17 Burst results for "Amber Benson"

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"I love him. Yeah, my my editor, I constantly mentioned this thing that that he said once, which I think is a really good like way to think about comedy, which is he, he distinguished between micro humor and macro humor that those are terms that he gave them, which basically is to say that you know, micro humor is kind of its punch lines. It's it's, it's lines that contain a joke, like no matter who says it. There's a joke in the line. It's like sitcoms or full of them. You know, it's a quip. It's a thing and it exists apart from the context of the who saying it and macro humor is like a line that isn't funny in itself, but but because it's so that person to say it. It becomes funny. So like every joke in clueless is just share being share, like as if is not a funny thing to say in the abstract, you know. So so anyway, John like John would always say, you know, and this is his sensibilities to Jonathan. The editor John Schwartz, he would say like the micro humor is like it can. It can be what sells your script or what makes people know? It's a funny script because it's not 'execution dependent. It's 'execution proof, but the macro humor is like the real gold apps. And we found that on the set we cut a lot of the micro jokes because the girls would be really in character like running away from some peril and they're like, I'm not gonna make a joke about him in and knocks frightening right now, like even we tried to make the make that stupid amended ox jokes. So many times we put it in another. Are we ready either Michelle said, so I can't. I can't tell you here, but like, yeah, it's for me. Like I I've written on a bunch of sitcoms and God bless them. But like shows like new girl. You know, we wrote a ton of all jokes forever choke and eat, you know, in that was very much the tone of the show, but like you know, every joke in a in a new girl script has fifty alternative jokes that the actors could do it any moment and serve up. And if in whatever way and in in that way, you don't get a moment of just a look or or or something like that. And it leads my favorite laugh. And I tell us all the time I favor it laugh in our movie is if you see the movie, it's it's after the girls flee their apartment in there just in the car quietly and they just for a moment. Looks they give each other of of their weird. Yeah, that's the thing that we could not possibly script- and not only did script at people wouldn't be like what a funny scrub brush filled with these moments that seem better at our characters just look driving, but like that's macro, it's macro that's just earned earn character earned moments. And there's so much of the movie people's would go watch as of this release. The movie is in theaters guess called the spy who dumped me, please. Maharaj elation. Thank you. Thanks for what we left. Are you watching on television these days? What movies have you seen that you have loved? Did you watch movies for research for this film that you want to recommend and scripts to watch movies we want. We watched a few movies. I mean the the worst thing. To me is that I. I have not been. I have not been watching anything like it's not a good answer, but I loved, I loved the Ninette special on Netflix, Hannah Cosby's comedy special. I thought that was the best thing that I've watched a long time. I've had a long live long flights recently. So I've watched some more things. I recently watched mosaic, the cetera Berg limited series which green love to had. No one talks about no one. I was really surprised. I was like, what I just thought it was totally overlooked for deserve. But germ soon was she was unbelievable, totally against type and completely nailed it..

John Schwartz editor Michelle Netflix Jonathan Hannah Cosby
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"The snow where like if we charge the snow and like she doesn't do it, we're gonna know it's us because we'd made the sacrifice for her. It was before you know someone and they're just a famous person. You're like it there such a there, so intimidating, and then the minute you start working with them. They're like gesture co worker. You know what I mean? You're like, oh, that person's here. Lying in other fear. Was that like the whole movie really is built in the chemistry between these two people and meal and Kate had never met. So their lives are different. Like Kate is Kate. Devoted to us, and and meal has two kids and like has has lived in l. a. and been in the spotlight for so long and Kate, like is allergic to the spotlight. So sort of of sister they never met until like until the table reads, like, let's let's have him go into a room like like an hour early and then we would, we do what are the icebreakers. So it was like I bought a bunch of port games. I, I was actually get them to Zucchero being more is that so literally I literally, I, I love karaoke and I bought a machine for my wife, but for me and I like I secretly got had the karaoke machine. Like with me, I was like in case I was like, I don't know. Maybe we should use some icebreakers do carry. Okay. Oh, I have a carry on machine, but like they could have been less interested in that. But like thankfully, beside in the room. And I mean, they're both the sweetest people in the world, and they kind of fell in love as as friends and and and then and then like elevated the movie beyond what we possibly could differences between them. Like sometime. You see a movie where it feels like everyone kind of went to the same school of comedy, or you're like, oh, those people kind of have the same three Quincy, and then the greatest. The greatest like buddy movies are odd. Couple movies are like while these people are bringing something really different, their joy, it's a joy to watch the sparks fly when like this person's coming from here. And this is coming from way over here and and Kate meal had I think it for being like to same age like beautiful actresses, they're very different in their way, but they also have like they have they're both down to earth kind of like no bullshit. Not into social media, kind of islands of grounded nece in Hollywood type girls. But beyond that, there aren't a ton of similarities in their lifestyle. So it was like dif- different different approaches as brushes him. There was there in, you know, it's also a great lesson a reading lesson like there's almost no meal o. line in the movie that we joke. We could have given. Right? And the other way around like, that's their jokes. Are there jokes? There's also I think that was true in part of the pleasure of watching the movie is it's true across your whole cast, which is like they're also different in their approaches to comedy or so different from like Jane curtain and yell, riser and Fred Melamed who so good..

Kate Fred Melamed Jane curtain Zucchero Hollywood
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"But and she and I worked on the same college sketch, comedy musical different years. We didn't overlap, we didn't overlap, but we, she was a super Kate was is a superfan of member Kate. Remember the year that I worked on it because she was a freshman and she like remember going the songs anyway. There was also about your cultish thing where we, it felt like we knew each other. Yeah, and I like I had like a really good friend to like a childhood friend who dated Kate, like we don't. We definitely like crossed paths without crossing paths. And when we eventually met her, like it was like it was like meeting an old friend. She really felt like a friend you've had since college just kind of on instantly feel like, oh yeah, that that person, you know, and we in. So she wanted to meet before she committed to this to the script. And it turned out it was a blizzard or blizzard hit New York, and we knew it was coming. So you know, so we, we left a day early and we trudged to him, you know, Kate is the least Hollywood least fancy person in the world. So she wanted to go to. Like a very, like. I mean, like a disgusting diner. I was just about to say the name of the diner which I remember as you said disgusting diners, and I'm so excited that I that didn't happen. It was at a. It was at a shithole diner. Trudge this snow to get there. And Kate came in this like like heavy park that we've, she then also wore the next week in LA. So I did not nothing to do this now and and and she, you know, we sat down and we ate, and she was like, great. Let's read the script like read the scripts, and she should be sat there in this diner in a blizzard in the diner was full and Kate McKinnon is, I mean, you know, in person, she she's dressed down. She's rush. She covers as many square centimetres of her self up as she can. You really can't walk through the streets of new jacket his right, but she's super New York. They're pretty good about. They're pretty good about it, but she gets stopped by the show famous. And so we're, we're in this. We're in the diner end in Susanna and Irene, the other roles and were reading, and then she gets into it and they're moments when she when she screams. I killed someone in a diner. Yeah. And you know when people are taking. But we went through the entire script in for us who who this whole thing lifted our brain to hear that loud. And I mean, she's a genius and I haven't like I've, I've been lucky enough that I've worked enough that like I can have crossed paths. The few people who maybe I can call genius and she is one of them and it was. It was so amazing. It was such an amazing experience. And then after that, she cheated on board as go through, really. And then we, we were having like a daily heart attack about whether or not we're like, oh, God like an as we trudged through.

Kate McKinnon Kate LA Hollywood Susanna Irene
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"And I, you know, it's and maybe it was a naive attain that led us to demand that because we were coming at things from a place of low status, and we kind of just decided to act really high status, but it worked out. I mean, we we had plans gate where they were great partners. Initially the, you know what they do is they buy scripts and then they figure out how in what way they're going to make them. And we, we were like, no, we just want to give you the option and you didn't have to make it. And if you don't, then we're going to get it back and they were like, okay, for. For teeny tiny, miniscule amount of money, fraction fraction of the amount that we would have made if we just sold it. So it was like, I think we just we countered in a way that I think surprised them as we were like, no, we won't take that paycheck. We will take a teeny Jeff that we're splitting in half. Yeah, so that we could retain the rights, but it was the best. It was like the best decision. I mean, and it's, you know, if it hadn't worked out, maybe I'd be looking back and saying it wasn't and only when things work out. It's like when you get married. I mean, I'm not married, but it's like when people get married, they're like, I always knew, and I'm like, okay, but I've always known about things that ended really badly, you know, one of them's well, but you always knew anyway, we felt like it would be better for us. It would vote out and it and it did so a now in that chicken and egg like now, I think we will have that confidence in time, but I would just encourage writers to to try to keep ownership as long as they can on. Sounds like you HUD something you believed in you. Had something you, you knew and you have to trust your gut on a lot of stuff even when you're the one with no power, right. Ironically, you actually do have a lot of power. Yeah, and the thing is, I mean, now as a director, I've I'm sent a lot of scripts that other people, right. So I get to actually see. I was never a person who liked to read a lot of scripts and I was writing scripts because I started to feel like I had no breadth in my life and everything I did was about, but but like I, I read a lot of scripts and like most of them are bad. And so I keep hearing this Moses at Haas. Most of them are bad and it's not America Crecy and most of their bat most the characters are really thin. And so when I read something even kind of good, I get excited about it and and people that know me are like way today and see if in a day you're still excited because I sort of get excited for a day and then I think about it and I'm not not excited. It's just in comparison to the bad, but the point is like if you have something really good like that is powerful and hungry for it. Yeah, it, yeah, people really want it. Actors and especially actresses good comedy, something that everyone wants, but especially actresses like there are more roles for them, but a lot of them are just like gender flip versions of bad guy, movies, you know, like, oh, come play this like bionic woman who has no weaknesses but gets to kick ass like women are kicking ass. Like watch this woman do stuff with no emotions are inner life, who's nothing deployed. There's nothing to play. It's just kind of feminist, but like one tiny part of what you need the cannon to be for women. So if you have something that's at all a twist on an expected thing like that's power and like, do not empower a person that is like less creative and less intelligent than you and give them your like child stunt do it, they'll kill it. How did before we wrap up? How did get on board. Well, there was a funny story that, well, I mean she got on board. We, we knew that she was interested in in doing some sort of female driven action comedy, and she and her first movie appearance was into San my first one day she had. She had a one scene in life partners..

Jeff Moses director America Haas one day
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"He he, his job was he gave a lot of exposition and so he he would want to know how everything fits together because he is explaining thing. And if I can't explain it, then he's not going to be able to explain that and as much as we were like, whatever. No one really. I mean, the plot has to hold up, but this is the first thing get cut is these long monologues. So whatever he was like, but why this? And Dave and I are like, oh, Wilkes went into a second. We have to go over here now and we're one is it me figure that out. Oh, no, it doesn't. There is that spy plot, right? The plot, they have to do it. And by the way we, we ended up simplifying that in post like we had a more complicated sort of web and what we found when we were like testing the movie was that like no one can. Like if they went with his character would flag, they would flag that the over of information and the fact that there are inconsistencies much more than they were flagging, not having more details about five. Do you think I always wonder this about that situation because I think we instinctively often, no, as writers that it's people are touching the characters, it's their story. Do you think you could have gotten the movie through though if you had simplified the Plotti plot? One hundred percent not. This, we didn't get a lot of notes, but a notes that we would get constantly is we need to understand this. And I mean, I worked in, I worked at mister robot. I worked on complicated shows where we had to plot many things. I had to make graphs and charts of who worked for, who in double cross to that, I sent to the studio, and you know, in then had to make adjustments. So their starts, a lot of that stuff is is not in the movie was played down the movie. But if you know if anyone you know of anyone has like a real question of how like the bad guys spy pot works after seeing this movie. I'm pretty sure I could probably explain it now at this point, and I would imagine having done that work mix the whole richer than it would if you hadn't them like, I think that just just going back to the idea of like the fact that we wrote a spec and then we were really, we, we just retain as at when we started to get like little bits of encouragement like Kay. Cates onboard, and now we have this and we have imagined. And we have Ron Howard wherever you know it when you get those little things that kind of like it bolstered our confidence to be able to say no to these sort of half opportunities like the opportunity to option it to a studio who wasn't gonna, make it the summer, but totally wanted to next summer. Like things that I think years before we have been like, oh my God, we sold the script grave and just being like, no, no, no, that doesn't sound quite right..

Wilkes Ron Howard mister robot Cates Kay Dave One hundred percent
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"What, what, how, what does that process look like for you? Well, it's kind of just like getting a feel for for who people are like you would anyone. It's actually not too different from when we're analyzing a character. We're gonna create lying. What is this person's weakness? What is this person security? So in the case of Kate, Mila who have great chemistry but are very different and are legitimately friends who have a lot of affection for each other, but lead very different lives. Like what's the. If what, what is the different way that they communicate even like what's their love language? You know, and Cates Cates way of communicating and way of thinking is incredibly cerebral. She's very introverted. She's more of a listener than a talker. She's very sensitive and very serious, which is not what people would think she's she. She is. I mean, she's the sweetest kindest person in the world, but she, you go to restaurant her. She just wants to hear about you. And yeah, she is like a very intellectual introverted person and and she's very, she thinks about things on a thousand levels and she thinks about the consequences and the political impact of everything she does, and it's really, it's, it's she's all in her head about a lot of things so. So for her getting her comfortable was about like a lot of conversations about like, what? What is the meaning of comedy? What is funny about this joke versus this other kind of joke, what isn't what isn't feeling natural about this moment? And. An approaching that from such an entity like you kind of have to talk in a very sort of like college, you know it was like it it. It brought me back to like college where you're like, okay, let me like analyze this in an articulate way that's gonna meet her like level of nuance of thinking about it, which is like your brain has to be so much more switched on just interject one second, let she taught me a great thing about character, which was incredibly which I think writers listening goodbye, find really helpful. She said that she was her characters to be able to be described with two words that contradict each other. And so she put the challenge to me and between both of us to try to come up with it and she came up with and she confident loser was this character, but every character she's had movie, she's wanted to do that. And I think that was an incredibly helpful way of thinking character. Right roofing to us going forward for sure. Yeah, yeah. So for her, it's it's sort of like talking to her. On the cerebral level on what she wants to be engaging in the character and for meal at sort of more instinct of emotional. She's like, I don't buy this moment. I don't like this. She's a little bit less. It's not so much about dissecting it as much as it is hurt his feeling present with it and like Houston through connection to Nick yet connecting to as she is so experienced as an actor. I mean, she has been, you know, she's in her early thirties and she has been famous for alarm, yes, so I would start it and it's like you have to constantly switch back and forth. So it's like I would get out of a discussion with Kate about a thing that I would try to use that same thing with me LA and she's like, like fewer were about like, what do you mean spit out? And I was like a faster. She's like, great. I'll do it faster. You know, like way I was way more up here than than she needed because she kind of could use the shorthand. So stuff like that. I mean in each actor has their own thing, and I think people want, and then Justin throws also a writer and he's incredibly respectful of directors. He will always put out ideas. If you want them, he never needs his ideas to be a thing, but but like letting him feel engaged in that process enough that it, it maintains the architecture of what we wrote, but also allows for him to like he's very talented writer. So what can he bring without sort of dismantling the structure that we, we have. So all of that, but it's just different with each actor in the sim Huron, which also was really helpful rate like he he wanted to. He wanted everything to track and make sense..

Mila writer Cates Cates Kate Justin Houston Nick one second
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"I mean, really, really quickly in a few weeks and the the whole script and then then let me just have the writing of the scripted. You divide up screen now. She had a partner for a while, but I never did. So there's to me, there was no value in splitting up scenes other than like making it go quicker. So I wanted to take advantage of having another person whose tastes ever like, and I think is funny and you come from writer's room regiments. We really, we just, we just went back and forth. And we just talked through in like sometimes like one of us would just like close their eyes and like I got something just give me a second. Give me a second. And then in that, that's sort of how it went. And it came to a certain point where we could very much internalize the characters voices, and you know, ref as them rips them, and we would always after write a scene, we would read it aloud. We would. We would both take characters. We'd read aloud and I think strangers, yeah. I mean, strangers saw all sorts of weird. Things happened the movie, like just happening allowed in public. There's one thing about just I think that I noticed about how he wrote together. That is like, I think a really good way of approaching things that for whatever. It's worth what I think is an this is something I'm trying to get better at doing because of my like aforementioned problem with getting way too molecular about every single thing much to the annoyance of everyone is that I'm not that annoyed. Anyway. So I think it's like start very global and broad and then and and then you do another pass where you get a little more detailed on the need, another press report dialogue in. So it was like we had a log line then the next pass is okay act, one broad strokes. It's this act to three sentences that act three three sentences. And then what are the scenes within each piece it? It's like if each thing is like a baby step and just feels doable, and you can have that like micro goals like today, we're gonna spend today figuring out all the seat, what are all scenes in act three just described them in a sentence, and then by the end of combing through it over and over, then you get to the point where you have each seen written with the bad version of the dialogue. And all you're doing is tweaking the dialogue. And then you have a script like it's like, that's all it is. You can take it apart like that. It's manage way more manageable and then have a script even if it is a script that is not the best version of what you could do. It is just so much easier to start working with that because there is something about the. The place where it is done that always feel so far off and you can just in if you have something that is that is has a beginning middle end that has a page number that feels it on the line. Then then you are. You're going to have much easier time for Sean. We're just about to be like, we've actually had to adjust our process now because we are split up a lot more both because of doing press for the movie, and I'm about to go off and do do a pile directed pilot thumbprints for someone else. So I'll I'll be gone for a bit, but we have this project we're doing and we're like, we just have to get a draft done and then we can rewrite and send stuff back and forth. But we probably can't generate something quite as good if I am like in New Zealand, you know, for Tunas slow sense. You're going to New Zealand for two months. Yeah, that's awesome. Really excited about it. I mean, I'll be working lots. I want a chance to like do New Zealand, but still, yeah, Sundays, maybe. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, totally. We do have to start to wrap up, but I'm, I wanna talk just briefly about I'm working with the actors and working the action sequence. Yes, I'd love it. Feels like working with the actors must have come very easily to it was I love working with actors. I love being a benevolent dictator flash director. I love the psychology of it. I'm like the child of two of two shrinks and I love assessing what each person needs to feel comfortable in creative and confident..

New Zealand partner writer Sean director two months
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:38 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"We, we knew what Andres job was. We wanted to put her in trader Joe's and like I, I have this like I have this allergy to like fake movie careers that are boring to right. Like you know, like I that, you know, you see screenwriters put people in offices and clearly don't know how how light companies weren't so so. So I I wanted to put her in turn, but I can't. I can't believe I got a feature article. I can't stand that. I get to write better, not screw this up and and we we knew that we would open it in this very muscular away. We, we knew that we would intercut with this drew having this incredibly intense action sequence and we'd intercut it with Audrey and Morgan. At first, it was Audrey at work, but eventually became this birthday party. And we were like, let's do the platonic ideal of like a a movie about best friends that starts with a birthday part. Like, let's let's write our version of bridesmaids. And splice it with our version of one of my ex-boyfriends by a JAMES BOND, we knew we, we knew the car chase incredibly early cartridges is so good. Thank you. We love. Well, that was the kind of thing we're thinking of where like, what are some great. What are some undeniable actions like? What? What are tropes of action and what would we do in that situation? So like if we were in a car, chase, like, what do all of our like neurotic like conservative like driving, right? Yeah. Zayed's, how, how would that come to bear? If we had to buy like incredibly bold and like high-octane, which is also the other car chase in the movie, got the biggest left in the theater that I saw it in the preceded apiece way. Which I don't want to give away. It'd be. So it's it's in the trailer, but it's, yeah, it's yes, I Susanna knows how to drive stick. I do not know. Where that came from. Yes. And then we knew, I mean, we knew what, oh, and by the way, when people think that that's a super gender like anti-feminists joke, I'm like, but I'm the one who, but we're not. No, I'm just I'm America. I'm the. I'm the one who tried to rent a car in Italy and was like low. I don't. I don't know how to do this. I was like, I was like, I'm gonna drive on Italy and I was like, all right, can't do this. Do you have a Toyota Yaris? Yes, we'll have one. All right. So then I'm going around in my Toyota. My my automatic. But yes, finding the your takes on those against tropes and then there were, yeah, without spoiling too much there to to scenes of older of older people that that are Morgan's parents are very, very close to me, and and and then we're gins. Dad's friend is very, very close to Suzannah's heart to those were both actors. We knew we would have there. We were sort of like, what are the because we obviously it was like, what are versions of curb your enthusiasm, eskimo moments that would go, you know, there was a scene that we cut from the movie. That's the kind of the perfect example of what the movie was in concept and probably wasn't original outline, which was that at one point when they have, you know, they have to figure out a tech thing. They take it to the apple store. Genius bar genius bar, and it's like the Czech Jamia says, and it crashes the mainframe of the whole thing. And then that's how they tracked them. And we, we ended up cutting it. But like for reason, it's like not worth Bill. Adding an apple store to do a thing to do, but then those speak to, what would you do? You would go to where the dumbest, who don't know how to do computers scout. That was our, it's great. So yeah, I stuff like that. So that you sort of have these moments built in new who the characters were and and it all came out really, really quickly..

Morgan Toyota Andres Audrey Joe Italy Suzannah Susanna Bill America Zayed Yaris JAMES BOND
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"So February and we went to them, we went to everyone and said. He had the script we have Kate McKinnon has to be made a few months. Yeah, which I think for a number of reasons was tough. Like I mean, Kate is such a beloved person, but this is a high budget movie and and it needs to be internationally via balls. Well, and you know, in non English speaking countries, it's unclear whether and SNL big dealer not. So it was like, she wasn't, you know that that that calculation of like, who's sort of like internationally viable movie star person. And is that person available in kids very specific window. So it was very hard needle to thread with. Luckily Mila who is also perfect for the part being exactly the right person who also was free and didn't didn't require us to change anything about the character we had in mind, so it's which was great. I mean, it could have been like the absolute wrong actress was available and we're like, oh my not what she gets mood, she gets it may, but we have to change the sort of DNA the pattern really fast. I mean, we had we had interest from several studios, some of them with. Veatch like we can make it, but we can't make it the summer. What if we just buy it and then we? And so you know, it's like, I'm glad that wasn't early offer Kosonen minimally tempting. Sure. We had a place saying we will make it the summer, but for half the budget. So it has to be a totally different movie re prepared for that. Dhruv conversations about that. We're prepared for every. I mean, I mean, the thing is like, let's try the, let's try the blue sky thing, but like, yeah, we'll secretly prepared for like, you know, that is what our million years of combined experience. 'cause like I, I can. I can figure out every note that I mean I've gotten every version gotten every version of note. You know, we haven't been happy about every version of note, but I'm positive that if somebody said if somebody said we can make it, but this is the crazy thing we need you to do. We would find a creative about it. We can try it for a few days do it. Right. I want to step back and just been five minutes talking about the actual writing. Process? Yes. How did you to work together? Once you knew this? Was the idea talked about what kind of time you put him, but what it actually look like? We took my tech, a venture walks with no books where we, we started just talking about what are scenes that we want to put in there. What are what are all the ideas we think are funny. We had a million techs chains in Google docs and just spent like a few days talking really broadly. I have like a problem that all of my different writing partners and workers have had with me, which is that I get really granular. I'll get fixated on some really specific thing and want to solve that problem. And so somebody like that and that Dave is like, can we just put it down on paper and we'll figure that out later. We don't need to figure out where the semi colon goes today, and I'm like, but if we don't know that, then how can we possibly anyway, we did that for a while. Then we outlined it together just the most basic beat sheet with some dialogue with some. Yeah, digital is a on a whiteboard to do with card tundra, do no. Did it. We just we did it in a tech stock in the lobby of the line hotel in Korea on, yeah, it's a great lobby lobby and John John, Gus Highland software. Sorry, plugging different. Be glad higher s. l. you're on. So you gotta develop competing software. You can do a crossover software promote. So, yeah, we, we wrote it, we we, it was like starting with this really broad beat sheet that could fit in half a page. Like this happens. This happens by the end of it. The girls end up LA LA. What was from the beginning? You knew you wanted in there even from those walks. You're like, this is a great scene. We. Very early on. I mean, we we, we had, we had a pretty good sense of who the two friends were..

Kate McKinnon SNL LA LA Veatch Mila Kosonen Korea Dave John John million years five minutes
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"We had a very specific goal and that goal was to get this movie made, and you know, just to veer off for Secondly, I mean, sir, my revelation as a screenwriter like going through this process is that I think that we all are just we put too many too hard for self of what we want a script to accomplish for us to consider it successful. And I see this with myself. I see it with so many people like you want the script to be good. You want to. To get a lot of attention for it. You wanted to sell it. You want to get made. You want it to get made well, you want to be involved in it. You wanna have a great experience being involved in it. You want it to come out. You want people to like it. You want critics to like it. You want it to make a lot of money, and then you want to get awards. And I've seen every step of if someone doesn't reach that one of those things and the fuck this would fail, and, and boy, that's too much pressure on on for anyone to put on yourself. And it's almost like an impossible target to hit. So for us for me specific, I don't know. I can't speak for Susanna, but for me, I just wanted this movie to get made and I wanted to do everything I possibly could just to get this movie made. Yeah. It was really well said, Dave. Thank you everytime everytime you started saying, so I want I want that. I want that one. Oh, wait. Oh, wait. That's my his points point. I shouldn't Hollis thing. So copy that you have everything else is. Yeah, yes, yeah. Yeah. I mean for me it was this thing of. I. Yeah. I mean, we wrote the script. We had incubated it like ourselves and not really like let other people into the process. And I think because we felt like we, we are proud of it. We liked what it was we. We didn't have to like mediate it with other people's ideas. It was just us and we're like, we're like this good. We let this like, fuck. Yeah, this is Awesome. Then when we approached agents with it to sort of that first line of of help or defensive, whatever it is like the usual questions came up like, are you directing, would you are you need to direct? What? Like what? If like, the, what? If what? If people say they'll do it but not with you? What? If what? If what? If and I think our attitude was just like, we'll cross that bridge like don't like, don't put that out there because then people will be like, oh, great, let's do this much safer thing. And so was over develop it or. Yeah, let's let's take a minute or let. Let's try to get the paycheck, whatever it was and it was. It was kind of, I think, because we were coming from a place of. Nothing that we just chose to continue to have nothing in exchange for having ownership as long as we possibly could have it. It's not like we had a lot of offers to sell the script for a lot of money, and I'm glad that we didn't because I think it would be really tempting to take those offers. But by then we loved the movie. So we were like, what if we just what if we just like. Only hold out for the most advantageous thing. And then if we find, we can't have that opportunity, then we can like regroup. Now that point we had had Kate McKinnon attached to the movie, and Kate gave us this great gift in that. She was only available that summer. That's that's her break and SNL. So you know, we, we started shooting this movie in July and we didn't really. We didn't even studios, didn't even really see it..

Kate McKinnon Dave SNL Susanna Hollis
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Thing I wanted to ask you about is is figuring out that arc and I wonder if there were conversations that you had with each other or later down the line about just how subtle and complicated that arc is because it's not thank you. Nothing. Something it's I go from something. Something better? Yeah. Yeah, I think it's funny because a lot of the choices like the choice to not have the girls fight with each other in the movie, the choice to have me LA, be meals. Problem is a little bit harder to describe than just she's a shy wallflower and then she has confidence and Kate's, not just as Amy friend. She also has the sort of like mixed feelings about being performance live. Like, is that her only value like she, she, she's it is both her greatest greatest point of pride and also something that causes her to feel really alone. And like, I think these are. Those are all kind of like indie movie choices, but we kind of got away with it because of the candy broccoli, because it's like you don't even notice because there's too many like things exploding Anderson, which I, I think it's great because if people come for the explosions and the fun and the gloss and whatever, and then they see a movie where like women are supporting each other, and it's not like just a cliche of a female character like we got away with, I think more subtle arc than most big movies. Would have for Custer's other shit in there. Yeah. Yeah, but it helps going down. Yeah, I think so. Or like we just didn't really get notes about that. Really. I mean, that's a whole other part of the conversation of how we tried to to position ourselves to not get noted to death. I did want to ask about that. Yeah, too. Because this is also the kind of movie that you could have handed to an agent. They could have sold to someone else to direct. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, we, we went into this..

Kate Custer LA Anderson Amy
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

03:37 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"So why are they, we'd I'd go to the coffee bean and you know, there's a coffee bean in in this is such a Hollywood conversation, but there's a coffee bean unless feel us where it is shared by both the apartment complexes south of hill her from south of Lichfield boulevard and the mansions to the north. So I would see some of my ex-boyfriends there and they were coming down the hill from their mansions just just after a swim in their rules. And I was leaving my sweaty apartment where you could choose to use electricity or the air conditioner go like, you can either use the air conditioner or the microwave. The refrigerator could run or more you where you will be cool or. Yeah, you could be cool or your food to be cool. And I, you know, I would run into them all the time and they'd be like, oh, how's it going? I'm like, oh, great. It's going so great. And anyway, so we had these jokes like these guys are just like success success after success. And I was happy for them, but I was also like this is I am I just like, beating, am I just like my just swimming against the stream all the time. And why? Why? Why like I can either bang my head against the wall about the fact that the kinds of movies I thought I was coming out to LA two right aren't getting made and like, oh my God, this system is against me, and I'm so mad about it, but also running out of money really fast or kind of like before and that flexibility it. It's not like when we started writing this, we were forcing ourselves to write against tone or against what we wanted. We just found that our our box was a lot bigger than we thought it was, which was great and they're open. So we sat in the pokey place and I opened up Email she sent, and I said, we should write a movie. That is called, this is a movie. My ex-boyfriend would right. And I said, we can temporarily title at that. We are changing it before we send it out around Hollywood because I need to be taken seriously. Although after placentas podcast, Shirley will not be. But that time that we will be out. Yeah, yeah. Now it's now it's gonna laugh about it, but yeah, so we did that. That's what the movie was called for the entire new writing. We're like, let let let's let's find the kind of characters that that xenon. I right, and we will thrust them into the kind of movie that we would not normally, right? Yeah. And we're like, I don't know what if we like we're like, I don't know what if you took the characters from broad city and like drop them into a born movie and even into that was kind of like, that's the idea, even though it's it's neither broad city nor born per se. It was just characters that relatable problems that banal stakes that high, we'll. And I will say hearing you, describe going to that coffee bean and your life going like, this is where this Milic Eunice character comes from. This is why she rings so true. Yeah, she feels like a real person. It seems because she if it very much. Yeah, Hurter is our. I mean, even though I'm a, I'm a dude, the characters are. -pletely us in Witten mixed with the actresses mixed with a bunch of other things, but there's so many pieces from these characters that are telling our stories and like in the case of meals character. You know, there is the sort of trope of the insecure girl who doesn't have any confidence and one we didn't think that was interesting too. When we were struggling, we still had confidence slash arrogance. Even though we had no reason to because we're working demeaning jobs. And also our concerns were little more specific to cut of an over achieving person like I don't want to do something if I'm not going to be really good at it. I want to do something if I'm just going to be okay at it, which is still an insecurity, but it's also it's also more specific than just, I hate myself very subtle though it was the.

Hollywood Milic Eunice Witten LA Shirley
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"I have to put all my eggs in this basket because at a certain point you do have to do that and you don't want to be distracted, but then that mono focusing can lead to. Yeah, you know, yeah, which is why I always cheat on all my boyfriend's. You. You don't wanna be putting too much stock in one person's only healthy. Yeah, right. Totally. Got a spread it out. Yeah, I mean, I, I would always sort of reassure myself career wise. Like if if I was serving a low point that I have the there are for lack of a more sparkling metaphor, like they're all these sort of irons in some fire something like, yeah, there are all these things somewhere out in the world that for that. If you know if something happens, like I could get a phone call about this. One thing at this moment at this time, like it is it is sort of this reassuring thing. And then I think when right before you went, I started writing this. I was just sort of at a point where there was there was absolutely nothing active. Absolutely. No phone calls. I was waiting on. Yeah. And you in the same situation. I was having nothing. So what were the conversations that led to this being the thing? Well, well, it yet to begin with the conversations that led to us decide to write anything together was like, we're just going to. We are going to do something bold for us. We're gonna do something unexpected for us. I'd never written with a partner before, you know, we both written studio movies, but partially why. You know, when I've written studio project that didn't get made the really book adaptations or they were something else in there that was like, this is something that I wouldn't have done on my own because on my own, I would be making these tiny like high-concept a little weird, but, but you know like, but, but you know, heart wrenching sort of things. But we, we began by saying like, okay, we're going to try to get out of our comfort zone, and we were going to try to like to swing bigger than normal. The conference every time every time. One of we. We were like, okay, we're not gonna let each other make every moment melancholy for like slightly melancholy. But like you know, life-affirming but but bittersweet, you know, like maybe that's. Yeah, we'll let me into promoting. I do because I do want to hear about this conversations, but Susanna you had written primarily with partners, right? Yeah. I have written with a couple of different people, but mostly with with a friend of mine, we'd we'd spent twelve years writing together. Oh, wow. I didn't realize. Yeah. And we had had a lot of, you You know, know, it's it's like. like we had initial promise for a career that seemed like it was well. Actually. Initially, we spent five years working as receptionists times that hedge funds and shepherd offices of laundry companies. And in her case, an olive oil store. But but yeah, once we were working, we kind of had a lot of almost like this is going to change your life. Oh, it didn't happen, but my God. Can you imagine if it had happened, it would have changed your life. You know, like that happened a handful of times with with an HBO pilot that got produced but not picked up to series with a a blacklist script that was green lit twice with two different directors who dropped off two times than green lit with me and a cast of the company lost their money in the European financial crisis. You know, like stuff like that happens a lot like for most my life. So it is like, I mean, it's crazy to think about, but you're describing many a typical career earned his business, which is so it's what are we doing impossible. And I think you know, when we made our indie movie at the same time that our TV show kind of got legs and she had always wanted to run a show and be on a staff into her. That was sort of the ultimate thing. So. And when I made my first movie, I kind of I felt like, okay, I have to make a second movie. I can't be one of those people, especially not one of those women who never makes the second movie. And so the pats kind of naturally diverged and she's very successful ninety writer now, but but it's it was interesting because we had a process together that was a bit different..

partner HBO pats Susanna writer twelve years five years
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Got really close. It was in prep and then it unraveled for for political reasons. I can't get into here and and basically suddenly this thing I've worked on for two years that I didn't have ownership of because it wasn't my original script and I had at the time thought, okay, here's an opportunity to work at a fancy company, man. If I get this movie made it. It feels objectively bigger than my last thing. It's a good next step and you did, I'm sure as as David on this stuff that he was working on just pour yourself into it because I have to. It wasn't I didn't feel like it was a job for higher, but ultimately I did not have ownership of it, you know? So it was like it was similar to the experience of being a screenwriter for hire on studio movies, which I had also done many, many unproductive times. I many, many, many, many, many, many times it just it felt like that again at had had some India sort of juice to it, and it did feel more possible and it got close. But then when it fell apart, it just felt like and suddenly I didn't have any. I didn't have it anymore. It just didn't exist anymore. And and so I didn't. I realised that my desire to make a second movie had been like setbacks in in in the course of one phone call set back two years. You know, when it was horrible as you're working on this work for hire? Yeah. Were you exploring your own thing. Where you're writing your own material or was this your whole life? Now this was, I mean, this is my whole life. I think as Davis saying it's like you to to be a good artist. You put your heart and soul into it so much. And then you have to like immediately divorce yourself emotionally, like to not care about the outcome, which is impossible like that's not possible. Yeah, it's like when you get that phone call that says it's dead. It's it's different. When a living thing is you're like it exists on my computer in a file, the exact same way it existed yesterday there's there's, there's it is. It is completely the same thing like, and and the force is dead is so is so bizarre and hard to wrap your hook your head into, and the forces that make it dead are entirely political, and most often corporate and have absolutely nothing to do with the creative merit of it. So I don't know. It was sort of like that happened and I hadn't really been pursuing my own thing because I, I mean, I, I wrote a book in that time, but in this in the film side of things, I just it got close enough that I was like, okay, now, now is the time when I..

David India Davis two years
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"You know, quite a bit of years that I've been in Los Angeles that I love and I still love and that for whatever reason I took as far as I could take it without waiting for somebody with money or access to say, all right, we're moving forward with it. And at the time when Suzanne and my path merged, it was a particular pilots that I really loved. They still really love and I really thought it was going to happen. And so like I dared myself to like, imagine it magin six seasons of it and to start like thinking of casting and like I, I also draw. So I like I made a poster and I really done. I'd really gone through a lot of motions of thinking of this as a real thing. And when you know that particular rug was ploughed, it felt like God. Like as I I, you know, I, I'm by no means. Complaining that like I haven't had a great career because I have, but like, but these things just it would just I would just get some close and then and then and then we were. We just happen to be working side by side on her own things. But we were like, buddies who worked together on a fun, our own things. When my heartbreak happened, man, my latest heartbreak, special heartbreak away, all of that extra thought and like artistry that you put into it like the drying and all of that when you do start to put yourself forward, as director of your on work is going to be a big part of what gets gets the project to move forward. So it's, it's like those skills are really good to practice with, but when you don't have that agency and you're looking for someone else to attach themselves and all those ideas are yours and they're not totally in your job description, it's like terrible. It feels like this terrible extra effort without like what not only wasn't required, but like nobody even noticed it. No one cares. And then my. My, my heartbreak was a, it was a project that I had been working on television show and decided to step down to consultant so that I could work on a book I was writing and also just try to get to to make another movie at had been a few years since I had made my first feature, which was a small indie movie. And these these titles by though this movie was called life partners. Yeah. Was the TV show chasing life? Yeah. And spy dummies your first non-life. I use exactly. Was it hard to break out of it? It was pitching titles like life spies, and I was like, what is the lifespan the end of their life. Yeah, but yet it'd been a few years. I mean, you. A couple of years. Yeah, years and I had hoped that I think because it was just like a minute before everyone was like women, women, women, women, dinas. We want women lady writers lady directors like before that the movie came out. So it was like just a little bit early from people to be for it to catch on and away with with all, but the most obscure of like net flicks audiences. So I think it kind of came and went, and then I wasn't really. I didn't feel like I had any traction as a director per se, and also those movies. It's not like a lot of movies that were the big studio comp of that movie, like Bridget Jones movies wore getting made even in the studio system. So it was like the step the the leap from life partners to a movie like this. If we hadn't written at ourselves, never would have gotten this job Amer not a million years. So. Anyway, if you write it, but but it was sort of like a a thing where I was consulting. I, I raised myself over the coals to get this job that was on a a, an indie MU blacklist script from years before that, that friends of mine had written and it needed an update and they the company wanted to. They wanted to to have a filmmaker kind of rewrite undirected and sort of I went down this road. It was a similar kind of thing to what you'd expect me to tuft on accident. It was a slightly bigger slightly more commercial, but ultimately still indie, comedy, teen comedy. And I worked on it for a couple of years..

director Amer Suzanne Los Angeles Bridget Jones consultant million years
"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

The Writers Panel

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on The Writers Panel

"Ending made. They're not super makeable in today's marketplace. If you look at my IMDB page, none of my son not exist when you when you have primarily been in TV at we should. I have, but I've been, I've been hustling the whole time. Okay. Well, we'll talk. We'll talk about. Yes. I mean, we, we came at this from a place of frustration because we both had professional heartbreaks at the same time and and we were friends and we were in a habit of sitting across from each other and friends we are. We're remained friends. We'll see. By the end of this castle, see whether we still feel. Back with us later Ben. But yeah, so we we kind of were venting to each other and and talking about how we lamented that. Like the thing we came out here to do wasn't really possible. And meanwhile, we are like fans of this genre of much more commercial thing, the action movie and and we kind of started talking about how what we love is these little survey, she'll comedies, but can we marry that with our love as consumers for these big tent pole type movies rather than see them as other people write those and other people other people, right those and have success. We like slave away over these other things that no one will ever know really how it feels is you get to sneak these character moments and character comedy into this sort of big temple we, yeah, we say we would take a big giant idea and then we would hide the small movie. Interesting. Like like small little character moments. Hidden inside this, this, this coating of commercials. Broccoli is the subversive feminism and subtle friendship and Judaism. Any unabashed northeast Judaism of the comedy style and then the, yeah. And then the candy around the broccoli, all of that's kind of them saying it, a disgusting metaphor, this full sugar this fan Dubcek's. Tempera flakes fatter around the broccoli is the sweet glaze on the bracelets on the the. The glaze is is the the fun- Alysha in the car chases all which was also really well done. Thank you like that. And I, I was actually telling producer Brett before you guys came in that, like I'm getting old. I find that stuff hard to watch or follow, and that is not the case for the movie, like all these. Spy stuff where like the action sequences both act like, I'm so like we've seen every spy trope. Right? And it seems like you really had fun with spy tropes and then the action sequences. Well, I'm just too old to follow them at this point, but they played so well and there are jokes in them, which is so great. Good. Yeah, that's the thing we tried to do..

Brett producer
"amber benson" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"amber benson" Discussed on WLOB

"With recovered movie actress and she's adorable and her name is rachel nichols dave age door will rachel nickell yes i'd say she's twenty nine 28 wade i really do you really mean adorable or do we just throwing a thought let's say let's say deb she's adorable to me she's the door that's all you are i would i though maker 21 she's probably like 19 i think she's twentyeight i already said look for y'all got tony arrived morning organizers volume a rare rachel is 38 child all right it's all right in other global another actress who is adorable dave amber benson is her name i ever benson twenty six amber benson is twenty one twenty sorry she's four 141 well that what we're all he could ask she could pass for a woman and early twenties easily yeah this movie actress has been around for quite a while there is your clue her name is yvette many yo dave um quite a while now i'll say jeez fifty eight rajub you're probably closer said she is seven six seven secs vets mini l k i need fear for this dave the united states national debt is.

rachel nichols rachel dave amber benson rachel nickell tony united states seven six seven secs