheroes but later on these stories shifted to tells of heroes that my family has to face and are the assad dictatorship. One of my uncles was killed under torture. My father had to burn his books before they were even published in order to protect us from the reaching. He burned his dreams along with his books. These stories must not be forgotten. My parents insisted the stories stopped being a best time. It's became a form of resistance. I studied filmmaking focused on the commentaries commentary. Filmmaking became my way of resistance. I commend stories of syrian hobos. Assad regime and an elephant when the revision started. I was arrested tortured and sexually assaulted when i was released. I left syria a west traumatized and tried to end my life. My wife stood by me and held me hang onto life but as a result i stopped making films

Syria Assad
Steps to Help You Create Your First Offer

Build Your Tribe

02:11 min | 5 d ago

Steps to Help You Create Your First Offer

"I wanna talk to you about your introductory offer now. I coined the term baby offer. I dunno like maybe ten years ago. And i think a baby offer is just hopefully a a way to look at the first offer that you make that is less intimidating. Oftentimes you'll hear business mentors and advisers. Tell you like dream bigger. You gotta dream big. You gotta go big. And i think that when we do that sometimes we make mistakes and we go to big and we create something that is more advanced than our lifer is ready for or more expensive than your relationship has the merit to command if that makes sense so in other words if my lifer has just this is the very first podcast you've ever listened to and you're just getting to know me and i tell you i've got this amazing course that teaches. You need to know about business marketing. And it's twenty five hundred dollars. You're not ready for that. We don't have a relationship on that level yet. I need to prove myself to you. You need to invest a much smaller dollar amount. And see that i can deliver and then some and that it works for you and that you trust my way of teaching and that creates a level of trust then allows you to make the next greater investment now. Certainly there are always exceptions to this right. Like if i have some pretty incredible marketing in place and you stumble upon an add your cold viewer or a cold audience. You don't know who i am. You haven't spent any time on my podcast. We haven't spent any time together. And you have a need and we have done an amazing job of targeting those people who already can afford or already at a level where they understand making that type of investment and the return on investment. Yeah that could happen but more often than not businesses about relationships. It's about figuring out if we trust people and how we can work together and we build on that in the way that we build on that is by creating a customer journey.

Where Did the Sex Go?

Sex With Emily

02:37 min | Last week

Where Did the Sex Go?

"Tell me what's going on thanks. I'm a huge fan of so happy. So i i'm a therapist always thinking always in my head but it can't figure this out. Okay i think of it. As like my my is spilling into my. I am in a healthy relationship with a man like seven months in and suddenly my fantasies of being with a girl sexually being with a woman is like suddenly moving into my daily life. And i go by the timing on. Turf big communicator. I've talked about it with him. I mean he. He's not like irritated by a bike. Is definitely not okay with me pursuing that. And i understand right but i just can't get my finger on why this suddenly like not just a fantasy it used to just the have dreams or that'd be the corn of choice by and suddenly it's like no. I want to do this in my waking life. And i can't get to the bottom of it. Have you met anybody. That's picture interest. I have not okay. How's your sex life with your partner. Our sex life is great That hesitation you hear. My voice is like i am struggling a little bit with the x factor like the while chemistry but everything is so great in a relationship and the actual sex is great as well in the communication until it's not something i'm concerned about but be x. Factors just the little though so for me. Okay how the x factor meaning dislike unspeakable chemical. I gotta have you right here right now type of connection that i didn't look my most toxic relationships honestly like thick the more toxic Stronger that was which is terrible and now in thirty and making smart choices. How long have you guys been together. Seven months seven months okay. So it's still do. How was in the beginning. Did you have that attraction. At the beginning we did. I don't know what we're off. i think. I don't know if is spending more time together than i usually spend with my significant other to be honest But it's died down a little bit and it's only seven months in. Yeah i mean. That's what happens in relationships. The honeymoon period is anywhere from six months to two years and then during the pandemic. Maybe you're spending more time together and that kind of squashes out the the the arousal and the attraction process because when we're on top of each other we're seeing to their more while we feel more intimate and more connection and more love with our partner it's sort of. Can douse the flames of desire. Because we no longer have that separation

NASA Perseverance, The First 100 Days

Astronomy Cast

02:19 min | Last week

NASA Perseverance, The First 100 Days

"So perseverance. What is it. It is a next upgraded version of curiosity rover. It's built on very much the same hardware plan but as happens when you get a few years. From one designed upgraded the systems and part of upgraded. The systems meant it has a belly full of crazy robotics and electronics. And they're going to use that crazy belly to gather up samples of rock. It also is carrying the first ever microphone on mars which people are far more excited about than i ever dreamed of like me. Well yeah it. It's still caught me by surprise. And they have an experiment for creating oxygen. They have a laser and they are putting rocks. Left and right and then of course. There's little ingenuity helicopter. Alright so then like compare and contrast like if we had perseverance and curiosity side by side and we were looking at them trying to spot the differences there the same size right same size and the roughly built on the same chassis. yes okay. The heads look very similar. It's when you start looking at the arms in the underbelly that everything radically changes. It's when you look at the underbelly. An armed that everything radically changed so arm does not have the little divet scraping machine that they have on curiosity that they've been using to up to rocks and remove a layer of weathered rock to see what's underneath instead. The arm has sherlock which is an ultraviolet violet spectrometer and it has a laser and they are literally zadran rocks and listening to hear how the zap sounds and using that sound getting an assessment of the density and other characters things of the rocks. This this is not something i imagine. This is the moral equivalent of doing science by knocking on wood except thursdays outing rocks.

Interview With Musician, Claud

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

01:57 min | Last week

Interview With Musician, Claud

"I always have guests introduce themselves. Would you introduce yourself. Yeah hi. I'm claude musician. Yeah that's all. I know about myself but it is. It is that the. that's actually. Yeah there's a lot there's a lot to learn that's exciting. I like to you know leave. It open ended here. Here's looking good. Thank you so is yours. Oh my god thank you. I just went swimming in now. I have that wet boy. Look but everybody's trying to get jealous. I wanna go swimming. Oh it's a you know. There's a local y. Near i live. And i go for early morning. Lap swims with like People that are like in their eighties and me and the nice secretly racism matt this before you came on i secretly. There's always like one pretty good swimmer. Who definitely swim in college or something. And i tracked them under the water and secretly raced them. They don't they definitely know. I'm doing this. But that's my that's my current lifestyle is swimming amidst the that's gonna be right like still like eighty like up in the morning like still in the world is not sound like a dream. Yeah that's like oh you know when you're like walking down the street in some the someone's walking in front of you and it's not like they're walking to slow but you wanna pass them now. I have to like a really fast walk at least a block otherwise talk.

Swimming Matt
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

12:57 min | 1 year ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"The back with MARCI would come and MARCI. We left off talking about the American dream experience and and one of the things that came out of that or at least started with is people sometimes. See that as a cliche that statement. They've heard it for years when you start to dwell and and and really. Don't go deeper. What does it really mean to experience the American dream? Then you start to really get you go. Yeah you know I am. Foggy would decisions. I am very uncomfortable making them. You wouldn't be if you really identified the troop inside purpose. Somebody else's your own and you would be able to identify when someone is trying to just sell you. Something new product whether it's an annuity or a mutual fund or an individual stock. You honor whatever vehicle even gold and silver. You would be able to identify some discernment that comes along. Say how does that fit into my purpose. He there's there are two different ways of looking at the investing world. Now why are we talking about investing? When we're talking about the American dream well your money and your relationship with money and we kind of walked through some of the relationships that people develop over their lifetime about money. Oh their fears and sometimes greed. Or they're mostly it's fear the fear of not having enough and the fear of being successful or fear of failure in all of those things we went through that in our last podcast so when we are living in that world of fear and maybe fear and greed mixed in there a little bit we try to solve at. We try to solve these issues in relationships with that. We these dysfunctional relationships that we have with money right by one of two ways. One way is what we're used to in the investment industry and the investment industry uses all that information about you and your behaviors against you. That's really key. You really have to understand that when you live in what we call the investor prediction syndrome. In other words. I have to have a prediction about the future. I have to try to guess which way the market's going. I have to guess or somebody has to do that for me right. I had to know what's going to happen today. It's the virus tomorrow. It's you know China relationships in the last couple of years ago it was Greece or Turkey. Or you know somebody blowing somebody up or you know there's trouble in the world always always always possible in the world or you know or we're going to get on the bandwagon of this new hot company or this new in hot technology or and today it's pat stocks. Oh my gosh people ask him about pot stocks. You know. It's really interesting. Well the company is anyway. I don't want to go into go off. Track here. But investor prediction syndrome is the usual. The default way in which people think about their investing world. Because that's where the most of the investing world lives it's an economic forecast political forecast stock picking market timing track record. Investing looking at Morningstar ratings. Stuff like that right. That's all speculative everything I just said is speculating and gambling with your money. And yet that's the world that most people live in fear. There's no guarantee there's no real. There's no reality to that. No one knows the future right but someone will come along and act as if they know and they'll write a book about it sometimes can be very convincing goodness digging tick and then get to ten minutes a morning talk show and you'll you know you'll be convinced knows. I just heard this morning and so it's got to be true and every word of it but there is. The good news is that there is another way of investing and that is based on academic investing principles is all body of academic research robust. It I have to make a differentiation. Here there's academic research that doesn't work isn't worth a Hilla beans and there is a robust meaning. It's done year after year on an ongoing basis to verify into re see if the these elements still are right and bear their Bear out and so they're empirically tested that means they've been put to the test. People have actually invested this way and it shows that those premiums in the market and the by having a diverse of purses diversified portfolio having a truly diversified portfolio based on the efficient market hypothesis and the three factor model. I said a big mouthful moist in vessels aren't going to know what those that terminology is into a form of events Yes we're going to talk about that today again in mind over money right got a class today and we do these on an ongoing basis so a little aside he listener make sure you check our website out and see when we're teaching classes fine out call us up get one we try to make them convenient to come to. This one is over the lunch hour. We'll give you a little box luncheon and talk about your own computer predictions cacophony like that word. I like it. I said that we're the I'm starting to use. I Find Myself. The terminology comes your a musician. I'm a musician as well. And a cacophony. Is that tuneup song? That the The play before the orchestra the concert right. It sounds like Oh yeah. It's it's noise that is just makes no sense. You know right has no but some tuning a so. These Invest Principles Nobel Prize winning in investing principles can lead you to a world of that. Powerfully allows you to invest and leads you to peace of mind in your investing world. So that you don't in that gives you the freedom right the freedom you need to move on with your life but that doesn't mean that you totally just you you you know. I think regularly what you're putting on is a little Little tidbits of information for people understand and keep on keeping on. Yeah kind of measure. Their as they're going along. Oh absolutely I'm not saying you just say Oh you're off put it and forget it. It's something that but you can rest. Easy can rest easy that it's beat once you understand these principles and if they make sense to you you know. They don't make sense to their people who their ego is into picking stocks. They WanNa beat the market and we don't believe in that vet so that's what you believe in. That's you know you're going to stay in that investor predictions addictive to a dictator. And you know I'll say right now. We are not for everyone. I mean we could be but in my mind. I do not speculate with my clients money right and I don't want them to speculate with their money and I don't want them giving their money to mutual fund managers that do speculate with their money. So now you what you have to ask yourself is how do I identify that? How do I know if my mutual fund is being speculative? I thought they were all really good. Well educated yeah they are but you can tell in there are some key indicators one is you know how many holdings to they have relative to the market? Hauer those holdings you know put together are the using the elements of the efficient market hypothesis. The three factor model are they actually using them and giving you an efficient portfolio getting the maximum return from the amount of risk. You're willing to take right right. Sounds simple and you can identify that. You really can't. We have a program where we do. Actually we call it the MRI like like you have an MRI. Done of your body to find where the trouble might be. So we look at a deep dive into your mutual funds and find out what are the holdings what are they and even tells me how. How much turnover you have. You know how turnover leads to cost. So that's another element of putting together a properly designed portfolio in engineered portfolio turnover. Yeah it can make people know realize that all those are commission -able turnovers and and taking a bite out of what the returns would normally be exactly. Most people have never had anyone measure the full cost of their portfolio. Are they're investing experience? They just maybe they know the Upfront Commission. Maybe and maybe you think that's only because they really don't understand it and I don't even think the advisers understanding I certainly was not taught it when I worked at a brokerage for. They don't tell you anything about that. I didn't discover that or learn about that until I went to classes at the University of Chicago and they gave me a formula and I came back and I took that formula and calculated by hand. The cost of some of the funds. I had been promoting and they were awful three and a half four and a half percent. How are you going to make any money? Trade the market only dot. Us Stock Market LARGE-CAP like the S&P. Five hundred is about nine to ten percent a year. Well if you're taking four and a half percent out. Wow you're really can become an out all the return exactly and then it's very very volatile. The other reason people don't achieve that market rate of return is that they're moving around because you have a lot of volatility the market drops. O- like this. Give me out of that until the adviser doesn't know anything else doesn't know what to do doesn't have any engineering capability in terms of creating a real portfolio coach. You they just sell stuff so they move you from one fund to another to another thing to another thing and they make commissions all day while they're doing that and sometimes I think they do just to pacify you only. Yeah absolutely absolutely okay. You'll feel better if I if I go this direction. So yeah no yeah we want to hang onto you keep you here and so we we don't tell you the truth we just we just pacify you for the moment and hope you stay. And the truth is most people their investments every three to four years and therefore where am I getting? This doll bar is a company that does studies these are. It's an independent company. It studies investor behavior disgusted studies. Investors returns the average equity fund owner gets about four percent or a little less. That is just mind boggling. When you hear it yeah that's right and I've talked to so many people that have no clue they think. Oh we're on a steady ten percent eleven percent return. That's pretty much average but they never really hard yes then. They've got a Ponzi scheme. Then they're involved in con- or a Ponzi scheme that's the only way that can happen and they better get out before the Ponzi scheme falls apart with Bernie madoff. Yeah I mean it that is really destroys the investing industry as it exists in brokerage firms insurance companies your typical bank broker all of that is destructive to the American dream. It is and I mean that sincerely and strongly. I want people to think about what they're doing..

Ponzi scheme MARCI Nobel Prize Bernie madoff University of Chicago Greece Us China Upfront Commission dot Hauer Turkey
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

14:50 min | 1 year ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Okay I'm here talking with Margie. Wig Up once again we are exploring the world of money and financing and all those good things Marci one of the things we did talk about on an earlier podcast but we didn't really take too deep dive into it was the American dream experience. I know you've been quite active and put none in In fact you got one coming up in April and other ones April beginning of May it's April thirtieth and may first here in Wisconsin. So this is going going to be an awesome event. I just got back from Scottsdale Arizona. I took a couple of gas. I can only take a couple of people at a time. Because there's people from all over the country come mm to Scottsdale to experience the American dream. There's a difference between knowing I won't talk about that a little bit Just knowing knowing something like I know the Word Love L. O. V. E.. I can spell it. I can use it in sentence but the experience of love is what it. It's when you look at your baby when his firstborn right when you look in your lover's is you know at the moment of its so you're absolutely drawn to it into yes. Yes that is a an experience of love and there's many things in life that we experienced so what we do who at the American dream experience and it's not about. It's probably easy to tell tell you what it's not about. It's not about materialism cereal ISM okay now material. Things may show off right in your American dream as as a As a way of expressing expressing what you want out of life Okay might be a home for example you know. I WANNA provide a home for my family. That might be part of your American dream. The experience of owning that home and having the financial means to do that is the experience of it. So that's what we do at the American dream experience. It's it's built around and the premise that if you live your life on purpose in other words the first thing we do we spend almost a you know a good portion of the first day just talking about purpose and trying to discover your purpose purpose is different from a goal goal. All is a thing or a an achievement or some some sort of destination nation that you want to achieve so it's an and there may be many multiple goals in your life. Nothing wrong with goals purpose is why you do what you do right. It's the why and that's what drives your person. And that's what drives you when you lack a purpose or you don't maybe you don't lack but you don't know what it is. Decisions nations become difficult to feel insecure and unsure some times people kind of bury their heads in the sand. You kinda idea they just ignore it. And they're faced with a difficult decision they avoid it. Yeah and so part of what our mission is is to help people who want it who don't want to avoid life or who really wanna live life and WanNa live it fully is to help them find that purpose purpose just you know. We don't give it to them. I don't tell you what we already got. One is just getting to it and then once you know so that it becomes easier to make decisions and live your life on purpose right and then you know of course the investing investing part of it is just you know those are the resources you have yet to fulfil and of course we go into you know what's real and what's not real in in the investing world so Let's get back to this idea of the American dream experience and it's really it's a human dream. It's not not isolated to the American you know Shore so no. It's not here American. The reason we call it the American dream is because in this country. This country was established based on these principles of life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Not The guarantee of happiness. I was like to make sure people understand that. No one is guaranteeing you or a life of the following. The life probably is going to have. It's bumpy roads. It's not oh he's GonNa be peaches and cream and we know that that's what we accept is. Life is a horse without the bumpy road. We can't appreciate the good for us again. Sometimes we get too comfortable thinking nothing thing is ever GonNa get in our way or never be a hurdle to climb and we see this in youngsters. Sometimes you see people sure you you know you'd think would know better but oftentimes you know we as as our age we're grandparents and we can see it as time. Ah Yes of course. Of course so once you know what that purposes although even those bumps in the road become much easier to accept an and work through well. Because you're going yes and you can gain from the knowledge in the wisdom that can come from their adverse time so we help people you know I really come together. And it's not just getting your purpose. Jimmy you know it would be you and your daughter and your spouse listen you know when the family when the family so this is this is built for families. They'll maybe families come in all kinds of cheese and shapes shapes right so maybe you're a single person right but you have family of some sort. It could be made up of friends who create your our family your inner circle so we want families to have freedom see that's where the American part people yearn for freedom freedom the freedom to be themselves to use all their abilities and and their creativity to create a world to be themselves so that is not again just American shores the whole world. There are people out there who want that freedom So we want to help families get that freedom and fulfillment so whatever that purposes we want to help them fulfil on that purpose. Yeah and that should create you know. The last part of that sentences freedom fulfillment and love so. Because that's where you know that that's is the engine if you would that kind of drives families so what gets in the way. That's one of the things that we try to experience life. It gets in the way for but we get in our own way sometimes trip over on yes a well I know that. Yeah we Own Way so so some of the things we do is discuss things that might cause people to have to think about. What am I doing in? Why do I I in talking to investors. We have what we call it. An investor inventory Scher. You know we take this inventory inventory to help guide our our conversation with investors so that we can you know. Get to know who they are what they are what their their experience in life has been in their experience with specifically with investing and many people they come to the so called called financial advisor agent. I don't care what label you put on the the salesperson that represents the the company they're working for whether you know whatever brokerage firm or the bank or insurance company like not to think of them as a salesperson zone. Yes yeah and they really are and you really have to realize at. That's where they're coming from where you're going to be lost. But why do people just ignore that. Well there are payoffs. It's easy to just do that because then you can avoid responsibility right. It was advisors zirs fault exactly that I make the money. I need somebody to blame somebody to blame. So if you're going to really experience freedom versing you gotTa do is accept responsibility and it's not a scary thing oh to yourself and your family. And that's you know part of what we are all about in helping people understand how markets work and all that Kinda so the American dream Events that you that you host are really designed to keep people on first of all to discover it for themselves us and then secondly to stay faithful to it stay on that track and their world of investing so much more about Knowing your purpose and it's it's so much more than just putting some money into a mutual fund right. That's sometimes how people treated. Hey I'm just WANNA throw it in there Erin forget about it. Let the chips fall. Where the and then some day when I'm ready to get? Oh there isn't that much there is and then of course it's somebody else's fault because nobody told me but it's too late to fix things and sometimes so I get it. Yeah how great it is is to know that to empower yourself. I mean that's a big part of what we try to coach people rather than acting like a salesperson and selling the people something and again this word you know words get used bastardized and you know this word. Coaching is now being used by people. Who are wanting you to speculate and gamble? Will you can go yeah. It's it's really sad but I want in this podcast. I want you to understand the the word coach as someone who is walking by your side helping you understand and develop the and empower you to play the game of life and specifically in our discipline of it the in the financial game of life powerfully awfully. So that you're really you know whatever your means are no matter where you are in life with you you know what would be called relatively wealthy or relatively modest or you know or just kind of getting by right now. It doesn't matter you can be powerful powerful about it and know what to do here a couple of things that I'd like to you know. What is the common relationships ships people have with money? Sometimes they have no relationship in other words they don't pay attention is simply. Don't pay attention somebody else will. I'll have to pay it. Yeah kind of leaving. Hey listen that's it could be a wife or a husband who says oh my husband does it or oh my wife does it. I hear that a lot. And then you go and use the credit card in charge up all kinds of bills. Sometimes I'm just saying you know. This is rush. I've seen the other partner in his. I'm surprised at that. I believe they did that. And then they get in trouble and that can cause law kinds of conflict in a relationship yes always trying to get more fear in that statement. Isn't there there is yes. I'll never never have enough enough. Have another always trying to get more matter. How rich people can get really never feel? It's enough that can be. That can be one. One of the things is isn't always my money equals my status my prestige as person borderie. See that there's a lot of people I feel that way. I know that at some level maybe all of us have a little of that shoe because it's in our culture but I do think it's one of those that you'd Kinda like to knock out of the human condition edition. I don't think we should take it for you. Know Take it like. Oh that's the way it is. I do think we should acknowledge that it's there and then dismiss it or do with it what you will fear of failure fear of success. There is that if I fail. People won't like take me. My wife will leave me if I fail. I'll get fired or to successful. People are going to expect of yes. I don't want anybody pretty coming. Hopelessness Yeah Yeah. Money is evil. If you think money is evil believe me you'll never have an money. You will spend it or lose it as fast as you can because who you don't WanNa see yourself in that light. Money is is hard to make hard to keep. Its creates stress scarcity mindset. I see a lot of that people. No matter how much they have they have a scarcity mindset now never enough again which goes right along with always trying to get more and I I will run out that fear again here so fear and greed are the big drivers. Yeah and when you have this guard your purpose and have a line that with your spouse your family and they might have slightly different versions of of of that but when you can come together on an true purpose now you can start to dispel some of those you can hardly and are you starting to feel how powerful that is absolutely much more powerful and walking into some brokerage firm and saying worship in my IRA right and they sell you the next mutual fund. That was you know a morning star rating okay. I just want to let people know. There's more to come if they have questions that can go. NOT WITH VERITAS INVESTING DOT COM. Yes we're all. Our our events are put questions..

WanNa Wisconsin Arizona Margie Marci Scher Shore Jimmy advisor partner Erin
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

10:16 min | 1 year ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Okay Jim Rosetta here talking great mercury and okay this podcast we are going to be talking have an idea. I'm and I hear it in this phrase on new all right under sometimes on Mutual Fund returns and you wonder where return whatever it says ten percent twelve percent fourteen percent you they will cherry pick a certain area and no he got it did any re- did any investor even actually get it our partners no one who's affiliated with managing the portfolio it's a third party Leo the analyze is quite expensive and painstaking but it's an important the trees people actually sure China and it's got all fees and expenses cetera okay all right very transparent and real undergirds that we give gifts okay so these are gibbs audited return Gotcha are waiting in there there's money flows in and out of these particular funds and it takes a good deal of effort on the this is an important issue the reason it's so important that is that people make you that's going to happen again so now I'm my money in a fun that did what is it and how are those returns that you're looking at and oftentimes we use empirically tested on robust academic research what does that mean there's a lot of academic anything really is nothing you should be counting real world application in other words people have actually used the methodology getting a d do you believe in an efficient market in does it work does the situations and then you you do this. I heard the markets you know where is the premium show up and so forth and so on so that will help you achieve in American dream no matter where you are in your not going to continue that are changing our Titian is going to say or a war is going to break out or somebody's going to bomb we saw it in nine eleven as that happened for the reaction what we do know what we can control is our own behavior yes we name do better than fixed income or bunch we know that and that that periods of time we know how often it shows up we also know that I'm small companies always do better that's interesting we know that value both what we don't know and what we can't control is exactly when that happens uh-huh and what you WanNa know what in back to our our discussion the question how do we know these returns are the standards is there a standard by which we use to to don't do this every day so for them they hear these things and that's all past performance nothing to do with the future so there's sure sure how do I know this fund is any good and you I think the price waterhouse or somebody like that I think has I gotcha okay. Exactly that's important too podcasts for today and we'll be coming at you again the next one we're going to be talking about..

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Okay Jim Rosetta here. Talking with Margie Wit Cup and we Finance Veritas Financial and. If people people want to look on the website you can do that at Veritas investing dot com eight Martin and okay this podcast. We are going to be talking being about audited returns. And how does that factor into our world of investing and absolutely a lot of times. People have an idea. I'm and I hear it in this phrase on new all right. Well what does doing all right mean and I see returns earns printed on people's you like on Foreign K.. Returns or sometimes on Mutual Fund returns. and You wonder where. Where are they getting this information? Did you really receive did any investor who invested in that particular fund actually receive that return whatever it says ten percent twelve percent fourteen percent. You know it it brings to mind. Are they getting that. Yeah the thinker as he's real returns because often in the industry as may seem surprising they will cherry pick a certain area and no oh unreal this timeframe from point to this point. If you had done this and this you would have gotten that well. That's meaningless. He who got it did any re- did any investor even actually get so one of the things we believe in is that our portfolios go through a process process called being audited. My third party ourselves not our partners. No one who's affiliated with managing the portfolio. It's a third party hardy. CPA firm well respected they oversee and they take every client. Every portfolio Leo. The analyze is quite expensive and painstaking. But it's an important function so that what we are telling our clients we know. Oh that this is what real people. They're going to discover what you're really got W- trees shirt on fees and expenses. This is all if it says Neta fees says it actually they do it gross and then net so you know exactly what the cost to the investor was etc CETERA. Okay all right very transparent and real. They also use what's called gifts global investment assessment performance standards so the standards that we give gifts. These are gibbs audited. Return Gotcha all. Rei Gifts is a standard methodology of how you calculate the return. It's a long process. It's a long return because there's time waiting in there there's money flows in and out of these particular funds. And you have to account for the money's flowing in and the money's flowing out and all all of that so it. It isn't an easy process. Like I said a good deal of effort on the part of the not the investor but the company managing the portfolios and the auditor to make sure that they are done right. Gotcha but this is an important issue. The reason it's so important is that people make their investing decisions often based on last year's czar last three years or since inception return. There's no guarantee that's going to happen again now. I my money in a fun that did well for a couple of years and then what does that mean to me. Could mean that it's on its way down for a while and how well managed. What is it and how are those returns that you're looking at and oftentimes returns are used as a sales tool right right? It's far more important. I've used this phrase before I'm gonNA use it again. I'll probably use it over and over will use empirically tested and verified. That's the verified part. C verified through this gifts audited return prosperous empirically tested portfolios based on robust academic research. What does that mean? There's a lot of academic research out there that it was good one day but tomorrow breath. It's fluky okay. There's a Lotta that is worth anything really is nothing you should be counting. But when something is when we call it robust it means as been proven to work over periods long periods of time in real world application in other words people have actually used. The methodology used the theory the hypothesis like the efficient market get hypothesis and I mean that's one of the elements of creating a do do you believe in n efficient market. It does it. Work does is the market work. Moore doesn't so that's one of the elements so you take those elements and you apply them to real investing the situations and then you you do this over and over and over everything you know repeatedly and you watch rolling one year returns and you watch rolling five year returns and where did the markets you know. Where is the premium show up and so forth and so on? So so how do we. Somebody's analyze these market. Yes so we know how to create the formula that will create the portfolio that that will help you achieve dream. No matter where you are in your lifespan right because I think one thing I'm getting is is The market is an ever changing entity. It's going to continue. That are changing. Our are the elements that we can't control. We don't know from one moment to the next what China's going to do or you know some politician Titian is going to say or a war is going to break out or somebody's going to bomb somebody or some natural catastrophe is going to ask me someplace. We don't know any of that. We saw it and we have no control. We saw it in nine eleven as that happened for the reaction she knew it was the bottom seemed to drop out of everything for a while a short while but we do know is everybody got scared. Scared what we do know what we can control is our own behavior. Yes we do know. Through this robust academic research we do know elements of of the market that actually add value. We know that stocks overtime do better than fixed income or bunch we know that and that has proven itself overtime to show up in the as a positive return rolling is you can calculate that periods of time. We know how often it shows up. We also know that large companies although they may do well small companies do better. You're over long. Periods of time can twenty year periods of time. Small companies always do better. That's interesting we know that value. Oh companies do better than growth companies over long periods of time now once in a while growth outpace value. But they need both both what we don't know and what we can't control is exactly when that happens. So we don't chase the market we simply know what elements what ingredients to get into into your portfolio and once you know that He just keep it balanced and what you want to know. What in back to our our discussion Russian about audited returns if you're looking at investing with a firm or in a fund or with anyone? I don't care who it is. You should ask the question. How do we know these returns are any good? How do I know that these are calculated properly? Are these gipps. Tips audited returns global performance standards. Is there a standard by which we use to to you verify these whether or not and how do I know if I'm going to get those returns if I invest in this most people Don't do this every day. So for them. They hear these things and they were they were inclined to believe it. Well you said it so I think it's true is it. It's true. Yeah what's the real test. That's all past performance nothing to do with the future so there's another little feather in your cap for one year in investing or one year looking to invest in when you're looking at your 401k. Ask The you know the provider. Sure sure do I know this fund is any good and you know that's not the auditors of the these gaps are the accounting firm. Possibly okay I think the price waterhouse or somebody like that has has been doing. That doesn't mean we always doing really good firm. That has a good reputation. Reputable firm I gotcha. Okay exactly. That's important too okay. Yeah I think you hit another area that Exchan- some late thing.

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Your risk tolerance so that your money is acting in a way that is suitable for your life. Your needs what you want it to do for you. That's how it supports your american dream. We bring us all back to your merican dream so you know if your american dream involves a healthy responsible danceable lifestyle in retirement years sure all right then hey what you need to do is design and structure a portfolio. That'll l. number one gets you. There ed depending on your age. Let's say you're in your twenties. Will you can stand years ahead of you. You can stand you. Can you understand it. You can you be able to withstand. Some big drops down so the ups will be that much much greater. It's over time you will make up and and it will build for you faster okay that being said as you get towards your retirement years or in your retirement years you don't want that high volatility because now if the market drops and had drops fifty percent holy moly you are not and you were counting on that one hundred dollars five hundred dollars a month some money to live on an income. Yes <hes> now. You have a problem so two things have to happen. One is the portfolio has to be designed to live within your tolerances for your needs to support your american dream and number two..

five hundred dollars one hundred dollars fifty percent
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

14:29 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"To this podcast and let me know what thank by leaving a rating in review welcome to profiles any american dream onto cahill this episode i joined by mindy sokolowski said that right correct me yeah nice job a m f aerial correct that's right so.

cahill mindy sokolowski
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

12:39 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Dave, or maybe two days and really delving into what is your American dream? I mean, a lot of people just kind of float through life. If you're not one of those people who thinks they're going to get anywhere by just floating through and dealing with you're probably not listening to this week to week paycheck to paycheck might be living paycheck to paycheck, but we can help you get out of that. But exist mindset, there's a mindset of. People who want life to be more than just the mundane, and I would imagine that people listening to our podcasts are people who want to discover and live life fully. So when we talk about the American dream experience, we're talking about experiencing something and abundant life. Yeah. Absolutely. A life of freedom. Not a life, a life that is belabored and burden down. You know, one of the things that oftentimes people feel terribly burned about our taxes and political systems, or political parties or just all sorts of things can get into your brain, and cause you to lose sight of that freedom who need? We're living in a Dan age. I think everybody's so politically charged. Oh my gosh. So easily offended today. I mean it's really I can't remember time like this, and there's no freedom in that. So. Accepting people as they are, that might be part of it, but living your freedom and that freedom leads to opportunity. And that's what is uniquely or was uniquely American at the time that this was talked about early on back in the nineteen twenties, or actually, at the duck colouration of independence, which really turned the world upside down, you know, and then there's this other element, it's called wellbeing. And in the well-being we, we need health, but we also need our wealth. You're there are studies that show that we like to say the money can't buy happiness, but then you show me a person who can't eat or doesn't have enough to take care of themselves of their family doesn't buy. I don't need Margaret money does not buy happiness in its totality. But it certainly goes a long way to providing for that wellbeing if we're living under severe debt and no means to pay those bills at puts a lot of stress on people. Yeah, it's a heavy weight to cure. It's heavyweight and that's called, then you have bad health, and you have all kinds of things that just lead to that to just this. Exactly. So this whole thing about the American dream experiences to create an environment. I just got back from Arizona. I went through the American dream experience with Mark Mattson sure of Matson money with the two women who I had invited in, and we had a wonderful time. I mean they were just awesome. You know, they thought it was an awesome experience, and it is an awesome experience. So the first part of it is delving into your own psyche. What do you think what do you believe? What are your values deep down inside of you, and are you living them out, and are you able to enact your life in a way that is meaningful? It isn't about a big pile of money. You know, then, then the second day we talk about the sort of the underlying principles that will support your American dream or your values. So once you've kind of discovered, you know what those values are you can. Now live a life powerfully. And with abundance, no matter where you're at let's say you don't have the ideal. Let's say you're not at your peak earning potential. That's okay, we'll know. But we can be headed that direction. Exactly right. Let's is driving the car. You want to steer it in the right direction. Exactly. Exactly. So what an experience we have one coming up in June. And we have these periodically and the opportunity to attend. I'm putting this out there on our podcast now for people to tell us what they think they're American dream is what does that mean to you? So if you'd like to, I'd love the people that are listening to this to just jot me a note. Yeah. Just some kind of communication, let let's what they're thinking about, when we use that phrase, American dream, and then to let them know that we do have these opportunities for the American dream experience to develop that to create the pundits mindset and the. Practical tools. You know this is not just pie in the sky. This is practical tools to achieve those things. So people can get a clearer picture destination wise. It's hard to imagine unless you can see that destination. It's foggy or not clear. I hear that a lot from business people. Yeah. I see where do you want to be in five years, the C a foggy picture? But the ones that succeed quickly are the ones that are very clear picture. That's right. Once you clarify it, then you can take steps and move in that direction. And it'll ULA chief it now I got a question for you. Who do you think has more trouble with their American dream or fulfillment in their life, people who have ten million dollars or one hundred million dollars, people who have very little? Maybe no savings are living Patek paycheck to paycheck. I would say the bottom rung of that letter. The people that have very little. And they're just getting by usually it's can I can I get through tomorrow? And you know what? There's a whole lot of people in between in the grays owns between those two your extremes, right? Kind of we call the middle class. Maybe upper middle class. I don't like labeling people. I really don't. I hate that. Yeah. I I've never liked putting labels on people people are important all in themselves. But I'd say people in the lower level with their what having more trudges struggling, I'm gonna say, both sides have troubles. Sometimes people with lots of money have more trouble. They have more fear fear of losing fear of looking bad admitting even that they might not know. Oh, they have a lot of problems. They can. I'm not saying everyone again I don't want wash anybody people on the other end of the extreme sometimes need to give themselves credit for what they are doing. And then start take steps to build their sense of wellbeing and see where there and then move towards a goal get things moving in that direction people that are have a lot of money, maybe need to kind of get off their high horse. Sometimes sure I've seen a lot of fortunes lost. Sometimes. Never enough and it and it's always could disappear or overnight, or somebody's gonna sweet talk them out of it. And there are target for that they're a target for. But they're also target for just the eagle boost, they get from working with people who schmooze them. Is that a great word schmooze? You know, they like that sense that eagle. Lottery winners. Never want their names revealed. If. That could be. I have no idea. I'm never been a lottery winner. I've had to work from my, I haven't either, but I heard somebody just one that huge recorders of several hundred I pray that it doesn't ruin their lives in, too many times, you hear it does a mini when people get a big influx of wealth, like that immediately. It's a whole different mindset and to go from one thing to another is not an easy transition. So you're seeing the top tier probably is more. They have as many problems doing it. Yeah, it could be fear of losing it, it could be that they think they've got it made and they don't watch out for all the stuff that goes on associated with money and wealth. They could be that just maybe it's not them the next generation that has not earned it, but just inherited that could fall apart, right? It is amazing. What money does to our mindset and I'm not against money. I'm all for it. I'm all for helping people build wealth and do the good things that money can do for us. And help us you know, with college educations paying off a mortgage, having a nice vacation with family and having family. And, you know, all of that costs money, does his some extent or another. I don't care if you're going to have a picnic in a park, it's still take some money, and some doing to get everyone together and do it as we think about being totally without and we talk how much more happiness you know, the songs sometimes make it. But you're absolutely right. Without the funds to be able to just, you know, to do simple, things like that it does cost something to do it. I understand so. Absolutely. So I'd like people that are listening to this podcast. We have to know that number one. There are these events, we call them American dream experiences because you actually get an experiential. Experience. It's just a phenomenon that I can't really describe because it's so personal and every person comes into it and comes out of it with their own take is really deepens in helps a person if you want if you really want to contact us, let us know you got our Email. You got our website, you can get in touch with us in multiple different ways, and we will give you the dates for some American dream experiences. Some will be in Arizona. We've got one coming up in a symposium. They'll be two thousand people or more there to do the American dream experience in. I can tell you one of those, how much information is how much you can learn from that. Yeah, you learn fifteen or twenty percent of what's presented. You walk away with a bushel basket of knowledge before you came, and one of the things that we teach these, I should say, teach which we expose are the kinds of things you need to think about and keep yourself safe from what, what did you? Call them scams. Schemes and cons. Yeah. That's going to be the subject for our next podcast. Are we gonna talk about how you can safeguard your life, your well, being your family, and what are the telltale size? What are the things to watch out for what are the questions to ask? Right. So that, you know, for sure that whoever you're working with or dealing with is not gonna steal you arrive line. Right. Right. Yeah. I think that's another stressful is the worry about that is pretending goodness. Yes. And then everybody's got money deal that they're gonna let you in and you get another question for you real quick. And one of my observations. And that is this who do you think is more susceptible to the big scheme are being taken by someone who is rather skilled, at being a con usually a person doesn't have much doesn't get approached very much? But it's the ones with a lot of money that Charlie has got a he's got a great idea that. Can make us both rich and big end? So you're kind of getting inundated with maybe friends family relatives acquaintances people that know you, I'd say the people with a lot of money or well that could be that could be I I've seen people pick on. There was a woman up here in our neck of the woods in the middle of Wisconsin, who actually tapped into elderly people, and she sold them annuities that didn't exist and they just she just gave them. They gave the check to her. And she had developed a reputation in by working for a particular company and I won't name the company, but her kon the con artist in her. She scammed a lot of people. And then there was another one just south of us. They're all over. They can prey upon all kinds of you might think it would be people who are very trusting and very unknowledgeable, but that's not necessarily. I just discovered, we had a radio interview I interviewed somebody that trains people how to spot people that you may be running a business somebody that comes to buy from you that may have early signs of dementia a jewelry store. For example of the person was showing up every day spending thousands.

Arizona Dave Wisconsin ULA Margaret grays Mark Mattson Charlie Matson one hundred million dollars ten million dollars twenty percent five years two days
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

13:28 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Listening to our podcast, you've been getting a little education, and you've been hopefully being able to glean what you need to out of these podcasts and Margie. I think we're educating them, and I think we're entertaining them at the same time share hope. So today we wanna talk a little bit about we've been discussing the American dream series each week. And today, we want to go into a cost a little bit what it costs, a one of the reasons, one of the things that we talked about, in a previous podcast was the fact that the average equity mutual fund holder, right? Only gets like three and a half to four percent on average per year. That shocked me is shocking, because the S and P five hundred which it alone is only one Essex, isn't even the whole market does about nine two. Tem a year on average from nineteen twenty six as they have measured it. Okay. So those two figures ten percent versus four percents G. What's the gap will part of that comes from the costs costs are a drag? There are real drag on your portfolio. Obviously now it takes something you can't capture the market. No one will do business for nothing. You don't go to work for nothing. Absolutely. You know, you don't go and play a gig in your music world. And somebody doesn't pay unless you're doing it pro Bono. But hey, you can only do so much of that. So we all expect to be paid the point is, is that you don't pay too much or pay for things are not doing you any good. Yeah. And that brings me to, you know what should be commonsense thing. But. Exactly. A lot of people don't even know where to look for the costs and there are hidden costs. Right. And this was something that happened to me and created for me, a great a ham moment. You know, I was in a class on modern portfolio theory, and we were going over this thing called costs and they were talking about turnover right turnover or turnover rates, which is the rate of how many times they buy and sell stocks. See, you've got one hundred stocks in a particular portfolio or a mutual fund, right? Okay. So you got one hundred stocks, if they're trading at thirty percent. That means thirty of those hundred are being sold and another thirty are being bought. Okay, that's turnover. Sometimes trickles transaction that transactions, yes, those transaction costs are not included in the expense ratio. I found this out after boy, I was in the business. For about fifteen sixteen years, when I took that class, and I found out about this little hidden secret that the expense ratio, which is clearly defined and clearly stated on your morning star reports or SNP five hundred reports or in the perspectives, you know, clearly stated the expense ratio, but what's not included in that is the turnover rate and the cost of trading the stocks in the portfolio, right? You can add another one percent to most mutual funds just for that for incidental things. Are you are the Mony managers revealing these trades to clients all the time or not, not at all? You think you're a buying. Hold person. Right. And here they are turning over your portfolio. Fifty sixty eighty percent middle churning do they, they should should they should what it does is it Jenner. Rates revenue for the brokerage industry or the investment industry. So they don't care whether the market's up or down, your portfolio is up or down there, making money on either end of it. They don't care. And that's something that every investor needs to think about, okay, the investment industry. I'm not talking about that. Nice guy that nice gal adviser. Remember, they always hire. Nice people people don't know how they get paid, and they don't even think to ask that, and even in you, you have to know what I'm telling you right now. So you should look at when you have a presentation if someone you're sitting across the table from an adviser, and they say, oh, here's this morning star four rated blah, blah, blah mutual fund. I think you should buy it. One of the things you should look at. And look for is the turnover rate and if it's more than ten percent. You should say, ooh Ouch. This is costing a lot. I hope people are getting this piece of important information coming out here. Yes, it is another thing that incentivizes or is the incentive for an advisor to present a particular funder fund company, or a family of funds. Sure is revenue sharing. Now back in, I think it was two thousand three two thousand four right about them. Maybe a little before that attorney general from New York came out with a big lawsuit against the mutual fund industry and the company, I worked for at the time also got involved in this and they tell your industry. And what they were calling out was this issue of revenue sharing. Now I'm going to reveal a little bit about my age here because prior to being in this industry, even though I've been right. A financial advisor for almost thirty years. I did sell industrial processing equipment out. What does that have to do? Well, if I had taken a bribe a slip under the table, I would have been in jail. We're not listen to street, you can bribe somebody it's called revenue sharing. Now they have disclaimers. And now at this time. Yeah, because that's what came out of that lawsuit. They have to put a disclaimer. Of course, it's teeny tiny print. You can't find an on some companies that went on their website. I mean it's almost impossible to find sometimes, and they really discount it, but the truth is it does set up a conflict of interest, share getting paid extra more than the commission. We're not talking about the commission because that's usually disclosed. This is money under the table. If you sell so much, you'll get a revenue sharing. The attorney general New York wasn't successful. Yes. He was successful in prosecuting, but the only thing that came of it is that they have to put it in print. Although that's it. That's it. People. Still my little little slap on the hand. Our company got. I like a seventy five million dollar fee. They had a pain, and, you know, whatever that was nothing dry, chump change hard to talk about numbers like that. But as chump change, but it comes out of your returns, guys. Also people people listen you do not well, if you're going to should raise the hair on some people's knuckles at might be listening. So I really hope so, because your returns are not coming from some money manager know some Google your returns come from the market the market itself. Right. And having a well engineered portfolio a discipline approach is going to get you a lot farther in the long run than going with what the investment industry want to do. So the drain on a portfolio could be pulling it down from a ten percent all the way to three and a half to four. Just on the fees based absolutely on the fees. Another part of this, however, is holding period. Lot of the average holding period for a mutual fund is like three years. So people are moving from one fund to another fund. Okay. So they're moving there. Turning and that's bad behavior. All around, if you have a properly positioned, a properly designed engineered portfolio, you should not have to be moving out of it in an in and out of it all the time moving around. You should stay the course and rebalance keep an imbalance, that's for sure. But what happens is people have, what are called these annual reviews and basically are just a sales and opportunities. Sell, you something different. So you take, you know, all I've got you in this fund. Now, I'm going to move you over to this fund. Sure. Yeah. You might not hear from your adviser, except when they wanna make a little extra commission on something. Maybe. And so this behavioral thing is also a huge drain on your American dream. Let's put it down and practical. It's not about funds. This is an above funds, or managers or gurus or this or that it's about your American dream. How are you funding? Your American dream, your college education for that kid, the retirement, you want or house, you wanna build and buy whatever stage of life you're in. Yeah, yeah. That's what it's really about. And so we're just trying to help people get the kind of momentum in their investing life that can fund and fuel that American dream. So remember that costs? Revenue sharing that expense. Ratio is does not include the turnover rate, the churning or the buying and selling of the securities inside of those mutual funds. I think what's great about what you're doing. Here's your having interaction with your clients on a regular basis, offering educational classes places for. So it's not like they're hearing from you. Maybe hey, I haven't heard from her years, but she's managing my, my portfolio. No. You have a we have a newsletter if anybody interested in getting our newsletter. A lot of this content that where I'm talking about. We put out in our newsletters, every quarter, we put something in these podcasts. Right. And the events that were hosting or putting on for investors and whether the invest with us or not we love to hear from him like to hear from you. Yeah. That's like the regular the last American dream event that you taught me a lot of things that I would totally oblivious of. And you know there's there are things we know things we know we don't know. Like, I don't know how speak Russian right? I don't know how to speak Spanish very well. So I know things and I know things that I don't know. But then there's this whole world called what I know I don't know. I don't know. Right. Surprise you. How much that's profound? When you think about that. And our job in my whole, impetus, Jim is to really help awaken that's American dream spirit, and awaken the investor to really realizing one number one, there's an abundant world out there and anything is truly possible with that. How do you get yourself aligned in fuel it, and get it because it does take what in our world. It takes some kind of money to usually fuel and to support those dreams. So that's our message in nutshell. Yeah. But it's part of the overall of the American dream as you're taking it in small bites on these podcasts. I think people are really getting awakened many of the people that you already have clients are educated. Well enough they understand this. Yes. But there's a lot of people out there. I know that have portfolios that are totally probably shocked hearing this. Well, we do thing that analyzes a portfolio, and it really does tell you a lot about it. We must analysis we do analysis regarding it's true diversification. And where where does it land on that efficient frontier? How efficient is it? Right. And that was one of the things that was presented at your American dream event. That's hard me I thought it was fascinating in a great way to really be maximizing, your portfolio, maybe picking up an extra three or four percent. That's been laying on the table for as long as you. Yeah. Well, I just wanna let folks know that we courage folks to send in any questions that they may have about these podcasts, and we can definitely kind of target answering questions on your future podcasts at we're getting folks can subscribe to these and receive them weekly because her coming out weekly so. All right, Jim. Thank you, yet. It was good today. I think we got a message out there that really helped me tremendously. So thanks, Marci..

New York attorney Margie Essex Google advisor Jenner Jim pain Marci ten percent four percent seventy five million dollar Fifty sixty eighty percent fifteen sixteen years thirty percent
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

12:50 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"It is going back to eighteen something right? Yeah, it is. And, you know, Mark said to me, he said, would you finance and I said, why think you crazy? But he said, why don't you look around is not really a good service out there. So we did a lot of national services came into town. So I did. And he was right. So I said, you know, finance you guys if you get up to about ten abilities, you'll make yourself a good living. So that was the deal. Okay. And this was in two thousand eight this is in two thousand eight okay in two thousand ten they relaunched with three ambulances and one. Wheelchair in really kind of going back to the future there with you and two ambulances in your mom xactly. Exactly. Invite away. My mum Trent ninety yesterday. Did she really she did? God bless. Yeah. I'm blessed. Yeah. She must be excited her grandchildren. Now. Yeah. Have re rebirth the business and stuff. She, she's really proud of them is and she has a little touch all times now. So she don't remember everything, right? But she is that's great. That's great good. Good. Good for you. So what's been like for, you know what we call Brewster ambulance to, to? Well, today, I I go in every day. Okay. And I work with my two sons, and it's fun for me today. Good. I have fun, working with them. I give the my ideas, I give them my thoughts, and they listen to most of them, we've had some shows, and I really loved his shows, when, when the when two generations are able to come in and also had show. With the second generation is, is sitting across from me and fascinates me because his two kinds of entrepreneurs in this world in my mind is the ones who start the business and is the ones who inherit the business. Some people would think the ones who inherit the business, the lucky ones heritage of business, but what I found, I knew this. But this is the show is really confirmed it, it's is there is some fortune with that you're fortunate to that you family has a business. But the challenges are, are sometimes even more, so because now it's not your business. It's family business. You didn't, you know you have to deal with the parent. Yep. Who you know started the business who ran the business who grew the business. It's often a challenge in kind of touch any family. You don't wanna bring the business home on thanksgiving and Christmas and stuff at the same time. You guys are talking business. I absolutely. How do the Brewster sort of deal with, so Mark and George George junior run Brewster ambulance today. They are actually the owners the owners, Brewster amulets, and I call myself that coach. All right. So that's how it is you, you're the coach. Yeah. You give advice to take it or leave it so. Right. But every so often, I have to pull the dad God. And they'll do it. I said, okay. And you're right. We talk business twenty four seven yeah. But ever wear we all go out to dinner. We'll put all cell phones in the middle of the table, and nobody can touch they'll give us over good. Good good. Every so often, we'll have somebody dial mock in his phone. It'd be buzzing in the military, and I can see them going crazy. Like who's calling who's call it? Yeah because he's excessively twenty four seven right in cases needed. Right. So the business started you got back with. You know, you got back into business in two thousand eight three ambulances two thousand ten so, so how did the boys, the sons was the growth process, you had to get a contract, right? We did. In fact, they had approved himself Burston was a well recognized, well, no name, and hadn't been forgotten, which I was surprised. But they had approved themself yet. Once they did that they started very slowly. Okay. And then a nine eleven bid come out in the town of Middleborough. And the boy said, should we bid on this, and I said, well, you don't want to be good practice. Let's put it together, but you'll never get you to new. Okay. And so we put the bit in. They got it now. How is that? How did they beat the, the more established? It was price and reputation, based on the old Bruce, too, because fortunately, some of the people in the community were familiar with the old bridge. Okay. Good. So the name was still well, well respected. It was it was, you know, from there it just out of a snowball mock is very personal guy. He gives his word as word as word yet, and he is the one who is building the business Georgia's in charge of the vehicles, and equipment purchasing so between the two of them in the me being the coach. It's, it's kind of like a good team its team. How many ambulances does the company have now? Ambulances were up to about two hundred and fifty. Wow. We also own east. Gary ambulance. I don't know if you know that. No, no. We bought that just before when into bankruptcy Beck about a year and a half ago. Okay. We saved the three four hundred jobs with the company around, and now it's doing well. So how many employees do you have all all toll totally? We have about fifteen hundred employees businesses just exploded. How'd has in the last eight years. Right. It has that's, that's incredible growth, incredible growth and you have your your academy for the tees. Yes, we purchased a school called CMT I two years ago. Okay, it was owned by Keith Wilson, who was a former employee of the original Bursa. Okay. And he now runs the school under the ownership of the proof the family and we train all our own him tease and paramedics really, really what is what is. How do you get an advantage from training your own? What are other other state sponsor schools or the private schools out there, that, that give the certification there, mostly private school? So you'll one of the private schools, the private schools, but we have a unique setting is the people that we are training gonna work for Burster ambulance. Right. So we can train them, not only in the medical side of the business, but the customer service side of the business side of the business. Exactly. And we can tell them what I stand and they need to meet our standards. Do you think that helps you keep your employees longer given that you've sort of brought them up in the business as opposed to just taking them as they apply to maybe three or four different ambulance, companies and around? Absolutely. It does. We have a great workforce. They very good to us, and we try to be very good to them. Yeah. And they usually stay with us until maybe a a fire department calls something. And then they'll stay with us part time. Yeah. Interesting. Oh, that's right. So if they work for the fire department than they can. They can supplement their, their job working few off hours. Right. Exactly. Interesting. Exactly. So you must have a ton of stories of picking up people from all different walks of life is a one person that sticks out, maybe most famous person that you've that the company's picked up, and the most famous person that I have ever transported myself, which a lot of generations fade probably don't even know but was Judy Garland. Oh, yeah. Thank Judy Garland took her out of the Sheridan. Boston wizard of Oz. You know, and I transported her to the pita Brigham at the time, okay, Brigham woman. Okay, Judy Garland. That's interesting. Yeah. Very interesting. Any like famous politicians or public figures other than in actresses, or actors probably probably you can't name right? I'd have to, you know, pull the Hippocratic, right? No, I get it. I totally get it. But it's just going down that path. You never know who you're going to be picking up. You don't what kind of condition, you have to be prepared for all, you know, all different types of I mean, you got to be prepared for almost anything. Exactly anything. We transported a, a sports player wouldn't even fit on a stretcher. I'll really all right? We'll guess who that might be? He was a basketball player. Oh, okay. Okay. That's interesting. Right. Yes. Out of seven foot bed for that wouldn't even fit his legs hanging over really, really. What is the and I know this may, we may run out of time before you can answer this one, but the obviously the, the elephant in the room is, is the insurance companies and Abam care. And, you know, sort of the state of health care, and how it impacts, you've got to be really nimble in this business to adjust like you did back in the day when when they started. To certify MTV's. Wh what is the biggest challenges you face as the company faces a as they go forward, you know, dealing with the concomitant changing of the healthcare industry and the cost explosion, that's taking place in people's inability to pay its? We have a high bad debt ratio. However, we transport everybody. Okay. And you can't turn anyone down. I never have and never will. Okay. But biggest challenge is being able to pay a work as a fair wage. Right. Because insurance companies won't reimburse you the whole amount of the cost of the business. Right. Exactly. A lot of people think, you know, you get two thousand dollars a call where we Bill an insurance company, fifteen hundred but with contract it, and they might pay us two hundred. Right. So it's kind of a false Phosa figure when it gets sent out there. Okay. And I don't think EMT's paramedics should have to work, two jobs, pay mortgage. Right. So if we can get, you know, rates up. Get wages AC, and that's my biggest challenge going forward. What do you think is going to happen? I mean this industry is, is faced so many changes over the last since two thousand eight you know, since the healthcare law was passed now it's being broken apart. And what is it? I know Massachusetts is somewhat unique, and in many ways better, although not perfect. I mean would do you know what the solution is out there? Or what's, what do you think will be better than what's what's currently happening right now? You know, there's will license the provide m I h which is mobile healthcare in your home. Okay. I think that is going to probably help a little, okay? I don't think that's the answer. Okay. I think some areas I health keel across the too high right and need to be reduced. And I think there's other areas that need to be increased. I see. And I think if we could find that balance it might be good for everybody. Right. Right. I mean, there's no question in your son's must know..

Judy Garland Brewster Mark Trent Middleborough Gary ambulance Beck Massachusetts basketball Burston Bruce Keith Wilson Georgia Burster Brigham
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

12:58 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"Please. Download and subscribe to this podcast. And let me know what you think by leaving a rating and review. Welcome to profiles, the American dream on Tim KO, and this episode. I'm joined by George Brewster of Brewster, ambulance. Welcome to the show, George thank. Thank you. Tim pled to be yet. Brewster ambulance. You have been in the business for how long George oh. The company was started in, in the eighteen hundreds that far. However, it was a stab list as a as a business in nineteen. Oh, six eighteen by someone in your family by my grandfather, really. Yes. Yes. And before you know this was ambulances were pulled were horse. He had a originally, a horse and carriage Philly. And it was it started. It was started on Sherman avenue in Roxbury, outside a deadly station. Okay. And in the late eighteen hundreds, he had a partner in nineteen sixty bought out his partner and renamed it to Burster ambulance, really the orig-. Name was mutual aid. Yeah. How did the ambulance business get star? I mean how did it start back then? I mean what was it? What was it like a you know, backed in, I don't know. I was born in nineteen fifty one, I didn't think you'll born back then. And all I really know is they had Hossan carriage. Yeah. And it was a right to loss, basically. Okay. Right. To the hospital private. Private company though, wasn't it is a part of the government or anything. It was a private company. Really? So would it go from nineteen o six like when did they have their first automobile when that changeover? Do you know that happened in the late probably nineteen o eight is pitches? I have a vehicles, okay? But when it actually happened. I don't know that answer nineteen away Brewster ambulance company transitioned from horses to cars to cause. Yes. Yes, dressing and it and it looked like a pickup truck with sides on it. Really? Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. Interesting. So how did you get what was your introduction to the business? Like, how will we when you started in the business, I started actually washing the office floor and the flows of the NBA? Ince's okay. As ten eleven twelve years old really. And that was my first job. And when my, my father died when I was eleven oh, really, yes. And he left my mother with six boys all teenagers and younger into ambulances Ueli. So we all had a kick in and help them and, and make it work. So you mom took over the business. She did a widow at six young teenage boys or younger. Yes. To ambulances. Yes. And so did you start? I mean, we did you wait to your sixty before started arriving emulate. So what you little younger I was actually a little younger. Yeah. The ability, we did what we had to do yet in, in nineteen sixty three when my father died women really went to popular owned businesses. But yet yeah, so she had a very rough time. So all six boys had a kick in. Day. We do what we have a do. Yeah. To make it work for and did the whole family. Join the business that at that time were how did you become the booster of Worcester ambulance, while I was in the middle of the six boys? Okay. But, you know my to all the brothers had other dreams younger brothers had other dreams, and I stuck out with mom. And I ended up owning the business at one point. Okay. So you went did you go to college? Or did you go right into the business? I went right into the business at fourteen I worked in the business. I was twenty two years old. When I actually took over the management of the business twenty two twenty two and at that time, had three ambulances yet, and I grew it to a hundred fifty ambulances. Really? Really all on the south shore. We Boston in the social yet. How did you go from two hundred two hundred twenty one hundred and fifty hundred fifty fifty. So how long did. That take you say, how'd you do it? But how long did it take you to go to to get to that level? I basically took over on nineteen seventy five and nineteen ninety seven I actually sold the company. Okay. And that's when I had the hundred and fifty two I believe, okay, ambulances. So now the healthcare industry has changed dramatically. Yes. Since then, but even during that period of time from the mid seventies two to ninety seven. So what was it like trying to grow that business in this environment where insurance you have to deal with insurance? People have to do with hospitals. I mean, fire departments are involved in some cities, and other cities. They aren't how did you how are you able to sort of get to that point where you maneuvered you way around to get from two hundred and fifty basically it was customer service. Okay. It was being on time being available in having the resources the service the customer at the time. It was lot of nonemergency, sir. Service. Okay. And that's when the police department would just put them back cruiser and ticket awesome. Right. Okay. In, in the early nineteen. Seventies, they enacted the a law will all all ambulance personnel had become emergency medical technicians. Okay. EMT's. Right. EMT's. I was in one of the first classes in the state, they actually paid me two dollars a class to go to school. Okay. And some companies fought the law that in what the law didn't think the law was any good for the industry. I didn't I complied. We did the best we could. And we turned it into a very professional type of business. What why would they be completed the cost involved or having the training because you had to pay for people to pay them, more to right? If they were EMT's verses just anybody right? Yes. And it was a matter of Queant on the vehicle. I say when I first started we had an oxygen tank that was it. And the only time could give oxygen is when it was under doctor's office when the lot changed, you had a purchase significant amount of medical quit for the vehicle. I see. I could be able to do more to treat patients more. Okay. In actually save lives. It's kind of like a mini hospital on wheels. Right. Absolutely acetate is yes. Yet, and can you. I mean how many so in that period of time from two to one hundred fifty have any idea how many people you picked up and service and saved and treated. I mean is that I don't. But under the thousands probably right. Or at least we would doing one hundred fifty thousand transports year. Okay. Yeah. So this might be a tough question to answer. But I mean, how many people who, who were maybe not living at the time you pick them up that, that ended up, you know, keeping them alive or making giving. Them sort of that ability to continue to breathe. The do you have you remember any like real? We don't really keep any type of stats on that. Okay. But it happens every day today and back then it happened, a lot also and philosophy is to just train train train. Right. People top of the notch highly trained by the best equipment. We give them the best technology when you put all that together with saving lives. It's a tough job, though, for people, I mean, you're at the scene of accidents is some horrific things. I'm sure that you in the people that work for you had a look at face and deal with that absolute, you take that home with you as much as as being on the job with it. Right. Absolutely. This something, you never forget myself. I was at a plane crashing. Logan airport, you know, thirty years ago and it's still fresh in my mind. Really? Yeah. Yeah. In the something she don't forget. It's very stressful. Yet, sometimes like being in a war zone. The streets of Boston. I mean it's calmed down quite a bit. Yep. Back in the day, though, there was over hundred people a year being shot and killed exactly. You know, you guys picking those people up. That's correct rive arriving at the scene trying to save those lives, that's correct and stuff. Sometimes put myself in danger trying to save somebody else's life. Right. Right. Right. So what do you look for in EMT? What is it that separates boost are separated boost to before you sold the business? We'll talk about the rebirth of boost. But when you will building that business up, what do you think that was separating you from your competition and driving you to the top of, of, of the business chain? It was the quality of the person. We will hiring. Yeah. And, you know, with always been one of the highest pay is in the industry, which attracts the best. We always gave the best benefits than any other company in the industry, and we always had great equipment. And when you combine all that together, people wanna work for Brewster, ambulance. Yeah. Yeah. It makes sense. It makes sense solely. And it's a very competitive business very competitive in terms of keeping the business, and also finding qualified people because becoming an EMT is not an easy. It's not easy thing to do. It used to probably be much easier. But now they've tightened up quite a bit. Absolutely can't get that designation without some serious study and some class. I mean, what does it take to be any? Mt. If someone was listening to this show and says something I wanna do I want to save lives. I want to be in that fast paced environment. And I wanna help people what does it take to be any? Mt. Today. It it's a course. And, you know, if you wanna wait for the rebirth. But part of the rebirth is we bought our own EMT paramedic school. Oh you did. So we train our only tease paramedics to make sure they're highly trained in the and they meet our standards really. So, so you've jumped ahead, but that's perfectly fine because, you know that ties into what was going to be my next question. So you sold. Business in nineteen Ninety-seven. You got tired, or you just decided? Hey, this is at the top right now. What was what made you wanna get out of it or or, or sell? I think I was tired and they got me on the right day. Okay. All right. And after I had to, to be perfectly honest, it was a mistake. Okay. I missed the business myself. I missed the people and I always had a great relationship with all the people that worked for me back then. Yeah. In fact, a lot of them today. Police offices, the doctors, nurses and still friends of mine today. Okay. And what was very unique is their children are now working for my children. Wow. And it's, it's really nice to see. So what, what happens to you sold at ninety seven could have just retired gone to the Cape, just relaxed, you know, got up out of the because it's a twenty four seven business. You're on all the time. I mean you can't really go home, especially the only company because the trucks are out all the time when. I, I took over the business. I actually had phones into a radios in my home, and if the phone rang, I have answer that phone, and it was a call had to go and do that. Call really which I did. And eventually, I had enough business where I could actually hire somebody to do that. Okay. That explains. Why after? So you started when you were fourteen basically driving along or sometimes driving the ambulance. So twenty years later, twenty five years later, you sell the business explains. Why you can get burned out. Yup. Exactly. And like you said, offer at the right time when did you when did you come back into the business? I was. When, when I own the first Brewster ambulance, I, I owned my all my own graduates. Okay. So I ended up in real estate by default. So I was in real estate for a short time while and I still am. But while I was out of the ambulance business. Okay. But one of my sons came to me, roughly around two thousand eight in, they said, hey, dad judge and I judge junior and I miss miss, the Bula business, and would you. So they had grown up in the business, and they would been working for you, before you sold. Yes, they were. EMT's field supervises, and they both ended up buying Quincy businesses. Okay. And they would they were doing okay for themselves. But they, they miss the balance biztv. Right. Right. My sons. Both have a passion for it like myself. So they wanted to definitely in the blood..

EMT George Brewster Brewster Brewster ambulance Boston Tim KO partner Philly Roxbury NBA Mt Hossan carriage Burster Logan airport Ince Worcester Queant Quincy
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

10:02 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Marci. Our last podcast we had some conversation about return on investment. We were talking about return on investment being around three and a half to four percent which for some folks may be a shocker and they might still be reeling from that. So maybe we could clarify a little bit as to. Yeah. I'm sure that it is a shot because most people look at the literature and the literature will tell you this fun, does eight percent or ten percent and has an average ten year or three year track record of this, and that, but the actual investor as from the studies done by Dahl bar dollar is a company that studies, both, you know, mutual fund performance and investor behaviors and what they find is that the average equity investor that means investing in stocks stock mutual funds. Only gets about three and a half to four per se. Percent a year. So it's rather dismal. Especially when you compare that back to what the market can actually provide. I mean, just one index, let's just take the S and P five hundred going back to nineteen twenty six has averaged somewhere between nine and eleven percent. So you're missing out on a lot of return even taking some costs into consideration. Does that mean their investments are just not in the right place? Is that well here's what here's what goes on? You know, we look at active managers with they're really looking at is most equity mutual funds are that people are invested in our what we call actively managed, and that means you have money manager, right? Picking individual stocks in the my hold a hundred or two hundred or you know, whatever number of stocks in a particular mutual fund, and then they're trading that internally. So one of the things that happens is. When you trade, there's a cost try more trades. And you find that this is something that an awful lot of investors don't know and even advisors and financial planners. Don't even know is to look at turnover rate when you look at the turnover rate, you're going to see how often are they changing buying and selling the stocks within that fund those costs eat away at your particular fund performance? So this lots of studies done on this, and those studies really show that the more turnover the higher the turnover rate, the lower the actual return to the investor so that cost is very real. It's a hidden cost and most people don't even know what we're not even talking about the Commission's or other management. Probably don't even concern themselves with it because they didn't know it. You don't know what you do. Don't know. Actually ninety two percent ninety two point. Oh nine. Sure. Two percent of the large company funds, did not even do as well as their benchmarks in small companies is even worse. It's ninety four point five percent, gutter, the funds in small companies didn't even make the grade, how many of us will be able to keep a job if ninety five percent of the time, we didn't perform well, you didn't perform according to our what the expectations are. So active managed funds. We have accountability. Yeah. Yeah. And actually, in the investment industry, you wonder where is the accountability? Yes. So we would really advocate people stay away from active managed funds, and look towards the called passive. But in that isn't to say they're truly passive, but you're looking to create a portfolio of different types of market, and other small companies large companies value company's growth companies all these various arts emerging markets international large, and small, and even micro companies so diversity. Yes, yeah. You create a mix that gives you the best reward for the amount of risk you're willing to take some of these are going to perform at better performance rates than others. But what you're saying is if the portfolio is engineered properly, it's going to be to your advantage to be able to capture exactly when. You capture that the market rate of return in all these various aspects. What you really want our investments that don't all go up at the same time all go down at the same. Right. And they have what we call dis similar correlation. But the net gain is much higher. Exactly. Right. Okay. All of this, describes Harry Markowitz was the guy who developed this way. Back in the nineteen fifties. Grow his PHD thesis on the advantages of diversification. Riot of that was any way of measuring. Or was it pretty much just a guess? Yeah. Actually prior to Harry Marco in for much of the twentieth century. We really just looked at equity versus fixed income. Okay. Wasn't until we came Eugene Fama. And Kenneth French came along nother couple of guys out of the university of Chicago. Well, actually, Kenneth French was from Dartmouth Eugene Fama are the university of Chicago came along with what is called the. Three factor model or factoring. In other words, large companies are less volatile than small companies, but small companies have greater return. So that differentiation large versus small right. Then you have growth companies in value companies value companies have more volatility, but also a greater return. And then, of course, fixed income versus equities stocks outperform, bonds, or fixed income over time. So how you mix those assets up is what's going to give you your return, not what some manager thinks because managers come and go. Yeah, no one has a track record that is perfect. Or in other words, that always knew exactly what stock we have a little saying, if managers knew exactly what stock to buy at any. He given point. How many stocks would you have to? Yeah. It'd be nice. Call the one really big stock fun. Unless you got a crystal ball that you can count on working all the time. And I don't know of anybody. That's got it isn't fair. It isn't there and it's foolish to invest that isn't investing. That's speculating and gambling. And again, I go back to that American dream experienced. We've conducted a whole session, usually about a day, sometimes even two days take to take investors through in one of the things that we are promises is to empower families are investors to achieve peace of mind, abundance in greatness, and we do that by supporting them in eliminating speculating and gambling with their money, the most people don't want to speculate in him if you want to go ahead. I mean that's your progress. Give this is freedom, right? Yeah. But I think why they're listening to podcasts so that they can get educated and get on that track. Let's. Some sleep better night, especially if they're headed toward that goal we talked about, I'd like to just share this with our listeners, and that is if you are interested in knowing more about the academic approach to investing and the empirical evidence of it, we have a number of really fairly easy to read books and other publications as the ways for them to educate themselves as to how that is done, how that's cheap. And we of course, conduct classes and all sorts of ways for calling or by going on online going online to request. Okay. Yeah. Let us know. Let us know what your questions are. And I think in previous broadcast, we talked about people coming in with questions that they may have cause there may be something specific on people's minds doesn't mean they're the only one thinking about it. So it's good for everybody to hear that. So future broadcasts pad cast can be addressing those questions. Glad to I think that would be lots of fun Gossen. Remember, we're committed to your American dream. That's what this is all about. We want people to realize their American dream, and I want to also just again reiterate that it's not just an American dream. This is a global human dream. And the more we create for ourselves. We are creating also for others. It's not all for me just for me. It's hey, let's create together does not take away from anyone the more you do. The better off, you are. I remember a good saying the best thing you can do for the poor is not be one of them. It's good like that. Create wealth, and it'll spill over to others as well. I think with that will probably wrap up this broadcast for this time. But folks can be listening for the next podcast. And again, fire in a question if you have a question, and we'll give folks will be able to, yeah. Exactly like that just had one. If you'd like that it's called spill spill report that where you can read about how VA spit text us or Email me and, or gone line. And let me know that you'd like a spiv report, Senator. We'll keep listening because we'll be back next week with another one..

Kenneth French university of Chicago Dahl bar Eugene Fama Harry Markowitz Marci. Dartmouth Eugene Fama Senator Harry Marco ninety five percent ninety two percent eleven percent eight percent five percent four percent Two percent
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

05:51 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

"Okay. I'm sitting here today. Another podcast and talking with Margaret wake up the founder and chief executive officer of Veritas financial services and glad to be back here Margie and talking again with you. Yes. And our audience and our audience today we wanted to recap a little bit of what we were talking about last week. And our focus was on the American dream, exactly restarted. We're taking a stand for that ideal that we kind of capsulize by calling it the American dream. It's not just an American dream. It's a global human dream. You can see it all dream a life force. It's in each and every one of us we want to do. Well, we wanna take care of our own. We wanna have a nice place to live. We want to be well educated as much as we can be. We wanna make a good living whatever that means. Jeans and have the kinds of things in that make life. Good. Right. Right. So just having a good life now in the old days back in the fifties. When you and I are growing up it was pictured as kind of a consumer thing. You know, you have the big house, and you have the big car. Noise. Everyone's American dream chasing, things and stuff. Yeah. Exactly. Now things are nice. Hey, I'll be honest. I like things I like pretty things. I like nice things. But we can't take those smart gene, the end of the journey. Sometimes we get there. And we look back and whoa. I wish I would have done this if I had it to do over. So if people can avoid that wish and say, jeez. I did everything the way I wanted to do it now. Yeah. That's called really understanding your purpose. If you can define your true purpose? In fact, we have session or we'd have a way of leading investors or our clients, you know, people just good old people leading people through a process where they can really identify their true purpose is purpose for life. And of course, it gets reflected in how you use your money. And how you invest your money. Sometimes people say too. Me I'll say, well, what do you want this money to do for you just wanna make more? Yeah. Just keep piling it up. That's all. Well, that's not a really good answer, quite frankly because somebody else's always going to have a bigger pile. The new isn't a kind of Sobhraj that it really doesn't your conscious can't go after it specifically because you're not being specific enough. You mean the American dream? Yeah. I mean about getting money and yes exact amassing wealth. Exactly. So you really need to define. What is that purpose? What am I doing? And what does it mean to me, my family, the people I care about the ideals? I care about right? What are the things that are passionate in my life, and then aligning that with your life? And that includes with your investments, we try to help people define that purpose. And then get their investing in alignment, so they're not speculating and gambling too. Many people are speculating and gambling with their money. They don't even know they are. Here's a clue here's a clue if you are working. With a brokerage firm and typical brokerage from that is a non fiduciary. You most probably are speculating and gambling with your money. Every come as a surprise to a lot of people. They don't realize that inside that mutual fund in their 4._0._1._K in their IRA's or whatever vehicle they're using sure. Inside those mutual funds. The managers are speculating and gambling. Why do I say that because you can see it in the turnover rate? You can see the a small number of holdings. Maybe a hundred maybe even two hundred holdings, meaning individuals stocks stocks of companies or bonds, and then they're buying and selling and buying and selling which is costing a lot of money and getting you know, where each transaction having to be paid for exactly which leads us to another really detrimental part of that type of investing is that it's costly, and it sucks money your money for no real purpose out of. Of your pock. That's coming right out of your investment is. Course, it is you pay the piper. I don't care what the so-called financial advisor says you are paying for that. Most of these people selling these products don't even realize how much cost that's incurring in that activity was actively managed funds that activity is costing you it's drag and this is comes from doll bar dollar is a company that studies investor behavior and investor results and the average in equity investor makes less than four percent. Wow. Surprising, especially when you know that just the SNP five hundred if you take that as an indicator of what the veteran everage at four percent. Yeah. But the SNP five hundred if you go back to nineteen twenty six has averaged between nine and eleven percent so rolling ten year period. So have to really understand that the market can and will give you a much better return if you are well diversified and avoid one of the biggest pitfalls, which is excessive costs internally on those mutual Varley

founder and chief executive of Margaret Margie Varley advisor fiduciary four percent eleven percent ten year
"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

The American Dream Experience Podcast

11:57 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on The American Dream Experience Podcast

advisor America Veritas financial Jim New York Marci Margie Carnegie Mark Margaret Asia twenty years ten thirty years four percent forty years ten percent three weeks
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

06:27 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"Welcome to the profiles. And the American dream podcast. I'm Tim Caygill twenty years ago. I wrote a book with the same title as live. The book explored enormously successful businessman in my hometown, Massachusetts ejector she had some common characteristics including humble beginning. Incredible vision overwhelming struggles in deep well of perseverance and in the end success beyond the wildest dream each at my new guess, we'll all have stories that are Justice intriguing if not more. So join me as we engage with entrepreneurs from many different fields of work unlocking secrets and inspiring people across the country that the dreams too can be cheat. Please download and subscribe to this podcast. And let me know what you think by leaving rating in review. Welcome to this episode of profiles in the American dream in Kahlil your host. And for this episode. I'm joined by David Jensen pronounced Jeter from lighthouse media solutions. Welcome to the show, David. Thanks, tim. Tell us what lighthouse media solutions is. So lighthouse is a Omni channel media company. We are publisher we own thirteen different publish brands, some TV shows would you marketing services for all different sized businesses here and New England across the US with a published brands, what do you publish? So we own like, I said thirteen but some of the bigger ones are New England, boating and fishing magazines, their magazines, but some of these also have TV shows as well as digital presence. Yeah. All right. And and you so you all three types of media, the broadcast media the print media. And obviously the online media, correct? Yeah. Let's do some event work as well. Okay. And so the goal of your firms. These publications is to promote the businesses and the people that you're writing about. So I would say our first objective is to create a lifestyle content that talks about the area and the New England communities that were involved in. And then we leverage those brands to to help businesses reach those audience members. Okay. So so this is content that people pay to go on. Or is this something that you guys reporters that do the research on the stores? How's it structured sure, it's combination of both maintain we certainly are an editorial firm, I and we're always looking for great local stories, and and and talking about the people and the projects and the events that are going on here in the local community. But like a lot of media today. There is a native content component to it. And we do sponsored content. Just just like anybody else would these globe? Does it time says it Wall Street Journal does and lighthouse? Yeah. And lighthouse, right. Put you in that category. How did you? How did this business? Get started so boat nine years ago gentleman by name, rusty Pearson's, who's the CEO and my mentor. He came to came to Cape Cod and started buying up some different businesses and bought Shriver publications which was southern New England weddings and through kind of a a bunch of different mergers and acquisitions has put lighthouse together used to be called. I knows publications. Okay. And then through the purchase of a piece of an agency became lighthouse media solutions. Okay. So that was nine years ago. And when did you come into the farm about seven years ago, okay in which what what's been your role since you started? How is it volved? Sure. So I oversee the marketing services out of the business and have slowly worked with rusty to learn more about the publishing and in the sales side of the business, and it's been an amazing partnership, and we've really grown and changes accompany. Obviously, the the media space changes rapidly. Gotta learn. To grow and change and provide both marking services at the business level. But also at the publishing in the and the broadcast side is would it rusty rusty rusting? What did he see in this? These these enterprise magazines are many magazines struggle print. We just talked to John abo-about print and how it's changing so much. What did he see in this? Enterprise that made him wanna buy share in and grow. So rusty came from a publishing background, okay. And as well as a marketing services background, and I think the reality is that we separate out print from a high in glossy magazines. You know, we are print like newspapers certainly is a dying industry whereas publications still have some shelf life, they have some brand equity to them. And so they oftentimes are at the local local markets still still doing really well. And so what rusty saw was the ability to still provide a product to to to local consumers that they still have that has value. And if you look at kind of how on channel marketing works today, there's a three screen approach that still very much include a publication component. And so that that that. That combination of of media types is both what rusty's felt would be of valuable long-term, but as well as a short term investment. Now, you have entrepreneurial background as well, which is different than took tell tell tell me what how you got involved. Would you first job? My first job actually was we're located in Rena bay today. Right. And so out of college. I was the doc. Would you go to college? I went to northeastern. And so I was the dock master here in marina bay, and then through that ended up becoming the GM and kinda ran the operations here for the marina and some of the land development, and in where did you go from there? So while I was there a couple of buddies, and I had out of college. Now thought it'd be a great idea to throw a block party. We back from Maine originally, and we used to do lobster bakes and we used to do big barbecues. And so we decided that we were going to throw a block party. But we couldn't find a pig. Roaster to to do it. So prising that you can pick here in Massachusetts. Yeah. So we found a guy in New Hampshire that had one for sale, and we went up there with a thousand dollars and asked the guy he would sell it to us. And he said, yes. And so we it was on trailing. We dragged it back. And so we did it big event hired a band and had that whole thing. And then all of a sudden we had this this smoker just laying around, and

rusty Pearson New England Massachusetts David Jensen Tim Caygill Wall Street Journal New Hampshire Kahlil US Cape Cod Shriver publications publisher Maine Rena bay marina bay
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

05:41 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"Welcome to the profiles. And the American dream podcast Caygill for twenty years ago. I wrote a book with the same title as live. The book explored enormously successful businessman from my hometown, Massachusetts their trajectory. She had some common characteristics including humble beginning. Incredible vision overwhelming struggles in deep well of perseverance and in the end success beyond the wildest dream each at my new guess, we'll all have stories that are just as intriguing if not more. So join me as we engage with entrepreneurs from many different fields of work, locking their secrets and inspired people across the country that the dreams too can be cheap. Please download and subscribe to this podcast. And let me know what you think by leaving a rating and review. Welcome to this episode of prophecy American dream on. Hey, ho, your host. And I enjoy today by far earth, the owner operator and entrepreneur in residence, Marcus miles media, welcome to the show. Mark Mony, Tim, thanks for having me. It's interesting because this is the first interview I've done for this show where actually sitting across from a radio professional while you've really going on a limb them, but you do you have some history and radio, right? Does owning a radio? Does that? Speaking into a microphone speaking into a microphone. Thank you used to have your own show. I did with my brother Jim in. Greg Webb was called about the house, and it was on a home repair. So people could call in with the dilemma of remodeling job. They are into considering get information from two forty veterans on how to get that that task completed on budget on time, and we had a lot of fun with it was over ninety six nine when ninety six nine was Boston talks. Okay. And what what year was that? Wanted Columbus sale own back that was about four five years back now. So it was a version of sort of this old house only modern. Yes. Sort of this old house meets car talk. So okay. Sort of like clicking Clack because it was my brother, and I and their brothers and still operas one is past. In Greg Webb was the other expert. So we had to forty veterans that could help you again, you'd might have three different prices on the same roof from three different contractors. And you think and they will weigh off one was you know, seemed reasonable the other two one might be too low and one seemed astronaut weekly high, and you could call in and say why is that and they would be able to Delvin that and give you the answers that you needed and they didn't have any skin in the game. Exa they weren't looking for work. They would just again on a home repair from two veterans who really knew what they were talking about the show is on three years, and they were really stumped on occasion. I would handle the Hindle the heavy lifting. When someone we had a woman call wants to say, I have this curious issue. She said when I'm in the shower upstairs alone, it leaks onto the floor in the bathroom, and then ruins the ceiling below in my kitchen. She said, but if my husband or son used the same shower, no leaks. So I said the gym Greg you to take a knee. I got this one. I said Ethel, I don't know where you calling from off the I'm gonna need your address in full name because you and I are going to get in that shower and figure this out. She didn't call back. Yeah. Waiting. Thank she decided to go with a tub. But we had a lot of fun with it. And again, the people and it was a hit right obligate. So we had a lot of fun ninety six nine the ownership decided to go to a music format after Boston talks the ratings weren't what they needed to be. So everyone abandon ship and we want. So you tell tell tell me sort of you own the show wasn't like you weren't working for the station. Right. That's correct. And I want it that way we had we will live seven AM to nine AM again on ninety six nine, and we were able to invite guests, and we decided who are advertise going to be I said to Jim and Greg to again to building experts said I'll never ask you to say, we believe this is a good product. If you didn't believe that. So I asked them what's your favorite window? What's the only window you'll put in Greg head of a long history and painting as well as what what you preferred brand of pain, and then we would seek out those advertises because I want people to know that when they listen to about the house that they were getting information that the two experts. Believed and it wasn't just okay. Who wrote us a check to advertise? This is going to be the window that we push. Yeah. And I knew that would have legs it had legs immediately. You don't have to be on the planet too long to know when you're listening to somebody. It's kinda hit you in the gut. If someone's telling you what they believe is the truth of someone selling you something, and it's a sales pitch. So that's the way we appreciate ties in also the advertisers were welcomed into the studio each week. We had a different advertiser in taking calls about their product self. It was a product that was a little shaky obviously we didn't want them in and be it's not someone that we were trying to attract. So again, we were trying to also be a resource for people to say, well, let's go onto that about the house website who who do they like for opening today use for marine paint who they use for decking stain? Because again, it was unbiased information that you're getting from two guys who had done it all and seeing all on us still out there doing it. So again, it was a lot of fun. Tried to take it over to WB. You are we had a a Cup of coffee there. But they have such a great lineup over there. Well, you know, what it sounds to me like you before this? This phenomenon is

Greg Webb Boston Jim Massachusetts entrepreneur in residence Delvin Mark Mony Ethel Tim four five years twenty years three years
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

09:10 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"Welcome to the profiles, and the American dream podcast, Tim KO, but twenty years ago, I wrote a book with the same title as his body. The book explored enormously successful businessman from my hometown masks uses their trajectory, she had some common characteristics including humble beginning. Writable vision overwhelming struggles in deep well of perseverance and in the ad success beyond the wildest dreams each my new gas. We'll all have stories at Justice treating if not more. So join me as we engage entrepreneurs from many different fields of work unlocking this secret and Spiring people across the country, the dreams too can be chief please download and subscribe to this podcast. And let me know what you think by leaving a rating and review. Welcome to profiles, the American dream in this episode. Tim kale before we go into the episode? Let's not forget that. And in this episode. I'm joined by Ron Agfa, the owner and operator of hair place. One welcome to the show. Ron, thanks. Tim have me so here place one how'd you get into the salon business Tump? Tell me about the family history about the business and how you specifically decided that that was going to be a future. Well, Tim, it wasn't a grand plan of any sorts. Most of most of them, aren't that's the good news. Most people don't plan it when they go. And especially when they're going to business from stuff that happens. But every story is unique about how it happens. Well, well, the way the business started years ago going back to Boston was my dad. Russell his brother Edward started. Russell Edwards ES LAN. They were on the little building on the corner, Trenton boylston street in town right above the Brigham 's were there, they had forty four cutters working from it. They decided to come back to Quincy father's roots. Were and my uncle was in Braintree. He took over the Russell Edwards name. And we started as Russell Edwards here place one. We eventually dropped the Russell Edwards, and we're here place one. Now, we're actually transitioning to HBO we don't like hip place one anymore screams eighties too much to really H P O H P O going with that really interesting. What year? Did you start? Your father ankle start the business nineteen fifty four. Okay. And were they train barbers or his style style. It worked for Frank Zona at the time. He was the biggest Salonen Boston. Okay. He had a great salon. My parents. My parents my father, my uncle both got into the business with him as shampoo, boys. Okay. Moved up through the ranks, and then they opened up their own salon. Really interesting. Now franc-zone never heard that were delauro guy. And all the folks still his grandson still have big salons in Hanover. Very big slot. Okay. Okay. Interesting. Interesting. So fifty five they come to Quincy what year and open on t seventy two and where was the shop? And Quincy cottage avenue. Okay. All right, next to the old strand theater. Right. All no, no, no. That's the other. That was the second location. Okay. That was the strength that it was on Okada Javan, which is right down the street across from the fours, basically. Okay on finer cut is. Being taken down. Now the memories come back. Okay. What year was that seventy two he transitioned. He kept us Alon in Boston. And then he wanted to get in Quincy. So we opened that one for about two years ago to decent following. And then we purchased land on just not streets at street. Right. And you know, it was history there we had big following in Quincy back in the eighties. So when was chestnut street open because that's when I remember opened in seventy eight. Okay. All right. Seventy seven seventy eight okay in the hippy dippy, seventies air and crazy air and stuff. So that's when the guys would come in for perms that was a big thing. Really? I can on rather rather never mean, my brother and brother-in-law were Guinea pigs once and boy, they they will give my father hard time for many years that I remember on seven guys will come in with best friend Brian Kelly. The match stalk. They call them red hair and Herman. He has never lived it down ever since you know, when did you get into the business? Well. You always been in the business. Well, yeah. Well, I was getting in trouble as a youngster. So my dad decided every day after school and Saturdays at I was going to work at the salon. Okay. And I was Janet of the building. Okay. For from about seven three grade on I've my only job of ever had. Although I did cut onions in the morning. Tony's clamp shop. Okay. You know, the family another family business from onions to hair early. Honestly, Tim, I'm not gonna lie. I didn't have colleges beaten down my door. There wasn't much to do. So it's kind of fell into the family business was never thought. I work there in school. I worked there after school. I graduated hit us in school before. I graduated high school really went nights feel beauty academy. My dad gummy going, and he taught me everything. It wasn't the schooling. Right. I've been here since I never really gave it much thought. It just happened. You know, he's talking to our previous interviewer Sarala was rain. Get your early students. Basically, she we talked a little bit. About the process of getting licensed and everything and it's pretty intense. It really intense. It wasn't intense back in the day when over there too or is simple. Nope. But I went to school cost me seven hundred and fifty dollars than I took a test that took all about three hours. And then you wait for your license in the mail. And that was it a lot hotter. Now schooling's twenty thousand dollars now. Really? Yeah. No. It's a lot our Sarah saying thousand hours you have to put in and then then you can you have to at least another thousand apprenticeship in us along. Yeah. So you started out. So this was in the seventies late seventy early. I graduated his school in eighty one or early eighties, and you started and you went in there, and you went so you're his style. It's not a barber. Okay. How many people were in the shop at that time? Well, we consistently always have about twenty cutters. Twenty right now. We're at twenty one a shop. Yeah. Very big shot is okay. When did you take? Oh, I think in the mid nineties. My dad moved down to. Florida and me, and my sister kind of took it over my sister. Then moved. She went to Florida than I was all alone running it. Okay. Okay. Which I liked. Yeah. So we talk a lot to a lot of entrepreneurs some of them who started the business of more second generation like yourself in some third generation as they had earlier today. Neither way is easy. And no ways in other way, because there's unique challenges both with starting a business from scratch or taking over the family business. What's the biggest challenge you face in terms of making it your own place? And but also keeping the tradition because you've got family and the business, and you don't want to disappoint you dad. Mom and stuff to same time. Trench change business changed the world changes over change with it. Correct. You know, you could be well, you know, I was when I took over. I just did everything the way my dad did it yet. No. And I never questioned. Why I did it? I just did it because this is the way it's supposed to be done. I think the challenges I'm facing. Now is now that I'm older, I'm not the same age as my employee's. They're younger they're in the twenties early twenties. So there's a disconnect between me and them now had before. And I've learned a lot from my son my son, he's doing well. He's went to BC. Hi babs. And now he's working for new in New York for NBC, and I'm letting him open my eyes to a whole new management style. Okay. Managing millennial. Yeah. I'm not do as I say anymore. Like, I had a certain challenge with an particular employee last week. So I was giving her I wrote down a text. Now. My protocol is send it to my son have him clean it up and send it back out. But you know, what the response is is much better. I'm getting the feedback. I'm getting from my employees because I'm a kinder gentler on now. Okay. Dealing with the millennials. You'll find that to as I say in the hardnosed boss were doesn't work anymore. Okay. My dad would have to adjust his right where it's incredible. And for a long time. I was fighting Tim. I was I'm like, no, this is the way I do it. So he always done it, especially when you go up in a busy with everything in the business. Certain certain things would just done a certain way. And now, I look back certain things like raise my prices in November. Now, not January first, and it just makes much more sense January. First is when people are watching the credit. Cards. Correct. It's right after Christmas, the it's very tight now in I always did it because the first the end, that's when you go up on the prices right now, you do it in November. You get bigger bang for your buck. Those two months of very busy yet. Right. Right. And people aren't watching the credit cards much. No one complains as much at that time than they do on the first of the year. And like I said, I get a bigger bang for the buck. I guess into Taliban. It's all the same. It's one year. Right. But it just seems like when I put that raise and I get less free from the clients. They don't seem to see it as much it's such a people business, and it's not a quick people not

Tim Quincy Russell Edwards Boston Ron Agfa Tim kale Florida Tim KO Braintree Okada Javan Brian Kelly Tump Frank Zona Brigham Edward Hanover Alon
"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

Profiles in the American Dream

22:56 min | 2 years ago

"american dream" Discussed on Profiles in the American Dream

"Welcome to the profiles. And the American dream podcast. I'm kaneohe. But twenty years ago, I wrote a book with the same title as the book explored enormously successful businessman from my hometown into Massachusetts their trajectory, she had some common characteristics, including humble beginning credible vision overwhelming struggles in keep well of perseverance and in the end success beyond their wildest dreams. Each my new guess, we'll all have stories of Justice intriguing if not more. So join me as we engage with entrepreneurs from many different fields of work unlocking, this secrets and inspiring people across the country that their dreams to can be cheap. Please download and subscribe to this podcast. And let me know what you think a rating and review. Hello. I'm Tim k hill. And this is profiling American dream, and I'm so excited that this episode. We get to profile Sarah little of little field salon. Welcome to the show. Sarah. Thanks him. Tell me what is little fields salon little failed. So on is is my dream. Okay. That's the answer. I was looking for and you did it not even Q on that. And that's truly my dream. I've always wanted to. I've always known. I wanted to be a boss of something. Okay. All right. So that's the dream is to be the boss, right? I think so I started working in a salon at the age of fifteen actually someone you guys will get to hear Ron ASA his story and one of the podcast. So I got my start with him. He's such an inspiration to me and someone that I still consider a mentor and a friend. So I got my thought there I was working at his shop, and then went on to hair school. And then just kind of knew how I wanted to grow the education, and the things I wanted to learn from that point you were fifteen. You wanted to be a hair stylist? I was fifteen and looking for a job. It was a job at though, but I loved the atmosphere of salon. Okay. Love being in the space. I loved like people that were excited to come into this lawn, and how it would make them feel that was started like what washing hair. Yep. Ping clean all that. Good stuff getting coffees. So then what you do after that that he worked at here place one after you went to Barbara hairstyle. 'cause Matala gist. Was that here in Boston? It was in Quincy. Okay at Mansfield UD academy. Okay. It's a very involved process to become licensed, correct? In massachusetts. I don't know if that's everywhere, but to become licensed to cut hair, you can't just open up shop and car yourself, Bob or history. Now, it's a lot of hours every seat requires, you know, probably between thousands of two thousand hours of school hands on experience, and then really working in this on environment. As it's going to really prep, you to be come who you're going to be as a headrest, what kind of hair, you're going to do the type of hair, you're going to do is some of the brands in hair care that you affiliate yourself with. So that becomes your getting licensed, you go in you have these academies in classes that you attend and that's all on your own doing. I started up right cracked. Yeah. So if you want to you can just get license and cut hair, right style here and be complacent and at that point, right? So how long were you working at here place one there about probably five years or some K? And then as you doing that, what was going through your mind, if you can remember longtime ago as far as I I wanna be the boss, I I wanna have my own place. I want to do things maybe differently than the way things done here. Right. I always wanted to have that education behind me. So I knew before I could be a good boss and be a mentor to others that I needed to have my own direction. What was my vision for the space and experience, but not only that again, what hair my going to do what is a stack of like, my style in the sale of hair that I'm going to be doing at that point. I became associated with some of the brands that I really felt drawn to so at the time like veta- was kind of the pioneer and that like wellness beauty eco friendly kind of beauty that like. Lived in luck that you know, I did my hair, but I didn't spend all day doing it. That's kind of the way I feel everyday don't even look because it doesn't even look at anything and UC's because they didn't do anything. That's a good hat kind of actually. Right. So you working and learning by repetition because the more you do the better, you you get at it. Or at least the more you get to know your customers, and what they want and then walk us through the process of all, right? I'm going to take the leap and be my own boss. How did you put that together? Gosh, it was it was definitely years in the making space that felt right? And you know, then whatever would happen. So we are going to be I looked kind of all around. There was a space and lower mills at one point. There was a spot down and hang on. And then a place and house neck was opened for quite a long time. That's a neighborhood of Quincy where I grew up and spent most of my life pretty much more families there something felt right about this face and just took the leap of faith. That's a little out of the way. It's a little the rest of the city so named set in its own peninsula. It's a small community. You kind of destination. You're going to drive a little audio way to get there by many other businesses down there, mostly residential. Yeah. It did it, and it is it's been great. It's we really got the clientele that we want because they hear about us because we're being talked about an positive way. So that's exciting. It's not because they drove by it's because they heard this salon and house. Really great. Isn't that the way at the end of the day locations important, but reputation is far more important and getting the word out people will drive a mile to get the best of something. But also settle for something that's mediocre walking by. So you obviously because you're not surrounded by other businesses. You not it's convenient. There's a lot of parking there. You have to make yourself different. Exactly the experience different. How do you do that? Yes. Just as important as a haircut is going to be the way that you're making people feel when they walk in the door. They're welcomed the space is really unique. There's music we provide you know, drinks, and we make the. Ersan that comes in very comfortable. And then that time that they're there with us is really focused on them and the whole experience. Yeah. So you did this. Did you immediately hire people to work for you? Or did you just start on your own? No, I did have a team pretty much right off the bat. Again, people just kind of came and had heard about what I was doing seem really interested in being a part of the team the most rewarding part is working with the team and inspiring them and -unding also like an educator to them. But it's definitely one of the hardest parts of the business as well. Which hard about it to get people to see your vision indicate division or I guess it's just where I put the most pressure on myself to make on feeling like I'm taking care of them in some way. Am I giving them what they need to to nurture them to grow into the headrest of they're supposed to be because these are people that are pretty much right out of school or only have a couple of years experience in the business. And then making sure they're going to alternately make my clients customers had exactly the way you were when you started working here place one. Yeah. So that's where you go. Oh back to the mentoring piece in trying to help people at the same time. They could go off and do their own thing if you meant to them too. Well, and you don't want that especially if they're good at you have to understand that. That's a risk you take of the fear. But you can't let that I'm still just going to be who I am. And I'm always going to do the right thing by them or even myself. It's just feels right to wanna nurture them and give them everything. I can. And and then honestly hope one day I can be a mentor to somebody. If they got to that point. I would I would hope that I can give them the same type of relationship or guidance that like Ron has given me. So we talked about this before the show started sort of the attitude you have to have as a client facing entrepreneur, you're not in the back room people. See you and they spend an hour or two with you every couple of weeks, and you're doing this over and over and over again. I mean, you're on your feet ten twelve hours a day and not only is your focus half to be on them. But you're you mind running business. Tell me about the challenge you face with that and being on. All the time. Right. Every customer. You're only good as we used to say. In the food is good as your last sandwich. Urines goes, you'll lose people for life. If over one visit. Yeah. One haircut a one just bad experience. It's like a football game. In psych yourself up every day before you go in. How do you manage sort of stress and the into keep yourself focusing engage with your customer? Okay. I love this question. And actually is something that for me just opening the business. So I've been three years in business with us launch somewhere. I see like the direction of the brand the salon growing is actually in the wellness sector. So Judy and wellness, right? It kind of goes hand in hand opening this lawn that was that was kinda my biggest lesson as I in the beginning. Maybe was more of a psyching yourself up every day, and and having a push through some days when you do feel tired or there's been a lot going on. But I did got burnt out. After the first year, I was working like eleven hour days back to back and not really like. Spending that time on taking care of myself. So that became my focus over the last year and a half is becoming really focused on that balance every day. And then you know, if if I'm not as good as my Lhasa to act to be good every day. So it has to be sustainable and like Tom Brady outlook. Right. Yeah. Fees and inspiration. No seriously. I mean, you're you're young what you want to stay in the business, and again when people coming into a hair, salon de looking at the people, I think about this in a restaurant looking at people serving them if they're healthy if they haircut if they look like they're enjoying themselves. And that gives you a feeling this haircuts going to make my day better. And that's important people have to feel better when they leave when they come in. And yet that is not always the easiest thing to do because haircuts. That's nerve wracking. Isn't it could be changing somebody completely from when they came in as far as they look tell me, that's an interesting piece. I don't really have experienced this. My wife and daughters because the hair never seems to really change. But how do you get someone to go in with long hair and say, I have a look view that I think is right. Do you do I would never do that in the first meeting? It would be I have to get to know that person and their personality and based on their lifestyle, and what's gonna make sense for them. I'd be able to talk to them tossing suggests if I thought that was right, but more often than not when people are ready for change. They they come in asking me for teens. And then that excited to do it. Okay. Then then it's could be blue hair, or I know there's a lot of color in your style. Yeah. We can go really natural. What we can do some bold stuff too. Which makes it fun for me. When I get to switch things you just talked about getting to know your customer. So you keep a file on you must know. I have such a good memory when it comes to. So recognize that face, and I don't even necessarily remember that person's name. It's only the second time, I met them, but instantly if they are talking about something it brings me back to that conversation. We 'cause I really am present. When I'm with that person. And. Tonight time with them. And like what how long are they going to spend on their hair? Do they have, you know, maybe a new baby? Maybe short hair isn't a new hairstyles right for them. You know, those things which mostly just your memory. You don't keep meticulous records record of like hair-color? Right. We do keep that. But again, I wouldn't wanna like do that same thing every time. So I always even wanna keep it. Interesting for myself in the client when they're in my chair, even though I'm focused on what we're doing that day. There is always talk to them about what do you want to do next time? And kinda putting something in there that I think might work. So if if I think I new haircut would be a great idea for them. I start putting that thought in their head the time before they're and my you're thinking about the next cut as you're doing the current here. What we're growing into a working twin, you're planning out your sort of schedule you have people on a schedule. Obviously. Yeah. My books pretty full every three weeks or so you told me before we went on the show that you're hiring you first barber tomorrow right tomorrow. You do men anyways. Not just women. It's men and women. Then women children. But yeah, we have we have a fairly large male clientele for salon space, again, keeping the space really cool in modern, not I guess unisex the word, I want you. It's a very modern under specific best the new word, but unisex was the word. I would sell really mean anything. I don't know what it meant. I guess it methods. Okay. If you're a guy to go in and it's okay. If you're willing to go in and they'll be a male presence now in a female dominated place is that give you anything to worry about are you concerned, or is it just as the culture going to be the same regardless going to say the same. He seemed to be the right fit. If you know what I mean and again younger so we can mold him to be part of the little field. You know, the little failed team. But I'm excited to add that element of like, the barring the shaving actually, my great grandfather was ever he had a barber shop in North Carolina. So I feel like I have some of that doing the men's hair was always something that came very natural to me where a lot of headrests don't feel that way about cutting shorter hair. So I feel like that must have been my great grandfather. Did you know that when you started out in the business? I did not I didn't find out till I was probably like halfway through my career one point, really. Yeah. That's interesting. Yeah. So it is in. Jeans. Then. That's pretty cool. I it's funny. How you especially when you're young, you know, old people old when you're young and you have no clue about time. You know, so history or anything as you get older you start to come become interested. If you're lucky enough, you get to know a little bit about the people that came before even if you never met them, right? You know, so barring is in the family jeans. That's pretty cool. You never knew that. It just drew you to it. What was it like when you found that out? Did you say this was destiny same? I mean, if it was like ten years ago. I heard the story it probably was like, oh, this is really cool. But then when I open my shop the on actually had some of his old plaques, and Barbara licenses and things like that. So that felt really special right? When I was opening those were given to me as gifts. So that was that was great social media plays a big role in business today and business development, and growth and messaging. How do you social media cheer advantage that may be unique or different or or just something that you think really help you it plays a huge? Role in the industry as the header thing industry is all based on imagery. It's really big maybe more so for us than than others. So we take pictures of every single kind almost that comes through the door, and they're usually more than willing. They love it. I think they take that as part of the whole experience they come. They get their after Shah, they get that glam shot after they post those right? So all the images that are on our Facebook, Instagram, all the hair that we've done as opposed to other images that maybe inspire us, which maybe places do, but we have a great look book or so to speak on Instagram. People can go right on that and pull up I want this hair as opposed to Google searching an image. They can say, oh, you guys did this like I love interest. Your notes are really kind of live notes we have that record written down of their color. But then to also go back and look at the picture like it's a visual library for yourself like I would tweak this next time. Or it's keeping you better. At what you do. We talked again to also about continuing education. You've recently been over the pond in London. Going out to the west coast soon. How important is staying up on trends, and knowing what's coming before it actually hits house neck? Yes. Much to like about that. Oh, the educations everything to me. It's what keeps me as passionate as I am about what I do. And I think that because I love what I do so much it shows. I think that's part of the drawer is when maybe people come into the on meet us for the first time, we have so much that we can talk about because we're constantly going and continuing education. Yeah, I'm really honored to be socio with the brand often. It's a hair color line. And that's who's sending me out to the west coast for training. This stuff local all the time when I'm drawn to something it almost naturally feels like that's the direction haircuts to go into it seems like a very natural thing when I see something that I like, and then all of a sudden it's to be everywhere. You ahead of the curve, but you can't be so far ahead that nobody's following you. You have to be a leader with followers as we as we often say, but it is kind of cool to be a little bit ahead of it. Exactly. I'm into that more natural look, so nothing ever seems to von gotta unapproachable for like the everyday person. You talked about health and wellness to is that something you're looking to. Incorporate into the business model as you go forward. I hope so I can't really like talk on that too much because you know, nothing's actually happening in that direction. But I feel very drawn to it. I love to share that knowledge with my clients, and it's funny clients at no kind of what I've been doing personally seem to come in and be eager to share stuff with their journey because it seems like the direction people are as a as a whole as a global thing people are very drawn to that right now. So well. Old saying is that you know, if you if you don't have health, you have nothing and is important as it is we're as a as a country, and as a culture where hardworking I mean, it's just in our jeans speak, but you also need to set aside time because if you don't have health, you don't have anything, you know, my as I told you my cousin is a bar in the north end. And he had a really bad back recently. I could tell by the way he was moving, but he's got to stand ten hours a day, and he can't take a day off. And you can't take. I mean, really can't if you have clients which you go into the day with clients, you don't just go into they hope and someone's going to walk in the door, and you don't feel good. It's going to reflect and everything. Yeah. Work, and like, you said the way sands so posture on that stuff, if you're not maybe strength training or doing something you're pastas going to suffer, and then that's just gonna be like long term thing. So so you work out outside of work. Yeah. Yeah. And you think you might draw that into the business it self or or just, you know, there's ways to do it sort of holiest as other ways to do it where you know, you sort of share ideas, like this is the gym I go to sharing the ideas of the stage that the state of that now, and we'll see I think there might be a future for a little failed to grow into the wellness base for those of us lucky enough to have hair it defines us, and sometimes you don't think about a guys maybe don't think about it as much, but some guys think about it more than women. Well, I should make those those it's been sex when I said it, but those gender things, and I take it for granted. Because I do still have my. I'm lucky it's again, that's all jeans people say that. I said had nothing to do with, you know, just try to maintain it and stuff. It is how you define yourself in many ways and the four the job that you have is important in people's lives. I mean, they may take it for granted or think about it and may take for granted what you do. And I was in the restaurant business some people thought. Well, that's really cool. And there's other people say making sandwiches. No big deal. You're not creating big wealth. You're not doesn't take lot. And it takes it does take a lot. Because again, you're you're part of people's lives every day or every few days, and their looks and everything it's a lot of pressure. I mean has your best accessory. You're wearing every day. So that's one important job. Also getting to be a part of people is is one of the things I find the most rewarding. So I've been cutting. Let's say Ryan Barrett. Tampa six years. But now, I get to the Saturday his daughter and son are going to come in for their first cuts, and those are things that I've been in the past. You know, the same. You're like, oh, you're giving a kid a heck out. But it feels really special to me and feels even more special to those of photos that stay in life. My my cousin has a picture of himself in the barber chair when he was like two I in his barbershop, which I think is at the same barber shop that he's now own and back to that. My great great grandfather as cutting my father there in an old picture and his barshop so full circle it really is cool too. And this has been a great interview. And I really story and stuff, but there were challenges. I mean, you still have to you have bills to pay you have people to pay does that stress ever get to be overwhelming take you off your game. Do you think about it too much? How do you deal with it? How do you overcome it? So you can focus on the job at hand. And I know that's a work in progress. I'm not saying Saul because none of us ever do. I still deal with it myself. Just know it's always there. But if you're having fun, and you're doing what you love that doesn't tend to like be in the forefront ever me. So it's always. The I mean, I guess if it doesn't it doesn't ever feel like a ways on me, the salons integrate place, I'm really lucky with all the successes. I've had there have definitely been some challenges with sapphire with finding those people that are going to back. You have so many great people surrounding me that helped make our so we're going to finish with the question. I ask everyone would you see self in like five or ten years or what is the next stage? You gonna stay where you are. You're going to grow you're gonna expand geographically or or which is I mean, do you think about that? And and sort of what is your short version or short answers to we think you are right now. Of course, you're going to be I feel really happy with the way everything's been passed. Like, I said six months, I think when I started to really focus on my health and nurturing the SAF things really great right now. I do always have future goals and dreams of growing whether that, you know, branches this out like we spoke about into the wellness sector or giving me a few locations. I'm not really sure where where it's gonna lead us. But I think that. Will have an organically something will prevent itself that feels right? Just like this this experience has it's it's funny with all the data with all the science with all the information out. The my feeling is always been that. Most entrepreneurs trust that got instinct that legion direction. Sometimes when you get to a certain pointers, you're on the road. You say if I knew it was his heart. I never would have done it, which is what you can't think about. But I think instinct serve you. Well, it doesn't constantly always work. But at least, you know, you made the decision and you felt good about it at the time. And you can always direct saying present just knowing you know, things will get thrown Yvette how you're gonna Dale at them. Well, a pleasure. Thank you very much for being on American best of luck in the future. Thanks for having me. All right. This is Tim k hill with Sarah little, and this is our episode of profiles American dream. Thanks for listening. Thanks for listening to profiles, the American dream. I'm Kim K hill. Please download and subscribe to podcasts. And let me know what you think by leaving a rating and review till next time. Thank you very much for listening. The.

Sarah little Quincy Ron ASA Barbara kaneohe Massachusetts massachusetts Boston Instagram Lhasa Kim K Mansfield UD academy veta North Carolina football Shah UC Google