17 Burst results for "American"

"american" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:12 min | 9 months ago

"american" Discussed on American Scandal

"America was having a difficult time in the 70s. The social unrest that began in the 60s morphed from flower power to street riots. There was the failure of Vietnam, the shameful and criminal actions of a president in an economy suffering from stagnation, unemployment, and inflation, the country was on edge, and some felt it personally. The new podcast American hostage explores this moment. Set an Indianapolis in 1977, American hostage is a suspenseful true story, starring John Hamm as Fred heckman, a beloved local radio reporter, who is forced into the middle of a life or death crisis when a hostage taker, Tony caritas, demands to be interviewed live on heckman's radio program. And as a result of the interview, caritas gradually becomes a media sensation and an unexpected national hero during a nail biting 63 hour police standoff. You're about to hear a preview of American hostage. While you're listening, follow American hostage wherever you get your podcasts, or you can binge the entire season right now on Amazon music or wandering plus. The 7 second delay for live television was introduced in 1975 by NBC so that Richard Pryor could host Saturday Night Live without the network getting fined for all of his obscenities. The delay would also be useful we discovered if a man were to be shot point blank. In the head, live on national television. And this is the dudes of the day Tuesdays. February 8th, 1970. Indianapolis, 9-1-1, what's your emergency? Yes, this the police? This is 9-1-1 dispatch. Yes, sir lieutenant colonists there. No, sir. Before you got there, who you got there, ranked high enough to take this call. I can help you, sir. If you can tell me what you stand up, do you think I won't do it, you stupid son of a bitch. All right. All right, I'm gonna tell you now, and you're gonna listen good and I don't repeat myself so you listen up now, you understand? Yes, I'm listening. All right. I've done a thing. A real serious statement, the kind of thing you are used to hearing about our bet. I've taken a prisoner, and I've got them here while shotgun battle strapped to the back of his head. And the saint no crank call. You understand me. Yes, sir. Yes, sir. I understand, but you say you've got something wired up a shotgun. I've got a real deal, 12 gauge shotgun wired up to the back of his hand and anything happens to me. It goes off. And if he moves it goes off and I gotta show there's a hundred ways to go off and only one way, don't. And that's keeping me alive and good. You understand. I understand. And they say no crank call. Yes, sir. This is not a crime. I don't ever have much for anyone to take. And these motherfuckers find some way to take it all, and I'm mad as hell. I swear to God, he's almost as good as dead. He's never been closer to dead than he is right now. Can you please talk to me and lower the guy? I'm talking to you, sir. And I lower the gun. He's got one. One's all I want. If you need to call, is who I got? The son of a bitch. Sir. Now I'm a mad mean motherfucker lady. I understand I'm the real deal. Yes, sir, I understand the real deal. I'm sorry, I gotta bother you all like this, but it ain't right, please tell me where you are. One 29 kingdom street. And you said? One 29 can't and street on the fourth floor and big calls office, and I'm going to tell you again the way he got this wired is you killed me, you kill him. My hand goes back on my fingers go limp and he's even shotgun shells at a back of his head. I swear to God. I understand so we're going to send over some of our fellas and see what we're going to get before. And we're sending police on their way. You've got the fucking right. Radio Indiana. W IBC. Indianapolis..

John Hamm Fred heckman Tony caritas Indianapolis sir lieutenant heckman caritas Richard Pryor Vietnam Saturday Night Live NBC America Amazon Sir Indiana
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:17 min | 10 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Heads by being the shirtless flag bearer in the opening ceremonies. Fun fact, he's the first winter Olympian from American Samoa in 28 years. You know what's amazing? Kai Owens. This teenage woman's mogul's competitor came back from having a very hard fall and injuring her eye and face in practice to finishing tenth overall in the competition. That was pretty gutsy. I stubbed my toe and I'm barely moving around. You know what's amazing, Asian Pacific Americans at the Olympics. As of the recording of this episode, the U.S. had 5 gold medals, Asian Pacific Americans, Khloe Kim and Nathan Chen, accounted for two of those medals, which means that 40% of the gold medals for the U.S. have been won by Asian Pacific Americans. You know, it's amazing. U.S. Olympic advertising. A lot of the posters feature 5 athletes and many of those show Chloe Kim and Nathan Chen some healthcare and Chen. It's just great to see so many API faces on U.S. Olympic promotional material. You know what's amazing? Chloe Kim. She became the first woman to defend her snowboarding gold medal, and she did it in decisive fashion off her first run of three in the finals. She also did it with humor and charm, talking about the churro sheet for breakfast and asking for a snack at her press conference. Fun fact, she hasn't lost the contest since 2019 when she competed with a broken ankle. Wow. You know what's amazing? The advertisers who are making commercials. Commercials featuring Madison chalk, Chloe Kim and Nathan Chen continue to highlight the impact that Asian Pacific Americans are making at the Olympics and will hopefully make it seem less foreign here at home. You know what's amazing? Beverly Jew. Also going by Julie. She's the young Chinese American who chose to compete for China as a figure skater. She's received plenty of vitriol on her less than fluent Chinese, and she still went out and competed. She also received plenty of hate for her poor performance and crying. The Olympics are a high level and stressful once every four years event. And many athletes are perfectionists and cry when they succeed as well as when they don't live up to their own expectations. The Chinese media is definitely treating her differently from the scores of American and Canadians playing for the Chinese hockey team who aren't fluent in Chinese and definitely didn't look great in their first game, losing zero to 8 to the U.S. team. You know, it's amazing. Eileen goo winning her first gold medal in the big air freestyle skiing competition. She did it by landing a double cork 1620 in her final run of the day. We looked it up. That's a move where you spend four and a half times while rotating twice off axis. I still kind of don't understand, even though I witnessed it, and I've read the description. It was amazing. Right. And I understand spinning. Right. It's the off axis part. Yeah. She ended up studying the French skier who was expected to win gold because she'd been leading going into the final round. You know, what's amazing, the treatment of Eileen goo by some people, including reporters. She isn't the only American born athlete to choose to compete for China or another the nation. But she's the only one to be repeatedly asked whether she supports China's terrible policies, treatment, and possible genocide of the Uyghur people. She's the only athlete that I've seen who's been asked repeatedly to weigh in on geopolitical issues..

Nathan Chen Chloe Kim U.S. Kai Owens Khloe Kim Olympics Madison chalk American Samoa Eileen goo Chen Julie China freestyle skiing hockey
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

02:37 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"The city claimed after the outcry when the landfill was open, that they were unaware. People lived in the area by the chef mentor landfill. The waste, which was mostly debris from destroyed homes, seems fairly benign, but in reality the debris soaked for days and toxic water. And a lot of wood used to build the destroyed houses, were treated with a compound that contained arsenic, which is now illegal. Fun fact, arsenic is actually a dietary element for rats goats, chickens, and hamsters, just to name a few animals. But it's definitely fatal in too high of quantities for humans. And other things. Yeah. Back to the history, two compound the problem of the presence of arsenic for over four decades, Vietnamese refugees created backyard kitchen gardens to feed themselves, and they used a canal via shared irrigation channels to water their crops. That canal was close enough to the landfill to potentially be contaminated as the debris decomposed. While the landfill was closed just a year after it opened, the trash within the landfill wasn't removed, and it still has a chance to poison the Vietnamese crops even to the stay. The other big disaster was the BP oil spill in 2010, which really affected the shrimping and fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. The state attempted to compensate the Fisher folk, but it was a short term answer to the ongoing problems for Vietnamese shrimpers and shrimpers in general. After the spill, Louisiana's vast shrimping economy was suddenly depleted and people were out of jobs for months. Assumptions were hired by BP to spray corrects it. A chemical dispersant on the oil patch for hours, but many were out of luck. By the way, Craigslist is dangerous and many who are hired by BP to disperse it face medical side effects among which were silver dollar sized boils that covered the neck and hands. There will be a time when people won't understand what a silver dollar is, I think. Oh yeah. So for those of you that don't know anyway, corrects it is also a funny name, I think. Yeah. As a chemical, I get it. But it sounds too much like Brexit now. It does. It does. Anyway, the lingering effect, even now, is that the once abundant shrimp are disappearing. And the brown shrimp in Louisiana are too small or diseased and unsellable in Mississippi and Alabama. Another consequence was that BP lawyers were actually withholding compensation from Vietnamese and Cambodian fishermen due to language, which was discovered by Ming Wen, who helped Southeast Asian American fishers with legal claims, legal language compensation and more..

BP Gulf of Mexico Louisiana Mississippi Ming Wen Alabama
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:04 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"These archeological digs helped establish the Chinese American history that had gone hidden for a long time before the dig. Now there's an exhibit at the Pacific grove museum of national history on the Chinese fishing village. There are also signposts installed by the cities of Pacific grove and Monterey on the coastal recreation trail to commemorate the Chinese fishing history. Let's move on to the shrimping industry, so we're going to focus on the shrimping practices in Louisiana today. And again, we go more in depth on the Filipino American settlers in Louisiana in season one episode 5, but let's go over a brief history, way back in 1763, Filipino sailors and indentured servants escaped Spanish galleons and made their way to Louisiana. The documentation of the all Filipino settlement at saint malo is dated to around 1883. In a few small villages and most notably the permanent settlement of saint malo, Filipino Fischer set up shrimping practices that became widely used, especially the Louisiana shrimp drying industry. These first Filipino Americans pioneered the dried shrimp industry. Now let's talk about the Vietnamese and Vietnamese American fishermen in southeast Louisiana. Following the fall of Saigon in 1975, Vietnamese refugees were coming to America and settling where they could. And one place that became fairly common was New Orleans. Refugees started to find work in the Louisiana commercial fishing industry, and many refugees had previous fishing experience in Vietnam, so it was an easier transition in some ways. As we covered in past episodes, Vietnamese refugees face racism and mistrust in a lot of areas they settled in. And Louisiana was no exception. Due to language barriers, many Vietnamese fishers didn't trust banks and insurance companies, or they just didn't have access to either. Along with that, societally, there was a lot of hate. And in the mid 1980s, it was common for Vietnamese fishermen to face harassment from white fishermen. These white fishermen generally felt that the Vietnamese refugees were stealing jobs from locals. As we covered in episode 41 on the seadrift conflict, Ku Klux Klan chapters even became involved across the Gulf of Mexico. Now, the shrimping industry itself was a bit cutthroat during the 1980s, each boat and crew were trying to make the highest yields and find the best area to catch shrimp in. They were also focused on processing their catch quickly and getting back out onto open water as fast as possible to continue catching shrimp. The Gulf of Mexico became pretty crowded and Vietnamese fishermen trying to make a living were seen as competition and a threat to American values. Even with all of the adversity, eventually things calmed down and Vietnamese American shrimpers and Fisher's found some stability. It was after Hurricane Katrina and Rita in 2005 and the BP deepwater horizon oil spill in 2010 that it became obvious politicians and policymakers were ignoring and sometimes openly rejecting the Vietnamese American community. In 2005, after Hurricane Katrina and then Rita, officials ended up creating racist and classist policies that negatively affected people of color's communities. The road home program made it difficult to secure housing and there were zoning laws that cut off basic infrastructure and clean water for thousands of POC in Louisiana. Many Vietnamese American fishers were displaced and weren't given help. And policymakers stated reasons like the Vietnamese community, being resilient and experienced with disaster. I know. You know what? They've come from a war torn area. And barely survived. Right, but coming over here. Look at, look at how well you're doing now. Yes. You're able to rebuild so fast that we don't need to help you. Pick yourself up by your bootstraps. Yeah. Another big thing was when mayor C ray nagin mandated the opening of the chef mentor landfill, which is just two miles from village de l'est Vietnamese where many Fisher's resided..

Louisiana saint malo Pacific grove museum of nation Filipino Fischer Pacific grove Monterey Gulf of Mexico Saigon New Orleans Hurricane Katrina Vietnam America Rita Fisher ray nagin
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:05 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"The fishermen began to bring the families over. Whole families would work fishing nuts together. Eventually, in 1900, 200 to 800 pounds of fresh fish were sent to fishmongers on clay street in San Francisco. Their dried products were also a huge portion of their income shipping to the Sierra Nevada mountains and more. Of course, eventually the Chinese fishers were faced with competition and Monterey bay started to become extremely crowded with European immigrants. There was a huge Italian fishing community that eventually took over what used to be Chinese fishing grounds. Chinese fishers tried to get around the conflict by fishing at night for squid, but anti Chinese sentiment was raging and new laws were enacted between 1875 and 1900 that disproportionately affected the Chinese operations. The 1882 Chinese exclusion act was really the start and increased discrimination, new taxes, and exclusionary legislation meant a huge decline in the Chinese American abalone trade. With the exclusion act, new immigrants couldn't come to America. So the older generation of Chinese fishermen eventually grew too old to continue working, along with that, local and state governments started to pass more laws and taxes to force the Chinese fishing communities to cease to exist. A lot of the laws were passed under the guise of conservation. But these laws didn't seem to apply to European immigrants. In fact, heavy fishing continued under Euro American fishers and the industry continued to grow. The abalone was over exploited and by 1990 California abalone basically disappeared due to disease and overfishing. In fact, now only red abalone is found in Northern California, and it's highly regulated and is currently closed. In fact, the red abalone fishing season is estimated to stay closed until 2026 and possibly longer. Chinese fishers were forced to as monterrey newspapers describe it, sell their boats starting in the 1890s and by the early 1900s only a few existed. During the late 1800s, a group called the Pacific improvement company, which was actually a subsidiary of the southern Pacific railroad, bought the land that the Chinese lived on. It was pretty well known that the owners and the locals wanted the Chinese gone. Then, on the night of May 16th, 1906, a mysterious fire ended up destroying the majority of the Chinese village. In fact, it took every structure besides the Joss house, and though it is unconfirmed, the fire is believed to have started from suspicious origins..

Sierra Nevada mountains Monterey bay San Francisco red abalone Pacific improvement company America Northern California California Joss house
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

03:16 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"<Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Yeah, <Speech_Female> exactly. And not a caricature. <Speech_Male> Yeah, yeah. <Speech_Male> So <Silence> <Speech_Male> yeah. <Speech_Male> Big question. <Speech_Male> How do we know that <Speech_Male> the creative <SpeakerChange> team was white <Silence> on this one? <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Besides a few <Speech_Female> smaller <Speech_Female> things, one of the biggest <Speech_Female> things to me <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> the amount <Speech_Female> of rice <Speech_Male> paddy hats <Speech_Female> that I saw. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> In Vietnam. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Now, <Speech_Female> you know, maybe <Speech_Female> in the <Speech_Female> shots <Speech_Female> of past <Speech_Female> Vietnam, <Speech_Female> I could <Speech_Female> excuse that. <Speech_Female> A little. <Speech_Female> Yeah. Except <Speech_Female> for the fact that <Speech_Female> these were <SpeakerChange> shots of <Speech_Male> nighttime. <Speech_Male> Yeah. <Speech_Male> And now rice <Speech_Male> patty has just <Speech_Male> you understand. <Speech_Male> They're <Speech_Male> conical straw hats <Speech_Male> that are typically <Speech_Male> used in the <Speech_Female> fields. Yes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It's a <Speech_Male> lot to walk <Speech_Male> out of the sun. <Speech_Male> I'm sure it's also <Speech_Male> good for rain, <Speech_Male> maybe to a certain <Speech_Male> extent, right? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> But it's not <Speech_Male> like you'd necessarily <Speech_Male> wear <SpeakerChange> them <Speech_Male> a lot at night. <Speech_Male> We actually looked up <Speech_Male> photos of Saigon, <Speech_Male> and we're <Speech_Male> like, <SpeakerChange> hey, I don't <Speech_Female> see that many rosemary <Speech_Female> has. Right. <Speech_Female> And so <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> return to Vietnam <Speech_Female> later on in the movie, <Speech_Female> it's supposed to be <Speech_Female> modern Vietnam. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> And in <Speech_Female> modern Vietnam. <Speech_Female> I mean, <Speech_Female> there were <Speech_Female> definitely less <Speech_Female> rice paddy hats in <Silence> the modern <SpeakerChange> shots of Vietnam. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> <Silence> the thing that irked <Speech_Female> me the most was <Speech_Female> probably the <Speech_Female> nighttime shots. <Speech_Female> Yeah. Where there <Speech_Female> were some people with rice paddy <Silence> hats, and it was <SpeakerChange> kind of like. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> I would say that this <Speech_Male> isn't necessarily <Speech_Male> that the creative team <Speech_Male> was not Asian, <Speech_Male> but more of <Speech_Male> it's an <Speech_Male> American made. <Speech_Male> Yes. <Speech_Male> But forcing <Speech_Male> a romance, not just <Speech_Male> in this, but actually <Speech_Male> in snake eyes <Speech_Male> as well. When you <Silence> think about it, forcing <Speech_Male> romances, <Speech_Male> a very <Speech_Male> genuinely <Speech_Male> American thing I <Speech_Male> feel <Speech_Male> when it <Speech_Male> sometimes doesn't <Speech_Male> feel <Speech_Female> logical. <SpeakerChange> Right. <Speech_Female> So. <Speech_Female> Right. <Speech_Female> There doesn't always need <Speech_Female> to be a love aspect <Speech_Female> to a story. <Speech_Female> And especially <Speech_Female> for me, <Speech_Female> in an action <Speech_Female> film, I'm not <Speech_Female> watching it for <Speech_Female> the love. <Speech_Female> In fact, <Speech_Female> I don't really want <Speech_Female> my character to fall <Speech_Female> in love, especially <Speech_Female> not with or <Speech_Female> even have <Silence> sort of <SpeakerChange> a <Speech_Female> romance <Speech_Female> kind of <Speech_Male> side story <Speech_Female> that's <Speech_Female> not necessarily <Silence> <SpeakerChange> necessary. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Female> Anyway, anyways, <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> overall <Speech_Female> well, we enjoyed <Speech_Female> it overall. I <Speech_Female> don't know if I <Speech_Female> would say it's a must <Speech_Female> see, but <Speech_Female> if you're looking for <Speech_Female> an action film, <Speech_Female> because sometimes <Speech_Female> it's fun to just have <Speech_Female> dumb action <Speech_Female> film. <Speech_Female> Both were fun. <Speech_Female> Yeah. <SpeakerChange> And <Speech_Male> just a fun <Speech_Male> little romp. I'd say <Speech_Female> protege is a smarter <Speech_Female> action film. Yes. <Speech_Female> I would say <Speech_Female> protege. <Speech_Female> I think protege <Speech_Female> got more laughs <Speech_Female> out of me. Yeah. <Speech_Female> Yeah, <SpeakerChange> with <Speech_Male> humor. <Speech_Male> Yeah, most of all, <Speech_Male> though, fun to see <Speech_Male> more Asian Pacific. <Speech_Male> Yes. A <Speech_Female> strong leads in mainstream <Speech_Female> movies. And <Speech_Female> not always <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> Kung fu masters. <Speech_Male> Not always <Speech_Male> Kung fu masters. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> not sinister <Speech_Male> evil. No. <Speech_Male> Asians. <Speech_Male> So <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> it's not a bad thing to have <Speech_Female> more movies like this. <Speech_Female> And it opens <Speech_Female> the door <Speech_Female> for some <Speech_Female> more Asian <Silence> lead creative <Speech_Female> films <Speech_Female> of the variety <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and so we can just get <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> representation. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> Absolutely. <Speech_Female> And more diversity. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male>

Vietnam
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:18 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"He steadily rising and has been featured on NME's 2020 essential new artist list, along with being included on the 2020 ones to watch list. We also mentioned her before, but ravina is another musician making a splash in R&B. Her pop R&B soul and jazz sound has garnered a strong following online. She was actually featured in ModCloth say it louder campaign, which aimed to celebrate individuality and strong women in music. In March 2019, she co headlined the Java jazz festival in Jakarta Indonesia with her and toto. She hopes to make space for South Asian Americans since south Asians aren't often seen in mainstream American music. Not only does she write her songs, she's also her own creative director and ravina is actually directed several of her own music videos where she focused on her Indian heritage and the quote rich interiority of women of color like herself. She states that mixing her Indian roots with new narratives is her life's work. After the release of her 2018 single temptation, she said on Instagram, quote, growing up, South Asian culture and queer culture felt like oil and water, something that just simply couldn't mix. I'm pretty sure I liked girls before I liked boys, but it took me until this year in my 20s to be able to verbalize and know in my heart that this is one of my truths. I hope that for a little Brown girls in the future, their queerness will feel nothing short of completely 100% mundane and normal. It's great to see some progress for people of Asian descent in the R&B scene. Of course, 88 rising an American multinational music company that represents mainly Asian artists is gaining traction. Most recently, they put together the soundtrack for Shang-Chi and the legend of ten rings. They're not innocent and have definitely misstepped, but their mission is to elevate AAPI voices. So we hope they continue to open the door to many more AAPI artists. And before we move on, we want to shout out the joy ruckus club for their work. Their festival covers all genres of music, and they try to give voice to so many of the AAPI community from small artists to big KPop stages. If you go back to episode 46 of season one, you can listen to our special episode where we got to participate in the joy ruckus club festival. There's obviously some room for growth..

ravina NME Jakarta Indonesia AAPI
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:33 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"Basically it's an award the recording industry association for America gives to artists based on the number of albums or singles sold. And 5 of Bruno Mars singles have sold 10 million or more units. Wow. Wow. That's a lot. This is crazy. And now on to the more recent Asian artists that made history in the American music industry, Joji. George kusunoki Miller was born in Osaka Japan and is of Japanese Australian descent. He may not be technically Asian American, but he moved to the U.S. at 18 and markets his music in America. He started off as a comedy YouTuber and created content under the name filthy Frank. And he also released comedy music under the name pink guy. He eventually stopped posting under both personas in 2017 to focus on more serious music. Under the name, Joji. His first album in tongues did well, but it was his second album ballads one released in 2018 that reached number one on billboard's R&B's, hip hop albums chart. He's the first Asian born artist to ever reach the number one spot on the billboard R&B hip hop albums chart. Wow. That's great. Yeah. I want to know why he called himself filthy Frank. Is it because he didn't bathe? Oh my God. Family friendly podcast. Yep. So let's talk about her. We've mentioned her a few times in past episodes, especially with all of her recent accomplishments and Grammy wins. But we haven't gone into a ton of detail. Born Gabrielle sarmiento Wilson, her stands for having everything revealed. She was born in Vallejo, California to a filipina mother and an African American father. She was raised in the San Francisco Bay Area and started performing as Gabby Wilson at ten years old. She was on The Today Show and she performed at the Apollo theater on September 23rd, 2007, covering Aretha Franklin's freeway of love. She also performed on moray in 2007, Good Morning America and the view in 2008, the 2010 BET awards attribute to Alicia Keys at the ASC AP awards and competed on radio Disney's the next big thing at the age of.

Joji recording industry association George kusunoki Miller America Bruno Mars Osaka Frank Born Gabrielle sarmiento Wilso Japan Gabby Wilson Grammy Vallejo San Francisco Bay Area Apollo theater California Aretha Franklin Alicia Keys BET ASC Disney
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"R&B was created by black Americans in the 1940s and its derived from gospel jazz folk and traditional blues music. The term was actually first used to describe quite a few different popular African American genres of music. Old R&B utilized electric guitars, double bass piano and drum sets, and the earliest stars like James Brown, Fats Domino and Little Richard were categorized as R&B and rock and roll artists. In the 1950s and 60s because of racism and segregation, white artists played blues based pop music were rock and roll artists, whereas black artists were categorized as R&B artists. Then, R&B diverged from white rock and R&B music started sound more similar to soul music. From there, R&B continued to change and in the 1970s, syncopated rhythms became more common. The 70s also brought the development of funk and disco music, which was formed from the addition of other instrumentation and rhythms to R&B. In more recent decades, R&B is now more often smooth R&B you'll hear a lot of keyboard driven songs, unlike old R&B, which was way more guitar heavy. The utilization of electronic keyboards synthesizers, software loops, and drum machines is common in R&B music today. It's also pretty common for R&B music to incorporate hip hop and rap artists into songs. Contemporary R&B is definitely different from old R&B. Now you may be wondering why we're talking about R&B on an Asian American history podcast and the reason for that is there are actually a lot of Asian American artists within the contemporary R&B genre. From keshi to ravina to Jeanne I go to her, there are a ton of up and coming Asian American R&B artists. Of course, who can say if these artists will reach the heights of other American artists, but it's cool to see so many varied Asian faces within a genre of music. Before getting into modern artists, let's talk about one band that was pretty commercially successful. Hiroshima. They were a Grammy nominated fusion band that incorporated traditional Japanese instruments with jazz, R&B, pop, and Latin music. They didn't create specifically R&B music, but they were focused on creating a band that would more proudly represent Asian Americans. They once stated they wanted to show Asian Americans were, quote, real people with really, real lives. Hiroshima formed back in 1974 and they've sold over 4 million albums around the world. The band's leader Dan kirim oto grew up in East Los Angeles and attended California state university Long Beach and led its Asian American studies department. He formed the band after meeting June kimoto, who played the koto, which is a traditional Japanese stringed instrument. They are still together and the members are currently Dan kurimoto, June current moto, Danny Yamamoto, chemo cornwell and Dan Cortez..

Fats Domino Little Richard James Brown keshi ravina Hiroshima Jeanne Grammy nominated Dan kirim California state university Lo Asian American studies departm East Los Angeles kimoto Dan kurimoto Danny Yamamoto chemo cornwell Dan Cortez
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:56 min | 11 months ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"There are plenty of times that, you know, an anchor, whether white or not, talks about other food. Yes. So, anyway, it's interesting. Yes. The cool thing is the hashtag very Asian. Yes. Trend has begun. Yeah. Michelle Lee is capitalizing off of that. And I believe donate, I have to double check, but I think she's donating some of the proceeds from various groups. We'll find the link and send it because it's cool to have a shirt that hashtag variation. Yeah. And also to make something good out of something that was kind of insane. Yeah. Making lemonade. Yeah. Yeah. So let's switch to some good news. Because we deserve that, don't we? Yeah. Yeah. American girls and we're talking about the very popular dolls. Not a guilty pleasure. I had two daughters, so I know exactly what they are. In the past, this line of dolls has not always been praised for their diversity. Nope. For the first time ever, their girl of the year doll is Chinese American. Careen tan, a Chinese American skier. In the press release, they stated, quote, we created karine to be or corinne. I don't know. Corinne trencher. It sounds cool saying it that way. Yeah. Okay, we created Korean to be a positive role model. Our fans can look up to and learn from as we all work toward a world where everyone is treated fairly and with respect. There have been a few other Asian American dolls created in the past and maybe we'll do segment on those ones, including Jess, the biracial Japanese American girl of the year doll in 2006, which, wow, 15 years between. Dolls of Asian descent. That's big. Yeah. But corinne marks the first Chinese American girl of the year doll, which is pretty cool. They're also working with author Wendy WAN Shang to create two books on the character. It's all about feeling seen and normalizing Asian Pacific Americans in this country..

Michelle Lee Careen tan Corinne trencher corinne karine Jess Wendy WAN Shang
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"History. After retiring from competitive figure skating, she has done a lot of things from writing her memoir to being chosen as a public diplomacy ambassador for both George W. Bush's presidency as well as Barack Obama's presidency. In that role, Kwan has been on diplomatic trips representing the U.S.. Her 1998 autobiography heart of a champion was published by scholastic and has had multiple printings. Additionally, she has written other inspirational books and been a supporter of a variety of causes like the special Olympics. It's amazing how many awards and recognitions she's received over the years. It would take another segment to listen them all, but here are a few noteworthy highlights. In 2001, she received the James E Sullivan award given to America's best amateur athlete. At the time, the last figure skater to be honored was Dick Button in 1949. In 2003, the U.S. Olympic Committee selected her as sportswoman of the year. They also selected her as the athlete of the month a record 14 times. And by record, we mean for anyone, figure skater or not, male or female. The U.S. figure skating association through their skating magazine chose her as figure skater of the year a record 7 times. And after the 7th time, they renamed the award to the Michelle Kwan trophy. She's been honored by the Los Angeles Chinese American museum as well as the Los Angeles Chinese historical society of Southern California, when they were celebrating Chinese Americans in sports. There is a whole slew of other rewards she's received as well that center around the impact she made in popular culture. They're truly may never be another figure skater as dominant and as beloved. This Olympics there will be several Asian Pacific Americans to cheer for with most of them in figure skating. Although there's a history of this representation, it's still something to celebrate and be proud of. As always, we like to follow up our main story with short recurring segments. This is a segment called highlighting organizations. And today's organization is gold house futures..

James E Sullivan Dick Button U.S. Olympic Committee Kwan U.S. figure skating associatio George W. Bush America Olympics Los Angeles Chinese American m Barack Obama Los Angeles Chinese historical Michelle Kwan
"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

Asian American History 101

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on Asian American History 101

"You're listening to Asian American history one O one, a podcast about Asian American history from generally known historical happenings to the deeper cuts that we don't hear about in school, where your host Jen and Ted, the daughter and father team. Welcome to episode 63. How's it going? Good. Although this will come out later, I just finished a pottery class, which was very fun. And I have enough pieces to give to everyone. Yeah, nice. To me, that is one of the best things about giving gifts. If you can make it yourself in some way, shape or form. Yeah, and you know some of my pieces might be a little bit ugly, but who cares? You're gonna get it anyways. Well, you know, what they lack in aesthetic beauty. Right, right. They have in terms of love. Yes. As the key ingredient percent I had no hate while I was throwing. Not at all. I wasn't frustrated at all. Also quick pieces. I'm a little cold this morning. Yeah, it's cold. You know? People are gonna laugh at us 'cause we are in Southern California. But even Southern California can get cold, and I know we are in a beach city, but it is 39° here. This is the first morning that it is broken below 40. I mean, it is also because we are in a beach city. I mean, we're right by we get the beach breeze and whatnot. Yeah. And I know that our climate is very mild here, but it's cold. And our House is insulated fairly okay, except not because it gets really cold. It's really cold. And it keeps all the cold in. So even when the outside warms up our House stays for freezing. Yeah, that's actually the insulation. Right. Because basically we keep that cold, hold on to it, whether it's summer or winter. And so I have a nice little space heater in my room. And so when I wake up in the morning, my room stays nice and warm and then I leave and it's so cold. Yeah, I think we have space heaters in every room. Yep. But we also use the whole house heater every now and then. It's just, you know, the house is kind of big. And so to do that, with only one or two people in the house, it just doesn't seem right. But I don't know if someone probably has a paper on this on which is better in terms of energy savings. Is it better to just use the whole house heater? Right. Or is it better to use a space here? And at what point is it better? Because maybe you're moving from room to room, in which case it makes no sense to have a space heater. Yeah, like it makes sense to have a space heater when I'm sleeping. I turn it on and keep my room up and then I turn it off and then go to sleep and then when I wake up in the morning, I turn it back on. Yeah. Well, if anyone has some heating, then please let us know. Or maybe someone out there is an HVAC specialist and knows the science behind whether it's better to have the whole house heater on or a space heater. Yeah. Anyways, did you see the news on how The White House announced a new initiative to disaggregate the data under the Asian umbrella term? I mean, it's cool because this initiative on Asian Americans native a Hawaiians and Pacific islanders will really do what we've been saying all along. Treat Asian Pacific Americans as something more than a monolith..

Southern California Jen Ted beach city White House
"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Welcome into another edition of american today. Produced by the american league network. I'm your host jesse allen. Well first up on today's program we're looking at some of the disappointing results. So far from early harvest across parts of the eastern corn belt this last wednesday on market. Talk i talked with mike zillow global commodity analytics and we discussed on the corn side. Some of the late season disease pressure and some of the disappointing yields were seeing in that eastern corn belt lot of reports from agronomists at farmers throughout parts of illinois indiana that they're having some quality issues there with some of this late season weather that has happened and we're starting to see an impact our yields. Here's the thoughts that Mugs zillow had about that and how that relates to our markets disappointing yields out of that eastern corn belt were hearing more late season disease in the east corn belt. And you know we pull up I know you have a corneal map. Here will pull this up. Just for our discussion. Mike on the video but Very interesting you know. We talked a lot about the eastern belt all year. Long how this is going to be the garden spot. This is going to make up for the western belt. And now we're starting to maybe pull that a little bit into question. What are your thoughts just with what you're hearing about. Some of those early yields mike. Yeah excellent points that you bring up. And i'll add to that that many producers in i think we in the trade thought the early corn would be the best because it would have gotten a round and not had to deal with the very hot august and very dry august and some of these key states. The map you're looking at right now is the september corn yield estimates by usda. And then. i highlighted the idea that five of these major corn producing states east of the mississippi river. Were all going to have record yields. I don't know a time when i've seen all five of these. Have the exact same situation where they've been able to have record yields posted in so that got me thinking even before i started hearing about the corn yields in illinois i started looking at topsoil subsoil moisture level. So what i did on this map. Was i highlighted those five states and then up and read. I put the yield for the state. Based upon some of the analysis i did notice that illinois indiana ohio all have moisture level conditions very similar to twenty nineteen. And that's the kind of analysis that i really liked. Jesse is when it all comes together. And you've got three states that are contiguous with one another all having a similar weather pattern in twenty nineteen all having similar yields or excuse me all having similar moisture levels as a result so it really calls into question of illinois's having a tough yield situation now is indiana going to have a tough yield situation and his ohio gonna to have a tough yield situation. Because as you say it's disease it's anthrax knows it's tar spotting of there are some lighter test weights as well One client in central illinois. Said he's running fifty to fifty four pound test weights and so this could be also disease related. Even though fund aside was widely used in these areas it seems to still be an issue of the plant health not being able to stay solid throughout the growing season. So this leads me to the next Analysis and this is where i did look at the topsoil and subsoil levels in these key states and i threw in iowa. I threw an iowa's well. As a result of the fact that i was obviously the key state to be looking at every year. But if you look at illinois. Indiana and ohio. Remember that they're similar the yield numbers and twenty nineteen. This is why. I say that is because topsoil subsoil moisture levels it all three of these states are almost identical within one or two points of where they were back in twenty nineteen. I just was blown away when i ran this. And all these numbers are as of mid september and again that's comments with meigs alot of global kabbani analytics from this past wednesday's episode of the market. Talk podcast which you can find online. Market talk ag dot com. Also this last week. I spent time with the big iron farm show in fargo. North dakota i got to catch up with jenna baroness with the north dakota soybean council to talk about biodiesel and some of the Advances that they are working on with biodiesel throughout north dakota and some of the new plants that are going to be coming online here very very soon across the state. Let's listen to that interview with jennifer tennis when the north dakota soybean council jenn it's great to catch over here big iron. Let's talk biodiesel. And i know that's a big thing. You guys are pushing here during the big iron farm. Show this week talk about some of the latest news and some of the things. You guys are talking about this week with growers and and folks coming through the show. Happy to do that. So when you talk about latest news in bio-diesel it's it's been hard to keep up every day. It seems like you see announcements of crush expansion new crush joint ventures have been kind of a new thing we're seeing and so one thing we're really Just making sure that farmers especially in north dakota are aware of is the joint venture that's been signed between marathon in dickinson that's producing renewable diesel and adm. The future adm crush plant in spirit. Would so when that crush plant does come online. Every bit of that oil is going to go to dickinson to the marathon plant to make renewable diesel essentially for california and it should be noted that that renewable diesel plant in dickinson is the second largest in the us and so for north dakota soybean farmers. I think it's good to be aware and we want to make sure they know that you know. We've really kind of been a spectator to this bio-diesel industry for a while. We've been supporting and ask the council because it's it's a pillar to the soybean industry but we're going from spectators to pretty major players And so this. Renewable diesel renewable diesel different from biodiesels drop in fuel. It is almost identical to petroleum diesel. And so that's why it's easy to use. California is really calling for it to meet their low carbon fuel standard and so It's great to be a player in that industry. It's going to open a lot of doors for north dakota soybean farmers. I believe it's a big reason that we're seeing that crush plant come into spirit would And i think it's going to be a great market option for your scum. And that's what i was gonna say is. It's a huge market opportunity for our growers here across north dakota and then something that they haven't had before obviously so it's going to create more options and create more competition out there for them soybeans. That's exactly right and in a state where we really haven't had soybean processing of any amount to speak of. It's really a big deal and it's something that we we hope to see. Even more of you know to take all of that. Oil is only going to power forty percent of that dickinson plant so they have room to take more and so that that's good news for north dakota soybean farmers why no soybean council are always advocating for soybean farmers and if they have questions about things like this or they wanna talk to you or they want to. Just stay up today with the latest news. What's going to be the easiest way to do that. Jenner checkup andy. Soybean dot org we have a farmer opportunities page also. Follow us on social media. We're pretty much handle. Andy soybean on almost every social platform you can think of so. Keep up with us there. We have a lot of farmer opportunities specifically in terms of biodiesel. We'll be having some bio-diesel farmer workshops coming post harvest and into winter along with that. We also have a rebate program. And so if you're interested in using biodiesel now's a great time to try it and save some money on your fuel. Jen appreciate the time. Thanks for catching us up on all things soybean council here big. I appreciate it. Yes thank you again. Talking with from the north dakota soybean council during this past week's big iron farm show in fargo north dakota. That's going to do it for another edition of american today. Produced by the american egg network. Thank you so much for joining in with the program here today. I'm your host jesse allen wishing you a great day..

illinois jesse allen north dakota soybean council mike zillow Mugs zillow indiana north dakota ohio american league jenna baroness jennifer tennis iowa mississippi river usda dickinson anthrax meigs Jesse Mike
"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Welcome into american today. Produced by the american ag network. I'm your host jesse allen. Last week i was able to spend time with the farm progress show in decatur illinois. I caught up with the incoming vice president for the national core growers association. Tom hegg we talked about a number of topics including starting talking about what's going on with the administration and some of the things they're concerned about in dc in conversation with your politicians back from your home state and all that because you know when they first brought this out all this is. Don't worry it's not going to hurt small businesses small farmers. We're gonna take care of them. Well as you get learning more and more no it they just major. There were stepped up. Basis is gonna hurt that farmer that wants to transition at farm down to his child to cat so he can continue that generation going on. I'm a fourth generation. Iv farm with my son. That's going to be the fifth. I wanna make sure he has that opportunity so we don't have to sell land off. Just three him to continue to farm. Are you here in some growers possibly transitioning that farm earlier and they want to right now to try and beat any potential policy changes. I think there's some growers doing that. And i also think there's This last Just in our area. A lot of land is all of a sudden coming up for sale by older couples. That are saying we're gonna sail now just so we don't have to put up with this A year or two or three years down the road of things we gotta watch and worry about their. It seems like moving forward. You know another thing to ethanol course and that's important to the corn growers and corn farmers across the country. And we know that there's some different Different things going on in dc right now involving around the rfs rb and and everything else there. And that's something that continues to evolve. It seems by the day and by the week tom. You know it's it's it's very interesting. Because american corn farmer we're saying why are people don't like ethanol it's renewable it's clean air takes out You know for the carbons and carbon dioxide. I mean we gotta cleaner air coming in that what we had twenty five years ago when we had the bad smog in the city's so we've cleaned that up more ethanol will use. We're going to get that much cleaner air but we're live with that every day. It's easy for us understand. It's hard for to get the people that aren't involved with it to understand how it much of a good product it is and it's also a cheaper product for them put in gas tank. What is if things according are doing right now to kind of help in the fight here against some of this pushback against that's an the one of the things we We did a You know that fifteen that the the judge said okay. The trump administration did not do some things correctly we would. It's not allowed to be used during the summer months. Okay we have a call to action going on to all of the people that are members saying contacting their politicians saying no everything is good with ethanol deserve. The vapor pressure is not that major major of a problem that they think it is. It's the same as an tan product. So it's not there so that is the main thing is with the grassroots organization. Get your members involved and get them. I'll make sure that the contact their politicians and then you know you mentioned with the veal you know. It's the voice. Set the at fifteen billion but it seems like we've always have a hard time getting up to there because of the small refinery waivers and that going on and now. We hear they might want to lessen that. Maybe down to twelve billion gallons. Well that's just Another kind of a slap in the corn farmers face that Ethanol is not as good and We're where we wanna prove wrong. And it sure going to impact our farmers bottom line. It's gonna hurt markets it could hurt demand A lot of things that it can do especially as you know. We're looking at another crop this year. Which despite some challenges in some areas especially the north western foreign belt. We're looking at another strong corn crop this year. We have another yes. You're right with that and you know once you start taking grind away. Okay we've got x. Amount of bushels of corn. And it's not going to be used if we we know. We can export everything because just We've have competition. And that's just part of the the corn farmers livelihood so we need to keep continuing have a strong ethanol and we got to continue to come up with some new uses that we can use that corn for just a g. Use up our piles talking about that corn crop here for this year Talk about your area. I know western minnesota and up into the dakotas. We've had our challenges with dry weather. But but how is that corn crop. Look in your area in my area. We were We we were into the d. Three so We up until a week ago. We had three inches of rain from when we start planting corn but Amazing where the the corn is on some heavier ground. it's It was holding in there because you we got a couple of key grains just to get us there. Are we going to be like we were in the past few years. No we know that. But that's why we carry crop insurance so there's gonna be stuff out there to harvest it just a matter of okay. Are we gonna have a later test. Wait. we're gonna have a heavier test weight that all adds up into the long scheme of things but You know last week we got three inches of rain. That's like i say double from what we had. It gives us a hope that we can. Mother nature knows how to rein in our area and we got to start looking next year already. We don't wanna have to be like some of the fellas up in the north dakota area where they had no moisture at all and it just dry dirt. Nobody wants plant in just dry dirt and hope things help or hope. Mother nature brings us a rain down the road. We hope that we can replenish soils for next year's planting season two and obviously you don't get in that crop out now hopefully there's not Too much tip or or other issues I know we've had some winds come through some areas too. so hopefully. there's not any issues with harvest here. This year and we can replenish. Soils going into twenty two. That's that's a very good point because that's the main key because we need the moisture coming in and it's dry In our area that the lakes are even down a lot. So you know that Everything's being used up and we need some moisture going into next spring and But you know. These crops are amazing that Every time they get a little drink how much they look better and how much healthier they look for that and then it can produce and all that these new genetics are just amazing while we'll cross our fingers and hope that Mother nature gives us some rains here as we get ready to replenish that soil. I think wait till after harvest so hopefully to get some of those rain so we can get in those fields. That's exactly right. We don't wanna be like a few years that we've had where your your mud and everything out and everything like that. No we don't want that we want to say get Get everything done. Get things wrapped up in. I think You know. I think harvest will start a little bit sooner this year. Just because of the conditions so I in in the long run. Farmers are always optimistic. We know we know what we're going to get and we're gonna say we're going to do better again next year. Well and lastly there's still a good price on the board out there right now for corn. Well that debt that is the main thing is that we have a respectable price and You know if we didn't have that right now we were looking like we did back in two thousand twenty. During the summer when price cash corn was down below three dollars. That helps nobody's checkbook. We'll take a five dollar. Roughly cash corn sale. I think a day tom. I appreciate the time sir Thanks to join me at the farm progress show. I'm sure we'll talk again soon. Very thankful for being here. Thank you for the work that you guys do to get that information out to the american farmer. That's tom hegg national corn growers association. This has been american today. Produced by the american egg network on jesse allen wishing you a great day..

jesse allen american ag network national core growers associat Tom hegg decatur illinois dc tom dakotas minnesota north dakota sir Thanks tom hegg national corn growers
"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Welcome into another edition of american today. Produced by the american egg network. I'm your host. Jesse al lin we continue our conversations from last week's cattle industry convention and cba trade. Show in nashville. As we talk sustainability and more with dr sarah place from a landco and a great discussion with dr place here during the convention and really interested and really exciting things that they are working on at a land when it comes to the cattle industry and sustainability and much much more here. Is that interview with dr sarah place sustainability officer with a landco. Dr sarah place and dr place appreciate you joining us here today. The cadillac district invention. Thanks for having me..

dr sarah Jesse al lin cba nashville Dr sarah
"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Welcome in to another episode of american anger today produced by the american league network. I'm your host jesse allen. Thank you for joining us here. On the show as we are talking about the recent spring wheat tour durham to her with the wheat. Quality council across north dakota. They were up there last week. And taking a look at that spring wheat crop that been here a lot about a lot of trouble with that crop and a lot of concern with the heat and dryness. It's been up there in the northern plains at the canadian prairies and getting a good first hand. Look at what's going on in north dakota at least here last week and joining us here on the show. Today we have dave green with the week quality council. Thanks for making time to join us here today. Dave my pleasure. Well dave the spring wheat to or. I know you guys wrapping that up here this week and we've heard a lot of the stories. The last few weeks about how much trouble that spring wheat crop is in across the northern plains. The canadian prairies. And we've been hearing the reports from you and your team here this week. Just about what you're seeing now that we're wrapping up this tour or just love your thoughts. What is the shape of that. Spring wheat crop. Is it as bad as we've been fearing well. I guess the short answer is that I was kinda shocked by by how bad it was particularly the the center. Part of the state We we have seen that. There was a red blocks on that palmer drought index and and If people told us that obviously it had rained most of the state for a long time. But you know so so coming in. He's still see it with your eyes. It does shock you a little bit and just see just what you know. No rainfall can do and and and that's kind of what we saw now as far as the prize or you know caught off guard or or whether it's better than i thought are worse i i. I don't know i. I think overall i was kind of. I thought that the story of this crop tour was that there was a miller's and and end users were very concerned going this crop or that not only. Would we have a little crop but a little low yielding crop but then it would have policy issues that that the he would have shriveled kernels. And we'd have had you know not enough emphasis firm. Tough to bill and tough to blend and i. I was pleasantly surprised. I know there was a lot of relief from everybody to see that. That doesn't seem to be the case. It looks like the the weak kernels that are there as small as they are are filling not shriveling and i. I suspect we're going to end up with a with a low yielding very high quality crop. I know some of the yields that Your team sent out during the week I know some of those bad areas that you alluded to we were seeing yield estimates in the twenty s range some other estimates were in the forties. Talk about what you heard from your team in. Maybe some good areas of north dakota where he saw some of that high quality. Wieland's what did that look like. Dave almost looked. You know the picture that was described was almost like If you if you could if you put a picture frame around north dakota you know maybe that first county around the outside of the entire state or or maybe even two counties in Looks to be pretty decent. You know not not average Not above average. You know something less than average but you know normal ish looking drier season crying of crops. I mean you know to your point in the forty six As you got off of that and move towards the center of the state or towards the river We got into areas where you know it. It got exceptionally poor. And then in between those than you know were areas that had gotten a shower and didn't or vista shower. You know highly variable in some of that transition brown between the real and and those those border areas now dave. We've heard a lot of chatter on social media and and heard from folks the last few weeks that they've been comparing this crop to nineteen eighty eight. Which we know was just a terrible year. Would you say it's on that level or is it better than what we saw. Last night's all the eight. Yeah yeah i i. I would have been one of those that that i saw that as an analog year you know when you started looking at crop conditions that are reported you know it. Was you know the percent good. Excellent la- so low and that was a magic year but just looking at that crop year with you know. Twenty percents Abandonment and fifteen. Bushel yield average. What they're spillway. This crop could get to that level unless definitely good news to here and you know just overall here dave obviously looking at issues With the crop and we continue to see moving forward. How that's going to translate to final yields and everything but overall i it seems like your guys is assessment on the week quality council tour. Is that not as bad as it was made out to be but still has its issues. Would that be probably a good assessment. Oh yeah it all depends on what you what you're saying if you were expecting to see the ninety eight crop reincarnate this then. Yeah i think things are much better than than you were you. You're thinking it would be at the time but So so yeah from that from that aspect if you were that negative To that level then then this would have been surprisingly good But this is this is a you know. This is a two thirds of a crop. You know half a crop and most of those areas two-thirds of crop and other areas. So so it's it's not good dave I appreciate your time here today. Any final thoughts You want to mention for us here before we run out of time. No it was It was a good tour. We covered a lot of grab. We think we did the right. We think we stopped enough with Eleven number of people to to get Enough results that would be meaningful and We'll see how the government takes. We did here in a few weeks. We will definitely see that and we appreciate you and your teams hard work. That's dave green with quality council. Thanks for joining me today. On a i appreciate it and again. That's green with quality council. Joining us to talk about the spring wheat and durham to or last week across north dakota with the week quality council and again a lot of things to consider with that spring week rob across the northern plains. Also here on american anger today. A group of midwestern senators urged the by administration to consider biofuels like ethanol as part of its environmental agenda focused by the administration includes a push towards electric vehicles the lawmakers tell the administration in a letter quote. Unfortunately the promise of homegrown biofuels at our agriculture sector appeared to be woefully underrepresented in your administration's energy environmental and transportation agenda and quote the group meeting with president joe biden and cabinet members to discuss immediate and intermediate steps administration could take to feature american agriculture and biofuels as part of the energy and environmental agenda lawmakers say recent studies have found corn ethanol to have forty six percent lower life cycle emissions than gasoline. The letter also asked the administration to rigorously implement the renewable fuel. Standard senate republicans. John thune chuck grassley roy blunt. Jerry moran deb fisher. Mike rouse joni ernst ben sasse and roger marshall sign the letter. This has been american. Act today produced by the american league network. I'm your host jesse allen wishing you a great rest of your day..

north dakota week quality council jesse allen Quality council dave green dave american league Dave durham Wieland palmer miller la joe biden John thune chuck grassley cabinet deb fisher Mike rouse
"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

American Ag Today

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"american" Discussed on American Ag Today

"Days the importance there and that the importance of of where net pf de that personal flotation device. Statistics tell us that majority of the people that drowned in the water had no intentions of getting in the water. You know they either fell in the water. They fell or tripped off of a dock or fell out of the boat. Or those types of things So it's important to to have that personal flotation device. Anytime you're around the water indefinitely on the boat and even for kids the it's the law to him up a precipitation device on When they're on the boat. So yeah you got to protect yourself in areas of water another thing that sometimes i think people forget about is that That family picnic or eating food outside and they sometimes maybe don't think about food safety but that's very important as well bernard yeah. We talked about a lot of health stuff to at progressive egg safety days. So it's not all just safety based but it's also health-based and the thing about picnics and having food and family there is keeping the food safe and we kinda talked about the two to four rural You know when you're dealing with food safety you know. Don't let that food sit out there. It doesn't matter if it's cold food or hot food. Don't let it sit out there. Net room temperature for more than two hours Because then you got that chance of bacteria growing in ed and and that type of thing the other two is when you storing your food after picnics done and you store it and you put in a container try to keep it from from being more than two inches deep in a container when you get those big old containers of food and your refrigerator. They're so big. They're so sick and a lot of times. It takes the refrigerator quite a while to cool that clear into the center again given that bacteria chance to grow so the second to theirs is talking about keeping those containers two inches at a max of of food being that way chills down in a little bigger here. Hurry in the four. Let leftovers you know anything anything. Over four days in your refrigerator you might as well name you know growing. It's growing something in there so So we talked about it. They will four days in the fridge. Probably probably needs to be pitched so. That's the two to four a rule there when you talk about food safety and what's a picnic without food exactly one. I think that food safety rules something that can. We can remember any other time as well to even if we're at home you know. Some people have those summer parties and they let stuff sit out inside For for too long sometimes. So that's that's a great thing to remember there as well. We'll continue our conversation with bernard jesse coming up tomorrow here on our next episode of american act. Today you've been listening to american today produced by the american league network. I'm your host jesse allen wishing you a great rest of your day.

bernard bernard jesse jesse allen american league