35 Burst results for "Amazon Rainforest"

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

03:36 min | 5 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Welcome to the shorts if I'm Josh and there's chuck and Jerry's here and this is short, short, short stuff. Hello. Stuff so short, I said short three times. Did we do a full episode on this guy? Yeah, we did. Who is the man of the hole? And I think it was within the last three years, maybe four years, I would guess it was probably around 2018 because that's when they released that video of him and everybody became aware that this man even existed. Right. So this is a bit of a recap and for sure a lot of tribute to a gentleman named the man of the hole is what he was called. He was, he lived by himself in total isolation for 26 years on his indigenous land in the Amazon rainforest, the tenaru indigenous land, and very sad to say the man of the whole has passed away. Yeah, and they think roughly mid 50s may be age 60 tops. He was discovered by a funai agent, funai is Brazil's indigenous protection agency. And funai had been basically tracking him quietly for the last 26 years. And the reason that they call him the man of the hole is because that's what fun I call them. He digs holes or he used to dig holes, certainly some were for animal traps, but they think some sadly were for protection from attack from other people, I should say. But the reason they called them the man of the hole is because no one literally no human being on earth aside from that man knew what that man's name was. That's right. He lived on about 20,000 acres of forest that eventually became protected and thus he was protected, he at one point had his people. We don't know what tribe he was from. We don't know what language he spoke. We do know that his people were likely killed by invaders. I think the last people that they think he had was about 6 people with him, they were all killed, leaving him alone, and finally that land and his lifestyle was protected and as much as I don't even we'll get to sort of the ins and outs of even peeking in on somebody like this and whether or not that's the right thing to do because that is sort of a thorny issue. But he passed away on August 27th, no signs of struggle. They believe he died of natural causes. This is another sort of thorny thing they are going to do a forensic examination of his body, which I get. I think there could be some value there to see what someone who lived in isolation might die of. Obviously they're genetic things that can still happen. But in any sort of man influenced death is probably not the likely cause. But my favorite part about this story is that he died in his hammock and he had covered himself with bird feathers with macaw feathers. Because he knew he was dying and that just sounds like a really peaceful, lovely way to go. Yeah, it is. But again, if he was 60 and this guy was living like about as healthy a life as a human being can live, you would think it seems really young, but yeah, the fact that he was covered in macaw feathers and there wasn't any sign that anyone else had been around him. Definitely certainly does point to the idea that he was awaiting death in a new death was coming. So should we take a quick break to that? And we'll come back and

funai Amazon rainforest chuck Josh Jerry Brazil
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:03 min | 8 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Capitol is set to air tonight on prime time television The committee looking into what happened plans to share what it has uncovered about then president Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election Greg valliere chief political analyst for AGF securities says Trump supporters are likely on edge Kevin McCarthy and a lot of Republicans have to worry about the quality and quantity of the witnesses over the whole month of June People like Ivanka Trump Jared Kushner I think a lot of people have stories to tell Greg valier says the key is how credible some of these witnesses will be This all begins at 8 p.m. Wall Street time Well while all eyes are on Capitol Hill ahead of tonight's hearing President Biden is in California for the summit of the Americas The rainforest and democracy topped the agenda for the Biden Bolsonaro sideline meeting Brazil's leader jair Bolsonaro is a combative right-wing populist who had lined himself with former president Trump and he and President Biden have not met nor spoken on the phone since Biden took office Both U.S. and Brazilian officials say climate the rainforest and democratic institutions will come up in the meeting which Bolsonaro teed up by expressing his doubt about Biden's election victory In Washington I may be more as Bloomberg radio FDA approval is expected on plans to administer a COVID-19 vaccine to ages 5 and under but The White House is not waiting It's already outlining its rollout plans for the vaccine the Biden administration says 10 million doses will be available largely through pediatricians Global news 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than a 120 countries I'm Nancy Lyons All right now thank you so much Carol massar along with Tim stenbeck live in art Bloomberg interactive broker studio streaming on YouTube So safe to say our kids just can not catch a break between the pandemic and being schooled at home for a long time missing out on all important socialization for months at a time And then the chronic shootings in schools and society where kids often end up being the target it has been a world full of stress for our younger citizens We did hear the House of Representatives yesterday passing a sweeping gun reform law but it seems like it's not going to get past the Senate Let's get into it in a specifically what it means for our nation's youth Joining us is doctor Tamar mendelssohn Director of the center for adolescent health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg school of public health that is supported by Michael R Bloomberg the founder of Bloomberg LP and Bloomberg philanthropies Doctor mendelson we wanted you on the program today because you're an expert in adolescent mental health child psychology And you can really give us an overview on what our nation's kids go through not just if they would experience a horrific event like this But just preparing for events like this When I was in school we weren't doing drills for active shooters Caroline know it wasn't happening when you were Columbine happened my freshman year of high school And I feel that was a sort of a changing moment How do we need to think about this in the context of mental health Yeah so thank you for having me It's a pleasure to be with you today And yes you're absolutely right that these kinds of events have you know sort of acute and then ongoing impact for young people And of course the young people who are most affected are either out of school we're shooting has happened or in the community in some way that even young people who may live far away are going to hear about these events through the media and like you're saying they may also be experiencing drills or other change procedures in their school So I think it's important for parents to understand that this might raise anxieties and concerns for young people So how do we approach this And I feel like that there I remember my sister who has three girls who are now in their 20s but they were younger and when there were things in the news whether it was during various administrations and headlines and kids either didn't expose them to news at all because she just didn't know when things were going to pop up That were questionable So how do we as a society as parents as caregivers do the right thing here And you know what Yeah Forgive me I think I need to break in forgive me the president is speaking at the summit of the Americas in Los Angeles and we do want to take our audience there This is in Los Angeles a gathering intended to deepen the ties between the U.S. and western hemisphere countries So let's head to President Biden at the summit of the Americas of the Americas I think there may be a fire or something Press that was a joke That wasn't true It was wonderful to be with you this morning I really made it And I want to thank the chamber of Congress for bringing together this group of business leaders from all across the region And all of us here in Los Angeles for a simple reason Because we believe in the incredible economic potential of the Americas I know I do We all do I mean I just think that the potential is unlimited The reason is fill with dynamic energy entrepreneurs who are.

President Biden president Donald Trump Greg valliere AGF securities Jared Kushner Greg valier Biden Bolsonaro jair Bolsonaro president Trump Bolsonaro Biden Biden administration Nancy Lyons Carol massar Tim stenbeck Bloomberg Kevin McCarthy Ivanka Trump Tamar mendelssohn center for adolescent health
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:44 min | 9 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WTOP

"Cattle ranch you might imagine wide open prairies in the American West Well cattle ranching in the Amazon rainforest is a growing business that's a major cause of deforestation And the U.S. is complicit A lot of Brazilian beef is served at American dinner tables Washington Post Rio de Janeiro bureau chief Terrence McCoy tells us an agreement was made ten years ago to cut ties between illegal deforestation and cattle ranching but it's not working Beef and cattle isn't individually tracked in Brazil So all you have to do to be able to work around this agreement was you just have to shuffle the cattle from farm to farm So you take the paddle from a dirty farm you shuffle to a clean farm and from the clean farm you can then send it to the meatpacking plant and we're off to the races The U.S. lifted a moratorium on Brazilian beef two years ago and it quickly became the second biggest buyer You've heard of little free libraries you've probably seen them Well there's a new concept that's putting the spotlight on artists in their work It's all about creating artwork to share and taking pieces created by others We just really wanted to bring that happiness to our community China may is one of the founders of operation arts foundation the nonprofit behind the mini art gallery neighborhood entertainment tour She says the goal is to create a free space for artists through tiny boxes that are set up like art galleries We know how hard it is for artists to make their craft their career Right now they have two in prince George's county and plan to expand The next location will be in Tacoma park and they're all open 24/7 Anyone can participate We really just want to see art everywhere Melissa Howell WTO penis The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame just announced its class of 2022 So which musicians will be inducted in November 5th Entertainment editor Jason fraley.

American dinner tables Washing Terrence McCoy Amazon rainforest U.S. Brazil Tacoma park China prince George Melissa Howell Roll Hall of Fame Jason fraley
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:23 min | 10 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

"Tell me what listeners can do if they want to help with conservation or learn more about your work. Thousands of people donate small amounts, even like $5, $2. I mean, there's also people that do a $1000. But whatever it is, it helps. It goes straight to paying our rangers, getting gasoline for our boats, scientific equipment, camera traps. It's the most direct way to protect the Amazon. And then, of course, there's all the other things like being a responsible consumer, not eating fast food beef. I mean, beef is one of the largest contributors to deforestation in the Amazon because they go and they cut down huge areas for cattle farming and it just destroying the Amazon. So there's also just at this point getting sharing stuff, like on social media, the fact that people share the fact that when the fires came out, the people shared that video, got it to the news, got it to people that now are big time funders and actually put some serious fuel behind this work and make us able to do this work. So it really is like it is a solvable thing. In conservation at the end of the day, what we're trying to do is not cut down a tree. You know, giraffes aren't going to go extinct on their own. It's only if we kill them. So this is a very solvable problem. We just need humans to focus for a second. So really keeping it as part of the dialog, helping good conservation organizations all over the world. Traveling, the ecotourism thing still works, support, whether it's Costa Rica or Africa or Peru. Come see the work we're doing. Get out there. Thanks for being on the show. I really appreciate you. This has been great. And I really appreciate you having here. You've really brought the rainforest to life for me. I appreciate a man and just this, you know, sharing the news and people being able to hear this. That's important. That's how we do this. It's how we get it done. So thank you for helping us protect the forest, really appreciate it. Good talking to you, man. Absolutely. Keep the snakes away from me. Paul roslie is a conservationist author and award winning filmmaker. He's the cofounder of Tom and dua expeditions and jungle keepers. You can find links to those organizations and to information about the Brooklyn botanical gardens in our show notes. Solvable is produced by Jocelyn Frank. Research by David jock. Booking by Lisa Dunn. Editing help from Williams. Our managing producer is Sasha Matthias, and our executive producer is Mia Labelle. From all of us on the solvable team and the pushkin family, we hope you learned ideas and strategies that you'll use to make your community and the world. Better places. I'm Ronald young junior. Thanks for listening. This summer I want to go to Mel which camp accomplish. My Friends say we could swim, play sports, craft, ride horses, and have new adventures every day. Mel would camp accomplish is for kids ages 5 to 18 with and without disabilities, with ten weeks of day camp and overnight camp options to choose from. It's all located in southern Maryland with paddle boats, ropes courses, and outdoor stage, and tons of space to run around and have fun. Sign me up at melwood dot org slash camp..

Amazon Paul roslie Brooklyn botanical gardens Jocelyn Frank David jock Lisa Dunn Sasha Matthias Mia Labelle Peru Costa Rica Africa Ronald young Tom Mel Williams Maryland
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

07:49 min | 10 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

"You start the eco tourism company, tamandua expeditions. Tell me a little bit about how that came about. The local guy at first met his name is Juan Julio and he just told everybody to call him JJ because he thought that was easier for the gringos. But it sucks. Now we all fall in JJ. Originally, he was doing that. He was saying, look, you know, bring people onto my land because I'm trying to protect he was trying to protect his land. And he said, look, we'll take you out for animals and he worked with scientists and so like go out in the morning and take data on macaws and then at night I'd be free to run out and look for snakes or do whatever else I wanted to do. Climb trees and stuff. Originally that was the first thing I was told was like, do that. Bring people that'll help. And it also gave me a reason to be working in the Amazon. I had a purpose. I was helping with something. Our deal is that we want to take people on authentic wildlife experiences. And so that's whether that's tracking tigers in India or coming to the Amazon and taking part in conservation, it's always like the real deal. And then also now that we have a ranger team and that we have all these projects running, I mean, things have grown so much that now there's so much for people to see when they come. How do you think eco tourism drives conservation? I've heard people criticize ecotourism for conservation and I think in some places there's like anything. I mean, in some places, water is great, you know, until it's a flood, but in the Amazon, in my region, it is incredibly beneficial. If you're a guy with some forest or if you're an indigenous community with some forest, you might not have a way of interacting with the global economy. Even if you're an indigenous community that mostly survives off of piranha and monkeys and a few crops, at some point you're going to need gasoline for your boat motor. And it's like, well, you got to buy that. And then when the loggers come and try to cut down your land, it's like, well, now you need a lawyer. So you do have to interact with the global economy. And so if you want to do that, you have to earn a little cash. And it's like, well, ecotourism is a great way to do that. Paul, can you talk me through some of the ways that people are pillaging, I guess, for lack of a better word, the rainforest. Yes. If somebody came to your backyard and started, you know, or your block and started cutting down all the trees and bulldozing the sidewalk. I mean, you'd have the cops out there in a second. We'd never allow that. Yeah. But when it's the middle of the Amazon, a lot of times no one's here to see it. And so bit by bit day by day, they've just been chipping away at it. People are cutting timber from rainforest. People are gold mining from rainforests. And so in my experience, I've seen the logging industry going after giant ironwood trees. These are 506 hundred sometimes maybe a thousand year old trees that are habitat for thousands of other species. And that at first even I was like, wait, thousands? But yes, it's a single tree can be covered in reptiles and birds and all this other stuff. Frogs will be living on the mosses lichens, vines, all this stuff is just like a skyscraper of life. And so when you cut that down, this all this habitat that's gone. You started a second organization called jungle keepers. Yes. Tell me about what that does and how that fights some of the extraction that you're talking about. Right now, what we have is a team of 8 local rangers, a fleet of boats. We have a ranger station, and we are currently protecting 55,000 acres along this river. So a lot of the, a lot of the area right around where we were starting to see that deforestation, we're sort of trying to arrest the cutting, protecting old growth forests, specifically. You know, it's like we can all do something. It doesn't have to be running with a sword on fire towards a bulldozer trying to save the rainforest and one heroic. Last stand. So I imagine you guys aren't running at bulldozers with flaming swords. What are some of the things that you guys do in order to stop them? We're not talking about like a citizen's arrest here. But if you guys are patrolling, I imagine there's some sort of execution factor where you guys are actually stopping folks from doing the things that they're doing to extract from the rainforest. We gave them a better job. One of our most esteemed colleagues is and he drives both for us and he does maintenance for us. He does all this stuff. His name is Victor. He was a logger. Wow. I mean, with logging, he was like, yeah, man, it's dangerous. The trees fall over and there's snakes and there's all this stuff and you got to be out there cutting and it's weeks on end away from your family and I was like, what if you came to us? 'cause you're like an expert on the river now, right? And he's like, yeah, I know this river like the back of my hand. And I was like, okay. What if you drive travelers up and down and help us out with what we do? And he was like, well, what else? And I was like, well, that's really it. And he's like, so I get good food, a clean bed. I get to hang out with people that I never met before. And he was like, and you're going to pay me more. And I was like, yeah, I was like, what does logging pay? And he's like, 50 soles of potatoes. I was like, bro, let's make it a hundred. I mean, but really, no, it's so cheap. It's so cheap, they're working for a wage that is keeping them poor and starving and it's like, when we started Sam and dua, one of the things we said was if we're going to bring people that have the resources to travel. Yeah. Make sure that the local team is paid in such a way that they're not just getting paid like a day wage that they're professionals at what they do. Are you guys just the jobs creating organization or do you guys ever find yourself in situations where you have to do maybe like documentation and prosecuting and what does patrolling look like for you because I imagine you guys don't have, you know, a big backing like organization, you're not necessarily the FBI of the rainforest. So how do you get the type of the type of executive branch stopping power to actually get in there and stop, you know? Stop the extractions. And you're right. I'm excited about this one thing about how we've been able to convert so many people, but you can't do that for everybody. We can't just make 5000 jobs. You can't do that. So, but yeah, on a normal day, our rangers are patrolling and monitoring wildlife, so they're checking where the spider monkeys are, do you see Jaguar tracks? Enforcement is something we do periodically where it's like when we need enforcement, we collaborate with the police and then because it's Peru a lot of times we have to actually pay the police to come out and do their job out there, but in order to get the police out there, they don't have them too. They don't have the resources to do what they're doing. Then when we say, hey, can you guys take a three day trip out with us into the bush, they're like, yes, but it's got to be like, you know, gasoline, you've got to handle our bedding food. There's a whole bunch of things that we basically we have to plan like a wilderness expedition for them. And it's funny. I went with friends to the Brooklyn botanical gardens, not that long ago, and the Brooklyn botanical gardens are currently fighting a developer that wants to put up a building that will shield the Brooklyn botanical gardens from all their sunlight. Where it's like, we got to get everybody to know about it first. We got to start to have fundraising and a storytelling campaign and we got to get people upset about this and not knowing about this. And then we have to hire lawyers and we found after COVID that there were like, I think it was 17 football fields cut right in one of the core areas that we're protecting. And it was like, who are these people? If we had to do some drone flights over, then we had to take that information back to the city, show the law enforcement, try and get them out there, but then the people had heard us coming and they ran away, so there's no one to arrest. And it's like, it's absolutely brutal work, but that is day to day. That is what we're doing. We are just putting out little fires trying to trying to protect this one river because that is.

Amazon tamandua expeditions Juan Julio Brooklyn botanical gardens India Paul Victor Sam FBI Peru bush football
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:37 min | 10 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

"IBM, let's create. Learn more at IBM dot com slash consulting. As a leading online real estate investing platform, crowd street gives investors like you, access to institutional quality opportunities across the country. Today, thousands of investors are building their personal portfolios all online. From multi-family and industrial warehousing to self storage and senior living, create your account for free and join an active community who have tapped into some of the most sought after real estate. With more than 580 deals and over 415 million in distributions to date, see how easy it can be to invest in real estate. Learn more at crowd street, dot com. As you got there and you know, you see this, you have this Jurassic Park moment where did you have another Jurassic Park moment when the jungle kind of turned out, or you saw less glamorous parts of the jungle that weren't so weren't so great, the grittier parts, you know, about visiting and living in the Amazon. Well, the thing is I love everything about the jungle. I mean, you know, people say, what about the piranhas? What about this? What about that? It's like, dude, piranhas are delicious. Pride. Piranhas are delicious. I mean, anacondas black Cameron, I've had close and counters with Jaguars, the only thing that after I had started learning and gone on adventures and sort of gotten my jungle feat, which is something you literally have to do because the native guys, they're like, look, you're too loud with boots on, take them off. So they want you to walk barefoot with the scorpions and the snakes and the spikes and the jungles. No, thank you. This is all Ronald repellent. You're describing a place that Ronald will see from afar on a tour. Wait, but your team just told me they got you plane tickets. You're coming with me next week. Yeah, my gold preserve the Amazon is by staying out of it. So that's dude. You're not the first man. A lot of people that really help us protect the Amazon. I've said the same thing. They're like, look, in theory, I want to protect the rainforest. I don't want to set foot there. I'm glad that it exists. And hey, you know, I respect I really respect that. At least for me, there's a huge benefit of that I enjoy it. You wanted to go yourself, how do you get other people excited about the Amazon about preserving it? How do you get somebody that, you know, that maybe apathetic or indifferent about the Amazon? How do you get them excited about your work and what it is that you're doing? The rainforests are huge global forces in the stabilization of our climate that keep tons of carbon in the ground. That's where all of our biodiversity is. Huge amount of land for indigenous people. I mean, there's just The Crown jewel of Planet Earth. And some people still don't care. Yeah. You know? But the thing is, if that's where you get to the level of like, yeah, but a bad environment, if you can't breathe the air and drink the water, it ain't good for business either. I was on, I was on a Fox News show at some point and the guy, he was actually nice off camera. He goes, look, he goes, I'm about to come after you, and I went, okay, he goes, but this is a financial show, and then they started and he goes, and I got a tree hugger on here. Now why would we want to protect the Amazon? And I was like, you got millions of starving people because there's no rainforest and everybody up here starts choking and the weather goes all out of whack. I was like, that is not good. For your third quarter or whatever it is you're worried about. And that's the truth..

Amazon Jurassic Park IBM Ronald Jaguars Cameron Fox News
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

03:20 min | 10 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

"Describe how big the Amazon is. And I don't know if you have any comparative terms. I can't really imagine the scope in the size. The Amazon basin itself is larger than the continental U.S.. And we yeah, it's huge. And when you're in this forest, when you fly over it, I was lucky enough to be in like a small cessna flying over. We were monitoring for a shorter dogs. And we reached parts where you can't see anything, but forest. It just looks like you're flying over a field of broccoli and there is nothing else. Yeah. As far as the eye can see and it's such a massive forest and it's not just jungle. It's a lot of people don't realize there's in the Amazon, there's grasslands and there's wetlands, there's the pantanal. There's all this different other types of ecosystems has been put bamboo forests. It floods and it recedes. It's so, so much more complex than we think that my big thing there that really blew my mind was that you show up and you see a bunch of green and these giant trees and you're like, okay, cool. But then it takes you a few years of learning to learn how much you don't know. Because once you learn all, let's say, out of 1500 tree species, I learned 30 trees and 50 birds and a few snakes and okay, so I learned those things. But I said, well, wait, the size of this jungle is so beyond our comparison that it's other than comparing it to the United States. I can't even I can't even begin. It's just massive. Do you remember the first time you stepped in there? I imagine that's different from the New York forests. So what was it like? You ever see the beginning of Jurassic Park? Would you see the brontosaurus? Yes. Yes. Grab your face and she stands up and like everyone gets chills when you see that and it was like the first time I stepped off the boat and saw a giant thousand year old KPop tree and trails of leafcutter ants and you hear two cans and there's spider monkeys. It was literally just like this is where I am supposed to be. It felt like it felt like it felt like waking up from the matrix for the first time. I was like, oh, this is what it's supposed to be like. This is great. The one thing that my teacher didn't know was he was scared of snakes. And I had, I had grown up like rescuing snakes, like one time on a trail in New York and New Jersey, some old guy was trying to kill a copperhead. And I just stepped in and picked it up and moved it, which by that point I'd caught hundreds of non venomous snakes, and so I knew how to do it. Thank you, Paul. This is with your guy. No. Try to stay away from them. I mean, I support you on that. Everybody should stay away from them, but the funny thing is a snake will never in any circumstances attack a person. You know, anybody that's messing with the snake, you know, you hear about people killing rattlesnakes and stuff. It's like, well, you could do that, or you could just keep walking. You could just not. What a radical concept. It's amazing. And there's a lot of that in conservation. But yeah, going to the jungle for the first time, absolutely was a major life-changing moment. That moment of seeing the jungle for the first time, that's it. That was really.

Amazon Amazon basin U.S. Jurassic Park New York New Jersey Paul
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

Solvable

07:09 min | 10 months ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Solvable

"Hey solvable listeners, I want to let you know that this is going to be the last episode of solvable for the foreseeable future. Thank you for joining us each week as we mine the brightest brains around for solutions to problems like climate change. Imperialism in the arts, size discrimination, exclusivity and gaming, the nation's mental health crisis, and of course the pandemic. Although the world has many more problems, this is the last we'll aim to solve for now. And with that, let's start the show. This is solvable. I'm Ronald young junior. It just looks at your flying over a field of broccoli and there is nothing else. That massive field is the Amazon rainforest. Stretching from Brazil to Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, French Guiana, and Suriname. Sometimes called the lungs of the earth, or its ability to absorb massive amounts of CO2 and produce oxygen. The Amazon now suffers from man-made fires and deforestation. If somebody came to your backyard and started, you know, or you're block and started cutting down all the trees and bulldozing the sidewalk. I mean, you'd have the cops out there in a second. We've never allowed that. The jungle is changing as people increasingly view the Amazon as a resource for things like wood and gold. And so bit by bit day by day, they've just been chipping away at it. People are cutting timber from rainforest. People are gold mining from rainforest. Paul rosalie is a conservationist and author. In August 2019, he posted a video showing the results of the wildfires destroying the Amazon rainforest at that time. It was viewed over 1.4 million times and received a lot of media attention. Just by people posting and re sharing his video, Paul and his team got the word out about what was being lost in those fires. Gave me a reason to be working in the Amazon. I had a purpose. I was helping with something. Which is something I really wanted. Was to not just be like, yeah, it's a lot of fun. I take pictures. It was like, no, I'm actually helping these people to protect their land. Through his eco tourism company and his team of forest rangers, rosalie is trying to get people to see why the rainforest exists. Why it's important to our daily lives. And what can be done to preserve the thousands of animal and plant species that make the rainforest their home. A single tree can be covered in reptiles and birds and frogs will be living on the mosses lichens, vines, all this stuff. It's just like a skyscraper of life. The Amazon's existence is also crucial to our own existence, helping to stabilize the climate. Rosalie remains optimistic that his efforts to save the rainforest will not be in vain. Saving the Amazon rainforest is a solvable problem. Do you remember the earliest time that you fell in love with wildlife or with nature? And tell me about how that came to be for you. So I was born in Brooklyn and my parents wanted to get away from the city, so they moved to northern New Jersey. And so we had, I had access to a lot of horrors. People don't realize doing New York and New Jersey is actually a lot of forest there. And so my parents used to take me on hikes. I loved Stormi summer days when the foliage is really thick. I wanted to pretend it was the jungle. And I used to love going out and looking for snakes and turtles and then as I got older, it took me to The Bronx zoo. It's like legendary. You see these animals that, you know, from all over the world that are so incredible, it just stuck in my head that that's something that you can do that a person can do. And then when I was a teenager, it was like going out into the Woods with a knife and one match and my dog, and I'd have to survive for the whole weekend. So yeah. One match and your dog just doesn't seem like enough to survive for the weekend. So you dropped out of high school with your parents encouragement. Tell me, tell me that story. Yeah, it always people always scratch their head when I tell them that, but I was the worst student you have ever heard of. Well, no, second worst. There's always that kid that takes it to another level. Noise. Always. There's always that guy. But no, I was, I think I got detention or suspended. How many times through middle school and then in high school is like, I was old enough to be like getting in fights with people and just failing all my classes and miserable and depressed. I mean, you know, it sounds like, oh, it was school, but it's like, when you're a kid, you're in a room, and they tell you, you're gonna be in this room for a long time. It's January. And you got months ahead of you, and next year is gonna be the same thing. And when you grow up, you're gonna sit in an office, and it's gonna be the same thing again, and it's just assignments and it's boring, and so I'd be like, all right, well, I'm gonna read, and then now Paul gave me the book, and I'd be like, you're not taking the book. Give us the book now or else. You're going to the principal office. We're gonna call this a, it was my mom came to me and she was like, look, if you want, drop out. And I was like, what? And she was like, yeah, you're not gonna be a couch kid. She's like, you're not gonna go work at the gas station. She's like, you gotta go to college. She's like, but you can get your GED right now. Which is two years of high school. And I tell this to kids, it's a get out of jail free card. If you're ready to go do something, if you want to learn a trade, if you want to go exploring whatever it is you wanna do, you don't need to sit for the second two years of high school. It's not made for everybody. And if you're one of those people, it's not made for, you take this test and I went straight to community college and then I applied to state school and I just, you know, I did my undergrad and that gave me the time to start focusing on what I really wanted and at that very, very young age at 17. I was already going, okay, well, what am I doing here? You ended up in Peru somehow, so take me on that trip. It was actually, I think, in school, a teacher had made a joke about like, oh, you know, this wood did their cutting down the Amazon rainforest for and I sort of said, wait a second. This is. That's a real place. The theoretically I could go to. And so I got it in my head and I started doing searches on the Internet and the first thing you look up go to the rainforest, you finally tours and stuff. And I was like, I don't want to do that. You know, I want to go, I want to go and do something. I want to go be part of something, something authentic. And I found this local indigenous guy who was working with macaws, you know, the color for the big colorful parrots. And I sent out an email and I missed it like a 130 other emails too, but I waited like a month and a half heard nothing and then one day I got an email back and was like, hey, you know, if you're good in the outdoors and you feel this and that, you can come. It was very surreal. And I had to fight that one as a fight with my parents with 'cause they were like, you are too young to be getting on a plane by yourself, going to the middle of the jungle down a road completely out of contact for days and days and days and weeks and with anacondas and bushmasters and Jaguars and poachers and all this stuff. Yeah. Yeah. So that one was tough. That was a tough one to sell. And I basically had to play the, you know, if I'm turning 18, I can do it without your thing, so I'd rather do it with you. So I had to we got into it on that one. But yeah, so getting there the.

Amazon Ronald young Paul rosalie French Guiana Suriname Peru Guyana New Jersey Bolivia Ecuador Venezuela Colombia rosalie Rosalie Brazil Paul Brooklyn New York Jaguars
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"At the UN climate summit that's been taking place in Glasgow for the past two weeks Towards the beginning of the summit more than 100 world leaders came together to promise an end and also to reverse deforestation by 2030 And Brazil were large stretches of the Amazon rainforest have been cut down was among the signatories At a local level though communities are already trying to make a difference In one corner of the Amazon those who used to cut down the forest are now working to save it and try to find a more sustainable way forward Anna Io nova reports now from the watu reserve in Brazil The Watteau reserve is a vast protected area deep in the Brazilian Amazon It is only reachable by boat down a wide river past clusters of submerged rainforest About 20 small villages dot the river banks where traditional communities have lived for decades That's their fault that you can see San Francisco de chagas to caribbee is one of them It sits perched on the banks of the guatema river flanked by lush green forest Around to 150 people live here in simple wooden houses on small farms planted with cassava cabbage beans The economy here was once fueled by cassava flower in a legal logging Chasing profits loggers raced all the powders a tree that grew to 30 meters in height But things changed when the area became a reserve nearly two decades ago Authorities cracked down an illegal logging Once viewed as acceptable in the community The village was forced to reinvent itself These days essential a concession of our country runs an equatorial large owned by the village Much has changed since her childhood She says the community now values the environment and is working to prefer the damage done in the past While finding other ways to earn an income We are trying to bring back species that were everywhere before And today we don't have then anymore Before we only thought of toppling trees and exploring stretches of land to earn a bit of cash Today we know that by taking care of the forests we can earn a lot more So today knowing what's right nobody wants to do wrong We are preserving these right here But when COVID hit tourism things got tough for the community So earlier this year residents set up a woodworking shop too and they hope it will bring them another key source of income They plan to produce artisan homewares like serving trays and wooden spoons Using sustainably sourced timber from The Rain forest The woodworking shop sits in a small clearing in the middle of the jungle with macaws flying overhead and a generator powering the table saws an electric Sanders Today designers from Rio de Janeiro are teaching students wearing hard hats and earmuffs the art of woodcraft One of the project leaders hopes that the skills residents of all ages are learning will help them kick start the new venture Knows about timber He spent more than two decades working as a logger across the Amazon sometimes raising forest illegally But now he believes sustainable timber is the way forward for his community We hope that soon will be able to get enough workers to be able to start producing and later on it will be a game for each family for each person for each worker who wants to work together with us to earn a living With legal timber So this was a dream and we succeeded today.

Anna Io watu reserve Watteau reserve Brazilian Amazon guatema river Brazil Amazon rainforest Glasgow UN COVID San Francisco Rio de Janeiro Amazon
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"Told me then. This is already beyond the threshold. You know, the point of no return. What are your thoughts now? We are seeing what has been predicted by science since a long time. The unfolding of the so called civilization of Amazon, there was a very influential paper that came out in nature magazine a few months ago. They found that for a large chunk of Amazon, almost half of it, the forces losing the battle. Those forests are no longer able to cope with the lack of rainfall and the increase in temperature. And the flammability of those areas as they grow dryer and dryer. And then trees start dying off, then they start releasing carbon instead of sinking carbon and they are no longer able to make the powerful biotic pump that keep the fabulous rainfall system functioning and therefore propelling the flying rivers. It's basically failing. And the consequences are also visible because most of its South America is having to endure a very prolonged drought. And now we are seeing this effect in the Amazon propagating. Now those rivers are in the sky or faltering. And there is drying up Brazil is facing a very serious energy crisis because most of the electricity is produced by hydropower. I just want to explain what you mean by those flying rivers because most people around the world think of the forest being the lungs of the world, right? A carbon sink as you describe it. But the Amazon creates its own climate by pushing water into the atmosphere and creating flying rivers that of course produce their own rain. And now because of deforestation, it is no longer able to do that. Hence why we're seeing these droughts and why we're seeing this change in the climate. Precisely. So when we cut the forest, then you destroy this fantastic mechanisms of self wetting or wet spots. And then the air starts drying up, the flying rivers are weakened. And the forces right now is being converted in a speed that it is not able to counter to survive. You know, after the global outcry in 2020, things are better this year, forest fires are down by half from last year. But what I'm hearing you saying is that it's just simply not enough. No. And also, from year to year, you have fluctuations which are natural and part of the climate system. And a system that is alive like on earth. You have a live mechanism provided by the biosphere, all the organisms, all the ecosystems. They tend to produce a stability. And the abuse that we submitted through destructive and polluting behaviors are basically being absorbed by the capacity that the biosphere has to compensate. Like our body, we can suffer quite a lot of abuse and still be okay. But then you have a threshold this crossed. And then you have a tipping point, where thereafter, the system is no longer able to hold it. I wanted to talk to you because this is my last show for NPR weekend. And I've been able to report on so many stories around the world, but I think one of the most profound was getting to go to the Amazon and see firsthand what you're describing I'm wondering as someone who, from when you were very young, as you recounted to me, has loved and studied the forests, what you're feeling right now. Where can they see? What I see is that, unfortunately, for not only for Brazilians for humanity at this point, it seems that we need a big blow, like a major disaster to wake up. Deforestation is not a problem of economics. It's a problem of ideology. People who are involved in clearing forests, they have the ideal logical mission to destroy that forest. And that includes many people who are now in power. That's Antonio novae, one of Brazil's leading climate scientists. Thank you very much. You're welcome. This message comes from.

Amazon South America Brazil NPR Antonio
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on WBUR

"So no, he wants to make a profit. He needs customers. Before companies will give him money to save the trees. He's got to prove that he's really saving them to do that. He needs to go to the stamp of approval Guy. Do you know Darcy? No. Hartono. Yes, I do. He needs to go to David Antonioli and the chief executive officer of Air David's nonprofit Vera validates forest projects like Darcy knows to make sure that they're taking as much carbon out of the atmosphere as they say they are. Were standard centers. So we spend all of our time developing the rules and the procedures, the standard that project developers like Dar Sano and others need to follow. So somebody liked Arsenault comes to Vera, and he's like Hey, I have this forest. It's gorgeous, Carbon rich. I'm saving it from being destroyed and I want to get paid for it. And Vera is like, sure, but you need to prove all that get some auditors on your land so that they can check it out. You can't just hire any old auditor. It has to be an auditor That's credited properly, which means they have the right training. They've got the right procedures in place to deal with conflicts of interest. And they can do the job aside from overseeing the auditors, Basically, Vera has to find out. Are these projects working? Are they living up to their promises? The whole process of getting verified can take years. The very stamp of approval is worth it because after a forced boss gets a vera stamp of approval, they now have something they can sell. Vera has certified. This project takes this many tons of Co two out of the atmosphere. For each ton of co two reduction. Vera issues one credit. This is a currency of this world what they call a verified carbon unit. These are the offsets that companies will pay someone like they're so no good money for But Dar, so no doesn't have the connections to sell these verified carbon units to big companies. Which brings us to the third and final link of the offset chain. The broker. My name is Diego Size Gil and I am co founder and CEO Pajama Diego startup Pajama. It's Who companies go to when they want to buy verified carbon units. Now his startup is relatively new, but it's attracted a lot of big name investors. Bill Gates. Climate Fund. Amazon Serena Williams, the tennis player who we are big fans off. Who is it? Part of why Silicon Valley investors love Diego is that he talks to them in a language that they understand in a way we are Marketplace like Airbnb, connecting supply and demand. It's like Airbnb, but for offsets, so I click it. Yes, If I'm a company, and I go on Diego's website, I can look for a forest. The company monitor sees forests with satellite images. And a I I wanted to zoom. Oh, Oh, there it goes zooming into Brazil. Oh, in the center of Brazil. Yeah, Big Big zoom next to the map. There's a description of a forest project. I can see how many verified carbon units it's generated. There's a verification report by Vera Some photos. Oh, I see a river. I am seeing trees. You can see a trace. This is a very Jesus. It's a very dense area of the Amazon rainforest. You can see the shape of a triangle triangle. Yes, that is the borders of the area that is being conserved. If I'm a company, I can choose to protect this forest. I can buy some verified carbon units and get closer to my carbon negative pledge, and that is the carbon offset chain. Usually, the company pays the forest boss who has paid the stamp of approval Guy and then a broker also gets paid for hooking the whole thing up and in the process, the planet is saved from climate change. Or.

Bill Gates Diego Size Gil David Antonioli Brazil Darcy Amazon Airbnb Air David Diego Serena Williams Pajama Jesus Silicon Valley one credit Hartono each ton Amazon rainforest Vera third Dar Sano
Wet Notes 8-30-21

Scuba Shack Radio

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Wet Notes 8-30-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shack radio for monday august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one. Well we have certainly had our fill of extreme weather lately just last week here. In connecticut we face the challenges of tropical storm on re just barely below hurricane strength and at the last minute it shifted east and we avoided the brunt of the wind rhode island wasn't as fortunate and now we have item a cat for hurricane hit louisiana. Extreme weather is now the norm. The news keeps getting worse. Recently there was a study published by nicholas bars from the potsdam institute for climate impact research and that was that the gulfstream could be varying towards irreversible collapse. Now the gulf stream is part of the atlantic meridional overturning circulation or a. m. Oc this circulation takes warm salty. Water from the tropics moves in north and then takes the cold water south. The study finds that the circulation is at its weakest in one thousand years. So what happens if the gulfstream collapses that will dictate extreme cold for parts of north america and europe. Is the collapse imminent well. That's not an easy question. Answer it could be decades away but as we have seen things are happening a lot faster when it comes to climate change not only will the disruption of the gulfstream resort in colder north american temperatures. It is predicted that there will be a rise in sea level disruption of the monsoon patterns and impacts on the amazon rainforest. An aunt arctic ice sheets. The study concluded that is that this is all a result of human endorse induced climate. Change in may of this year. I talked about a project out on lake. Tahoe called cleanup lake. That project had an ambitious goal of cleaning over seventy two miles of the mountain lake. So i thought i would give it a quick update on how the work is progressing. Now these numbers come from the cleanup delake website. Cleanup delete dot org as earlier this month. Team of divers has removed an amazing eight thousand. One hundred and twenty two pounds of trash were three hundred and three thousand six hundred eighty four kilograms and covered about twenty two miles or thirty four kilometers of coastline. There update indicated that they have completed seventy four dives over twenty seven days of diving. The diver's consumed two hundred and eighty six cylinders of air. Today there have been eighty one volunteers who have delivered two thousand six hundred and eleven volunteer hours. Now i'm not sure if they're on pace to meet their objectives but that's not always the measure success. The amount of continuing effort is what really counts. Keep up the good work guys. The annual boston sea rovers clinic for this year is just one month away. The two thousand twenty clinic happened just a couple of weeks. Before the corona corona virus lockdowns took effect. We really didn't know how serious things were then. Now as we continue to emerge from the pandemic the show may just have the distinction of being the last face to face. Scuba show in the world before the pandemic and the first face-to-face scuba show in the world post pandemic monty. And i were at the last meeting. And everything's proceeding for the october. First and second show the show will follow state and local mandates and as the days pass by. We are all hoping that the show will go off his plan. This year shows moved from the traditional march date to october as a result of the pandemic that you'd be a great time to enjoy some early fall weather in new england. It'd be great to get together and diving is certainly a social sport. Do you miss dive training magazine. I sure do. I think i've re reread all the back issues. We have a good shop at least three times. So what's happening with the publication. Well i reached out to catherine castle garcia the editor to find out the latest catherine informed me that they hope to be publishing again in the fourth quarter of two thousand and twenty one. Now that's some good news. The fourth quarter is not that far away. And i'm certainly looking forward to dive training magazine hitting the streets and finally here on wet notes. I wanted to give you an update on the situation with dutch springs. If you remember last time. I reported that the property owned by stu jill school had been sold to trammell crow texas developer. Who's planning to build a large warehouse facility on the property. The initial word was that dutch would shut down after the season while a lot has happened in the last couple of weeks i there was a petition that garnered over three thousand supporters to keep the place open and as we know petitions can only go so far then there was support from patty professional association of diving instructors patty due to white paper outlining the economic benefits dutch brings provides as a diving venue. Patty estimates that because dutch exists. It helps to generate three point. Four billion annual retail sales in the northeast they tag the economic benefit to bethlehem at thirty four point five million as for tax revenue. The paper indicates that about ninety. Eight point nine million is generated for state and local taxes and northeast and about two point one million for bethlehem in addition to patty support. The lehigh valley planning commission has called the proposal of disaster for the quality of life in the lehigh valley while it seems that there a great deal of opposition to maybe very little that can be done to stop the effort. One positive. I that i did see. Was that trammell. Crow was indiscretions with local officials to offload the fifty off lou to fifty acre quarry for community use. Just how would you get to acquire if they build the warehouses. I don't know while the saga is far from over. I would expect that we won't see. Dutch brings open for the twenty twenty two dive season but his al michaels once said. Do you believe in miracles. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes. Here on scuba shot radio for august thirtieth two thousand and twenty one

Gulf Stream Dutch Springs Clean Up The Lake Dive Training Magazine Boston Sea Rovers Wind Rhode Island Potsdam Institute For Climate Gulfstream Resort Hurricane Cleanup Lake Boston Sea Rovers Clinic Amazon Rainforest Mountain Lake Nicholas Connecticut Catherine Castle Garcia Louisiana Tahoe Arctic North America
Amazon Rainforest Now Emits More Carbon Dioxide Than It Absorbs, Study Confirms

Here & Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Amazon Rainforest Now Emits More Carbon Dioxide Than It Absorbs, Study Confirms

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"Apac was spotted in this part of the valley. Recently miller's return to set up a wildlife camera and do a howling survey he climbs off trail sit still for over an hour and calls out to the wolves then he waits for a call back nothing today but when he does hear something. That's a good indication. Okay something's going on right here. He's gathering intel so he can direct sheep away from those trouble-spots that's not possible. In the herders he works with deploy air horns in flashing lights. Just making sound flashing lights to scare wolves away since the project started more than a decade ago. The number of sheep killed in the area is down. Only one wolf has been killed yet. The effort is an outlier in idaho. Because ranchers here preferred to use lethal methods and want to lower the wolf population now because of new legislation passed this year. That's easier there are more opportunities for hunting and trapping and private contractors can kill wolves on behalf of the state miller thinks the new rules could have implications for the wolf projects. Work he says moore wolf. Hunting will inevitably break up packs in without a cohesive unit. They might not be able to go after traditional prey instead opting for easier targets livestock. That theory has been supported but also challenged by research. Still the nonlethal work will continue this summer. One rancher who works with the wood river wolf project is cory peavy the sheet manager at flat top ranch in carry. Initially he was skeptical. I wasn't convinced that a few flashing lights and proverbially banging pots and pans was going to make any of difference using nonlethal methods takes time in coordination. Peavy says but it's been working Implement things that change if you move a up. Few move lights around something for them to fixate their curiosity on. It's enough to inspire caution in the wolves and he's trying other things on his own like a pilot study with a researcher who's monitoring if attaching flashing lights to his ships. Ears will deter predators. Making these changes is risky. He says for example the lights could stress sheep out in that could affect their growth. But he's willing to experiment for a larger good. I see the potential benefit as being worth it. So i take that risk. The wolf project reduces some of that risk because it pays for logan miller position and all the gear it gives to the sheep. Herders in nonlethal management recently got a big boost in each of the past two years wildlife services a government agency which often responds to rancher calls by killing wolves has received a one point four million dollar appropriation from the federal budget for nonlethal projects..

moore wolf miller Apac cory peavy flat top ranch intel idaho wood river Peavy logan miller
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"The journal nature. That says the amazon forest once known as the lungs of the planet now emitting more carbon than it is absorbing scott. Thank you thank you very much for having me. The state of idaho has a new law on wolves. It expands hunting and trapping opportunities and makes more money available to kill the animals but a group of ranchers is taking a different approach to avoid predator livestock conflicts before they happen. Rachel cohen from boise state public radio reports. Logan miller skinning the forest floor. He's looking for signs and see how this has been. Broken bone has been snapped. Miller works for the wood river wolf project. We're not too far from the city of haley on a popular trail. It might not have been a wolf that made this kill. Were examining he says but maybe one came by and checked out. The leftovers spoils jaws are powerful enough to break bone. He's scribbles in his notebook. Takes down the gps location and does this whenever he sees clue attract. Some scott signs of pray. He's trying to piece together. Where the wolves are hanging out environmentalists a wildlife services agent in a rancher started the wolf project in two thousand eight. The goal is to employ nonlethal methods to prevent wolves from killing livestock. Sun valley is one of the most historic sheep ranching spots in the country each year ranchers bring their herds up to the mountains to graze and miller helps keep them safe from wolves..

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

09:34 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"Afford a one bedroom apartment. We should be asking how useful this this minimum wage reading is to begin with robin farzad is host of public. Radio's disclosure thanks robin. Thank you german. Chancellor angela merkel visits president biden at the white house this afternoon. It's likely to be her last official visit. Because she's stepping down this fall the us in germany our allies of course but there's also some tension between the two countries over a russian gas pipeline. That washington opposes dan. Hamilton is director of the global europe program at the wilson center. Welcome to the show. Dan thank you. Thank you the overarching. Arching theme for this meeting at the white house is the friendship between the. Us and germany. How would you describe the relationship in this first year. The biden administration chancellor merkel you know in the last number of turbulent years started to gain the mantle of leader of the free world. It's not a mental. She wore very comfortably. And i think she's happy to give it back to the president of the united states. I think this meeting is sort of some of that transfer The meeting relationships gone well but she has been a bit hesitant to fully. Embrace it by administration's agenda. 'cause she's conscious of the delicate political balance going on in the united states and the republicans could take a house or two in the us congress in the midterms so One of the things. They'll be talking about president. Biden halted the trump administration's planned to pull thousands of american troops out of germany. Why is it important in your view that we keep those troops there. Germany was not only the frontline and the cold war but it's become since the end of the cold or sort of a secure platform for us forces not only for europe but for the middle east afghanistan. Africa many other places The medical facilities in germany or were injured. Us servicemen from afghanistan. Africa middle east. Go 'cause the flights to the united states are so far away Germany is the staging area for us. Forward presence nato ford presence on the eastern flanks of nato so it's a it's an has been the center of africa command for For the us military so even though the threat today may seem a bit more remote than it was during the cold. War germany's still principal ally. It also has forces in afghanistan. it's been training forces in iraq Critically important partner in the western balkans as well as these broader projection capabilities. It's the base for us power projection in much of the rest of the world. Okay the one sticking point if that's if that's not too strong of a word in these talks today is that russian gas pipeline pipeline to germany. Is there room to compromise. And why does washington oppose it. The opposition is that the pipeline and not only bypasses east european countries because it goes through the baltic sea. It basically cuts out ukraine As a gas transit country and you know gas revenues for ukraine country. That's been salted by russia In fragile shape or crucial those gas revenues and so I president biden. Call it a bad deal and there's difference opposition in the us. Congress chancellor merkel has continued to back the deal so compromise. Yeah there might sorry. No no no. It's okay. I just just quickly you. You alluded to Chancellor merkel's as being the leader of the free world defacto anyway during the trump years. Can you just talk about her. Legacy in this last Twenty seconds we've got. She's had a profound impacts. You know she's been chancellor for four. us presidents Seeing them come and go there have been ups and downs in the relationship but she has never wavered from commitment to atlanticist germany. That looks outward together with the united states is the daughter of an east german You know She east germany. It's quite a quite life story. She has and i think there dan dan. Hamilton is the director of the global europe program at the wilson center. Thank you thank you to south america. Now where the planet is losing an important buffer against global warming a study published yesterday and the journal nature found. Part of the amazon rainforest is now putting out more carbon dioxide than it absorbs blame deforestation intentional fires heat waves scott denting as a professor at colorado state university's department of atmospheric science and he wrote the article that accompanied the scientific study. Scott it is good to speak with you and good to be here. Thank you but the topic is difficult because we often hear the amazon described as the lungs of the planet and now to hear that they are releasing. The forest is releasing more carbon than is absorbing. How alarming is that to scientists. Well it's not good news on the other hand This is something that a lot of us have been concerned about for a long time. There's been a series of studies over the last ten or fifteen years that show the uptake of carbon by the forest decreasing. The difference here is that rather than going out and measuring trees on the ground. Which you know you can never be sure that ones you measure are representative of an entire continent. This study actually measured the co two in the air with small airplanes across the amazon for nine years. And so it's a very comprehensive survey of the region and it is certainly concerning that the uptake of carbon by the forest is decreasing and even has reversed in enlarge areas. Remind us how important the amazon is to the entire planet so the amazon is very important for the planet in many ways certainly Not just for sucking up fossil fuel. Co two from the atmosphere It's the most productive ecosystem on earth. It's one of the most by a diverse but from the point of view of the carbon cycle the amazon is converting huge amounts of co two from the atmosphere into would that eventually gets eaten by bacteria so forth after the trees die. So there's this very rapid cycling of carbon in and out of the forest. The trouble now of course is that the forest is dying faster than it's growing especially along its boundaries. Well can we talk about that because that gets to the question of why this is happening. Why the forest is no longer the carbon sink that it has been for so long. I is it because of the the fires that we've been hearing so much about burning in the amazon. The whole confluence of things that are happening particularly along the eastern edge of the amazon. It's important for listeners. To understand this is a huge area. we're talking about. It's almost as big as the as the united states. So it's a it's a gigantic area and along the south and east fringe of the amazon deforestation. A lot of development. There's also of course logging for wood and wood products and all of that is happening in the context of global climate change so it's also warming up at the same time that it's being cut back. The trees get stressed by drought. That makes them more susceptible to burn. And then that sets a sort sort of feedback effect into motion. Where more dead trees leads to more Water loss and more drought more heat and so forth. So it's a it's almost like a chain reaction along the eastern fringe of the amazon. And what are the consequences. Potentially for that chain-reaction on the planet the immediate consequence. That's the subject of this major. New study is that where the forest used to take up net carbon from the atmosphere so essentially as providing freebie emissions reductions right. We would like to cut our fossil fuel emissions and the amazon and other forests have been doing that forest for free by growing trees faster than the trees were dying and now that's reversed and so the large areas on the eastern side of the amazon are now adding to the co two in the air instead of subtracting from the co two in the air. So there's there's both sort of regional consequences for the plants animals and people that live there and also kind of global consequences for for our climate system for our economic and social systems. So what do we do about it the main thing that we have to. I'm sorry if this sounds a little flip is we gotta stop setting carbon on fire. We gotta stop digging coal oil and gas out of the ground and using it to fuel our energy and economic systems as quickly as we can because the earth system is no longer Providing this free service of sucking that carbon down as much as it used to We need to learn to live. Better lives without studying carbon on fire. Scott denning.

germany united states president biden amazon robin farzad Chancellor angela merkel wilson center biden administration afghanistan merkel center of africa command War germany white house western balkans nato Chancellor merkel middle east Hamilton global europe ukraine
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"Us would need to work nearly ninety seven hours per week just to afford the average two bedroom home. We're talking one hundred hours a week here. Well more than two fulltime jobs. I mean a junior banker on wall street who works ninety one hundred hour. Weeks is making mid six figures hundred. Forty eight hundred and fifty thousand dollars after a bonus with all sorts of benefits so it is really striking. The report also breaks down the racial disparities. That are a significant part of the problem. What do the numbers tell us about that. Black and latino workers who we know already make less than their white counterparts. They're more likely to spend more of their take home on rent in this case. More than forty percent of black and latino household spend north of thirty percent of their income on rent versus twenty five percent of white house sold so forty percent households of color versus twenty five percent of white households in our final minute. Here i want to ask. What's the most effective solution to this problem. Is it simply raising the minimum wage. Certainly easier said than done is lowering rent. Prices also hardly an easy thing to do. maybe both what. What is the answer. I don't believe there is a fast and easy quick fix of just a couple of bucks over a few years. You know what you're seeing is such a yawning chasm between prevailing wages which have been stagnant and the cost of living which has been increasing. Say nothing of other. Inflationary pressures that we've been talking about recently and what about the federal state and food you know. Federal and state food housing healthcare systems. That goes to so many low wage workers in the service sector while the likes of walmart and mcdonalds payout big executive compensation and shareholder dividends and buybacks if minimum wage workers in ninety three percent of counties across the nation..

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"What difference these payments are going to make in their lives so these tax credits will be transformational to families. For example one of the families spoke to recently. The mom has a child. who's about one years old. She's been wanting to go back to work but can't actually afford to work because you can't afford childcare so after i educated her about the new child tax credit that it's a regular payment. She can count on and that it is not taxable. The relief in the room was just palpable. And she immediately said okay. I can go back to work now. I can use this money to pay for childcare. So people will get a check but it is a tax credit. That's an important distinction who qualifies. Yeah it's a great point. Ninety three percent of american children qualify the only children who don't are high income children and children who are not citizens who don't have a social security number and this is really important because previously the child tax credit mostly benefited a different group middle and higher income children. So many parents are not aware of this credit. Don't realize that they do qualify. Do people have to do any special paperwork to get into the program to start getting the money so in theory no most families the projectionist somewhere between eighty and eighty five percent will automatically get these payments and they will do that because they have filed taxes and claim their children in the past the government the irs who's distributing the money will be aware of them and then for families who haven't taxes but claims stimulus payments last year. They are also already in the system and we'll get the money but there are several groups who are expected to miss out that fifteen to twenty percent of children are unfortunately some of the most vulnerable. These kids live in families who are often in deep poverty so they really did not have a reason to file taxes there are also our families who are mixed status. Meaning the parent is not a citizen and may not be documented but the child is a citizen. Those children are also owed this tax credit to get it. The parents have to get a special sort of filing number called an itin file tax return claiming the child and then they got the money understandably many of these parents are worried about the safety of doing so and then a final group of children who are going to at least temporarily miss out our children born in twenty twenty one to date the irs has not created a way for parents of newborns to update them about this child and family and receive payments so currently they will have to wheat until next tax season and later in the spring to receive money for those children. Okay and there are certainly barons. Who don't earn enough to pay taxes or parents who are undocumented who could otherwise receive payments under this program because their children our citizens how do you make sure they are getting help. That is really critical. There are a lot of online efforts going on right now different websites. I will say the approach. We're taking is more of a grass roots approach so in the pediatric clinic. That i work in we are having conversations with every family who comes in simply asking them. Are you aware of the new child. Tax credit about ninety percent of them. Say no so. This type of grass roots work is very slow and tedious in some ways. But i found to be the most effective republican critics of the expanded childcare tax. Credits say they're worried about fraud. Or even disincentivising parents from work. It's the same thing we heard about other benefits in the broader covert relief program. Do you think that's an issue here. I really don't. I know that it's popular thing to say. But the evidence does not bear out that people don't want to work. Parents do want to work but their financial barriers to them working things like childcare transportation. This credit is actually empowering parents. And letting them do so. This is a temporary thing. These monthly payments will only be sent out for the next six months. How big of a dent can that make given the need. That's out there so it will be great for the next six months as who cares about the future of our country and the development of children. I believe this should become a permanent policy to help raise healthy children dr lucy. Marcel co founder of boston medical centers street cred tax help program. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me if you could use a good chuckle right about now. You might wanna check out the book notes from the bathroom. Line humor art and low grade panic from one hundred fifty of the funniest women in comedy. And if you're not up to reading there's also an audio book here's a contribution from sesame strong. I am one of the most morbid people i know now. I don't mean morbid. Like i'm super goth. I'm more evade assault. And i from my girl won easily. Forget appointments and plans and double book myself constantly but you better believe. I'll never forget. The story of the german man who was killed by his own spiders and snakes and was found in his apartment covered in a spiderweb cocoon. Sorry made you think about that. That's usually my quickest way to explain my nightmare. Brain notes from the bathroom line was published in march. We spoke at that time with one of the contributors i o a debris the voice of mri on the net flicks animated series big mouth. We also spoke with amy. Solomon the books editor. She's been a producer on the hbo series berry and silicon valley. You know amy. I was Thinking that now that we're a year into this pandemic that reading something funny and that made you laugh. Could actually be something that we really need right now but then i mean i know this idea came about a long time ago for you and in fact you were trying to recreate a book. You'd read when you were younger. Tell us about that. Yeah totally so my ultimate icon. Queen is gilda radner. I grew obsessed with her. I mean i still have a bit of a shrine to her on my book show and so she contributed this book in nineteen seventy-six called titters. That was a big collection of humor by a ton of amazing women and it was always insane to me that there was never another collection of humor by funny women since nineteen seventy six so it had always been my dream to do another and that's not from the bathroom line. I knew you love gilda radner. So we're going to hear a little bit from her. Okay this is roseanne roseanne. Danna the loud mouth consumer affairs reporter on saturday night. Live weekend update here. She is reading the letter from of. You're from far lane new jersey. Iraq's in it says there dan thursday. I quit smoking now and depressed. I gained my first broke out. I'm nauseous i'm constipated. My feet swelled china's franken. I guess what should i do better. You sound like a real attractive. Got said to play that for you. We'll talk more about what was it. That inspired you with her. I mean how many people can get out there and like be yelling about being constipated and be back accused. That's pretty rare of but also you know she was this hilarious jewish woman from the mid west. That was a big deal for me. And there's something so like sweet and vulnerable about her and she's big inspiration inspiration for the book as well and it's by the way of course entirely done by women written by women. Why was that important for you. Finding women have always been my favorite thing in the world. They have always been around when i went to college. They were all there when i moved to. La to work in comedy they were all there and clearly we should be making room for way more And i hope this book shows people like my god. You could hire all of these women to make your tv and movies and everything are the most popular person. Do you really know all one hundred and fifty of these comedians. I this is. This really really is not a good portrayal of me. I am a big door with no friends. But no i knew a bunch of these women and then i basically just spread this web of i would ask them like who are your friends. Who are your favorite people. And that was part of what was so magical about doing the book is there would be so excited to tell me about who their favorite gal pals were too so i just slowly sort of spread this web of amazing women but one of them was i. Oh are you still there I.

irs dr lucy Marcel co gilda radner amy roseanne roseanne boston silicon valley hbo Solomon Danna franken new jersey dan Iraq china
"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"amazon rainforest" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wb. You are don gonyea. I'm peter odell. This is here and now we're getting reaction to the department of justice watchdog report that lays out serious problems with the investigation against former usa gymnastics. Doctor larry nassar the doj inspector. General says f. b. i. Agents failed to respond with urgency to complaints that nassar had sexually abused more than one hundred and fifty athletes over the course of years and it said that senior. Fbi officials in the indianapolis field office lied to the inspector general about its investigation. Sr serving a one hundred and seventy five year prison sentence but now some us senators are calling for potential criminal charges for incompetence at the fbi joining us. Now is rachel den hollander. She's a former gymnast. And one of nassar's victims ritual. Thank you very much for speaking with us today. Thanks so much for having me on in looking back at your own experience with law enforcement in this case against leeriness or does this report surprise you at all. I wish i could say that. It does. But it really doesn't the reason. I chose to come forward so publicly. As a whistle blower was. Because i was confident that they're in fact had likely been botched investigations and likely outright corruption with law enforcement. As much as. I wish i could say this is a surprise. It's not. this is what survivors face all the time. We just finally got spotlight on this case it. Tell me if you could your own experience. Did you get the sense when you were speaking with investigators that they were taking you seriously so i was incredibly blessed to have a phenomenal investigator and msu pd andrea mumford and also a phenomenal prosecutor. In angie ida's but i out every survivor that i work with nasser survivors and otherwise. It's incredibly rare to be able to say that. And i think that's something. We have to grapple with culturally. Is that this report. What it what. It unveils here is not an anomaly. It really is the norm out of every two hundred. Thirty rapes reported to the police. Only about six results in criminal charges only about five resulting conviction and jail time and our conviction rates for non rape sexual assaults are even worse and what we see in his. Fbi report is just some of why we happens. Dynamics and why survivors don't feel safe to speak up. One of the things that the report said was that larry nassar continued working with young women and girls for a year after authorities were aware of the allegations against him and that more than seventy athletes. In that time were abused. How does that news hit you. It's horrifying it's evil. It's disgusting and it actually downplays the reality of what took place. It was actually closer to eighteen months before i came forward. What we need to be asking now is what we're not seeing. Why do you think through such an apparent lack of urgency at the fbi again. This is not unique. This is a story every survivor faces. We have a a situation in this country. Where law enforcement is often very poorly trained to even understand evidence and trauma what we have to realize is that it took six years and hundreds of victims and intense public pressure to be able to shine a light on the failure of law enforcement every single. Fbi officer who did not bother to launch a proper investigation who did not accurately report who colluded with usa. Gee all of those bad actors have moved on and there are no consequences while the survivors are left to pick up the pieces if we have seen this much in one case in one report after six years of pushing for answers. What's happening everywhere else that we're not seeing two survivors. Don't have that kind of help and support. And you're referring there to the special agent in charge of the indianapolis field office is j. abbott. The inspector general's report said that he made false statements to investigators and that he was seeking a job with the us olympic committee. During all of this so what does accountability at the fbi for these mistakes. Look like for you. What do you want it. Looks like punitive action. It looks like a recognition of the credible failure in a system that goes above and beyond the statement. That's been released that essentially as bad things happen. We don't want this to happen. This this report lays bare the failures and that essentially says but those failures don't matter enough to have this hard conversations to put real consequences in place. Rachel you mentioned those little girls the victims. Of course you're as well. And i wonder if the acknowledgement that there were serious errors in this investigation will help you and those other girls. Somehow he'll or does it. Just open up the wound even further. I am grateful for the recognition that we did get. I'm grateful for the doj's investigation if we're going to change what's happening in our culture of rape and abuse. That goes straight to the top of law enforcement. We have to start having serious discussions about how we have accountability and consequences for bad actors in law enforcement because they have all the power authority and none of the accountability. Rachel denhellender is a former gymnast and a whistle blower. That helped bring these sexual abuse by larry nassar to light. Rachel thank you so much. Thank you some extra. Money is on the way for parents with young children. Starting today parents. Who qualify will receive monthly payments of up to three hundred dollars per child. That's because of childcare. Tax credit that was expanded during the pandemic president biden says it will lead to a historic cut. In the child poverty rate joining us is dr lucy. Marsal a pediatrician at the boston. Medical center who co-founded the street cred tax help program. Welcome thank you so much for having me you work with people in need every day What are you hearing from them about..

nassar larry nassar fbi indianapolis field office don gonyea peter odell department of justice watchdog rachel den hollander andrea mumford angie ida doj wb npr gymnastics usa msu us olympic committee abbott Rachel Rachel denhellender
Coronavirus Surge Drains Brazilian City's Oxygen Supply

NPR News Now

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Surge Drains Brazilian City's Oxygen Supply

"Air force is now airlifting covid nineteen patients out of the city of manaus in the amazon rainforest. Npr's philip reeve says the health system. There has collapsed. Brazilian authorities have begun flying covid victims out. An oxygen supplies in after hospitals managua's ran out of oxygen following an unprecedented surge of cases. Doctors say patients are dying. In that beds of suffocation some families buying their own cylinders to give too sick relatives. There's a waiting list of hundreds for intensive care beds. The tragedies causing a national outcry officials say they'll fly more than two hundred patients to neighboring states yet. Hospital beds a filling up across much of brazil and they're concerned the maoist patients will spread a new strain of the virus recently traced the amazon. Could it breathes. Npr news ridge netto

Philip Reeve Manaus Amazon Rainforest NPR Air Force Managua Brazil Amazon Npr News
Brazil Amazon Deforestation Hits 12-Year High Under Bolsonaro

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

Brazil Amazon Deforestation Hits 12-Year High Under Bolsonaro

"Square. Miles of the amazon rainforest were burned or cut down within the past year. That's the highest level of deforestation in twelve years in bar. Or blaming brazil's government. Here's npr's dan charles. These are brazil's official figures on deforestation from the country's national institute of space research. The institute says the amount of deforestation increased ten percent over last year. Which in turn was a big increase over the year before most of this land clearing is illegal but environmental groups. Say brazil's current government is no longer vigorously investigating and prosecuting environmental crimes. They say the government instead has cited with ranchers miners and loggers. Some scientists have warned that continued. Destruction of the tropical forest could permanently damage. It reducing rainfall across much of south america. dan

Dan Charles Brazil National Institute Of Space Re NPR Amazon South America DAN
Travel to Bogota, Colombia

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:50 min | 2 years ago

Travel to Bogota, Colombia

"I would like to welcome to show a Lauren Pesky from wonder Lulu Dot com, which has way more use in. Lulu than you would expect, check the show notes for how to spell that. Lauren welcome to the show. Hi. Chris thank you so much for having me. I'm really excited to be chatting with you today and were chatting about Bogota Colombia and Lauren. What is your connection to Bogut all? The Age old question I truthfully never had Columbia on my list was really on my radar but love brought me here. My boyfriend moved here five years ago, and so for the past five years I have been visiting on and off and finally kind of made the move down here this year. And you picked a good year to move internationally. I know talk about crazy timing. I finally five years in Ra do this I'm going to get the visa all of that, and then I got here in February and. March the whole country shutdown. Excellent. So we're GonNa talk about the things that you're going to be able to do win it opens backup starting to do now but why should someone go to Columbia specifically Bogota? While let's start with Columbia as a whole is one of my favorite countries I've ever been to and the reason for that many many reasons but I just love how diverse the country as from region to region. So in one country you have the Amazon rainforest, you have the Andes mountains you have desert you have the Pacific Ocean you have the Caribbean it's really just in terms of bio-diversity. It's pretty incredible how many landscapes you can see in One place and beyond that region to region the cultures are so different that people in the language event. I have a friend in get Mungo, which is another major city here who says when she talks to her family on the coast in Bonn Akhir Carthagena sometimes, she doesn't even know they're using a phrase that she's never heard before i. know that's in a lot of places that it's just it makes it a really really interesting place to visit. And what kind of tenor are going to recommend for us? So today, I'm going to be specifically talking about Bogota. I feel like Bogota is the capital city. I know a lot of people fly through here but often I feel like it's an overlooked major major city most people when they think of Columbia, Colombia's really gaining popularity in recent years. The first thing they think of Karma Hannah are medigene and so now that I live year and I've been visiting for so long feel like so many things are overlooked here. So I really kind of want to dive into that and talk about kind of what makes this place special. And we should say up front that Lauren doesn't claim to be native Spanish speaker. Hearsay medigene and you think it should be many Yien or something else. She's still knows better than I knew it. So what do in Boca? I if you don't mind just talking a little bit of language and so far from ever Oh you must be fluent you're visiting so much. But the reality is I'm not in so I kind of have a perspective on what it's like to be here in traveling around when I know very little. Of course, I've gotten better over time but still learning you can I assume you know the essentials like survey support for? That's the first phrase you learn the clerk. Learned one beer please. Exactly exactly. Go back to your your question about, but was how I always to me. It's an eclectic mix of traditional and modern Colombian culture, and I just love how you can kind of go from playing Tejo and eating a maybe another EPA bay case on the street to dancing salsa, and then the next day you're at a fine dining Peruvian fusion restaurant in high in cocktails at a jazz bar and it's Kinda got it. All excellent as long as you're going to promise to explain to me what you were just talking about with. The two things that you're eating and going to somewhere in the course of the conversation. I will. Definitely. To that. So don't don't even worry. What are we going to see in Bogota? Where are we GONNA START? Okay. So I kind of want to break this down is a massive city. It's eight million people. It's a sprawling city. There's so much to do so much to see. So I, kind of want to break it down by by neighborhood because it's so big I feel like it's less of A. Hit these top ten things? Would you see a lot of those lists just great which is fine. But a lot of those lists stay in only one neighborhood. Probably. Heard of it I'm pretty sure you've talked about it before in Candelaria in. So I kind of want to talk about each little neighborhood and kind of what each place bring. So the first place like I was saying is the most popular I would say it's the most heuristic part of the city which you know sometimes I think you hear its touristic which equals bad to some to some but to me candelaria, it's a beautiful part of the city. It's the Old City it's the cobblestone streets and the colonial Spanish architecture, and so I'm going to start there with kind of like day one, right so the reason I start. There is because there is this place in that area of the city that's in the more southern part of the city, not all the way south almost like mid south is monster at day, which is this big beautiful mountain that overlooks the entire city. It's a really great like first thing to do because you really get the lay of the land and see just how massive the city is. You can get up there three ways you can hike up, you can take the there's like a dealer kind of train that goes up and then there's the cable car and the cable car ride up if you're not afraid of heights. Is Beautiful. When you get to the top I mean like I said, you have this beautiful sprawling view of the city and just kind of a little tip even though I do recommend going early on and during the day the careful because on the weekends it is mental. I've seen lines that are probably three maybe more hours. Okay Yes I really recommend if you can go during the week. That's great and then if you kinda wanted using a little different if you go right before the sun is setting, it's like a beautiful beautiful view bogus some pretty gorgeous city sunset. So that's kind of something to keep in ninety.

Bogota Lauren Pesky Columbia Colombia Candelaria Bogut Chris Andes Pacific Ocean Boca Bonn Akhir Carthagena Amazon Mungo Tejo EPA A. Hit
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 2 years ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
Tapirs Help Reforestation Via Defecation

60-Second Science

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Tapirs Help Reforestation Via Defecation

"The Amazon rainforest is under threat. Fragmentation fires and climate change are just a few of the hazards in natural intact forests. Animals that eat fruits helps to keep the forest in a constant state of regeneration since they deposit seeds in their droppings as they travel could the same process help restore areas degraded by fire. So data tapers walking around. They study area and day. Of course boop a lot because they are huge adverse. Lucas Paolucci. From Brazil's Amazon Environmental Research Institute so our team ask whether they could be walking around and eventually helping to reformist is area through there. Oops and of course the seeds that are with it. Tapers are the largest terrestrial mammals left in the Amazon rainforest. Imagine a five hundred pound pig but with a small elephant trunk on its face. That's sort of what a low and taper looks like the species is threatened with extinction but certain areas still have quite a few tapers roaming around using a combination of camera traps aerial imagery and field observations. The researchers measured the density and abundance of taper droppings in three different parts of the rainforests over the course of seven years. One test plot was experimentally burned each year. One was burned every three years and one was left completely intact. We saw that they were according to times more often in disturbed areas named the unburned plots and also person times mar seeds. That's a lot of seeds extrapolating from the data intact. Forests a single taper deposits. Almost three thousand seeds in a single hectare or ten thousand square meters but in Bern areas the animals dropped nearly ten thousand scenes and while researchers don't know how many seeds can germinate after a trip through a taper as digestive system fewer than one percent of such seeds appeared damaged. Potatoes are just part of the equation. After they do a number two done Beatles get to work forming the SCAT into balls. Before burying them seeds included Paolucci is now looking at whether Dung beetles like the taper. Deng are also more abundant in recently burned areas. Putting tapers to work doing what they already do. Best is perhaps the cheapest method for large scale tropical forest restoration. Such renewal is critical for carbon sequestration. Biodiversity Preservation and much. More tapers won't do the job alone but their work would help. Lower the price tag.

Amazon Lucas Paolucci Amazon Environmental Research Paolucci Brazil Bern Beatles Deng
Pope Francis stops short of allowing married men to become priests in Amazon

Joel Riley

00:25 sec | 3 years ago

Pope Francis stops short of allowing married men to become priests in Amazon

"A word from the Vatican this morning pope Francis not changing Catholic rules to allow married men to become priests liberal Catholics were hoping the pope would take up the recommendation of bishops from the Amazon rainforest allow merry men to become priests as a way to address a priests shortage there but the pope is not going for that so we're keeping an eye on those stories

Pope Francis Amazon
Why Gen Z is being labelled Generation Anxiety

The Big Story

09:46 min | 3 years ago

Why Gen Z is being labelled Generation Anxiety

"So it's twenty twenty. We're officially in the next great decade. But I won't lie to you. It's hard to be optimistic. About what the future sure holds a new report says home. Affordability is a growing problem for the average Canadian families. A new study of wildfires around the world from the Amazon rainforest to California says human activity is raising temperatures and adding to the threat. Job Market is tough and it's especially tough for college graduates. A huge number of them are actually working at jobs. That don't even fire a college degree if you're a millennial or a boomer or one of those rare rare Gen xers you might be able to get away with blaming this pessimism for the future on your age and life experience but the same can't be said for generations the young bucks of the future. Today's teens and young adults they should be excited about the next ten years keyword should in reality party they aren't instead they're being labeled generation anxiety anxiety is nothing new among young people but Gen Z.. is worried about vote. Much bigger and more pressing issues than previous generations. So how much of it is justifiable. How is it affecting young people right now? And what can other generations due to be more helpful and understanding I'm Stephanie Phillips in for Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the big story. Johanna Chisholm is a digital. It'll producer at the Toronto Star. She looked into why Gen Z.. Is being labeled generation anxiety. Hydra Hannah. Hello how are you Stephanie. I'm good thanks so when we first reached out to you to get you on the show you said that this topic you know really interested you What about this topic interested you so much for sure I'll admit that it was assigned to me by an editor. So I don't WanNa take full credit for it But what I was given the opportunity to sort of dig into this topic. I was Gung gung-ho because partially previous reporting that I had done kind of focused on Internet culture in youth and so I had come across bits of anxiety in teens in adolescence revolving mostly around like self harm on social media accounts but when I was given the opportunity to dig into why it is that the more broad generation is experiencing anxiety at such high rates than other generations. I thought this is an awesome time to go on. This and I had the space to do. It hadn't hadn't editor support to do it so that's really why I was really interested in digging into it so you wrote that Gen Z.. is going to be remembered as this. This generation anxiety. So what is the reason. Most recent data tell us about the levels of anxiety for this generation. There was a lot of really interesting. Thank studies that came out about this. The one that I thought was most relevant to our readers that are you know Toronto Ontario focused Cam each study. That came out that she saw a fifteen percent increase in youth. Anxiety between two thousand thirteen and two thousand seventeen and that was in the Self reporting so again. There are problems with that but but this huge jump to see just in five years. That teens are self reporting that they themselves are suffering from severe psychological distress which is characterized as either depression or anxiety symptoms and then there was an EPA study that came out from the American psychological association that sort of mirrored that data in Americans Americans students that it was doubling from two thousand ten to two thousand fifteen which is in that same sweet spot. We were talking about with the two thousand ten being this sort of anxious decade So that that was confirming in the numbers and then the part that I was assigned tasked with really doing was going to the kids and the teens and actually speaking speaking with them to find out what's going on with you guys not that you can really contrast it with the before but just to get their takes on why they're feeling anxious and what's going on there air so so who did you talk to And and what did they tell you about their anxiety So there was a large group of teens that reach out to me. Initially Ashley. It was kind of hard getting you know. Anxious people to come forward and talk about their most intimate feelings about things but eventually I was able to get a hold of Some teens from ages fourteen to seventeen who are in high school and junior high to get thirsty takes on it from more to less inside of things and then I was able to get teens. Who are in the university level? So twenty two twenty three because Gen Z.. Cuts off twenty-three. In most situations some people push it to be twenty-five five. I think but I think most people agree like Pew Research Center Says Ninety Seven to two thousand twelve. Is Jesse because you had to be. I guess like sentient went for nine. Eleven for that event to be characterized as millennial and yeah so I spoke with a bunch of different teens all who were experiencing different kinds of anxiety Heidi and kind of different levels of awareness about it so once I spoke with he didn't even really characterize his symptoms as anxiety because he didn't even really know that it was anxiety he was just looking out at. What are my prospects after I graduate and he no? He's an ECON student at the University of Toronto. A student and really good and pretty sure. He's good for for jobs after graduation but even he was looking at job banks Canada every single day and was like my heart just feels heavy. I was getting Migraines at the library and couldn't really like put into words why he was feeling these things and then when someone asked him like hey do you think it's anxiety he was like. Oh maybe I don't know whereas other students I spoke with reveal airy capable of putting the words to what they were feeling so I think that also speaks to level of awareness ernest. That's out there for young people that previously wasn't there right and I spoke with a climate activist in high school. who had some very powerful awful things to say for seventeen year old that I quite honestly was blown away by but she was sort of just experience or explaining how you know she would talk to her dad about it was like for him growing up and the contrast between what she's looking at and what he was looking at? which was you know? Buy a home get a job or get a job by home. Live in the suburbs CBS. Pay Off your mortgage and she's looking at it like. How am I going to afford school? I don't even know if I can with all these. Oh stop cuts with all of these different stressors in the economy. Hey how can I even think about getting to the point where I'm getting a job or so much even buying a house There's a lot lot in there. Yeah those are big issues. Yeah complicated issues. What is research? Tell us about the world that these young people are well. There was a lot And part of the issue had Haad reporting it was like I'm packing it all into one article because you know you look at the world that these kids are walking into the world is on fire quite right literally at their feet. A precarious work is a huge issue. For them one in ten Canadians I believe stats candles. Reports that are part of the GIG. Economy and precarious work isn't just GIG. Work present as contract work or part time work but there's just an increasing amount of this non secure lifestyle that these other parents have There's also also the retreat of democracy that we're seeing fake news You know just social media technology all of these different things it's the cacophony of things. Just being shutdown these kids throats. So it's it's a lot that's To unpack for someone. Who's you know this vulnerable age group? Who are now between the ages of eighteen take twenty three to accept just digest and be like okay? Well maybe I won't be able to get a job and maybe I won't be able to afford a house and all those things that basically secured cured having good quality of life aren't going to be attainable. Well I I was talking about it. With other producers on our team and a lot of them expressed russell. They had feelings of anxiety when they were in high school or university. But it wasn't about these like big issues news about things that were kind of in control like their friendships or short term goals. Like you know. What University am I going to go to our? What job am I going to guide? Or what skill am I going. Go into that kind of thing. So what makes the situation for Gen Z.. So so different. Why are they concerned with these big issues? I will say that I think technology definitely is playing a large role in it. Part of the the Kwanza have with like pointing our fingers right technology to be the thing that's causing us is sort of a knee jerk reaction to say. Oh you know. Phones and cell phones and social media are causing all these woes and our youth because that sort of rationale has been applied to previous generations. When you Komo TV was causing it? We always point our finger at exactly social media digital world share But I definitely think it plays a role and I was speaking with a a researcher in the United States who sort of studies the role of technology and family life. Okay and she was explaining how not just technology but the way the information nation the sheer quantity of information that is just constantly available at your hip and just a moments away versus previously when you could kind of choose to not be turned the TV on and you could choose to have the radio off. That's not an option so much for teens The other thing that I'll point out that in some of the feedback that I received from Just readers who are of those generations you know the the boomers the Gen xers they were pointing out the stressors that they

Gen Z.. Toronto Precarious Work Stephanie Phillips Editor Job Market Amazon Migraines Pew Research Center Johanna Chisholm California American Psychological Associa Jordan Heath Rawlings United States Gung Producer University Of Toronto Ashley EPA
Ex-Pope Benedict calls for his name to be removed from controversial book on priest celibacy

News, Traffic and Weather

00:44 sec | 3 years ago

Ex-Pope Benedict calls for his name to be removed from controversial book on priest celibacy

"Former pope Benedict what's his name removed from a book promoting priestly celibacy in the latest flare up between traditionalists and modernise to the Vatican this is Megan Williams reports from Rome the books supposedly co authored by retired pope Benedict and traditionalist cardinal Robert Serra was set to be published this week with released passages showing it comes out strong against allowing merry men to be ordained after a high level church meeting in the fall that address the priest shortage in the Amazon rainforest pope Francis is expected soon to endorse allowing older men to become priests there Francis supporters say cardinal Serra manipulated the ninety two year old retired pope into the attack on Francis the cardinal has agreed to remove Benedict's name is co author but he insists the former pope had approved

Megan Williams Rome Pope Benedict Cardinal Serra Francis Pope Amazon
Two Popes, and One Big Furor After Benedict Weighs in on Priestly Celibacy

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:46 sec | 3 years ago

Two Popes, and One Big Furor After Benedict Weighs in on Priestly Celibacy

"Former pope Benedict once his name removed from a book promoting priestly celibacy in the latest flare up between traditionalists and modernist at the Vatican A. B. C.'s Megan Williams reports from Rome the books supposedly co authored by retired pope Benedict and traditionalist cardinal Robert Serra was set to be published this week with released passages showing it comes out strong against allowing merry men to be ordained after a high level church meeting in the fall that address the priest shortage in the Amazon rainforest pope Francis is expected soon to endorse allowing older men to become priests there Francis supporters say cardinal Serra manipulated the ninety two year old retired pope into the attack on Francis the cardinal has agreed to remove Benedict's name is co author but he insists the former pope had approved everything Meghan Williams ABC news

Pope Benedict Megan Williams Rome Cardinal Serra Francis Pope Vatican A. Amazon Meghan Williams ABC
When the Bellbird Calls You Know It

60-Second Science

02:22 min | 3 years ago

When the Bellbird Calls You Know It

"Is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Alina Organ Brown that incredibly loud song soaring over quieter. Birds in the Amazon rainforest belongs to the male White Bell Bird at one hundred twenty five five decibels his short but startling songs are louder than a Jackhammer. The White Bell born may be the loudest bird in the world. These birds are are making making extraordinarily loud noises noises. That are so loud that there they would be harmful to our hearing if he had to hear him. Close Mario cone half curator birds at Instituto. Nacional Keesa stay Amazon. He and his colleague. Jeffrey photos recorded the birds in their natural habitat. Their findings are in the journal. Current biology birds like the screaming Piha. Or Milwaukee Cockatoo have also laid claim to the loudness title but the researchers think the new study has better instrumentation cremation and data than most studies previously published in the scientific literature. Loud sounds are usually for a long distance communication and then when the listener though the potential listeners up close the volumes dropped way back down so that nobody needs to call a lot of attention to themselves or blow out each other's hearing but in the case of the white bellied the opposite it seems to be true. The loudest sound they make is actually reserved for courting a female. When the female comes close they just switched to their loudest sound. And do it right right in her face. The male displays another feature an extendable. Waddell it looks like a worm hanging from above the bird speak when they do their loudest song. which is this fast to note? Bung that they do Giving the first Bong looking away from the female with their back to her and then swing going around right into her face for that second note and that Waddell whips around and I suspect that if she were to close she'd get it in the face. Most birds have paper thin abdominal muscles. But the half pound bell bird. Roughly the size of a common city pigeon had a washboard stomach. This just incredible thick says muscles rippling all along its abdomen. The powerful muscles provide lots of singing power but the mating song is short and sweet because a very loud sowed sound like that apparently has to be really short for the bird to be able to do it at all

White Bell Bird Alina Organ Brown Bong Waddell Amazon Milwaukee Cockatoo Jeffrey One Hundred Twenty Five Five D Sixty Seconds
Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

NPR News Now

00:51 sec | 3 years ago

Amazon fires intensify Andes glacier melt

"A new study finds that fires in the Amazon rainforest are speeding up the melting of glaciers in the Andes Mountains mountains that provide water to millions of people. NPR's Richard Harris reports scientists are concerned that rising air temperatures can accelerate melting of mountain glaciers. Now our research team has identified another threat to these important water. Sources smoke from fires in the Amazon can waft high into the atmosphere black particles net smoke sometimes settle settled on mountain glaciers. Those dark particles capture energy from the sun. Like a patch of blacktop that heats up in the summertime and that speed up the melting of these glaciers and eventually will endanger fresh water supply researchers from Brazil and France documented this effect on Bolivia's Zongo Glacier these black particles along with dust increased meltwater runoff runoff during the peak fire season the study is published in the Journal scientific

Amazon Andes Mountains Richard Harris NPR Zongo Glacier Bolivia Brazil Journal Scientific France
Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon is highest since 2008

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:56 sec | 3 years ago

Deforestation in Brazil's Amazon is highest since 2008

"The rate of deforestation in the Amazon rainforest in Brazil hit its highest level in a decade NPR's Phillip Reeves says it's according to data published today by Brazil's government nine thousand seven hundred and sixty two square kilometers of rainforest were destroyed in the year ending July that's more than twelve times the size of New York City this will re ignite the worldwide outcry that erupted in July and August when there was a surge in the number of fires in the Anderson many blame Brazil's far right president Jibal Senado saying he's encouraging illegal ranching logging and mining by weakening environmental protection I'm calling for the Amazons riches to be exploited these latest numbers of from Brazil space research institute an internationally respected organization will not recently accused it of putting out false information but this time his environment ministers accepting the numbers saying Brazil's governments discussing new ways of cracking down on land

Brazil NPR Phillip Reeves New York City Anderson President Trump Jibal Senado Amazons Amazon Sixty Two Square Kilometers
"Guardian" of the Amazon Killed in Brazil by Illegal Loggers

Democracy Now! Audio

08:29 min | 3 years ago

"Guardian" of the Amazon Killed in Brazil by Illegal Loggers

"We begin today's show in Brazil were an indigenous this forest protector named Paolo Pollino Wajda was shot dead in the Amazon by illegal loggers on Saturday it's the latest attack in a wave the violence targeting indigenous land protectors since the election of Brazil's far-right presidential you're both Sonata last year why did you gotta was killed when he and another forest forest protector were ambushed by a group of illegal loggers inside the Aurora boy reservation in the northeastern state of Miranda he was part word of a group called Guardians of the forest Wajda spoke to Reuters in September about his efforts to save the Amazon sin sauce nervous listen Y zone the we're protecting our land and the life on it the animals the birds even the tribe who are here too there's so much destruction of nature happening include trees as with would as hard as steel being cut down and taken away the myth obscured sometimes but we have to lift up our heads and act we were here fighting attacks against indigenous people in the Amazon have spiked since Bolt Sinato came to office his administration's work to open the Amazon even further to logging mining and agribusiness business companies while violating the land rights of indigenous peoples earlier this year eight former environment minister warns Sinatra's administration was systematically destroying Brazil's environmental policies with one former minister saying Brazil is becoming an exterminator of the future to find out more about the situation in the Amazon John and the murder we speak to guests shriram Queen Sosa is a field coordinator and legal advisor Amazon Watch he's joining us from solid waste and the northeastern state of Mara now the state where Paolo Pollino Guavas Yada was murdered and in San Francisco Christian Party is program Director Amazon on watch we welcome you both to democracy now let's go to Brazil to speak with our I guess Schramm Queen Bre can you explain explain what took place in the Amazon what you understand happened to this Gordon of the Amazon for civil Good morning and thank you for having me so the situation that the the Gorgonzola forest face today is the struggle for survival and protection of the way of leaving the digits people the Amazon and they have little protection from the state government from the federal government and as as you setting the wrestler leric from both not of speeches further entitles landowners and logging and an illegal oh minors to invade for the more indigenous lands so these struggled at the plight that that that indigenous people have is to protect the forest to to protect the wail of leaving and they all live so what happened to to to Bala Boolean is that he was he went hunting with his his cousin when when they were ambushed by five gunmen and last you look luckily luckily enough he he was shorting be armed so he could hide unfortunately all Lino was federally shot in the head and and died right away then the the other Guarino the forest as you said last whether he ran ten kilometers at wounded to to close by Aldea which is how indigenous villages cold here Brazil then he was helped by by his fellow glazier and took to a hospital and and this is why we know all of this in such great detail I want to go to a clip break now. of the Guardians of the forest that was produced by Vice Survival International Paulo Pollino appears in the clip as the Guardians Coordinator Olympio Budget Datta Warns of the risks to their our lives we're hearing the boys indigenous territory. We are the guardians of the forest contributor blogger pin gunmen to kill some of the Guardians of Harari Boyce thumbs father we're all worried about these threats justify the gunshots have been fired at some of the guardians houses you don't want war we want to resist here Nari boys there to indigenous peoples thing which has had a question genre and Wa where the most vulnerable people in the world you want the president authorities to help protect the lives of the guardians whose lives are threatened boost to I'd like to bring in Christian Party as well into this conversation Asian program director at Amazon Watch if you could talk about the community you have worked with as well Guada- Shahdeh one of the largest indigenous groups in Brazil and talk about who the Guardians are and how what they're fighting eating fits into the whole fight for sustainability on the planet and to save the lungs of the planet the Amazon rainforest yes thank you amy the question Jadida like other indigenous groups in Brazil have been abandoned by the state to defend their territories with volunteer tair groups basically policing massive territories buoyant territory is sixteen hundred square miles that's larger than Rhode Island and they're doing this without any federal support and what they're doing to defend these territories either some of the last forests left in the state of mind you know which the state that straddles both the Amazon and how by incredibly important for us that are left in this area they're doing this on behalf of all humanity because they they are protecting the critically critically important Amazon forest that sustain our climate protect our climate power our should say fuel the rainfall all over Brazil would also here in this country instead of California rainfall is slackening due to the fact the Amazon what is being decimated today and the guardians of the guards the forests are doing this work therefore on behalf of all of us but without the support that they deserve observe their their rights are enshrined in Brazil's constitution their rights to territory and to their way of life they have been systematically deprived of these these rights and what we witnessed today are two days ago with the murder of polly you was example about a manifestation of violence growing in these communities I wanNA turn to another leader of the guardians the forest democracy now spoke to Sogno glad you're Java during the climate strike March here in New York in September she's a leader of the Brazilian indigenous peoples articulation I'm here today to participate in the climate march bringing on the voices of the Indigenous Peoples Brazil to denounce all the destruction of environmental airman destruction of the Amazon and the legalization of genocide against indigenous people owner he was in the for five hundred thousand nine hundred people in Brazil have been resisting resisting by Friday against the political and economic powers under the name of development and in the name of progress

Brazil Sixteen Hundred Square Miles Ten Kilometers Two Days
The Deadly Fight To Protect Brazil's Amazon

Environment: NPR

05:42 min | 3 years ago

The Deadly Fight To Protect Brazil's Amazon

"For Brazilians working to preserve the Amazon rainforest how far they'd go to combat climate change is a serious question deforestation is up sharply in part because of the surge in fires this year many of those fires are set by criminal groups stealing land as NPR's Philip Reeve's reports Brazil protecting the forest often falls too courageous individuals willing to risk their lives people of the rainforest holding a meeting in women and children and shorts and flip flops a sitting inside a wooden pavilion clearing among the trees they're here to talk about routine forest stuff jumbles about the timetable of the ferry on the nearby they discussed who's going to use the communal tractor the relaxed mood is deceptive. Shuo proposer as president of the residents association that called this meeting ethical when you get more details bother Barbosa people here actually deeply worried we're in the Amazon's western part in the Brazilian state of actually people around here are mostly subsistence farmers and rubber tappers who rely on the forest for their livelihoods words just reached them that their neighbors a few miles away are illegally setting fires to clear land for cattle a major issue for that's disturbing setback especially for activists who risked their lives defending forest but Boza is fifty five he's been an environmental activist here all his adult life years ago one of his fellow activists was shot dead by legal ranches now as forestation surges bubble believes people protecting the forest face a growing threat he's not alone I think it's become significantly more date interest. Daniel Wilkinson directs the Environmental Rights Program at Human Rights Watch Human Rights Watch has been investigating the deadly tactics the organizations in the Amazon News against those who stand in their way Brazil's far-right President Shaya boatswain auto wants to exploit the forests comic potential and is often accused of cheering on these criminal groups Wilkinson says the problem started long before Bolsonaro took office but ads what's new is that Brazil has a president who is openly hostile to the Brazilians who are trying to protect your forest including the government's own Inbar agencies killings in conflicts over Amazon Land and resources a common in Brazil Brazil's pastoral Van Commission which tracks these says the been more than three hundred in the last decade only fourteen cases went to trial says Wilkinson when people get killed in this part of the Amazon lers are almost never brought to justice the police blamed the fact that communities where killings happen often are remote but in fact even when killings happened in town they released any serious investigation these criminal groups often have connections in high places and plenty of weapons activists and also environment enforcement officials who dared to challenge them can expect their lives to be turned upside down the Soda Community How just ask Yoshiko logo ratty Saddam Lobos thirty seven and an indigenous Brazilian he lives deep in the rainforest inefficient community in the state of Para last logo launched a campaign to stop illegal loggers and miners invading his communities land he put handmade signs on trees pointing out their lands protected by law and telling landgrabbers to keep out it wasn't long before we started getting death threats his mind boss Katha Pinta Mata logos some loggers and miners decided to kill him and set up an ambush he escaped because he received a last minute tip off the Lobos now enrolled in a zillion government protection program for rights activists some the threat although he says it only provides limited security mostly in Kohl's and police escorts when he travels in the same program is this man never dodger decision running against I wouldn't wish this life on anyone there's a lot of suffering that's Danielle Pereira an environmental activists also he and his wife took on logos and a work one day to find to freshly dug graves outside that they spent the last six months at a secret address in Brazil's capital Acilia and have no idea when they return to the forest even in the big city they don't feel safe as a spur Sochi a residential some groups people who are against US belong to organized groups they are rich criminals who have the money to go wherever they like the emotional toll of living at constant risk is huge says Seo logo is squeaky he says he will it's public places and has stopped hanging out with Francis you're aware that you could be killed at any moment he says we don't know who to trust Lobos considered giving up his campaign to protect the forest on which is community depends question do I do. He's decided to carry on because he says in his heart he knows is sue you prefer to name. York was doing the right thing.

Brazil Amazon Daniel Wilkinson Philip Reeve President Trump Environmental Rights Program Boza NPR Barbosa York Six Months One Day
VF Corp. Stops Buying Brazilian Leather While Amazon Burns

Business Wars Daily

05:21 min | 3 years ago

VF Corp. Stops Buying Brazilian Leather While Amazon Burns

"This episode of Business Wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from Pitney goes. Try It free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit. PBA DOT com slash B W daily in Uh from wonder I'm David Brown and this is business wars daily on this Wednesday September eleven. The Amazon is he's burning as we now know in late August aerial photographs showing Sao Paulo plunged into darkness in the middle of the day stunned the world that day turn night eclipse lips was a mystery at first but soon it became clear that the cause was some eighty thousand fires burning thousands of miles away in the Amazon rainforest the F. Corporation the multibillion dollar owner of Timberland vans shoes and the north face does not want any part of it late last month it announced that it will stop buying vying Brazilian leather. It won't start again the company said until quote we have the confidence and assurance that the materials used in our products do not contribute due to environmental harm in the country so what does footwear have to do with fires well. The fires on the edges of the Amazon are result of deforestation the station in drought loggers farmers and ranchers cut down trees often illegally they also set fires to clear vast swaths of ranchland mostly to fulfill the world's growing demand for beef. There are fires in the Amazon every year but the number of blazes this year is up about eighty percent over last year according to CNN the news outlet reports that the growth in the blazes is purposeful a result of pro beef industry policies promoted by Brazil's president gyroscope scenario Brazil is the world's largest exporter of beef Bolsonaro says he is not to blame the Amazon rainforest plays a huge role in mitigating climate change. The area is so enormous that unharmed it produces about twenty percent of the world's oxygen BEF Corp says it makes about five hundred million products a year making it one of the largest users of raw all materials in its industry in its effort to improve the company sustainability. VF Corp has been overhauling its supply chain by twenty twenty one. The company claims it will reduce the environmental impact of its raw materials by thirty five percent. Now one of those materials is leather Timberland. You know the Conic Yellow Boot Company is. VF's largest leather user leather is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. That's because of land-use changes like clearing parts parts of the rainforest. It's also do the copious amounts of methane made by the cattle themselves v F says fifteen percent of its greenhouse gas emissions come from leather weather. It's largest contributors cotton at more than forty percent given its public commitment to cleaning up the supply chain. It's response to the Amazon fires. This makes sense. One of Timberland's biggest rivals is doc Martin maker of the iconic Black boot. The British brand earned revenues news of about three hundred fifty million pounds last year up twenty percent from the year before the much smaller brand has made no public supply chain commitment similar to those of the F. Corp but like the F. It belongs to a consortium called the leather working group which sources materials from tanneries that attempt to reduce the environmental impact of leather processing icing on its own the corpse decision isn't likely to have much effect on Brazil's commitment to fighting fires in the Amazon but often where one company goes rose so go others and when they do together they have an impact so to do shoppers who as we pointed out here more and more lately are increasingly concerned about where their products come from and what effects they may be causing. We're not on the planet from one. This is business workday. Hey do us a favor and take nick few seconds to tell us more about yourself is visit. ONE RE DOT com slash survey sweet love learning about thanks a bunch. I'm David Brown will in this episode is brought to you by central online from Pitney bowes shipping in

Amazon David Brown Pitney Bowes Brazil Pitney Conic Yellow Boot Company UH Vf Corp VF Bef Corp Timberland Vans Sao Paulo Doc Martin Maker CNN Nick Bolsonaro President Trump
Jair Bolsonaro claims NGOs behind Amazon forest fire surge – but provides no evidence

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:11 min | 3 years ago

Jair Bolsonaro claims NGOs behind Amazon forest fire surge – but provides no evidence

"The amazon rainforest have been on fire for several weeks and brazil's right wing. President bolsonaro suggested wednesday without evidence that the fires were started by non-governmental organizations the mind at least quotable zero is saying quote. Maybe i am not affirming affirming it. These ngo people are carrying out some criminal actions to draw attention against me against the government brazil and quote adding that quote wrote the fires were lit in strategic places all the indications suggest they went there to film and start fires. That's what i feel and quote. Greenpeace brazil lil shot back with its public policy coordinator marciel strini calling the president's statement sick and pitiful in a video. That's gone viral. A brazilian woman expressed anguish as she pointed to the destruction. The fires brought which she blamed on deforestation for cattle ranching a practice. The bolsonaro has actively encouraged. The video was shared by the us-based sunrise movement which said in a tweet quote we cannot tolerate political agendas of deforestation we we will not watch our future. Burn away and quote

Brazil President Bolsonaro Amazon Marciel Strini President Trump Coordinator