29 Burst results for "American Chemical Society"

"american chemical society" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:24 min | 3 months ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on WTOP

"Needs to do more but it's hemmed in because at some point we have this dichotomy that long-term short term interest rates And if the fed goes too hard on the short term interest rates it makes it unprofitable for banks to lend money and almost always when that happens the recession happens 6 dozen records set Wednesday more will be broken on Thursday says CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson So in terms of new records a 100° in Nashville that's a new record We'll also set a toasty record in Charleston West Virginia at 97° and 98 Probably even 99 in lieu of the FDA's advisory committee has unanimously recommended that the agency approved the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines for very young children CBS News medical contributor doctor David agus I think parents around the world are going to rejoice that this vaccine is available and the hope is we could do better on the vaccinations of kids with this vaccine than we had done with the older kids age 5 through 18 We're only about 35% of kids in those age groups have been vaccinated A third public hearing of the January 6th insurrection investigating committee begins early Thursday afternoon CBS Robert Costa will be watching We expect to learn new details from pence's former council Greg Jacob about how Trump was enraged on the eve of the insurrection inside The White House one on one with pens will also learn about how Pence finalized his letter resisting Trump's pleas to block Biden certification will learn all about how pence's inner circle handled a crisis in the presidency There's some evidence that a beer could be good for you Cheers Men who drink a locker beer every day could increase the diversity of their bodies gut microbes and reduce the risk of diseases That's according to a new study published by the American chemical society Logger beer is brewed fermented and conditioned at low temperatures with some considering it the best beer for heart health CBS Jim Priscilla Amazon customers in California can sue the company for failing to warn buyers that some of the products it sells may contain hazardous substances The state Supreme Court refused to overturn an appeals court ruling that Amazon violated the state's toxic warnings law It could be another record for NBA superstar LeBron James a one of a kind trading card from a 2020 2021 collection is being auctioned off this month This.

David Parkinson CBS News David agus Robert Costa Greg Jacob Moderna pence Trump fed Pfizer Charleston Nashville West Virginia FDA CBS Pence Biden Jim Priscilla White House
"american chemical society" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:16 min | 9 months ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on KOMO

"High country including for skiing you should see Bluebird skies up there at the ski resorts and the come before weather center I meteorologist Shannon O'Donnell showers and 46 in downtown Seattle You're in the middle of 20 minutes of nonstop news at 6 O 6 The federal aviation administration is waving off concerns that 5G wireless signals might interfere with airline safety Car one haig reports C tac and many other airports are officially in the clear The FAA has released a list of major airports including sea tac and commercial jets including Boeing 7 37 and 777 saying 5G signals at these airports will not hamper the ability of these jetliners to safely land in low visibility conditions James Lewis with the center force strategic and international studies says there never really was a danger to begin with There is no interference But he also tells CNBC the FAA blinked in the face of telecom pressure So the phone companies after paying 84 billion thought they were going to be able to use this spectrum And FAA didn't like losing the tussle to some extent The concern was that the wireless band known as 5G C operates very closely to a band used by some airplanes to indicate altitude The FAA says interference may still be a problem for some smaller aircraft Corwin hake komo news Thousands of Clark county residents in southwest Washington have been working from home since the start of the pandemic are in no hurry to return to the office Komo is carling Johnson explains why Thousands of people who live in Vancouver and other parts of southwest Washington work in Portland and surrounding communities That means they pay income taxes for what they make because Oregon has an income tax but many have been working from home because the pandemic And so they are exempt from that income tax Scott Bailey regional economist for Southwest Washington A nice raise directly in cash but also don't have a commute anymore Which is it's a big traffic issue And don't have to pay parking and all this kind of things Bailey tells como at amounts to an average 5 and a half percent pay hike for those working from home now and not having to pay Oregon's income tax because they live here Curling Johnson Come on news We know doing certain things during a pandemic can be risky but now we know exactly how risky Brian Calvert has more on a new study that might cause you to reconsider certain activities While we all have to wear masks in most indoor places still there was a time things were even more strict We have a power to prevent these preventable deaths There is not being used And that's the vaccine that is a lifesaver That was governor inslee in late December of 2020 when we still weren't allowed to go certain places But many were good sports about it But we gotta do we gotta do in order to get this under control These days we can go most any place but there are still risks The American chemical society studied different conditions inside some of our favorite places and can now quantify the COVID risk involved First the study ranks the most dangerous activities or the things where COVID transmission is at its highest The top of the list heavy exercise followed by shouting then singing then normal talking meaning if you're late for church you run in the front door shout a hallelujah no offense but maybe you should have just stayed home Kidding aside let's look at going to the movie theater or any theater for that matter It was pretty aggravating because everyone pretended not to know the rules even though I think most people did Going into a theater where people are talking and not wearing masks carries a 54% chance that COVID will be shared The risk drops to 24% for people talking and wearing a mask And if the theater crowd isn't talking like that ever happens but if it did and they were all wearing masks the COVID risk is now 5% I mentioned exercise before Many gyms are looking the other way when it comes to wearing a mask Heavy exercise in a poorly ventilated room where no one has a mask carries a 99% chance of COVID transmission If everyone has a mask on the chances are cut.

FAA Shannon O'Donnell center force strategic and int carling Johnson Scott Bailey Southwest Washington James Lewis Curling Johnson Brian Calvert Komo skiing CNBC Washington Boeing Oregon governor inslee Clark county Seattle como Vancouver
"american chemical society" Discussed on STEM-Talk

STEM-Talk

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on STEM-Talk

"Oh marley. The creation of nana's skill materials for advanced structures has led to a growing interest in the area of bio mineralisation and during your time at their directory us specifically research the process of bio mineralisation and the assembly of nonstructured inorganic components into hierarchical structures and this process led to the development of a variety approaches that mimic the recognition and nuclear capabilities found in bio-molecules for inorganic materials synthesis. So can you talk about your two thousand. Two paper appeared in nature materials where he described the in vitro by a synthesis of silver nanoparticles using silver binding peptides. It sounds really interesting. Yeah in. I guess it's worth pointing out before we get to the papers wells. What was happening in the late nineties and early two thousands around bio mineralisation and why was such same exciting time period in the late nineties. Pioneering work done by dan more at the university of santa barbara university of california santa barbara and his work on the abalone shell and and understanding as nature's composite was really starting to lay the framework. For what an exciting area think bio mineralisation was to become graduate student of his angela. Belcher went on to a career at mit and was really a trailblazer in the use of technique called f- aged display which for those who aren't aware of phages of virus for that specific for bacteria Particular type of fay jr had been Genetically engineered to display a large random combinatorial libraries of peptides. That could be screened to see if they could actually bind to a certain surface and that was a technique in tool that we use to actually uncover these peptides that were that. Were playing a role in binding and nucleated silver again. Aside from from dan angela. I mentioned her individuals like steven man at bristol. Joanna eisenberg who is leaving Lucent labs at the times now. Harvard a metzer. Kaya university of washington. So there's just a lot of thought leaders that were adding to this growing body of work showing that indeed a biology could be a useful tool When it comes to nuclear eighty Silverton silver in this case but just metals and oxides and semiconductors in general and then another part of the the paper. That was key was in this part of our thinking and always doing this work. Was that biology if we can if we can take it out of the system if you will. We could then control where we put it so we can control the deposition. Hence that's the the reason that we put the micro capillary patterning aspect into that papers. Well it is not in this paper but it was one of the the researchers that we also published on about that time. It's the basis for why we were looking at techniques like depending on lithography and collaborations with chad merkin at northwestern because again it was going to be a technique that was going allows to control where we place these bio-molecules that would have some type of deposition effect and then as we got into that the other thing that came to light was we can now begin to have the ability to control the phases of the resulting materials which again from a material science perspective is incredibly beneficial because usually it's only specific phases that have a particular application in technology area so morally another paper during this time period which we understand. You're particularly proud of appeared in advanced materials in two thousand and four. And you and your colleagues had taken a protein that was responsible for thermal sensing and incorporated into array. So can you talk to the listeners. About why you're so fond of this paper yet. It's one of those. It's it's not certainly in the top five of of citations of of work that we've published but as you point out i'm proud of it because it's one of those instances and performing science and engineering where you see a wild hypothesis become reality and in this particular case so you. We were asking these questions. Which again were were quite wild at the time. Even to this day. I think which yeses question could we clone a thermally responsive protein incorporated into a prototype device. Still have the protein be active and actually create an image thermal radiation and. That's exactly what we showed in this paper and that we could take this thermally responsive protein put it in crude sensing array and actually image a thermal source at the other end of the lab again aside from proving the hypothesis. Demonstrating that yes. It was possible to create a room. Temperature organic thermally responsive array and that in many ways was the whole reason that we went down this road of looking at biological infrared sensing so they actually see a translate into a device was very rewarding. Imagine doesn't always happen. Yeah stem talk. Isn't educational service of the florida institute. For human machine cognition a not for profit research lab pioneering groundbreaking technologies aimed at leveraging and extending human cognition perception. Look emotion and resilience. You and your colleagues followed up this paper. With an article. In two thousand and five that appeared in the journal of the american chemical society. This study has been frequently cited over the years. And can you tell us about the significance of this paper. That had the interesting title. Polly peptide template synthesis of hexagon silica platelets. That doesn't just roll off one's tongue. As scientists we often have a unique talent to create the most awkward titles possible in this particular case. This work was really aimed at trying to find a a lower cost alternative to the work that we were performing so many the peptides that i referenced earlier can quite expensive especially. If you're thinking about how. Can i scale this up into some type of industrial process in so looking at the work with poly l lysine. That was away which we could begin to scale up and perhaps get around some of the cost barriers. But the other interesting outgrowth of looking at some of these other substrates was the fact that a physical property of in this case. The polymer polio. Lycene like molecular weight played a role in the process so now from a from a process engineering perspective. If you will. We had another another lever or dial that we could tune to begin to control the the result material and then around that same time we It published some work in bio macromolecules. That continued to unpack this role of looking at both chemical influences and physical influences in the process so from a chemical standpoint. That's where we're talking about. Things like molecular weight. Or the degree. Of cad ionic polymer being used and in the physical sense we were looking at things. Like flow or hydrodynamic fields and the application of electrostatic fields. And i would. I'm proud about really in both of those. Both of those papers in that. We were starting to take this body of knowledge that we were discovering and putting that in tables that we could share with the community such that if people wanted to go off and make this class material what we're going to be the conditions that we're going to be necessary for in terms of molecular weight and environment so we're going to shift topics just a little bit marley and talk about another role that you've played from two thousand. Three two thousand six. He served as a program manager in darpa defense science office pursuing high risk. High payoff research. And i'm sure that this was just an absolutely eye opening experience for you as well. Can you talk a little bit.

university of santa barbara un fay jr dan angela Joanna eisenberg Lucent labs Kaya university of washington chad merkin nana marley Belcher santa barbara mit florida institute angela bristol dan steven Harvard the times american chemical society
"american chemical society" Discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

03:21 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Weird Wacky Wonderful Stories Podcast

"Topical joke for those who listen regularly okay. Talking about space. Did you know that. The atmosphere on titan is actually quite unique titan obviously being One of the moons that are in our solar system what mood. Jupiter moon titan isn't it. I don't know She asked me now. What about it anyway. I'm sure it's jupiter but now you've made me look idia. 'cause this says one of the solar systems on shores ju if both coming in snow will you please So anyway they've managed to recreate the atmosphere on titan in a glass cylinder here on earth. And what they did was they just talk. Droplets of water liquid water. Okay liquid and they turned the temperature down because you can get all in water. They turned to temperature dying to minus two hundred ninety degrees fahrenheit little tube in nineteen to say in a glass cylinder. How big the cylinder is okay. I'm sure you could have some fun with it but joking joking anyway. They turned the temperature down in this in this cylinder. Okay two hundred and nine hundred minus two hundred nine degrees fahrenheit and all of a sudden it started producing these these other molecules. The molecules find the atmosphere on titan proven. Obviously the water was the finding sort of body if you like on that moon and obviously with the temperature space and everything as cold as it was. Hey presto this well no but it wasn't. It's it's gone beyond that. Let me just find a bit on here. That says to says as part of an experiment showcase jew in a meeting of the american chemical society titans unique atmosphere was effectively recreated in small glass cylinders. Liquid water was placed in the cylinders. The researchers turn the temperature to minus two hundred ninety degrees fahrenheit the known temperature on titan and then studied what happened as expected. The results were nothing. Short of amazing to molecules appeared in the cylinders junie experiment include in. I'm to get this totally wrong. A section my trial and propia nights royal The research described these molecules and say they occur predominantly in one crystalline form that creates highly polar nanna services which could serve as templates for the self assembly of other molecules of prebiotic interest. So in other words you can grow bacteria from it. So i mean hey. I think that's amazing that they've been able to do that. Those two molecules. I seat tra- nitra. Oil and papaya are trial are two molecules fan. June the cassini mission that explode satin moon sat in certain saturday his americans for sutton with that saturn sadder and asked saturn it. And it hurt..

american chemical society tita sutton
"american chemical society" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"That's going to take a different violent. Our next cool fact is about at breath. You know it's embarrassing to have bad breath but most of the time you don't even know it and that's because at least until recent masking times most people can't smell their own breath. They walk around offending people all day without really knowing that it smells like they have a vulture in their mouth. If you have really bad breath it signals a problem with your gut. Bacteria because your gut bacteria are formed and shaped at the start of your gut which is actually in your mouth so problems with gum disease or with just really bad breath means that. There's a systemic bacterial problem. But how would you know well. Researchers at the american chemical society of which my grandfather was a lifetime member. I might add a small portable censor like a breathalyzer that detects bad breath now exists. This is a thumb sized device. That quickly sniffs your bad breath to see if it has hydrogen sulfide. Was that mean for. You means that very soon. I'm sure your iphone. We'll have a bad breath detector and it's going to be amazing actually. It doesn't mean very much except for the fact that we are now shrinking our sensors so that if we can pick up hydrogen sulfide in your breath we can pick up all sorts of other stuff as well and we are very close to the day where we can measure all sorts of stuff. That's coming out in your breath. Intel you hire biologists working in ways you can barely even imagine and funny enough hydrogen. Sulfide that stuff that smells like rotten eggs when it builds up in your cells and you have too much of it it actually has an effect like cyanide but small amounts of it in your cells are important signaling molecule that are probably about as important as nitric. Oxide just doesn't smell as good and if you don't remember nitric oxide from a previous episode. You need to get caught up nitric.

american chemical society of gum disease Intel
"american chemical society" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

"Of all pregnant women but might be up to three times as high depending on the diagnostic criteria. Used save these researchers the task force recommends clinicians screen for station diabetes between twenty four and twenty eight weeks using a two step approach of both a screening tool like an oral glucose challenge test and diagnostic. An oral glucose tolerance test. Just the tolerance test or a fasting plasma glucose test a new way of looking at glucose gone these researchers say they want to administer it as a preventive writing in the journal of the american chemical society. They say they have developed. Hydro gels that remain intact in the presence of glucose but slowly destabilize as levels drop releasing luca gone into the system safely raising blood sugar and this is really very early on. It hasn't been tested in people. The early challenges so far have been keeping the hydrogel stable and keeping the glue gun from leaking out of the water like structure. But they say they've got it and they are moving on to further studies a lot more to come. But i i want to tell you about one of our great sponsors helps make diabetes connections possible and that is real good foods where the mission is real good. They make nutritious foods grain free high in protein. Never edit sugar and from real ingredients. We are big fans of the pizza. Benny puts his in a frying pan. I prefer the air fryer. They keep adding to the menu line with breakfasts in waffles and breakfast sandwiches and also great meals made with cauliflower or stuffed chicken you can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I'll put a link in the facebook comments. And as always at diabetes dash connections dot com back to the news now and is this the new okra or is it something. That might actually work looking. At camel's milk to help lower blood glucose camel's milk supposedly has many of these sought after bio active properties of what they call superfoods. It is set to help with insulin. Resistance and glycemic control. There's a clinical trial going on right now in abu dhabi looking to see if that is folklore or the real deal one study they point to is in a camel breeding community in north india. Which found that. Those who regularly consumed camel. Milk had a zero percent rate of diabetes. Quick warning here camel milk. If you can get it is very expensive. You are warned to avoid it. in raw. For the association of diabetes care and education specialists annual conference starts this week. The theme is changing forward. It was designed to highlight patient. Care that moves away. From what organizers call an institutional task oriented approach they want to push for more individualized care that reflects the diversity of people with diabetes. It is a virtual conference. Of course we'll have an update next week. Committee sessions or reports that are of interest. That's it for in the news this week. If you like it please. Share it quick housekeeping. Note a thank you before. I let you go. I have something called the book to clinic program where i'm able to supply pediatric endocrinology offices and clinics with my book. The world's worst diabetes mom. I'm thrilled and flattered that educators and endo's think this is a value to families. And i wanted to say. Thank you to our book to clinic sponsor our newest one diabetes. Their mission is to raise diabetes awareness through modern cute humorous and fun. Tease ten percent of their profits. Go to jd are f. It's really reasonable to become a book to clinic sponsor. I am not trying to make a lot of money here. I just can't pay for all the books myself to get them to the clinics. That want them. We do have a list if you are interested. Please let me know. If you'd like to sponsor like i said it's really reasonable if your clinic. Who wants books. Reach out. And i will put you on the list. Please join me wherever you get your podcasts for our next episode on tuesday. You're going to hear from my son and get his thoughts on what it was like to spend one month overseas with a youth program. Not focused on one. He is sixteen. You bet i am happy. He is home but we both learned an awful lot. That is coming up on tuesday. Thanks so much for watching. I'll see you back here soon. Diabetes connections is a production of stacy's media right so deserve all rungs avenged..

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"american chemical society" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Aaron Mahnke's Cabinet of Curiosities

"The beehive. This episode was made possible by best fiends. This year everyone's excited to jump into summer. Life's getting back to normal immoral resuming our usual activities except this summer. Everyone's bringing their fiends along with them. I mean they're best fiends. Because everyone's obsessed with this five star puzzle game download best fiends for free from the app store or google play and bring superfund brain challenging puzzles with you from the beach to the backyard barbecue. Taking best fiends on vacation is like getting twice as much relaxation. And no matter how much you play you'll never run out of best fiends goodness. There's always a new cute character to collect or another level to beat over five thousand challenging levels in all let best fiends keep. Your brain challenged all summer long and beyond get the ultimate summer accessory. Download the five star rated puzzle game best fiends on the app store and google play for free today. Friends without the are best beans. Can i confess something to you. It's something i'm embarrassed about. Even though it happened almost thirty years ago you see. Despite being an above average student in high school i nearly failed in one subject chemistry. Maybe i shouldn't feel so badly about that. I know a ton of people who have told me the same thing chemistry even the basic stuff is tricky and it takes a special mind to master the rules and systems inside it. As far as i'm concerned those who go on to study it in college let alone. Grad school are the closest thing to wizards to walk the earth. But there's no denying the power of chemistry right if it wasn't for smart people trying out new ideas. We wouldn't have superglue or penicillin or the tiny glowing rectangle. You're using to listen to this story right now. Chemistry has changed the world so while it's a tough subject for most students. Let's be grateful for those who excel at it. Students like stephanie. Stephanie was born in nineteen twenty three to parents who had immigrated to pittsburgh from poland and she discovered an early love of the natural world. This was thanks in part to her father who worked as a naturalist and even though he passed away when she was just ten that interest never went away in nineteen forty six. She graduated with a degree in chemistry from carnegie mellon university and then took a pause. Medical school was on her list of goals but she needed to earn the money to pay for it. I so she took a job as a chemist at dupont putting her bright mind and her new degree to work once settled there. She was put onto dupont's pioneer research laboratory team their mission defined a lightweight fibre. That was stronger than steel. You see at that point. Most automobile tires were made of rubber and reinforced with steel wire. It was effective but it added a lot of weight and dupont understood that chemistry might hold the answer now. Stephanie had no plans to stick around. Medical school was where she wanted to be but she was the sort of person who found chemistry fun. If you can believe that and soon enough a summer became a year and then to in nineteen fifty-nine. Her work won her a publication award from the american chemical society. She had demonstrated how to produce nylon rope inside a beaker of chemicals. Not earthshaking on. Its own but stephanie did it at room temperature. And maybe you're thinking to yourself wait. I've seen science teachers do this in school. And you'd be right but it was stephanie. Who taught them all how to do it. Stephanie would end up. Filing twenty eight patents over her four decades at dupont while building a legendary career as a chemist problem-solver and innovator not bad for a job. She never intended to keep just a way stop on her journey towards a medical degree that could have helped her save lives but thankfully one of her inventions made up for all of that in nineteen sixty four. The us was about to face a gasoline shortage and one way to help cars use less. Gas was to reduce their weight which brought tire project back to her desk. If they could find a lighter material to replace that steel wire inside them tires would become more efficient. now. I'm not going to go into the chemistry of her solution. You can listen to the first twenty seconds of this story for my reasons. Why plus the terminology is so complex. That would put my tongue into nuts. But in layman's terms. That get us into the ballpark. What stephanie did was recognized some potential in something that others would have considered a mistake. Most nylon fibers were made by heating the polymers. And then running. The clear solution through a spinner at a sort of hypodermic needle for polymer solutions. The results were stiff fibers. That broke fairly easily. But stephanie created a solution. That wasn't clear. In fact she later described it as sort of like buttermilk and when run through the spinner at this new recipe for lack of a better term produced a fiber that was five times stronger than steel after a brief stint inside tires. This new polymer found. Its way into more flexible items rope fabric for sales and even bicycle tires but it was one particular item of clothing that changed history. Stephanie kwalik might not have made it to medical school earned her degree and gone into practice. Saving lives in hospitals everywhere in america but she invented something that has kept a lot of people out of the hospital ever since the lightweight incredibly strong flexible and adaptable material. That we use today in bulletproof vests kevlar. I hope you've enjoyed today's guided tour of the cabinet of curiosities. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts. Or learn more about the show by visiting curiosities. Podcast dot com. The show was created by me. Aaron monkey in partnership with how stuff works. I make another award. Winning show called lor which is a podcast book series and television show and you can learn all about it over at the world of lor dot com and until next time.

dupont stephanie app store Stephanie google Medical school Grad school carnegie mellon university american chemical society poland pittsburgh layman Stephanie kwalik america Aaron monkey cabinet apple
"american chemical society" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Gotcha okay i accept your Your so with your you have to websites now ryan Education consulting and what is the one. Let me bring the other one up. really quick it's Let's learn about science dot com Tell me the different. Why why the two websites in would the purposes of well. One of them is my day job. Which is i own ryan education consulting and i write curricular materials and assessments for companies. Who hire me And that's your toward them in it shows more of my academic and professional endeavors on that page and then the let's learn about. Science is for my book that i wrote and to promote that instagram. Tiktok all that presence That's gonna be turning into a blog as well to help. Parents teach their kids these concepts and show them the toys in stem activities. Worksheets that are out there to help them help. Their kids understand things a little better. Okay let's take the first one for you talked about a ryan consulting And curriculum development now is that forced schools public schools private schools or or Capitalist companies who are training Individual and staff. What what are we talking about. When you talk about curriculum development curriculum development in the sense of public schools and some private and for some publishers. So i recently worked on a textbook. For the american chemical society helped write the lap manual and also the test questions that came with it for the teachers to use So are we moving forward in curriculum in your opinion or A we still mired in pathways of of teaching in has it has Has developed and been applied development have been applied more than i'm aware i am seeing the developments being more applied to make things more about a phenomenon that needs to be explained instead of memorizing. What are the planets like that it would be wide. What concept helps explain why. This planet rotates around revolves around the sun orbits. Yeah so there were getting more into the uae. And i've actually found myself having to relearn some things..

instagram american chemical society uae
"american chemical society" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

Newsradio 600 KOGO

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Newsradio 600 KOGO

"Need to use AstraZeneca in our fight against Cove it over the next few months. White House press secretary Jen Psaki says the three vaccines approved for use in the U. S. R Enoughto handle demand. The AstraZeneca vaccine has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration but is widely used in other parts of the world. Us is also sending medical equipment including ventilators and raw vaccine materials to India is that country deals with a spike in covert cases. That's Jared Halpern, reporting a new form of treating the Corona virus may soon be coming to the United States. Visor is now testing a single pill treatment in clinical trials with healthy adults and it could be available sometime later this year. Advisor's chief science officer says the pill is a Proteus inhibitor that could be prescribed at the first sign of infection. It works by preventing the virus from reproducing itself inside the body. The U. S drug maker unveiled the pill earlier this month at the American Chemical Society. Spring meeting. I'm Mark Mayfield. A new study points to climate change as causing a shift in the Earth's rotational spin. Researchers in China say global warming is melting polar ice, and that's most likely behind the recent polar drift. The studies suggest rising temperatures from the burning of fossil fuels has redistributed enough water to move the north and south Poles eastward several feet since the mid nineties. Scientists say the slight change in the earth's axis is not enough to affect daily life. Thankfully, at least for now, the study Appears in the Journal of Geophysical Research Letters. Doesn't Earth wobble on its axis anyway? Yes. From what I understand, okay. Sixties and seventies icon is the latest art artist who urged Britney Spears father, Jamie to release her from her controversial conservatorship share is coming to the defense of Britney Spears as she heads into a court battle with her father over her conservatorship. Spears has had her financial affairs controlled by a court order Conservative ship since 2000 and eight after she suffered a serious of public meltdowns, including the famous ball Britney, however Spears in recent years I started to wrestle control back and it's garner public and celebrity support following the documentary framing Britney Spears chair recently told the Press association. I think her father should move over. And let her have her life. I believe she's been paying long enough. Spear said She won't resume performing while her father controls her estate. All right. The death of Rebecca Zahau is the subject of a new book. We've been talking about it a lot in the newsroom. We're going to talk to the author of this book at 8 40 Hear the stories Trending in San Diego. There is officially more vaccine that demand for them, with about one in five people not wanting to get vaccinated. A pioneering plan will be introduced to the county today that would give legal representation to undocumented immigrants facing deportation. Recall efforts against the governor officially have enough signatures to qualify for the ballot. Down traffic and your updated weather. It's gonna heat up. Ah lot yeah, later this week, but we'll have more color news time is 8 16 Diego's news and information station. CDC recommends Children get vaccinated against 16 Diseases of valet named Justice Bolden shot and killed at the Pendry Hotel a block later. Four shot injured news radio 600 Kogo. Hey, it's Ted here for loan pronto. And I got to tell you something, you know, let on and I We've been talking about home prices on the morning show now for a long time..

Rebecca Zahau Mark Mayfield Jared Halpern United States Britney Food and Drug Administration Jamie Spear Britney Spears Justice Bolden Earth Spears San Diego CDC American Chemical Society Ted China 2000 Jen Psaki White House
"american chemical society" Discussed on Sounds of Science

Sounds of Science

05:41 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Sounds of Science

"I'm joined today by dr ugo. Sharma from cas which is a division of the american chemical society. Cas specializes in organizing and analyzing publish scientific data that informs researchers through their search platforms such as science finder and has also being used for customers learning analytics applications. I'm also joined by charles river. Scientists dr david clark. Who's a enthusiast together. We will be discussing the role of machine learning and chemistry how we can train computers to support researchers and how he can keep machines happy with high quality data. Welcome ugo and david exe my. Thanks mary me too. So i wanna start by getting our listeners on the same page. Can we discuss the difference between machine learning and true a i in which is really more valuable for chemists realistically sure. Yeah so we're gonna start by defining ai to a is it's really a broad concept refers to machines with intelligence and for the purposes. Here we can define intelligence is the ability to solve a problem so machine learning is actually a component of i. It's has subset and machine. Learning actually enables a system to learn by itself for chemists specifically a is the ultimate goal so using computers to speed up discovery and innovation and machine. Learning is really. What gets the work done here. And especially within applications like drug discovery so essentially you know leveraging computers to and existing data help reduce the available candidates face potential targets and some used to accelerate and reduce costs for drug discovery. This is really where rubber meets the road. And so you know africanus. There's other applications around things like molecular property. Prediction were trying to predict things like solubility melting points. You know all of these things. Leverage machine learning using known molecules in their properties the sort of predict properties for for new molecules that were unsure of other applications around molecule design. So medicinal chemist a lot of time designing new molecules variety of applications and then another sort of hot area right now. For a and chemistry's retro synthesis says basically when you have a given molecule using ai to predict viable pathways to actually synthesize that molecules becoming a pretty key area so for a drug discovery standpoint. David which part of this process is one of the most valuable for chemists like in terms of being able to analyze giant piles of data and come up with something useful. At which point is that the most useful for you a. A human chemist various levels of usefulness. I mean for many years. Chemists have been taking data and deriving predictive models from it in perhaps long before people were thinking of this as i. But i think one of the really breakthrough applications of i that i've seen in recent years has been the so-called de novo design of compounds where and i has been trained on a very large database of known drug molecules and then asked to invent some new truck molecules or truck candidate molecules that resemble <hes>. What it's been trained in some way up. Put us still different enough to be innovative and useful. So they'll be props molecules that have same types of collectively and fiscal chemical properties up at an unless novel in terms of their chemical structure. So i think it's really those as we've been mentioning taking very large sets of data and bringing new discoveries are of them that you know you just couldn't do that with a a human person. Is that the. The task is too great it so easy for people to get stuck in their own knowledge space. If you like not be able to think outside that whereas the machine has no preconceptions if you like can come up with something that's truly novel. Yeah so the machine theoretically can know every chemical every drug that has been patented the formula for all of them and it can sift through that and find ones that haven't yet been tried but it can do more than that can at ugo it can also predict what kind of chemicals might actually hit a biological target. Yeah exactly so. I think that's sort of a especially with you. Know things that are going on in the world right now around. The pandemic is understanding mechanisms that can produce a specific kind of biological activity like like antivirals inhibiting well replication finding molecules that can sort of work along those pathways in all of this is based on leveraging existing data so using previous research <hes>. Training up models we can learn relationships between things like structure and activity and then applying those models to new data. Or you know. Maybe drug already been approved to repurpose them as therapeutic agents. Yeah so bringing it back to your company <hes>. Can you describe what see as does as kind of an elevator pitch sir. Sorta the short version here. So we're a division of the american chemical society being specialize in designing scientific information solutions that help organizations essentially be more efficient by leveraging the work and learnings of other scientists in our recent focus has gone beyond just our products like science finder which mary mentioned before <hes>. Providing customized services to drive things like enhanced scientific data management increased scientific workflow efficiency are probably most relevant to the discussion here enabling high-value high high-precision initiatives required customized data sets coupled with scientific expertise

Dr ugo dr david clark david exe american chemical society Sharma charles river cas ugo mary africanus
How to Keep Computers Happy Using Chemistry

Sounds of Science

05:41 min | 1 year ago

How to Keep Computers Happy Using Chemistry

"I'm joined today by dr ugo. Sharma from cas which is a division of the american chemical society. Cas specializes in organizing and analyzing publish scientific data that informs researchers through their search platforms such as science finder and has also being used for customers learning analytics applications. I'm also joined by charles river. Scientists dr david clark. Who's a enthusiast together. We will be discussing the role of machine learning and chemistry how we can train computers to support researchers and how he can keep machines happy with high quality data. Welcome ugo and david exe my. Thanks mary me too. So i wanna start by getting our listeners on the same page. Can we discuss the difference between machine learning and true a i in which is really more valuable for chemists realistically sure. Yeah so we're gonna start by defining ai to a is it's really a broad concept refers to machines with intelligence and for the purposes. Here we can define intelligence is the ability to solve a problem so machine learning is actually a component of i. It's has subset and machine. Learning actually enables a system to learn by itself for chemists specifically a is the ultimate goal so using computers to speed up discovery and innovation and machine. Learning is really. What gets the work done here. And especially within applications like drug discovery so essentially you know leveraging computers to and existing data help reduce the available candidates face potential targets and some used to accelerate and reduce costs for drug discovery. This is really where rubber meets the road. And so you know africanus. There's other applications around things like molecular property. Prediction were trying to predict things like solubility melting points. You know all of these things. Leverage machine learning using known molecules in their properties the sort of predict properties for for new molecules that were unsure of other applications around molecule design. So medicinal chemist a lot of time designing new molecules variety of applications and then another sort of hot area right now. For a and chemistry's retro synthesis says basically when you have a given molecule using ai to predict viable pathways to actually synthesize that molecules becoming a pretty key area so for a drug discovery standpoint. David which part of this process is one of the most valuable for chemists like in terms of being able to analyze giant piles of data and come up with something useful. At which point is that the most useful for you a. A human chemist various levels of usefulness. I mean for many years. Chemists have been taking data and deriving predictive models from it in perhaps long before people were thinking of this as i. But i think one of the really breakthrough applications of i that i've seen in recent years has been the so-called de novo design of compounds where and i has been trained on a very large database of known drug molecules and then asked to invent some new truck molecules or truck candidate molecules that resemble What it's been trained in some way up. Put us still different enough to be innovative and useful. So they'll be props molecules that have same types of collectively and fiscal chemical properties up at an unless novel in terms of their chemical structure. So i think it's really those as we've been mentioning taking very large sets of data and bringing new discoveries are of them that you know you just couldn't do that with a a human person. Is that the. The task is too great it so easy for people to get stuck in their own knowledge space. If you like not be able to think outside that whereas the machine has no preconceptions if you like can come up with something that's truly novel. Yeah so the machine theoretically can know every chemical every drug that has been patented the formula for all of them and it can sift through that and find ones that haven't yet been tried but it can do more than that can at ugo it can also predict what kind of chemicals might actually hit a biological target. Yeah exactly so. I think that's sort of a especially with you. Know things that are going on in the world right now around. The pandemic is understanding mechanisms that can produce a specific kind of biological activity like like antivirals inhibiting well replication finding molecules that can sort of work along those pathways in all of this is based on leveraging existing data so using previous research Training up models we can learn relationships between things like structure and activity and then applying those models to new data. Or you know. Maybe drug already been approved to repurpose them as therapeutic agents. Yeah so bringing it back to your company Can you describe what see as does as kind of an elevator pitch sir. Sorta the short version here. So we're a division of the american chemical society being specialize in designing scientific information solutions that help organizations essentially be more efficient by leveraging the work and learnings of other scientists in our recent focus has gone beyond just our products like science finder which mary mentioned before Providing customized services to drive things like enhanced scientific data management increased scientific workflow efficiency are probably most relevant to the discussion here enabling high-value high high-precision initiatives required customized data sets coupled with scientific expertise

Dr Ugo Dr David Clark David Exe American Chemical Society Charles River UGO Sharma CAS Africanus Mary De Novo David
"american chemical society" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Of coverage that they get that way in so to be able to get into bigger places where you have bigger contracts that that's just something that takes a lot of time in getting in the right places it. It was a lot harder than i was expecting. And so did you start right away by creating a linked in profile where you try to gear it towards that or was that did they come later on i think. I have it linked in profile before. All this i. I remember making a website. That was not very good. But it was something i use linked in and i did professional links and paid the extra to do that so that i could have all the credits to message people that i didn't know and i reached out to a friend who had left academia and asked like. Hey when you did this who did you start with in. So that's who i. That's how i knew there were places that would work with me with just starting this out and then from there other people heard about me. I started focusing american chemical society. Had this great leadership program of every conference they have these free courses you can sign up for and fifteen people in them so you have to sign up quickly. But they're free and they help you work through in three hours like your mission statement your vision statement and things like that and I went to one. And i came back rejuvinated and it was like oh i switch gears by was my first website. I'll do anything. I'll do research. I'll do the celtics. Made me jane of all trades which was interning lake where it was like. What am i an expert and And so. I focused very carefully on what i wanted to do. What i'm really good at at. What is kind of what the market needed right now. And a redid. My website and are focused that and Kind of geared more. That way and i was were focused and it was so much better because then that's what i was known. As was stephanie rights. Items she is really good at finding contexts. That are unique and things like that so i still. Every once in a while get people asking me to do some qualitative research and if it's a cool project that i'm like oh i have to know the answer to this or or if it's about ethics i love talking about ethics an oddity of mine probably because i was part of a study and so i'll say yes.

american chemical society stephanie rights celtics jane
"american chemical society" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

Papa Phd Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on Papa Phd Podcast

"Nine we sat down and we kinda talked about how i really like the product aspect of things of having something at the end to make better and to get out there so that i can see change instead of finding the theoretical components of something And i we talked about what that could look like for me. And because of all my networking connections. I had already done. You know how they're always Side consulting projects like for textbook companies to look at items and things like that. There's just they're all out there. So i was able to reach out to one. And i ended up going into assessment and writing a standardized assessments for states and becoming a content lead there and learning more about project management and managing stakeholders and things like that And i just. I really liked it. I like that. It's different every day. I like the state gives you a set of standards. And they say okay. Mix new contexts and i get to learn new things An again it's that person component. Like where it's i get to see the teachers as they read them. I get to hear how their students do. It has an impact on some students. Lives and i get to use my education to do it. So it's not there's no. Abc or d. Just to like trick kids. Abc or tells me whether or not you you think concentration is the opposite of what it is that you've got them inverted or things like that like to actually give some insight into what a student does in. So that furthered. My my love of this. This side of things and i ended up breaking off and going on my own in just writing items and developing curricular materials full-time I started my own company and it was through all those networking opportunities because every time someone leaves the company and you ever relationship with them you still know them. And then they say oh. Hey i know this person. Why don't we contact them in. So it just keeps building out building out and that's how i first started. I reached out to places that i knew like. Hey is there anything going on that. You might be able to throw my way. And i ended up really working on and the chemistry in context book for the american chemical society and that relationship grew this year i was one of the co editors of the lab manual mom in so. That's just something that because i've networked at these events and i knew people and then we just so every time i go to a conference i make time i set time aside to speak to people. And say hey. What's going on and reminding people that i'm still there and that's still something i'm interested in and then occasionally i have a booth at an expo and people can come to me or sometimes i have a friend man my booth for me and i walk around with my car like hey have you. Have you met me which is kind of the hard part of doing what i do. Because i don't like that component. But yeah it's i would say i don't even i wouldn't even say i liked to network i just i understand its value I'm an introvert and conferences..

Abc american chemical society
"american chemical society" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

05:07 min | 2 years ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"And Steve on my talk 1071 everything entertainment. Steve is out. My Shannon is in this's interest. Sitting there is a new beer like no other. Yes, And you're excited about it right? And I'm not normally a beer fan. You know, I'm not, You know either. No, I'm not a beer fan. I'm definitely you know, I'm a white wine lady s O when I saw this, but I was I was reading these articles on pop sugar dot com And this is the headline that caught me said No, you're not dreaming. Dole whip beer Israel and it's made with actual pineapples. And I was amazed how excited my taste buds got when I read that, and I was like I was like, Okay, I would go him get that and the can looks very appropriate that like the pictures that they did have to promote this product. I'm a fan of the pineapple even on pizza, which I know is a controversial states. I know that's a very controversial stance. And so I was really excited to hear about this. Especially since it's it's supposedly dole whip sour beer. And when I do try the new beer varieties. I like those sours that they came out recently. I don't like the super hops he wants, but I do like this ours. Assume I was all excited to go and get this and it turns out they released this. It was a special release by first magnitude brewing company and they had it mostly in Florida, and it's already sold out. I know it was. Yeah, I was super soft. He really kind of excited when I saw the headlines and I'm like, Oh, I will go find that can't Where can I pick it up in my local, You know, liquor store? Nope. I can't get it So they said Ln Italy they liked it so much. That they were going to get some more because it sold out like immediately. You know what? I bet these damn kids. I'm telling you what this is E bet it with on tic tac or something. You know where or on social media or, you know, a bar, stool sports or something like that, Because This happened with a I think it was a sangria on. I can't remember the name of it, but it was sold out everywhere. And I finally found it at a liquor store in like moose Lake or sturgeon lakes because it was gone in a flash. You mean Yes. Okay. Yeah, because the distributor's couldn't keep up with the demand because there was so much buzz surrounding it because It once it hits the Internet. Oh, gosh, you know, and some of those, you know, Instagram and Tic tac, and I don't remember what it was that something went viral, and then now it's gone. And that's how I feel about this thing. I'm like, darn it. I was like with part of the the name the Dole whip. Yeah, don't hours what it is, and I just feel like, especially this time of year. That sounds like just super awesome and refreshing. Like you were sitting outside and you're having a nice socially distance cocktail. Which your people out around guys he brought in earlier the bonfire out in your driveway. This sound that sounded like a really good You know, 60, a refreshing summer drink for me. So they come back out with it. If my that I don't know if I would even try that, that that I could see that at the state fair. Oh, agreed. That would've been a front thing. They're right. It's just that time of year. We go. I feel like that's the you know, when this is the time of year that I do want to try all of those lime driven Citrus driven, you know, cocktails, and especially that's when I'll give one of these beers. A shot is this time. Me too? I know State fair and for now agreed, anyway, all right, Well, let me know when you find that. Yes, try it. I'll make sure that I kept like 26 packs. Just weaker chick. Right? Right. Make it a case. Correct. Well does get no good. Want beer will sit in my fridge forever. Planning ahead, though. We got friends. We could go through the case. We could go through my driveway, right? I'm good with it. I'm I'm good with it. Okay? I have news on milk. Chocolate chemists have created a new milk chocolate, okay? So dark chocolate we know is supposedly better for you than milk chocolate. We have convinced ourselves that dark chocolate is a health food. Exactly. Well, it's funny. You say that because I got these little power up little individual bags of Of just a trail mix, correct Costco and they've got teeny tiny little pieces of dark chocolate in the mix, and I'm like, yes, yeah, you get me dark chocolates, one of those things that they're just enough studies that we say that is good for us than it is, but we go but you need like, like what you have in your trail mix like little pieces of it. We convince yourself it's so healthy weekend devour a whole bar. Okay, like it's a health food, which it's not. But still, I like I need all of those. Things for exactly okay, So apparently people like the taste of milk chocolate more. Okay, So this is good news for those people. Researchers at the American Chemical Society have figured out a way to make it healthier, and they give it even more antioxidants and dark chocolate without affecting its flavor or texture..

Dole Steve Ln Italy American Chemical Society Costco Florida Instagram Tic tac Israel moose Lake sturgeon lakes
"american chemical society" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"So-called entourage effect is some synergistic assembly of molecules in a transient state that again, the turbines might be doing. One thing to flag wage might be something else. That, you have a little bit CB Gina there you know CB Jesus got incredible properties doesn't get you hire anything or I mean for any bacterial and forever effects you saw the paper were they were talking about Kobe to I mean there's there's a lot of of research that needs to be done by people like me and people like yourself and all the generation of new snap annoyed scientists that are going to get inspired by listening to this podcast. Yeah Ya I hope. So I I really do and I think that's that's probably an excellent place to start to wrap up the conversation because I I. Always. Say it goes as long as it goes. You know. With me? I'll talk to you as long as you talk to me. How many things to talk about we can we can have another session if you want again burden. For down the road somewhat but it. Has Been Great Yeah absolutely in yeah. Definitely. WanNa follow up. I'm sure we could do a whole series. Together. And before we totally sign-on, I WANNA hand the platform over to you let people know. How to learn more about your work. Any of the companies you're societas with how they can learn about those anything. You WanNa share and any closing notes The podcast is yours until we sign off. Okay thanks is will gather appreciate the opportunity to come on in fact that he was kyle yet. and. Yes I want to just talk about the formation of the ACS thing. So. As the. DENVER ACS meeting in March of of twenty fifty. I met with my friend Mike Bishop and his supervisor Jim Dawson at hide off International. Hide Office equipment supplier into laboratory industry pharmaceuticals. Food. Processing kinds of biotechs of they make a very popular line of a rotor graves which. Solvent recovery, extraction operations, and. Had this notion again, this feeling that you know Again, twenty fourteen twenty fifteen states were coming out and legalizing through as a testing industry that was sort of being birth, which again, we've talked a little bit about testing, but you know having an analytical chemist in in that role in those facilities, we realized that we are here at the ACS meeting in Denver Convention, Center. We we looked at these these chemists than you know, ten years from now, a fair number of these people are going to be working in the canvas street. And and we had a conversation there that led us to. You know what we should try to form our own division and having the sponsorship of someone like hide off because. They're the people who sponsored optimism or L.. Were before they called the polio ward and they called it the. North American Award for excellence and commitment to canvas canvas in fact, check it out. Kyle actually signs it own. Nice. Well I have kyle signature hanging up in my office. Very cool. Yeah. These guys are all my friends. So I eat Mars but anyway so we got together with. This is actually before Ezra and before John Got Together with a few folks and we said you know. It's probably pretty unlikely that the American Chemical Society would devote an entire division to just one plant right I. Mean they do have a society rubber chemistry. But if you think about it, that's the tire manufacturers and there's a lot of rubber that's manufactured in the world. Probably about the same size of the cannabis market if you think about it, rubber finds its way everywhere tires sneakers..

Kyle ACS DENVER Kobe CB American Chemical Society Gina Mike Bishop cannabis Jim Dawson supervisor North American Award Ezra Center John
"american chemical society" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

04:33 min | 2 years ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

"Up the ranks as vice chair, and hoping that in twenty twenty one I can be a chair of the organization. We're actually applying for full division status in the fall with any law. That's that's been really exciting to watch. We have about seven hundred members now, but I guess what we're doing here back to your original question. What is the purpose of this well, so the American Chemical Society is one of the largest and oldest scientific organizations in the country, and really it's a worldwide thing. and of course candidates has become a very hot topic. In a lot of spaces, but in general in the US says we get further and further towards federal legalisation. There needs to be this legitimization that needs to happen because for a long time. This has been wook science. Yeah Yeah. It's been kind of just like mountain men that are just like you know I grow the bomb, and you know I. Get tested some lab with who knows what methods are they have they been validated properly. You know there's a lot of questions that come up for someone who's been in a regulated industry. Understand science well, and they're like well. You know they're asking questions, right? Right all right and a lot of those questions early on didn't have very good answers. I'll tell you that right now. So really what can is hoping to do is one drive professionalism within the industry right because it was black market for a very long time, and so that professional element I think in a lot of ways. It's gotten a lot better. I'll tell you right now. But we are still a very young industry, and there is a need for professionalism in the industry. So that's part one. Part two I really see it as building community, a scientific community that is focused on pushing the industry in the right direction and being good stewards of the industry, so that's either through promoting research. Or getting people in the right places that they need to go getting jobs. Because it's sometimes hard for a lot of these scientists to break into the industry, because you have to know someone right and for a long time it's been kind of taboo to get involved with the industry. If you're from a traditional science, background, you know some people in the traditional sciences would probably think of it as career suicide, but a lot of looking at it now in a different light, which is great. Because it is obviously now very legitimate industry..

vice chair American Chemical Society US
"american chemical society" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

News Talk KOKC 1520

06:08 min | 2 years ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on News Talk KOKC 1520

"Face masks are part of life these days, and it looks like they will be for the foreseeable future, at least until we have a vaccine for covert 19. But some people have more than just a fashion or convenience. Objection, toe wearing face masks, they say masks mother them and make them lightheaded like they're not getting enough air. A few people have even claimed they crash their cars due to mask induced oxygen deprivation. Experts say. If you're wearing a mask correctly, that should not happen. Frankly, don't think it's a great concern for most people, Most people who are wearing a mask wearing a mask made of common fabric cotton that people put together to make just something to go on stage. That's Dr Bill Carol, adjunct professor of chemistry at Indiana University and former president of the American Chemical Society. The mask, But most people are wearing Are not going to be filtering out particles from the outside to any great extent. What they're mainly doing is they're trapping moisture dropped with the person wearing the mask is exhaling. And because that's the case because you're not relying on the mask, or you shouldn't be relying on that mask to filter out all this stuff from the outside. It doesn't quite matter so much whether you have a fitting really tight to your face. Because there's a lot of stuff that you're going to draw in through the loose weave of the cut. So if you start from the idea, and if you wear a mask for any period of time, you know this because it gets a little moist start from the idea. That what you're doing is you're exhaling into the mask and keeping your breath from going along distance, and you're not so worried about the inhaling part because there's not much of that mass we're going to do anyway. Even after all this time wearing facemasks, many people still have the misconception that a mask is meant to protect the person wearing it from the virus. In reality, your face mask is meant to protect other people from you. Just in case you're infected, and Carol says it doesn't take that much to do the job. This is what I do is I have nice Texas Free India. I tie around over the top of my nose, and it's open on the bottom, and that does the same job of blocking my capability to breathe on somebody close to me because First of all, my breath goes into the clock, the second, it also exhausted downward underneath it. And that's really all you're after is to block that ex elation. Think about it this way. I mean, when you go out in the winter, and it's a day you can see your breath. That gives you an indication of how least partially how far your breath goes when you exhale. And what would happen to you when you were a little kid, and you put your scarf over your face? And you had brief. We breath didn't go so far. What's more scars kind of got dampen froze up. Did you ever have that experience? Well, that's kind of what you're after, However, wearing something other than a cloth mask could be entirely different. For example, the N 95 mask often worn by health care workers, It's designed to filter particles from the outside, and it's not meant for the general public in 95. His men to kill throughout 95% of particles of a certain size. And essentially what that means is the whole through which you're stuck in the air. Are small. So think about it. Think about if you were a scuba diver and had a regular sized snorkel, snorkel the size of a soda straw. So it would be difficult to draw as much air through one soda straws would through regular snorkel and you probably need more in order to have an adequate supply of here. It's possible that some people wearing tightly fitting in 95 now ask, might find it a bit challenging to breathe. About a month ago. You heard one of our guests talk about the difficulty of wearing an N 95. Dr Lucinda Halstead, medical director of the Evelyn Trammel Institute for Voice and Swallowing at the University of South Carolina. I wear them They're very hard to wear. Studies show that after about wearing them for an hour, he saturation issues re breathing your own oxygen. Goes down and you're so to inhalation and circulation in your body goes off. So by the end of the day, I usually have a headache. People who have a number of medical conditions may also find their breathing constricted by a mask. For example, people who have COPD once again depends on the man because if what we're trying to do is wear a cloth, Mac To reduce the distance that dropped that we inhale. Go, then it really shouldn't be constraining your breathing very much You're going to draw here in through the main school around the outside of the mask is really not that important. What's important is that you're breathing out mask in 95 or a respirator or even like self contained breathing apparatus like a firefighter. That can act differently for people who feel that they have actually do have some lung constrictions. Some people claim that exercising with a mask also makes them lightheaded. Social media users have done their own experiments with a pulse oximeter clip to a finger. They've claimed blood oxygen levels in the low nineties when they wear a mask while exercising. Carol says it's possible but oxygen levels have to be lower than 90. To be dangerous. I wouldn't be overly worried about Low nineties. Under those circumstances, recognizing your exercising hard you've given yourself constraint. In fact, there are people who have what I think they're called Exercise masks, which are specifically designed To make it more difficult for you to breathe in order to increase your aerobic capacity. Now that's a different kind of mask. In fact, my gym I've seen football players wear them. And you know God wasn't wearing them on a StairMaster. With the idea that yes, this does constrain my breathing. It gets me out of breath faster, and it forces me to adjust more. I mean, I think what they're after is the same sort of thing is like training at high altitude. Where perhaps you're trying to force your aerobic capacity but making it more difficult to breathe in that way, But no, those masked exists. That's Internet Look up. Questions exist. Restricting your breathing on purpose is one thing. But for most people wearing a cloth mask, too little oxygen and too much carbon dioxide shouldn't be issues. If you feel like it's hard to breathe or you're getting lightheaded. It's likely that your mask is too tight. To do its job. It's okay to have a free flow of air on the top and bottom. You can find out more about all our guests on our website Radio health journal dot org's Our studio producer is Jason Dickie. I'm Nancy Benson..

Dr Bill Carol American Chemical Society Indiana University adjunct professor COPD Texas president Nancy Benson Dr Lucinda Halstead Radio health journal headache football Jason Dickie Evelyn Trammel Institute producer medical director University of South Carolina
Will the Paper of the Future Be Made of Poop?

BrainStuff

02:38 min | 2 years ago

Will the Paper of the Future Be Made of Poop?

"It's become an evergreen piece of advice for aspiring writers. Put Your Butt in the chair and write a first draft no matter how crappy. Now thanks to a breakthrough in chemical technology that first draft can be literally crap or at least printed on it researchers announced at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in March of two thousand eighteen. That it's possible to turn manure from cows elephants goats and other grass munchers into yes paper as you may already know. Paper is made from cellulose. That usually comes from trees. Not every place has a lot of trees but as we all know everybody poops and some of those poopers leave patties around for stepping in or collecting if you of a mind to collect poop like these. Acs scientists are one of the researchers who presented this idea at the ACS meeting in question Alexander Bismarck. Phd was driving around Crete and watched goats eat grass and poop it out. He thought that maybe the goats were doing to the grass. What paper manufacturers due to trees turn it into cellulose that could be made into paper? Because of course that's what you think of while you're driving around an idyllic island. Chretien excursions some animals. It turns out do a pretty good job. Pooping out paper cellulose depending on. Which animal is doing? The Manure Manufacturing Bismarck said in a press statement up to forty percent of that manure is cellulose which is then easily accessible to make paper from trees. The TREES HAVE TO BE GROUND. Way Down by machine into a pulp before being made into proper paper. Goats do that work for free. Every day of their grass munching poop lieven lives. The only thing they require is more grass which makes more poop which makes more paper and they need some water to drink and maybe scratches on their little chins but either way. It's a more environmentally friendly process than traditional papermaking and it's not just goats. The researchers moved onto piles of Paddy's from horses cows and elephants to elephants in wildlife parks in Africa. Our number one at going number two at the San Francisco Zoo alone. An adult male African elephant can produce three hundred pounds. That's one hundred thirty six kilos of Pooh. That's a lot of potential paper. The first uses for this PU paper would probably be industrial according to the researchers it could filter wastewater before it's released into the environment which seems fitting but papyrus or Nanno paper as the researchers rather boringly call. It could also be used to write on. So don't give up fellow writers. Our first drafts could soon be really truly crappy.

American Chemical Society Manure Manufacturing Bismarck PHD Alexander Bismarck San Francisco Zoo Chretien Crete Nanno Paddy Africa
Leo Baekeland Announced Bakelite - February 8, 1909

This Day in History Class

03:25 min | 2 years ago

Leo Baekeland Announced Bakelite - February 8, 1909

"Or wherever. You get your podcasts. In this day in history class is production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm eve and you're listening to this day in history class. A podcast for people interested interested in the big and small moments in history. Today is February. Eighth Twenty twenty. The day was February. Eighth nineteen thousand nine Belgian chemist. Leo Bake Land announced his invention of Bake lite to the public. Bake lite was the first truly synthetic resin fake. Lynn was born in Belgium. Jim In eighteen sixty three. He got his bachelor of Science at the University of and a couple of years later he received his doctorate of science bakelman invented Velox photographic paper and by the late nineteenth century. He was wealthy. He sold his velox paper rights to Eastman Kodak for a million dollars. Yes and at that point. He moved into his snug rock estate in Yonkers New York there. He had a home laboratory. Where he worked with his assistant Nathaniel Thurlowe? Oh in the lab bacon began experimenting with combinations of all and formaldehyde years earlier. Scientists experimenting with the Substances Senses reported that the combination formed a hard material other chemist had been working with final and Formaldehyde to create a material that that could compete commercially with Lloyd but they were unsuccessful Bake Lynn and Thurlow began working on creating a synthetic shellac since natural. Natural selleck was in short supply was used to insulate electrical cables but since it was made from a resin secreted by a bug there wasn't enough of it to meet demand hand they did create a female formaldehyde. SHELLAC called Nova lack but it flopped. They switched gears to creating a synthetic resin that could be infused in would to strengthen it. Bacon started writing in a new laboratory notebook in June of nineteen seven documenting the tests using the mixture. Sure on wood. In his June nineteenth century he wrote the following in part all these tests were conducted in concentrated horizontal digest and and the apparatus was a reasonably tight yet. The surface of the blocks of wood does not feel hard although a small part of gum that has moved out is very hard at first. He called the substance Substance D but soon he began referring to it as bake lite with two days in a lecture he gave to the New York. Section of the American Chemical Society on February eighth. Nineteen O nine Bacon announced his invention in it. He said by the use of small amounts of basis I have succeeded in preparing a solid

Bake Lynn JIM Leo Bake Land Twenty Twenty Bacon Eastman Kodak New York American Chemical Society Belgium Yonkers New York Selleck Nathaniel Thurlowe University Of Lloyd Thurlow
"american chemical society" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"american chemical society" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Open over veterans day weekend news brought to you by cutting dental group the parents of a four year old boy who died in Palmdale been arrested for his murder investigators spent months looking into no quadras death lawyer Brian Claypool says the arrests yesterday he had a big impact on family members this is a great sense of relief for myself and his family who cared deeply for now eva Hernandez said she had taken care of for great grand son for a couple of years she stayed with me you know what. the parents originally claimed the boy had drowned antrum only back KFI news LA has dropped its lawsuit against the consulting firm price Waterhouse coopers the lawsuit was over the massive overbilling debacle at the department of water and power LA's city attorney says his office could not move forward with the case because key witnesses have invoked their Fifth Amendment right against self incrimination researchers say tests on monkeys show promise for heroin vaccine it works by producing antibodies against the drug and blocking the high caused by heroin the research in the journal of the American chemical society says the vaccine was most effective in the first month after vaccination but the effect could last for over eight months Facebook says it's gonna try to buy art it's going to try out a feature that some users may not like the company says is going to do a test in Australia to hide the number of thumbs ups and reactions people put on their posts the person doing the posting will still be able to see the count but no one else will Facebook says is trying to make the site less stressful to use. transferring elision park five that north bound side after stadium way crash has been cleared from of the left hand lane now is off to the right hand shoulder but it's still a really heavy right from Broadway heading to Norwalk a five north found is going to be a busy righties are coming away from crime any dead it stays tough all the way up to the six oh five and heading to krone fifty north down after hidden valley parkway there's a stalled car blocking the second lane from the left get ready to tap on those breaks from magnolia Avenue K. find this guide helps get you there faster.

Palmdale Brian Claypool eva Hernandez LA attorney Facebook Australia elision park Norwalk murder Waterhouse coopers heroin journal of the American chemic eight months four year
STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:31 min | 3 years ago

STEMinists: Mary Engle Pennington

"Should all feel grateful towards she advanced the science related to a key appliance. You use every single day and probably take for granted the refrigerator. We're talking about. Mary Engle Pennington Mary Engle Pennington was born in eighteen seventy two in Nashville Tennessee see soon after she was born Mary's family her mother father and younger sister moved to Philadelphia to be closer to her mother's wealthy quaker relatives. Mary's parents ordered their daughters interests and hobbies as a result. Mary learned to garden with her father. At a young age she also Oh love to read and spent hours on end at her local library. It was there that she had her first break. Through all reading the book on Medical Chemistry Mary Very was studying a chapter on nitrogen and oxygen when something clicked she later told The New Yorker. I realized Liberty Hoop that although I couldn't touch taste or smell them the really existed it was a milestone. Mary was twelve years old when she had that. Aha moment and from that point on she wanted to learn everything she could about chemistry. Unfortunately the rest of society wasn't so keen on Mary's budding in curiosity at that time studying scientists considered unladylike. Mary tried to convince the head of her boarding school to allow her awesome instruction in chemistry but the headmistress refused still Mary's fascination with medical book didn't go away she went to the university -versity of Pennsylvania which was located near her house and demanded a professor there. Give her some instruction. Despite the fact that she was still only twelve years old the professor told her he would consider teaching her if she learned to read and spell the words in the book and returned when she was older though she didn't didn't return to that specific professor she did return to the University of Pennsylvania in eighteen ninety s she was the only woman in her class and studied chemistry and biology in the university town scientific school to earn a certificate of proficiency she had to settle for that instead of a Bachelor's slurs degree which was denied due to her gender nevertheless she returned and earned a PhD in the same field in eighteen ninety five the University of Pennsylvania was one of the only schools to get doctorate degrees to women at that time after graduating with her PhD. Mary created her own lab. The Philadelphia Clinical Laboratory to analyze different bacteria. She took aim at the ice cream supply she she educated farmers about safety practices while handling raw milk in order to prevent outbreaks of sickness in Nineteen Zero Five Mary Bet Harvey Wiley a famous chemist and the two began working together on cold storage and refrigeration the next year thanks in part art to Harvey Wiley the Pure Food and drug act passed which tightened regulations on food labelling and safety the government created the bureau of chemistries mysteries food research lab to help fulfill the safety requirements outlined in the law and Harvey Wanted Mary to be in charge after all she got the top top score on the exam required to enter Federal Service. Harvey was so sure that Mary was the best choice but he tried to conceal the fact that she was a woman woman. I referring to her only as Emmy Pennington on the necessary paperwork his trickery was soon discovered but harvey continued the fight by arguing that Mary couldn't be denied simply on account of gender. Mary was hired to leave the lab her work in that lab established. The foundation of today's food knowledge that keeping bacteria count low and refrigerated foods like milk eggs and cheese is instrumental to food safety. She also also developed standards for processing chickens for food led an investigation of the refrigerated boxcar and served on Herbert hoovers war food administration station during World War One in nineteen nineteen. Mary left her work for the federal government to continue research in her own lab about the safety of frozen foods foods through her later research. She discovered that freezing food was a more viable storage method than canning or smoking during her career. Mary won the Garvan Olin Medal the highest award given to women in the American Chemical Society in Nineteen twenty-three she was is recognized by the American Society of heating refrigeration and air conditioning engineers as the greatest American expert on home refrigeration. She's also also in the National Women's hall of fame throughout her career. Mary encouraged young women to participate in the sciences including her own meese who also went on to pursue a stem degree. Mary passed away in a hospital in nineteen fifty two. She was eighty years old. Today we might take Mary and go Pennington Science for granted but she helped save millions of lives by educating society about food safety

Mary Engle Pennington Mary Eng Mary Bet Harvey Wiley Professor American Chemical Society Mary Philadelphia Emmy Pennington Pennington Science Nashville Tennessee University Of Pennsylvania The New Yorker Meese Philadelphia Clinical Laborato Pennsylvania University Town Scientific Sch Garvan Olin Medal
A smartphone app can detect tiny amounts of norovirus in water

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 3 years ago

A smartphone app can detect tiny amounts of norovirus in water

"Engineers in Arizona say they've come up with a way to detect tiny amounts of a virus that can lead to illness through contaminated drinking water NPR Joe Palca has more according to the centers for disease control and prevention norovirus causes some twenty million cases of acute gastrointestinal illness each year in the United States while the majority of those cases come from contaminated food the virus can also occasionally be found in drinking water the new test mixes tiny fluorescent polystyrene beads with the water sample the beads are coated with a substance that attach is to the norovirus and causes clubs to form in the sample if the virus is present a smartphone camera with a low cost microscope attached can see these clumps of their their details of how the device works are being presented at the American chemical society national meeting in San Diego Joe Palca

Arizona Joe Palca United States Norovirus NPR American Chemical Society San Diego
How Hazardous Is Peeing in the Pool?

BrainStuff

03:52 min | 3 years ago

How Hazardous Is Peeing in the Pool?

"This episode is brought to you by the Capital, One saver card, earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. Two percent at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet terms apply. Welcome to brainstorm a production of I heart radio. Hey, brain stuff. Lauren Bogle bomb here with summer fast approaching here in the United States. We need to talk about swimming pools, and the dirty secret of swimmers peeing in the pool. It's not just gross, according to the American Chemical Society, it's bad for our health research has shown that there are about thirty two eighty milliliters of urine per person in public pools. That's about one to three ounces or about a shot glass full per person to counteract the urine, and other stuff that winds up in the water like sweat Slava dirt, end, traces of fecal matter. We add chemical disinfectants to keep pools clear and clean and keep us from picking up bugs like salmonella and E clai and those disinfectants are doing their job. But unfortunately that's not all they're doing those disinfectants can react with urine, sweat hair, and body care products and other organic matter that winds up in pools and create what researchers call disinfection byproducts or db peas these byproducts can cause serious. Health concerns, especially for professional swimmers, and people who work around pools, chronic inhalation of db peas can cause respiratory problems, such as asthma, and are the main reason for the red burning eyes, you may experience in the pool. And the number one culprit is you guessed it urine, which causes half of the db peas found in pools in the air around them. Urine contains Iria a chemical that reacts with chlorine to form. Trichloride mean the compound that makes a pool smell, like a pool. You'll never enjoy that smell again, it's also the one to blame for I burn and respiratory issues a real problem for competitive swimmers who spent so much time in the water, but cutting down on db peas tough since you're getting in the pool is something almost everyone does. It's just easier than getting out to take a leak and people mistakenly think the chlorine will just take care of it even Olympic swimmer, Michael, Phelps, and Ryan locked e joke about their pool ping, Ernest Blatch Lee, and environmental engineer at Purdue University said in an article in chemical and engineering news. High profile. Swimmers have a real opportunity to take position of leadership. And responsibility, the best thing that swimmers could do to improve the swimming environment for themselves. And for everybody else who uses the pool is to practice. Commonsense hygiene, that means I taking a shower before getting into the pool to rinse off much of the dirt sweat, and lotion, our bodies carry around and second, but most important, don't pee in the pool. But what about the ocean fish p there? So why not humans right? Well, you're in luck. It's absolutely okay to swim and p with the fishes. Today's episode was written by Karen, Kirkpatrick, and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production of iheartradio's, how stuff works for more on this, and lots of other sort of gross, but important topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com and for more podcasts, my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi, I'm Chelsea handler. And I'm launching a brand new podcast with iheartradio called life will be the death of me. And I'm gonna talk to all these different people, my BFF Mary McCormack. That's what we should call. My book tour the apology, or great idea. Sorry. Everyone on this whole podcast should be called. It should be called with the orange because of the orange theme of the book Archie. Glad I went to therapy. Life will be the death of me with Chelsea handler. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Iheartradio Apple Chelsea Archie American Chemical Society Lauren Bogle Salmonella United States Mary Mccormack Iria Ernest Blatch Lee Asthma Trichloride Purdue University Engineer Michael Tyler Karen Ryan Kirkpatrick
Tennessee Whiskey Relies on Missing Ingredients

60-Second Science

02:24 min | 3 years ago

Tennessee Whiskey Relies on Missing Ingredients

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata all bourbon, whiskey doesn't have to be made in bourbon county Kentucky. But it does have to be produced from at least fifty one percent corn. And it has to be aged in unused charred oak barrels Tennessee, whiskey on the other hand must be made in Tennessee as the name implies. And in addition to the steps that create a bourbon, the distilled whiskey undergoes, another one called the Lincoln county process where you take your fresh whiskey this lie and you filter through sugar maple charcoal. It's also called charcoal mellowing trend. Curly is a graduate student in food science at the university of Tennessee institute of agriculture and just for the record personally, I prefer bourbon whiskey filtration through charcoal made from the wood of the sugar maple tree is known to mellow the flavor of Tennessee whiskeys like Jack Daniels, but the underlying chemistry was a bit. More of a mystery. So curly teamed up with the sugar Lynn's distilling company in Gatlinburg Tennessee to. Put their whiskey to the test. He used gas chromatography coupled with actual human sniffing to identify about three dozen aromatic compounds contributing to the whiskeys flavor profile, he then tracked the quantities of four of them to branch dock halls and two ethyl esters before. And after the Lincoln county process turns out the charcoal stripped out, a third of the branched alcohols in nearly half of the ethyl esters curly's advisor food chemist, John Peterman Afo. Hey, co message is that the branched alcohols and at the last Jewish that we analyzed in this study decreased, and that the distillate was smoother tasting and less harsh after the Lincoln county process. The researchers presented the work at an American Chemical Society meeting in Orlando and the goal. Curly says is to take some of the guesswork out of making great, whiskey, especially when the stakes are high. There was a head to Stiller at one of the big bourbon distilleries who said you really only get two chances to make a fifteen year old with. Munaf again, basically, we're just optimizing the tools to help the distillers get to the flavor profile that they want as for the flavor profile. He wants well. I'm not saying that Tennessee, whiskey is better just is. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Tennessee Lincoln County Bourbon County Kentucky Graduate Student Christopher Dodd Gatlinburg Tennessee University Of Tennessee Instit Lynn American Chemical Society Christopher Don John Peterman Afo Jack Daniels Stiller Advisor Orlando Sixty Seconds Fifty One Percent Fifteen Year
People eat this deadly poisonous fish all the time. Why?

Curiosity Daily

02:00 min | 3 years ago

People eat this deadly poisonous fish all the time. Why?

"Today in weird foods that are incredibly poisonous that people eat anyway. Okay. Now, hold on listener know, what you're thinking if thinking, okay. This is some weird obscure food thing is trendy and like one place, but this is a really popular big cultural thing in a huge portion of the planet. I feel like if you said, what's one poisonous thing? That's a delicacy. People would say this food, and that food is pufferfish they're considered the second most poisonous vertebrate on earth right behind the golden poison frog of Columbia, and this isn't just some weird eccentric food from one or two places in the world. There are chefs who specifically trained to cook this delicacy, especially in Japan, China and other parts of southeast Asia. That's because the flesh of pufferfish is considered a delicacy in certain parts of the world. They're deadly because of a neuro toxin called. Tetrotoxin? It's produced by tibia that live inside the fish kind of like, how bacteria in your gut produces all sorts of smelly substances. One pufferfish has enough of the stuff to kill thirty people. That's why people have to train for two years before they can call themselves fubu chefs and even then five people die every year from eating this stuff. It's not just the flavor that draws people in though, small doses of neuro toxins have been known to create a feeling of euphoria. So it's almost like you're eating something. Tasty and feeling like you've taken a drug all in one consider this story, a public service announcement, so you know, the risks. If you see Puffer fish on the menu at a high end restaurant, but consider this to in January twenty thousand nineteen researchers announced in the American Chemical society's journal of agriculture and food chemistry that they'd identified the major compounds that make pufferfish so tasty. So who knows maybe someday we could all experience that delicious fish without the deadly side effects. Yes, waiter. I'll. Uh-huh. To the pufferfish could you please hold the deadly neuro-toxins. They could kill me. Yes. Thank you. That's exactly how it order it using that voice surfeit. I mean, it's a fancy restaurant. That's how everyone's supposed to

Southeast Asia American Chemical Society Columbia Japan Journal Of Agriculture China Two Years
Asia Argento will lose her job at 'X Factor Italy' if sexual assault claims are true

WBZ Morning News

00:45 sec | 4 years ago

Asia Argento will lose her job at 'X Factor Italy' if sexual assault claims are true

"News Italy, reacts, now to allegations had Harvey Weinstein accuser Osceola are Gento paid off an undercover rather underage actor after sexually assaulting him in the wake of a New York, Times story that as a gentle paid a three hundred Nine, hundred thousand dollars settlement for a sexual assault claim the producers of the Italian X-factor say they will end their contract with, the Italian actress filmmaker if the claims proved true at. Genta was one of the first women to go on the record about her alleged raped by Weinstein. And became. A major spokesperson for the. Metoo movement the, times reported that a gentle paid a former child actor the settlement in, April after an alleged sexual. Encounter when he was seventeen some three years ago, Megan Williams ABC news

Brian Hafner United States Theodore Mccarrick Harvey Weinstein President Trump Rome Microsoft O'malley Washington October Mountain Genta New Haven Connecticut American Chemical Society Times Stan Rosenberg New York Jim Carroll Second Degree Murder Mclean Hospital Facility
Maple leaf 'Botox' could prevent wrinkles

Brett Winterble

00:45 sec | 4 years ago

Maple leaf 'Botox' could prevent wrinkles

"Counts including first degree murder in the deaths of his pregnant wife and two kids well county district. Attorney Michael Rourke says thirty old Christopher watts is being held accountable for the death of his unborn child. Is, well we filed one count of. Unlawful tampering excuse me unlawful termination of a pregnancy in. The first degree which is a classroom selling. As a result. Of Shannon being pregnant at the time of her death earlier today that the watts family visited, San Diego a couple of months. Ago in Hillcrest. Today a grand opening celebration for another new fire station in San Diego news as Amanda shot ski has more this is replacing this new, fire station replacing a station. That was here since nineteen fifty one this one has a lot of updates

San Diego Italy Mission Valley Point Lom Hillcrest CBS First Degree Murder Heather Myers Christopher Watts Matt Piper Adrian Peterson Rhode Island Attorney Michael Rourke Mayor Faulkner Washington Redskins Shannon Bill American Chemical Society SAN Amanda Mike
14 injured outside Backstreet Boys concert at casino

WBZ Afternoon News

01:33 min | 4 years ago

14 injured outside Backstreet Boys concert at casino

"Two, the backstreet boys were forced to call off a show in Oklahoma yesterday. After severe weather came through the area and injured fourteen fans the concert was being held at an outdoor stage at a casino and resort in Fakher Ville Oklahoma when a sudden storm packing. Winds up to, eighty miles an hour struck people at, the concert were told to seek shelter but some standing on line stayed. Outside and, were hit by entrance trust is knocked down by the storm many were treated on the scene and.

North Kansas City School Distr Oak Park High School Kansas City Fakher Ville Oklahoma Mike Roby Sam Litzinger American Chemical Society Oklahoma CBS Twenty Percent
'Little Red' 1967 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 found after 50 years, could be worth millions

WBZ Morning News

00:35 sec | 4 years ago

'Little Red' 1967 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 found after 50 years, could be worth millions

"Morning to you MTA gown WBZ news top stories now New Hampshire police are actively investigating after a teenager or. Shot, at as he entered a. Portsmouth home looking for a party well it was the wrong house apparently he had the. Wrong address and started. The homeowners who were. Asleep at a time. T was not injured any book by Aaron Hernandez's lawyer is out it's called. Unnecessary roughness inside a trial and a final days of Aaron Hernandez the book includes three. Suicide notes Hernandez road the night before he died and in taxes some school systems are helping illegal immigrant children

Aaron Hernandez CEO New Hampshire Bolton MTA Portsmouth Carroll Shelby American Chemical Society CBS Ford Mike Roby Ivan Drury Maine Sam Litzinger Analyst Jeff Gilbert Detroit Texas Mustang