24 Burst results for "Amazon Basin"

"amazon basin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

05:17 min | 5 months ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"And they were like no. Don't use any of that. Yeah that's like a animal cells in an fats in particular they purify they don't decompose. And putrefaction makes them stinky stuff. I think it can also generate a lot of disease bearing pathogens. So i was surprised to see this article. Say put it in there. Well and they kind of said in this article. If if you're really heavily managing this thing you can do it. But i don't know i've discern. Don't they said turn it into a slurry. Which rose i don't wanna see freud and riches lender at home mistake. That slurry with corncob leavings on. But he said whip it up into a slurry and as long as it's a good heart actively managed pile. It'll it won't be a problem. I'm going to go ahead and say i don't think you should do that okay. I don't know what to do with the animal leavings. But i don't think you should compost it It might make sense to you to say. Hey i have an outdoor firepit a that would be great in my composter no incorrect. Although this specifically says charcoal ashes. I think any kind of charred ashes. Yeah like burnt. Wood is called charcoal. So are you sure. Because i know i know what you just said was true. But supposedly the entire amazon basin and i learned this from the greatest book of all time. Fourteen ninety one by charles c man. The entire amazon basin was a managed forest That the indigenous peoples down there had made completely fertile and fecund by instead of slash and burn they were using slash in charge techniques and there was way more carbon locked into the charred tree stumps and there was the ashes so it became more fertile. So i have a question about that one. You know. I'm going to back off of my determined stance. 'cause i dunno it would make sense of it was coal like charcoal briquettes right. They have cement and all sorts of chemicals in junkin them put. If it's charred wood or wood ash. I wonder all right. Well somebody let us know. Charles seaman man. Tell us The pesticide treated plants. You you know you know my stance on pesticides period. Don't use them. But if you do definitely don't put that stuff in there because your whole thing here is you want you want more or less organic compost pile right in the end and so one of the things that people love about composts it is. It actually is organic and we're going to explain how i didn't know this until we did this research but we'll explain how because we're going to go through the process that.

amazon basin charles c Charles seaman Wood
"amazon basin" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:27 min | 6 months ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Who deal with forest when that usually thinking different timelines yell for three fifty or one hundred years usually not that much as humans. We think in much shorter timelines and recently. I've become shorter and shorter linked to election cycles to project cycles. So let's step back from that for a minute and look at longer term timelines where we think like a forest and when you think like a forest we also start to see this in a historic perspective. If let's say we think back a hundred years today now it's twenty twenty one. Let's say it's nineteen twenty one and you would have flocked up to somebody on the streets and said you know i've got a great idea. It's called the universal declaration on human rights. They would've said well. What what the hell are human rights. Who who's ever heard of a thing like that and you say oh. It's it's things like you know. Women should have the right to vote and people would be like. Oh that's a good idea. But that's not going to happen. In most countries women wentz allowed to vote at the moment. So it took a century to anchor this concept of basic and universal human rights in the human consciousness. I think we're at a similar stage in our evolution where this idea of ecological literacy or basically of ecology which means that knowledge of our common home has to be anchored in our collective consciousness because without the knowledge of our common home. We can't manage a common home which has economy so we need that ecological literacy to play a much much bigger part in how we see us. Liz ation and that's not something you do. Even antennas may the decade can set the foundations for about new relationship between humans and nature. But it's going to take more than that. Unfortunately we don't have time was california and the you know the canada and the whole north west of the us under record breaking heat wave right now We just had a recent study that the amazon basin might already be beyond the tipping point. What's actually gone from a carbon sink to a common sauce and the sauce also other greenhouse gases. So we clearly don't have the time so they're trying to as quickly as possible. Make that shift in human consciousness in the way to do that is through a global movement that brings us all from point..

wentz Liz ation amazon basin california canada us
"amazon basin" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

The Larry Elder Show

02:23 min | 6 months ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on The Larry Elder Show

"But what do they say there. What do they say there. What do the people of the amazon basin say about their heritage. Think about their heritage. What i i know. This sounds crazy. I know this is shocking. But what if everything that. We're depicting as racism more. What disney is depicting. Racism is actually something that's pretty important even though albeit we look at it is pretty bad. I get that. But what if it's a sense of pride to other people in those areas. I don't know. I don't understand why would be but i don't know and this is part of the problem that i have with these people that just invent racism and find it under under a rock under a over a tree under a car tire wherever they find race. This is the problem that i have with the the the they are absolutely destroying not just our heritage not just our memories but we don't know what they're doing to others. The ride has been open since nineteen fifty five nine thousand nine hundred fifty five and somehow everybody got along. Okay i read in the right. It was fine. I didn't care. I didn't know what it didn't make a difference to me and i guarantee you since the ride has been around for so long. What sixty five sixty six years. I'm guessing that a lot of other people didn't care either until these woke liberals started looking at this stuff and re imagining. I don't think the people riding the ri- complained at all see. This woke. kness is destroying our memories our traditions in america. But now they're going around the world and telling the rest of the world our diversity our inclusion america's so much better than yours and they don't even see it their arrogance and we got a call them out. You got to say the tunnel to towers foundation helps us keep our commitment to never forget larry elder here this year the foundation is honoring gold star and fall in first responder families.

amazon basin disney kness america towers foundation larry elder
"amazon basin" Discussed on Fully Automated

Fully Automated

05:21 min | 7 months ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Fully Automated

"It's just sort of ask there a way to sort of maybe just say like the longer term point is fine. It's it's how they're getting there. That's the problem domain. It's it's a really powerful challenger superiors and i would. I suppose i suppose there are two onces. I could give. I think the the way in which the the claim that are making. The book is the planetary politics so the vision that vision of planetary politics which was put forward by anthony burke and his collaborators is that we will have planetary politics but it will look very different from what they anticipated and expected so there be you know the kinds of claims that they made were that the amazon basin or the arctic ocean should be given the status of nations in various international. Fora so in we would kind of Pay you know. Give the requisite attention to these parts of the world that are overlooked in favor of kind of male human concerns and that seems to me that seems to me kind of problematic and all sorts of ways because i mean nobody lives in the nobody lives in the arctic ocean and the amazon basin in those those countries nations and peoples. And they have. Those aren't just geographic areas. Those kind of places where people live you have all sorts of interest in aspirations that go beyond the ecological concerns of western academics. And so this is the question. I suppose you know this. Is i think the that if there is to be a planetary politics it can't get around that question and thinking in terms of geographic regions that are under environmental stress. I think is the problem so we will have a planetary politics. But as i suggest in the birds going to be one which is say competition over the warming. Arctic over competition over the sea routes that are opened up by the arctic melting competition over new sources of New natural resources that as lithium rare earth metals that will be needed for the cycle kind of green industrial revolution. New sources of four electric batteries. And what have you. And that is the way that planetary politics will be felted. Won't be felt from the vantage point of the unipolarity era. It will be felt from the vantage point of a more fractious and contested world order and for better or for worse. But i think there's no way of getting around it so if we are to have some kind of response to those challenges it will be one. That weren't that we can kind of Treat various parts of the world purely as if they're ecological units rather than places where people nations exist. People live with all sorts of aspirations and hopes. Which aren't you know purely set by. Environmental questions.

anthony burke amazon basin arctic ocean Arctic arctic
What's the Largest Lake in the World?

BrainStuff

05:09 min | 1 year ago

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

"Siberia's Lake Cal is not your average. Lake. At forty, nine miles wide by three hundred and ninety, five miles long that seventy, nine by six, hundred and thirty, five kilometers. It's the world's largest freshwater lake and with history that dates back twenty, five, million years it's also Earth's oldest. But size and age aren't the only things that make this. Lake. Special. Lake by cow is also home to more than three thousand, seven, hundred different species, many of which are only found in the Baikal region. That's why by cows often considered the Galapagos of Russia. No in case it's bio-diversity doesn't dazzle you here's another but Julia fact. Lake by cow has its own version of the Loch ness monster. Its name translates to water dragon master and it's described as a giant sturgeon with a prominent stout, an armored plating along the back. The monsters history goes back centuries with ancient carvings depicting this terrifying creature. Interest peaked we thought. So here's a starter guide to this ancient beautiful and mysterious late, which is by the way a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lake Baikal is located in southern Russia near the border of Mongolia, its depth of five thousand, three, hundred feet about one thousand, six, hundred meters makes it the world's deepest lake about five hundred feet or two hundred meters it's also famous for its clarity of water and ice. When the lake is frozen, you can see dozens of meters or hundreds of feet down. And as we said at the top, it's also the world's largest lake that size twelve, thousand, two, hundred, square miles, or thirty one, thousand, six, hundred square kilometers makes it comparable in volume to the entire Amazon Basin? A first scale? It reportedly takes about three hundred and thirty years for single water molecule to flow from inlet to inlet. So. How did like by cow get so massive About twenty, five, million ago lake by CAL formed through fractures and shifting within Earth's crust. It wasn't Lake Baikal as we know it. Now, though experts believe it was a series of lakes similar to the Great Lakes in the United States while scientists aren't positive how lake by CAL went for many lakes to the behemoth. It is today they do have theories. It could have been sinking earth erosion earthquakes or increased water from melting glaciers although it's likely a mix of these factors and more. That unifying change took place in the pleasing epoch about five point three to two point five million years ago. But this lake isn't finished growing. It's expanding at a rate of about point seven inches to centimeters every year at the same speed at which Africa in South America are drifting apart. At this speed, some scientists believe lake by Baikal is actually an ocean in the making. The lake boasts twenty-seven islands, the largest of which spans two, hundred, eighty square miles or seven, hundred, twenty, five square kilometers and has its own lake mountains and the population of fifteen hundred residents. The locals connected to power van underwater cable in two, thousand and five, and we're connected to the Internet shortly after. Some Call Lake by Cao, the Galapagos of Russia not only because it has an impressive array of those nearly four thousand species but also because eighty percent of those animals are found nowhere else. One reason for this unique biodiversity is the lakes. Array of hydrothermal vents which are commonly found in oceans but lake by cow is the only freshwater lake known to have them. Cold water from the lake enters cracks in the Earth's crust through these hydrothermal vents. When the water reaches magma, it heats up, then returns resurfacing with minerals and heat. These rich minerals are probably the reason some of the lakes most unusual species were able to develop including several unique fish and the nerpa seal species, which is the only exclusively freshwater seal species in the world and its evolution is mysterious and some scientists believe it arrived by a prehistoric river from the Arctic But beyond seals fish other common animals found in the forests and mountains surrounding Lake Baikal include. Elk. Reindeer links wild-boar, and of course, the lakes frequently reported water dragon master. And this ancient lake has another air of mystery about it. UFO sightings. Many locals have reported strange lights and alien spacecraft throughout the years and several Soviet era documents mention ufo instance in sightings around Earth's largest lake. However for all of its natural wonder, amazing wildlife end stranger sides for lake cows one hundred, thousand permanent residents it's simply home. Made, occupations are forestry agriculture, fisheries, hunting, and tourism though that's currently on hold due to covid nineteen. Here's hoping they opened back up soon.

Call Lake Lake Baikal Lake Cal Russia Galapagos Unesco World Heritage Site Siberia CAL Julia Great Lakes Loch Ness Monster Amazon Basin Mongolia South America United States Africa
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 1 year ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

Facebook Apple Amazon Mark Zuckerberg Google Tim Cook Instagram Jeff. Bezos Tim Co Twitter CEO Casey Brett Kevin Cellini Jeff Bezos Jim Jordan Sicily Mckenna
"amazon basin" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Just like Eric Drexler posed the rather unpopular Grey Goose scenario regarding nanobots designed just like Elia's oryou, Kowski and Nick Costume identified the A. I should have friendliness designed into it. Just like others have raised the alarm about risks from biotech and physics. If we examine the problems we face we can understand the risks that they pose and if we understand the risks that they pose Then we can make an informed decision about whether they're worth pursuing. Scientists working on the Manhattan project did the same thing when they took the possibility seriously that they might accidentally ignite the atmosphere. So they investigated the problem to see if they would. We don't at this point have a clue as to what the possible outcomes for future technology Maybe In trying to guess it's something like that today would be like guessing back in the 19 fifties about what affects clear cutting old growth forests in the Amazon basin would have on global cloud formation. It's just too arcane and question for a time when we don't have enough of the information. We need to respond in any kind of informed way. We don't even know all of the questions to ask at this point, but it's up to us alive now. To start figuring out what those questions are. Working on space flight is another good example of where we can start. Among people who study existential risks. It is largely agreed on that we should begin working on a project to get humanity off of earth and into space as soon as possible. Working on space colonization does a couple of things that benefit humanity. First it gets a few of our eggs out of the single basket of Earth. So should an existential risk befall our planet. There will still be humans living elsewhere to carry on second. The sooner we get ourselves into space, the larger our cosmic endowment will be One of the things we found from studying the universe is that it appears to be expanding outward and apart. Over deep time scales that kind of time skills we humans will hopefully live for That could be an issue. Because eventually all of the matter in the universe will spread out of our reach forever. So the sooner we get offer and out into the universe, the more of that material we will have for are used to do with whatever we can dream up. We're not going to call a nice space tomorrow. It may take us hundreds of years of effort, maybe longer, but that's exactly the point, a project that is so vital to our future. Shouldn't be put off because it seems far off the best time to begin working on a space colonization program was 20 years ago. Second best time is today. Way are working on getting to space Truth. But there's a world of difference between the piecemeal efforts going on across Earth now and the kind of project we could come up with if we decided to put a coordinated global human effort. Behind, spreading out into space. Imagine what we could achieve if humanity work together on what will probably be our greatest human project..

Elia Eric Drexler Amazon basin Manhattan Nick Costume Kowski
"amazon basin" Discussed on Amazing FBA

Amazing FBA

11:01 min | 1 year ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Amazing FBA

"I like to find you. Always want to be innovative and be creative. But you know I think in the Amazon basin the private space that can create a world problem so if I'm not going to invest in that education. I'M NOT GONNA Invest Advisory Services UP FRONT TO MAKE SURE. I'm really safe and secure and moving forward with this innovative type product and I'm the I'm not gonNA innovated all. I want something dumb boring stupid that people are buying. I want to get it to market and I want to sell that just because from a risk perspective. You're safer doing that. You know as you look to source products and you find something that just stands out from the crowd right. Maybe you're looking at milk for authors and there's this one in all the milk father's time to look the same but there's this one hand pump milk froth that doesn't just have a handle but that handle has a special stylized design that allows you to more effectively in the stir in the whipper has a unique design in a coil functionality. If you see unique in the products that you're looking at your thank you. I could do that to. Nobody else seems to be doing that. That to me. Screams Patent and that means I've got a decision point. I'm either GONNA walk away and do something. That's dumb boring and stupid or I'm going to get some advisory services to see if there's a patent on the if there is I want to understand how I might be able to navigate it but you got to become educated if I'm going to move forward down this past kidding that's another very valuable point that you've made other head which is really diff- innovative and interesting. That's a warning sign. Which is I mean. It's great if you own it or he can it. I guess but if you doug than it's a big problem so it's find it really is yeah. I guess is again breezy together lawyer because again. It was like to see that. If you got legals right. It's a massive contested advantage As a business strategy you know go. I would be done investigate. United we give you a ring. 'cause you sound like you're not perfectionists inside no. I'll case robot. What do we do about this? Let me say okay. We'll go look it up here. On T S S. You know that the testing system the states for the equivalent and then. Yeah then we can make take view on. This does protected. So you gotta go in. Hey GonNA make design changes shoulder. You call good lawyers and all just you know what stay out of it and I think that's really good In to really go for it but know what you're doing already stay away roth of not middle ground way. You what you're doing is like I hope nobody. You know the Anorak saw or hope nobody sees when I also as you kind of. Go DOWN THAT PATH. A little bit. I look at patented stuff yet. I is as risk right. But if you do see somebody. That has a patent. You're not a client. The other day you know kind of out of the blue in their white list of been doing some research and found this patent and it's an interesting product and the company seems to be defunct and they don't seem to be selling the product you know he was kind of like. Why just I'm just going to move forward. They'RE NOT GONNA they're not gonNA figure it out. I'm like well. Why don't you buy the patent? Like if they're out of business and you know. They invested all his money in the Patton on it by it then all of a sudden instead of them having the club in the bag. You've got it and you've got you know something amazing you can do with or if they won't sell it outright will maybe you get an exclusive license and then you can go out? You know. You didn't have to pay any money up front necessarily and you're just paying a small royalty near the only game in town. That's the cool thing about all this stuff is with every challenges and opportunity right and so if you're seeing patent again I am a pretty conservative guy. Most often if I'm looking at products just go the other direction but if I do want to go down that path cool but that's an interesting conversation about it. Maybe it's we innovate it and make it better right. And so we navigate the patent. You look at the recipe that they've given us we figure out how we can avoid it and they can even more improve product or no maybe like the product so much we WanNa License. We want to get it to market. We want to make sure we secured our rights. We do that or you know maybe the company we do a little bit of Diligence. There defunct their belly up. You know you think for a couple of hundred bucks. You're not going to sell that patent. I guess is they will. Because what else are they doing with right? Like Opportunity Opportunity Opportunity but it's all about mindset and we can't have the right mindset and can explore all those opportunities unless we have educated people around the table helping us have those conversations at the very positive again at the Novi Concert Might BE GETTING DIM view after awhile that that is the for the bad times. But what you're looking by. Israeli saying intellectual property as shopping for products in a sense but you shopping full the ability to continue to sell a product oversight in type design into the future with protection on legitimately in all senses including legally. Take down the competition. That sounds great. I mean I I really think the idea of shopping for patents particularly without being ghoulish about it but you know their businesses People giving up on businesses. That'd be five minutes young the might even Flat some people invest so much time to any money into the hope of creating a product including passes related to the compensation we had lost a beside the little. Get right to selling stop protesting whether in one wants it but will they have done often. This creates intellectual property. This is able to get out Mockus Sisal I wonder whether it right now. This could be the next few months. It'd be real Balkans to be had and that's a very look against the tangible assets of a business often. Douglas that track to somebody's failed to sell the product. Why would I wanNA buy their inventory? And that's a reasonable point. The may fail to sell your product in the form but they may have spent twenty thousand pounds on a apart since which they did not be used in. There just wasn't money out of its. They might suddenly put three thousand people. I'm personally but I know that Dan Derek's was talking about he. He's a good farmer on copyright copyrights genius but he he come across data. He's laws and life threatening On the east odd his private business with a formula and to be fat he knows about Erik as he has goes but is a full deficit. Goats a supplementals grady obscure but the point is he full. Media didn't developed just formula on the rights to use it degrom. Somebody five thousand bucks on Sunday was off and the next thing he's got he's got a business. Yeah now it's really interesting. I think that's like so many people run towards intellectual property as you know it's from a defensive position right I've got knocked on my brand of locked them. My product locked him a copyright. And there's absolutely that right but going back to the whole mantra business is war. Sometimes you need a shield. Sometimes you need a sword right and and sometimes you can buy one by going through the pat repository and find one. So it's amazing. I think we're can wrap it up on that because it's just such a positive. I really like his opportunity minded lawyers enough to have never met once so welcome. I I think you get the entrepreneur. Think y'all don't mean that are spiking similar noise counties what a nature. They tend to be risk averse. And that's kind of why you hire them. You know. An entrepreneur should be muscle Patina stick to and state and lawyers in concerts should be somewhat at least risk aware but nevertheless it's refreshing to find some middle ground. So I think it's really helpful. I I just think it's that's where the magic happens is when a mock meets Laura and they realize the illegal situation is Moxie opportunity will arrange and those are kind words and certainly appreciate that the way. I aspire to practices is being what I call a trusted adviser and so trusted advisers. Certainly going to advise you of risk right. I'm a rainy day so a person. I see a risk everywhere. That's what they do the law school so same time. I think I think you will also see opportunity. I think any lawyer worth their salt is really gonNA make their clients. Think they're going to be able to paint the whole picture the client they're going to give them all the options that they have available to them and then let them make the best decision for their business. That's that's what the bean lawyers all about the ask me. It's a bit more like this. Don't you think too but I can't resist because I love the Godfather in the yes. I will caveat an illegal Disclaimers of course those gangsters on you are highly legitimate businessman this is not any similarity that conciliatory. I think While they called it a couple of copy is like that the boss of the bosses which to some extent maybe on Maloney about all entrepreneurs onsides about having that level of power maybe has would really let identities mcgahn disregarding bad things about myself with the put. You've got the boss. But then between the boss and the people to do stuff. And it's very tempting to sit at ball. Cataclysm feel very powerful is not that middle ground with the second in command because CDRH additionally it means adviser and it has a lot of power an interest because he's the Games in the midst of actions acres violent grazing people compass advises on strategizes and thinks things through is a powerful. Things happened. The team I really think lot of people underestimate remain most was in speights. Arkansas' more moist saying. I'm GonNa add if you get the right lawyer. Was their lawyer. More unless they really announced the press themse- Gates not so. I JUST WANNA say a couple of things I mean festival and thank you really refreshing. Some fun stuff never thought said that about on some interesting possibilities mind buying Ip. It's obvious had thought of it like Alice. Gray between the excited about that kept the things. Listenable new mentioned copyright under appreciated really imported. I'm not going to leave that one hanging. We got time now Ryan GonNa leave it hanging bargain. Come back on the show. You'll have absolute until balance because that sounds like a g C thing to know the other thing is we'll to just reiterate them for. They didn't pay the first upset. How people can get help from you. I should they need it or get in touch again at absolute. I appreciate that. Opportunity head on over to private label protection DOT COM. You can download free brand protection blueprint that will give you the four step process..

Amazon basin doug themse- Gates Patton Gray Ryan Dan Derek grady Douglas Erik Arkansas Maloney Laura Moxie CDRH
"amazon basin" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Retailer internet retailer but Amazon is in the Amazon basin in the Brazil limited edition Oregon it's been sold out for ages what I didn't realize is that brand manager Doug Baldwin and master blender Rick Rodriguez of CA unbeknownst to me when we talked about doing a couple of years ago one of the officers club selections using the Amazon basin they stashed away a bunch of the CO Oregon knowing that they wouldn't be available so I thought we were going to do three CO sessions and they said we got a little surprise for a general going to sh to see a section for the March officers club selection and won CA Oregon very very limited wrapped in six year aged resilient broadleaf a very unique dark chocolaty oily wrapper it's finished with what's called a full month in court at the head they take the rapidly and they rolled up tight so it's got a cord that goes about an inch wrapped around the top of the head a beautiful full bodied cigar exotic taste wonderful Rick Rodriguez master blender longtime friend did a marvelous job with it those of you that are members of the officers club you will absolutely enjoy the CEO or Jana in addition to the CO session if you haven't got them yet you should get them by mid next week everything delayed with this Chinese Communist Party one virus I want to strangle every one of them including president xi Jinping of China cigar altering and highly sharpened leaf exposing device now this is a show some troubling alleged English you're getting however what I would love to do with the ski team if I could make a bigger version and fit president xi jin ping of China if I could feel his head inside this cute teen and go home like Marie Antoinette it would bring the world much pleasure the people of China would be would be thrilled ecstatic democracy in China wouldn't that be a wonderful thing the phone just to avoid self sharpening stainless steel guillotine could do that job maximum be two you'll flame throwing and heat producing apparatus you are listening to the C. C. K. the Chinese communist killer the cigar Dave already laboratory came up with this one of our location devices you can take a look at that I mean this thing is just incredible this thing I'm telling you you could line up about fifty Chinese companies starting with president xi Ching paying and go right down the line just like a fire breathing torch boom they'd all be vaporize like that I will use this today on my C. A. O. or yeah six guard preflight checklist complete no faults detected area clear of all enemies of pleasure approval to go throttle up in three two one perfect cuts I will close the foot of the cigar and as I do let's go to voice talent and smoking today voice teleporting international libation I am smoking a nineteen sixty four but drone anniversary edition and the fabulous feline the Portuguese princes Colleen is smoking a rocky Patel edge them over and say hello on very nice Portuguese princess readings cans on hi there Portuguese princess what I understand you've been busy in the kitchen why have I not seen anything at the pleasure palace any delicacies coming my way they're all under quarantine your what I miss that they are all under quarantine over under quarantine I see okay well they sure you could you could get them all her medically sealed for my safety and still.

Amazon Amazon basin Brazil Oregon
Indigenous Amazonians Managed Valuable Plant Life

60-Second Science

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Indigenous Amazonians Managed Valuable Plant Life

"Barred. If you watch nature documentaries it's easy to come away. With the impression that lush tropical forests have been largely undisturbed until modern times tropical forests of soda long been considered to be these pristine wildernesses that humans haven't really touched until recent industrial foolish started to invade them and challenge them with twenty th century capitalism archaeological scientists. Patrick Roberts of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of human history however in the last two decades archaeological data shown that actually human societies occupied modified these environments of many Millennia. Roberts says some of the trees alive in tropical forests are up two thousand years old and they're sort of like time capsules storing record of past human activity in their tree rings chemistry and DNA so we wanted to see how different existing methods might come together to explore. Tree populations tree groves tree ages by looking at the largest witnesses of the changes in human activity in the tropics. The trees themselves for example indigenous peoples of the Amazon basin cultivated Brazil nuts for thousands of years. Roberts colleague Victor Kitano Andrade analyzed tree rings to determine the age and growth rates of Brazil nut trees near the city of Manaus. He found that many trees were established in the late. Sixteen hundreds but there was a steep drop off in new trees around the middle of the eighteenth century as colonial communities came into analysis about the city. They drove indigenous. People out often killing them they found is that actually that growth slowed after this period without these traditional management strategies. Brazil Nut Trees. That were still standing name announced. Today we're actually affected by these pre and post colonial changes in human settlement activity. Another example is how communities selected for genetic traits in a variety of tropical trees such as the cocoa tree used of course to make chocolate of more detailed full gene. I'm alison this. Plant has shown that humans may have even selected genes. That reduced bitterness improved. Its resistance to disease for their own economic benefit. The study is in the Journal. Trends and plant. Science Roberts's recognizing tropical trees is time capsules of cultural heritage. Gets US yet? Another reason to protect them. Not just because of their ecological benefits which is hugely significant but also the information. They store about human

Patrick Roberts Victor Kitano Andrade Max Planck Institute Brazil Manaus Amazon
Guarana

20 Minute Fitness

04:57 min | 2 years ago

Guarana

"So as I mentioned Gerona. Brazilian plant native to the Amazon Basin. In Koran extract is made by proce into seeds into a powder it contains a range of stimulants such as Caffeine theobromine which is a bitter alkaloid of the Cacao plant and it's also direct however. It's mainly acts as a way to relax your muscles and is a cardiac stimulant and Grahn also boasts a number of antioxidants with its anti oxidant profile. Actually being very similar to that of green tea. And I'm sure you've heard of numerous benefits of incorporating green tea until diets. So let's start with the theories that Rauner helps with fat loss much like. Cla's was they will be basically looking about whether the live up to the hype so Grahn is a rich source of caffeine as just said and there is evidence to suggest that caffeine can help boost your metabolism from anywhere between three to eleven percent over twelve hours. So you'll bodies could be burning more calories at rest and what's also interesting that Gerona seeds are known for their high caffeine content around three to seven percent which is actually twice. That found in coffee. Beans Phen- is one of the most research substances in the world. And because of this were on a has not seen very much research because it contains a lot of caffeine itself. And that's what they've chosen to do the research on however it may be more effective caffeine not only because obviously has higher caffeine levels then coffee beans but also because Gerona contains other compounds that may also be beneficial for weight loss as bench before it contains small amounts of Theo brooming and also natural phenol. Anti-oxidants called Catechin which are present in lots of different dietary products. Like your your plants. Your fruits yakult sprees blueberries rapports and catechists are actually the major component of green tea extract and studies have shown that daily consumption of green tea containing six hundred ninety milligrams of Catechin for twelve. Weeks can help reduce body fat so as Catkins are in. Iran is also a suggest that it could help with a loss as well as study called modulator effects of Rauner on adipogenesis found that Grahn has an anti adipogenesis potential media counters adipogenesis which is the formation of fat cells from stem cells. And this is due to its ability to modulate micro Aurigny and genes that are related to this process. So micro army is small. Non Coding Arna that regulates gene expression and therefore biological processes in different tissues. It's also been found. Suppressor genes that aid fat cell production and promote genes that. Slow it down and the some evidence of that she suggests that increases fat oxidation which is the body's usage all fats for energy. Again though I would say that more evidence needs to be done to confirm this as most. The studies have been done on small subject. Pools with with limited amounts of people so a tooth needs to be more research conducted them once again. Studies have also tried to determine whether there's a link between Garonne and improved memory recalling cognitive function because `Grana contains high levels of caffeine. There's suggestions that might help reduce fatigue and they're starting to do more studies on the effect on your sort of cognitive function one. Such study had one hundred twenty nine eighteen to twenty four year olds and they were tasked complete a ten minute version of the cognitive demand battery and this includes a series of different tasks for them to complete and some of the group were taking a vitamin mineral supplement whilst others had a placebo so thirty minutes after having the drink whether it be a placebo or the vitamin MINERAL DRINK. They did six completions of the battery. So our testing and vitamin mineral `Grana combination resulted in improved toss performance in comparison to placebo both in terms of the speed. They complete the toss on the accuracy or performing them throughout so this suggests you know increased mental acuity and the ability to focus and hone your task more. It also showed that there was less mental fatigue when you had the wrong supplement associated extended task. Performance low doses. Grew on of course been found to improve your mood learning. And it's much like the Jin sang which is long been used in Chinese medicine to improve your memory and counteract stress to set shed sort of similar benefits as Jinxiang minutes not truly new tropic which are drugs supplements and other substances that improve cognitive function but from the tests that have been done it may help to energize to function regardless so `Grana has been associated with a number of other health benefits including improve skin condition. Heart health pain relief but again as I've mentioned before. More studies needs to be conducted on larger. Tempur to really conclude whether Rana is a miracle settlement but unfortunately again. We have time for this episode. So if you do want to look further and score on and his health benefits I strongly recommend taking a look. It's very similar properties as I said two green tea benefits so that might be another place to read about

Caffeine Grahn Gerona Amazon Basin Rauner Stimulant Catkins Rana CLA Theobromine Theo Brooming Iran Garonne Jinxiang
"amazon basin" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

Sustainability Explored

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Sustainability Explored

"I traveled to Brazil where spent days in the remote part of the rainforest very far from big cities. And this is where I absorbed as much information from local indigenous people as I possibly could have handled later on this episode. You will learn them. Thinkable waste both. The Sahara in the Amazon rainforest are connected. I promised I promise you will be surprised. The Amazon rain forest also known as Amazonia or the Amazon jungle is the moist broadleaf tropical rainforest in the Amazon volume that covers most of the Amazon Basin of South America. The basin encompasses seven million square kilometers of which five and a half million square kilometers are covered by the rain forest. This region includes territory belonging to nine nations. The majority of the forest is contained within Brazil with sixty percent of the rainforest. The Amazon represents over half of the planets remain in rainforests and comprises the largest and most biodiverse tract of tropical rainforest in the world with an estimated three hundred ninety billion individual trees divided into sixteen seven species. The rain forest likely formed from fifty six million years to thirty four million years ago it appeared following a global reduction of tropical temperatures when the Atlantic Ocean had widened sufficiently to provide a warm moist climate to the Amazon Basin. The rainforest has been in existence for existence for at least fifty five million years and most of the region remained free of Savannah type by oems at least until the current ice age when the climate was drier and Savanna was more widespread. There have been significant changes in their own rainforest. Vegetation of the last twenty one solomon years through the last glacial maximum and subsequent deglaciation. No The promise. Sahara surprise.

Amazon Basin Amazon Brazil Atlantic Ocean South America Savannah
"amazon basin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

12:40 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Such a negative reaction is because there are laws antitrust laws we say that you either kill or by an open platform you gonna be selling against the merchants on the platform exactly what Amazon does here in every time something successful suddenly shows up at Amazon basin basics and the motion so producing there and other competitive products go out of business so what is going to prevent is from this sentiment on but not plastic behavior that's what the such a negative reaction to it now on the other hand with apple and Samsung mode is been rolling out the red carpet for apple and and something to come and manufacture their phones that any event that is is that China has become a big problem for American companies that is a lot of pressure on them to move manufacturing out of China so this thing will come over here will give you all the facilities you want we have a very large market for you and we will welcome you okay I want to take all these companies piece by piece let's start with the Amazon how do you then make in roads they're giving you show up in your green with protests well first of all you don't break laws like what they're doing the other center trust investigation Amazon has been playing games that they have third party companies so if the console by you know their own amazonbasics products over there they simply by a company put it under the guise of a different company and then promote the heck out of it so these of anti competitive behavior is at Amazon does in the United States is also doing in India it shouldn't do that it really should if it's going to be new to the market place it's a new to market this so used to obey the laws and do what's right not only in India but also in the in the western Europe is also you know imposing restrictions on Amazon so Amazon is out of line with and this is why their protests and these people don't want to go out of business and I want to be dependent on Amazon for their livelihoods because what they're worried about is that Amazon would start undercutting them and put the a hundred a thousand people out of business that's what the worry worry is rightfully so by the way okay so it's not just Amazon but a Microsoft their CEO has been critical of India as well and and you were you know talking about how he's sort of been isolating himself from working with India by making comments on some of their religious based citizenship laws how do you again work with India but then also not have to be able to comment on some of the things that perhaps you don't agree with well my consultant actually very well respected that such an antenna is a legend over there I think you made a mistake by commenting on this this this this new immigration up on this and they have which says that we welcome we we will we we welcome minorities from neighboring countries except if the Muslims you know that's a very contentious issue and so they have made some comments about it which was actually an accurate and he got a lot of trouble for it and I'm sure you'd aggressive but there's been no other issue with Microsoft being open with their so and you know as far as being critical of what about the United States we have Muslim bands here as well with a wig talking with the Texas independent accept refugees bracket Syrian Muslims we we discriminate as African Americans why don't we clean up our own house first and that's what the arguments are about seven and a lot of you know commenting on this and yeah yes Microsoft their problems here but they also bones in America comment on American before you start criticizing us and that is for any criticism also I said you know exit is very widely respected that and myself is on wonders in India well it's not all bad news because use Marley pointed out at the beginning of the conversation that apple and Samsung have sort of had a different experience over there they've been perhaps more welcome to look at perhaps receiving some subsidies from India to help them gain some in roads what is the difference in tactics if you well between the companies that are being received while companies that are not one of them in any case a Microsoft I think there was just a glitch over here the good the good the company is doing very well and is very one inspected second Adela is a legend in India because of you know of what he's achieved so there's no issue with that Amazon yes is a big problem here and again the the problem here is Amazon itself I don't think it's a country that's a problem it's Amazon's money monopolistic ways which we call it in the United States and we shouldn't tolerate over that of yeah what right I mean they're doing very well and and then we can go is to move manufacturing and and be them Indians haven't been buying the high end up of phones because they're so expensive the sampling phone the better but this is normal now you know competitive business there isn't really an issue with the with the those companies what advice would you give perhaps this is C. E. O. as in this case I mean when we talk about apple and Tim cook he's frankly had a great relationship with president trump relative to some of the other big tech companies here you go abroad to India and he's having a better relationship there similar with Amazon's Jeff Bezos struggling here with the relationship in the U. S. and then appears of course the broad with India struggling with the relationship there what is the difference does it come down to the CEO it can mean enough so that made a mistake in commenting on on India's CA laws but that's a minor glitch I died I think at the end of the day it's going to be forgotten and and then my so is going to just fine with Amazon's amount of really understanding what the complaints other than not being so greedy and not being so monopolistic like that in the United States so they have to understand that that they're not going to get the free rein they've had in the USA the than in the rest of the world the laws are tight and you Condi's indigo to Washington DC and and by the politicians I get them to support you like this it's a more difficult in other countries and it is in other states so they have to realize the the politics and then they have to also realize the social impact of what they do that if Amazon stocks now believe the same though the platform is as in the United States and putting hundreds of thousands of people out of business on a low grade massive unemployment and they will be public protests again against it understand that while great thoughts on tack in India and the intersection between the two Harvard law school's Vic walkway thank you for joining us and they still had we'll hear from co founder and general partner of VC firm and recent horror when Ben Horowitz he is our Studio One point no gas part of that conversation next this is one of our how do today's entrepreneurs and CEOs build a workplace culture they can whether both good and bad times limber technologies brownstone speaks to Ben Horowitz co founder of it venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz in the interview on Bloomberg Studio One point now they discuss his new book called what you do is who you are on how to shape business culture take a listen when you think about culture it's really complex it's a complex topic and so I'll just give you a like a kind of start at all from my own like experiences CO where I was like okay had only be a good seo sales call the old head it's like the Gee COS like how do you do this what you to focus on in their life been paid attention to culture and I'm like okay got it what's that how do I do that and stuff got very vague and I was on a roll like finds it's a vague how do you do it and it turns out that you know all these little things that your employees ask themselves like you know what do I say like should I say state tell fiver telly said a like returned a phone call today or tomorrow should I likes it the red roof inn at the four seasons all that is dictated not by like your mission statement every okay ours are all that it's by your culture no often a kind of a website they're gonna be there could be principles in there on the wall cultures that's what you believe that's not what you do and you know this is why what you do is who you are and this is what's okay about that but so then you get into it further and you go public cultures not every culture works for every company like every company is trying to do what it's trying to do and he's a culture that supports that so like apple doesn't need the Amazon culture the frugality because they're high doesn't fly coach everywhere all does not flying first class on their their campuses like other got five thousand dollar door knobs and stuff on the thing because like everything's got to be about like perfect design where is Amazon is about low cost leader so different cultures and so that kind of got me into well like in order to write this book I really have to understand Blake who some of the very hard cultural problems and also make those examples from like really different things so you open your mind up you're not just like I'm inside Silicon Valley I'm getting these people with stem degrees and so forth you have to think about your people from first principles when they walk in with it and building a good corporate culture you have to be harsh sometimes so you tell the story of reed Hastings transforming Netflix from a DVD to digital company and he stops inviting the DVD executives to meetings yeah like the the executive yeah the most coveted meeting and I don't I mean I'm sure they're not happy about that so so they're running stand to see io's need to you know to be tough and sometimes even cruel to create a good corporate culture well look you know I mean it it you know because sometimes it's necessary area and you have to be careful right because sorry like is the Cronus out of intent for like to be sadistic or is it to demonstrate the priority or set the town like here I find people ten dollars a minute for being late for a meeting and cycle that person you know like she had to go to the bathroom where you like finding her like eighty dollars like you know like people gotta go you gotta go but it's the cultural point is we really value the time that entrepreneurs have to spend billion companies and so we plan to do everything from like finish our phone calls to go to the bathroom to whatever and we are on time to that meeting and that's more important than how unfair that particular fine was for that person that was one bar technologies Brad stone's begin with injuries and Horowitz co founder Ben Horowitz be sure to.

Amazon Amazon basin
"amazon basin" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

11:43 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We're back gate continuing our conversation with my guests doctor stuff and tenor of Amazonas magazine in Swiss Tropicales so we kind of got a little bit of insight into thirty your background in in education I kind of wanted to hit on Swiss Tropicales first and then we'll move on Amazon is but so I learned from your website that you at this room in Ohio when you I guess sometime after you moved to the states with sixty three tanks what did you end up keeping in in all those tanks and what kind of was picking your interest at that time well always catfish that these were sort of the first thing that always came about I actually started off in a small apartment with my wife I think it was in two thousand and two or something I said you know I've always kept fish and she was kind of like okay so we had a bunch of tanks all over the apartment in the bedroom and the living room and the office and eventually decide that it's you know we got to hang out longer in Columbus than was originally planned and so we looked for a house and the most important thing at the house was finding a house that has a basement where you could stick about your fish tanks. and yet and I ordered I don't know seventy some tanks Roma manufacture and set them up and that was the first time and I kind of realized that gets a little out of hand. because suddenly at all these shelving parts in the basement and piles of tanks in the garage and all kinds of supplies piled up and that it actually takes quite a lot of time to put everything together but then once I was set up I started you know mark's tent draws loaches and and catfish is really the BSS W. again except in life form at that became the sort of the center that was also of course about to get ten years after the so called el number and a catfish boom the black turbaned start it with all those fish mostly from man the central Amazon basin and that's totally changed all be because suddenly we were used to getting some fancy Malawian tank any can sick let's that were expensive but usually they were expensive for a very brief period of time because most of them are rather easy to breed well a few tiny cans excluded but most of the large from all of these are not that difficult so that they came in were super expensive and within a short time if the price drops well it was different but the catfish they came in and we killed literally thousands of them because we didn't know how they left we didn't understand that they were living in very warm what there that is very clear very highly oxygenated and has absolutely no organic traces whatsoever you know it's not an Amazon River like you think it's more like a clear what the creek up in the mountains except it's very warm and we didn't know all that we also didn't know that these fish for the most part don't eat algae or or plant matter that they are actually mostly carnivores and so we killed millions of fish in the initial years until we start to understand how the species actually live so lets some say way over to Swiss Tropicales and when I was kind of going through your website you mentioned a lot of it was actually founded on the your need for materials for your H. a math which I had to look up and learned it's the hamburger maten filter is that correct that is right yeah yeah yeah I I think you mentioned on this your site is well it's really not I hadn't heard of it before can you maybe talk a little bit about that and I guess how that became sort of the basis for a lot of your the the business end of Swiss Tropicales yeah as have ridiculous shin all filter foam kind of developed in the sixties and seventies and I think that was at some time some to people say sometime in the nineteen seventies somewhere in Hamburg somebody came up with the idea of sticking a piece of foam at the end of the tank and then pumping the water from one side to the other using nearly if this do you and nobody really truly knows where it originated but it's entirely possible that it was that reach should because that was sort of the center of innovation in the Aquatics all be in Europe at that time and I knew the foam the so called famous blue form four years working in the store we used it for all kinds of things and when I came to the U. S. I was kind of looking around trying to to set up by tanks and yeah not too very much avail multiple companies I contacted could even tell me what the phone exactly is that they sell. and some were just laughing at me in terms of like yeah you're not you know important enough I was like okay went back to Europe got into contact with the E. M. W. is to manufacture off one of the various types of phones and can and she became their U. S. distribute there and we have now go back twelve some years or more than twelve years of working together and it was literally just trying to build my own Fisher room and then people saw it and said Hey can I get that and eventually it was a cheap disco songs in Baltimore who encouraged me to do it commercially because he's obviously wanted a bunch of phone do and that got it all started and with the first few pilots in the garage my I told my wife well I did I gotta have phone for the rest of my whole life for this is a good idea. so I guess the latter replied in the long run but yeah it's a lot of people didn't know what it's all about and it's still fairly well known but I'm not spending a huge amount of time on advertisement and I'm forty I'm not a good video graph for or anything so I you know no you two videos yet yeah that's I mean I've I've literally need to have somebody do that for me simply because I don't have the patience for doing stuff like that. well I thought you had some nice pictures on your I think was on your website because I was trying to figure out how that how that worked I think was on your website I was trying to remember but on but yeah so I so I guess you just feel they're very efficient and real good filters I guess is that that kind of well the the principle is actually when I comes back to a call edgy you know studying how these things interact the idea of self the filter from is essentially that it's just a huge bio tall but you which habitat for a filter organisms the form itself is really not doing that much it's literally just trapping particles by then it's a microorganism which digest all the organic material that comes into it and you know to give you an idea of a block in a ten gallon tank in terms of filter surfaces as big as a medium sized canister filter at a fraction of its cost. you don't have any hoses that hang over the site so there's no no risk of leaking or right our problems and nail driven filter you have a power outage which in Columbus was quite common then if you have tons of little palm surrounding and hang on back so little internal filters they have the nasty habit that when the power comes back on and they're a little full of sludge they just don't come back on and then you come back in the evening and you have a bunch of you know filters that didn't turn back on then you have to go around to fishermen. right there are three even filter that problem there exists you know the problem comes back on it comes back on and with one single air pump you can do the whole room and if you have a longer power outages small battery set up order a generator can around the whole Fisher room whichever makes you know emergency maintenance a lot easier okay now I make a lot of sense well let's talk a little bit about Amazonas now so definitely one of my favorite aquarium hobby magazines beautiful pictures great articles really good detail and very well researched so how did you first become involved with them his own as well we touch on that haunts care givers before early in my career and Hans Georg is actually the founding editor of Amazonas magazine in Germany and that started up in the early two thousands and by twenty twelve an English edition was published by restoring forest in Vermont and shortly there after I became involved as the translator for both Sam's on us and coral magazine because Houghton suggests that meet to James Lawrence the owner of freeze to rain forests to do the translations simply because I guess on top of speaking both languages I also know a few things about fish and that is of course quite helpful but in terms of you know making sure that the context that she is correct after the translation and so for years said that the translations and you have a little bit over a year ago James decided that he would like to step back a little and so I talked to my colleague Smith Peterson and Mike two GRT about yeah if we can handle that and so we jumped into it set up a new company aquatic media press that is now the Senshi boning Amazon as magazine so we still license the German called tend to be of. or sat our own because there's certain articles that are not all good for the US market say for example snake kids while certainly interesting snake aides are totally legal in the US henceforth it's not you don't read two people a favor if you talk big about something they called keep. that's sad on one hand alt you know you could argue the knowledge audiences might still be there but you might also encourage people to do stupid things like smuggling them into the country which is and I always emphasize that is actually bad I mean you can argue it'll is justified you can debate that you don't like the rule you know there is ways of of addressing that angle wing trying to change those rules but just ignoring them is actually counterproductive for the whole hobby because if we have a bunch of black sheep that do stupid things then the result is usually the regulations get tougher and then the ninety nine percent to do fishkeeping legally with the best intentions have to pay the price for that one percent who's been dom running Google's I wanted I wanted to touch base a little bit on the current issue July August and the theme of of natives and I guess I mean it's it's since Amazon is is in you know out of Europe as well as the U. S. I mean it's really focusing on north American natives can you explain the interest I mean I my understanding is that Europe has a real keen interest in north American native fishes can you talk about that a little bit well I guess there's always the the thing for what's new every now logged off the whole PS driven at the forefront the by the enthusiast by those people that are always looking for something new or unusual so for a long time it was of course South America then there was a lot of emphasis on the job over the last few years but then especially because there are some really extraordinary photograph first here in the US that have to send you know taking pictures of.

Swiss Tropicales Amazon Amazonas ninety nine percent twelve years one percent four years ten gallon ten years one hand
Musical Note Perception Can Depend on Culture

60-Second Science

02:35 min | 2 years ago

Musical Note Perception Can Depend on Culture

"Music music but what shapes our perception of music to candidates are the limits of the human brain and the exposure. We've already had to music during our lives. If we only test participants with expense with best music than we'd really can't know whether the speeches come from the experience or from the biological constraints psychologists noory Jacoby of the max-planck-institute for empirical aesthetics during the past few years he and his colleagues have visited a remote area of Bolivia took investigate this question so we traveled there by taking canoe ride or it can Cessna plane or a couple of hours track to communities. Don't have running water orange. The CIMINI are an indigenous people who live in the Amazon Basin we specifically recruited participant from the believe in Amazon because this this participant had relatively little exposure to music for example octaves are a staple of western music but Jimani musical instruments don't feature them as an acoustical go phenomenon. An octave is defined as the interval in which the vibrational frequency of the bottom note is half that of the top note. They're considered the same note inactive apart for example Middle C. N. Nine High C. for the study she money participants pence were asked to listen to simple melodies and sing them back to the researchers. This exercise revealed that the money don't perceive tones that are knocked of apart as the same note on the other hand participants from the US did recognize octaves other musically trained Westerners were better at it than those with no musical training ansel Hansel what is exciting years highlights the importance of experience and exposure on the mind the researchers in the journal current biology in an earlier study Jacoby Bubis colleague Josh Mcdermott and his team from mit found that the chimney don't find an unpleasant to hear notes sight-seeing f sharp played together but there are distant Combo. That's particularly grading too many western years. Despite the evidence that experience influences pitch perception biology college is also a factor. Jacoby says the new study also revealed the both Westerners and the Toumani have trouble distinguishing between really high notes above four thousand thousand Hertz even though human hearing goes all the way up to twenty thousand Hertz and that may be because no matter where we're from we hit the limits of our brains before we reached the limits of our ears. Thanks for

Noory Jacoby Jacoby Bubis Amazon Basin Amazon Ansel Hansel Cessna Bolivia United States MIT Josh Mcdermott Four Thousand Thousand Hertz Twenty Thousand Hertz
"amazon basin" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:53 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Of climate change so we're seeing hey you know we were one of the many climate victims or climate refugees that we're seeing and we're starting to see that elsewhere or no we saw the the brothers and sisters in the Bahamas as offering basically as much if not even more that weeding eating Puerto Rico where one year after there were still people without electricity. There were feeling the effects. My name is Tanisha Bri. I just just turned eighteen years old and I'm here because climate changes the nursing a few scientists say be up to up to twenty thirty and I'm only going to be like twenty nine then so it's my future at stake. I'm nine years old here today to protest climate change. I'm asking them onto the trash smart because it's not just key to make a lot of grownup still does my name is John. You I am from the Philippines teams and I am here today because I want to stand in solidarity with all of the young people who are rising up and spend standing up for the future. I've I've never seen anything like this before and is in. It's truly truly amazing. It's the climate crisis a matter of life and death for Filipinos and we all know that the the story is quite simple and classic those who have the least contribution to this problem Martin of Hildebrand of its impact and that is so unfair that is so unjust and in the Philippines pins we faced massive typhoon super storms and and massive droughts and and this is a matter of of of life for us and it's affecting real lives real people real livelihoods and you know when we come into the streets like this in my country. When you defend the environment you you can die you can be killed and I hope people in in in America recognize that you have the space to to be able to express our views about the future and about about the planet but not every country in the world has that privilege my name's Alina Hussin. I'm from the Bronx High School of Science and my son says the Exxon Mobil knew about climate change about fifty years ago and they did nothing about it. They actually paid money so that they could deny it. They spread propaganda against time change. We need to hold them accountable. In My name is Lucky Tran. I'm a scientist and science communicator. I'm with March for science today and scientists joining the climate strike today because we've had enough people women's warning the world about climate change for decades and decades and decades politicians have not listen to us and we need a change of transformative change and society right now. That's why scientists are herron thousands marching all around the world because we're angry because we serve the community with up front line communities. We have to try to make a better well right now researching. It's not enough. We're leaving the labs and went demanding action in the streets is with everyone here today. Take my name is Halima and from Somalia and I Walk Condition Paul Save Somali women and children. I oh I think in the climate crisis that we can see the strike is all about is really happening. In countries like Somalia particularly there was drought three consecutive years that we've we've never had raincoats and that means that people have been losing animals and these are the only standard leaving that'd be behind so meaning that they've lost literally everything so that's means that once they lose everything then they have to be displaced and once you displaced it means that you crossed out of your house once these families are forced of course it exposes them into risk so being you know human human rights violations happening do in general of Amnesty International and Amnesty International is in this March because we want to send a message to the world that climate change constitutes at mass death penalty facing all the people on the planet right mouth. That's the reality of how we have neglected acting on it so we are running out of time and the the significance of this particular day which is already we know the largest number of people have come out on a single day of climate action is the fact that young people abroad a moral appeal to the conscience of even the most toughest CEOS of fossil. Oh feel companies. I'm not sure where to get through to trump because he's himself a tough nut to crack but bottom line is I feel that we are reaching the tipping point now. The global public opinion is shifting addicting way. It's going to be irresistible for governments to not act so yes we we are not there yet but the momentum is building to send a message that nature does not negotiate we cannot change the science and all that we have in our will change now his political the wood and to existing political leaders need to understand the political will is a renewable resource so if they don't get back together they will find themselves out of power if they're not willing to missing from the global climate strike in New York the protest ended at Battery Park where sixteen year old Swedish climate activists catoon. I'm very addressed the crowd but first artemis a shocker bomb a nineteen year old indigenous activists from Brazil took to the stage Muzak Rabah. My name is Artemisia Shaqra. I'm nineteen years old and I'm from the shocker eat by people all in Brazil. I'm here today representing the more than twenty five million indigenous and traditional communities from the Global Alliance of territorial communities this alliance is formed by four organizations a pip from Brazil quaker from the Amazon Basin and pb from Central America and Amman from Indonesia together. We protect six hundred million hectares of forest but I'm also here as a young woman because there's no difference between an indigenous young female activists like myself an a young indigenous female activists like Greta are features connected by the same threads of the climate crisis. The Amazon is on fire. The Amazon agonizes year after year for the responsibility of the government and it's destructive policies that intensify deforestation and drought not only in the Amazon but in the other five resilient by oems climate change is a result sort of this and it also helps to make the fire stronger and beyond the Amazon. They're the forest of Indonesia Africa North America who suffering has such an impact in my highlife and in your life we indigenous peoples are the children of nature so we fight for our mother. Earth because the fight for mother earth is the mother of all of their fights. We're we're fighting for your lives. We are fighting for our lives. We are fighting for our secret territory but we are being persecuted threatened murdered only for protecting our own territories. We cannot accept one more job of indigenous blood spilt song and it is my honor to introduce Gradison Edinburgh.

Amazon Brazil Philippines Somalia Tanisha Bri Bronx High School of Science Bahamas Puerto Rico Exxon Mobil Indonesia Africa North America Amnesty International America Alina Hussin Gradison Edinburgh scientist Martin Halima Amazon Basin New York
"amazon basin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And we have always come at it from that perspective their perspective is in this the perspective of their representative organizations the coordinating body of indigenous organizations of the Amazon basin for example which has the representative organizations the Amazon regions of online Amazon countries is that this is in their advantage and they want California to do it so I think sh sure there are different opinions but we have to look at the on who who's taking the people. overwhelmingly people from the tropical forests are on the front lines or with it let me get some more callers on Michelle thank you for waiting join us here on form. right thank you very much I'm self pastor I work at the nature Conservancy here in California and I offer it and a slightly different perspective we are supportive of this standard and and I do you recognize it's easy to make the discussion and debate around cap and trade but we see the value in this standard and Airbnb has own doorstep every today as really in doubt endorsing a framework for how do we actually account for emissions emission reductions that come from tropical forest degradation and deforestation and while at some point it could accompany a cap and trade program. I don't have a lot of utility beyond that it could actually complement a number of different kind of policy is an effort to avoid forced degradation they just wanna flag that a no and respect all the discussion and debate around it we do support California cap and trade program but we also support a lot of other measures to reduce emissions in California and beyond its borders I'm so I can feel it yeah for my dissident arsenal with a standard not necessarily endorsement of linkages to cap and trade program officiate your call I thank you for calling them and read a tweet here from Isaac this is the guest believe the California air resources board is sitting cap and trade centers in line with what you and scientists have said is necessary Kitty wells well do first. now I do not I think that California's cap and trade program is an economic theory that has some inherent flaws and its administration in the way were starting a price and that amount of allowances that are allowed in the system and the trend we have seen is that the pollution has not only not decreased and communities of color who are located near the source says it has increased since cap and trade has been in place which is a violation of California state law and we believe that what we really want the scientist a RB to focus their time and energy on as on reducing those emissions at the source and not sacrificing the hold the interest of those communities for the promise of potential gains somewhere else that could come with significant human rights issues and may not even reduce the amount of carbon that is been promised I want to leave a comment from a listener who writes the current situation is this hardening it's time to talk about treating the forest as a utility that creates oxygen the value of which is greater than the profit from commercial clear cutting nothing else will say the Amazon and if we don't act it will be gone we get another call around in that you Dan you're on the air good morning. right thanks again Paul I'm going to follow up on. here caller on. at this rate is the worst of all possible carbon pricing policies I works great in theory but as your Shoshoni doesn't actually work while in reality and a much better way to actually reduce emissions which should be the goal of all these things is to put a rising price on the carbon content of fossil fuels eight four by the fossil fuel companies where they get the stuff out of the ground where the imported. and then take a hundred percent of the money and get it back to every legal resident on an equal basis and studies show the.

California scientist Amazon basin Amazon nature Conservancy representative Michelle Airbnb Kitty wells Isaac Dan Paul hundred percent
Fired Up!

The Sustainable Futures Report

06:03 min | 2 years ago

Fired Up!

"But increasingly read comment while ago posted about the sustainable futures report. The correspondent was concerned that i was trying into politics. The truth is everything is political while we can all do something toward solving the climate crisis. It is only governments and politicians who can make the changes of the magnitude that will make a difference. We are talking about system change after all. I know that many of you listening thing to the sustainable futures report are not in the u._k. I think that even you would have noticed that you k- politics are in some turmoil at the moment in fact this has been going on for three years but it's finally approaching day new mall. I say finally but everything may well have changed by the time you hear this anyway. They situation is the new prime minister has sought and received the authority of the queen to prorogue or suspend parliament of course she couldn't refuse but that's another story. The point at issue is that this would allow the prime minister to govern without parliament and allow how him to complete brexit the u._k.'s departure from the e._u. As he chooses i happen to believe that leaving the ear would be a disaster. Komo concerned if this prime minister can sideline parliament than any prime minister can do it on any issue. That's the reason i spent tuesday in london with your for europe and the yorker remain voice clap. I hope you saw us and hurt us on the evening news on bbc you see i tv and channel. Brexit is a sideshow by comparison with the climate crisis while breaks. It dominates u._k. Politics antics little of significance will be done on climate change all on many other issues that we've been neglecting over the last three years worrying agreeing also is the fact that many permanent brexit tears pacifica's climate deniers if i'm being political in opposing them and so be it in the climate crisis news this week the amazon fires why they're not the only fires why they he may not be as bad as you think a why they may be much more serious in ways you don't expect the future of the consumer society professor ian boyd retiring chief scientific advisor defa has set out his thoughts which looked very much like system change to me and the flying prince. I'll all common offsets making his travel common neutral the fun as in the amazon have been making big news news over the last couple of weeks that destroying the rainforest sante threatening an area which produces twenty percent of the world's oxygen on the amazon amazon rainforest is the lungs of the earth. Isn't it well. Yes no i strongly recommend that you listen to more or less a statistics sticks programme on bbc radio four which is available online and has carried out a detailed analysis of the situation they spoke to daniel net stunt of the earth innovation institute who explained that the fire houses have been identified by satellites are not burning rainforest generally the rainforest doesn't burn because it's so damp and humid what can happen is that low level fis can burn the leaf litter on the forest i flow and this can scorch the trunks of the trees and callum off these files are not visible from space and their effects are only evident once the trees have died off which may take a euro reversed point then is that the fires may be more extensive than we know at present. The fires that we can see from space are carrying on land which is being cleared. It's common practice for farmers to burn off weeds. Where land has been recently cleared. The trees are left to dry out and then abundant. One of the major consequences of these files is smoke soot in the atmosphere leading millions of people to seek treatment for respiratory diseases smoke from the falls code sao paulo which is mulling one thousand miles away from the amazon to be plunged into an apocalyptic darkness in the nineteenth of august the new president of brazil k. A. bowl sonata has taken a very hard line on the amazon weakening the brazilian environment ministry and turning a blind eye to illegal logging and deforestation he the amazon as a resource to be exploited by minus farmers and loggers as reported recently when the brazilian satellite satellite monitoring agency revealed significant increases in the rate of deforestation. The president denied that it was true on the director of the agency was dismissed. Does the amazon produce twenty percent of the world oxygen. It depends how you calculate but according to daniel napster it consumes a lot as as well and the net effect is more or less neutral. He sees the most important function of the forest as cooling effect as every every drop of water transpired by the trees evaporates. It cools the atmosphere you the effect of this across the whole forest is enough to have an effect on the climate of the whole world. Let's not forget the consequences of the fires and the deforestation policies for the indigenous peoples of the amazon amazon basin. They see the homes that food sources their way of life destroyed tribes that have been wolf generations a coming together against a common enemy enemy. Surely the global community should take that pont in our own interest as well as this president bolsonaro initially initially suggested the ngos had deliberately set the forest on fire in order to embarrass the government rejected the twenty two million dollars that politicians titians attending the reason g seven summit in biarritz pledged to help fight the fis. Can the world afford to stand by and let this destruction attraction continue. It's claimed that attention to the amazon leads the world over the fact that there are far more fis in africa but it's not the same thing writing in courts africa kolin bill senior lecturer in ecology university of york says fire is an essential part of the savannah savannah. The first to know is that the impact of a wildfire depends more on wet and what it is burning than how big it is or indeed how many fines there are the vast majority of the african fires currently earning seemed to be in grasslands and exactly the places we expect to see fires of this time of these files are usually by cattle famous as part of their traditional management of the savannahs where the animals graze some files are started to to stimulate new growth of nutritious cross for their animals others are used to control the numbers of parasitic takes own manage the growth of thorny we scrub without fuzz many savannahs and the animals they support wouldn't exist and lighting them as a key management activity in many any of the iconic protected areas of africa for instance. The sarah getty in tanzania is known worldwide for safari animals and all inspiring hiring builder beasts migration and i'll work shows that around half of its grasslands each year most foss both in the amazon was an ad in africa therefore deliberately started by humans as part of land-management b._b._c. news reports wildfires ravaging parts of the anti with areas of siberia alaska greenland and canada engulfed in flames and smoke satellite images

Amazon Prime Minister Brexit President Trump Daniel Africa London BBC Biarritz Europe Sao Paulo Savannah Savannah Komo Siberia Alaska Greenland Tanzania Sarah Getty Earth Innovation Institute Bolsonaro
"amazon basin" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Morning and commander Ryan Easter day of Davis high school graduated nineteen ninety seven is taking command of the USS McCain after spending a year and a half as the ship's executive officer is the top dog he is nice got the keys these drivers that's no small job not at all I'm a that would be intimidating for me I mean even walking up to the ships I know it I know it was him that that's a point of pride for Davis high school exactly thank you you've got one quick **** we should probably sneak into this is out of a blog called fire aviation apparently at the president of Bolivia has asked for a seven forty seven supertanker to help fight those massive wildfires in the Amazon basin it just took off yesterday from McClellan here here yeah so it's a huge air tanker it can carry up to one nineteen thousand gallons of water or fire retardant and it departed yesterday and it's on its way well it's going to be there shortly if not already to Bolivia on to try to help you know fight some of those fires interesting very interesting the run for the White House in the push by the trump campaign to win back women who have been turned off by trump's language how will they do that in three minutes sources you trust Christine them and on the same chain on news ninety three point one K. FBK here's a tender little tale fresh from the trail about a cowboy fell.

Davis high school USS McCain executive officer president Bolivia Amazon basin McClellan White House trump Christine K. FBK commander Ryan Easter one nineteen thousand gallons three minutes one K
Fires in Amazon Rain Forest Have Surged This Year

The KFBK Morning News

00:29 sec | 2 years ago

Fires in Amazon Rain Forest Have Surged This Year

"Morning Brazil's Amazon rainforest has seen a record number of fires this year in eighty three percent increase over the same period last year and if you don't know about this place lot of species in the Amazon basis three million species in plants one million indigenous people and it produces more than twenty percent of the earth's oxygen the Amazon basin and why is it burning well because a lot of farmers there are burning down the force of the farmland raise

Brazil Amazon Basin Amazon Eighty Three Percent Twenty Percent
"amazon basin" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"She says she didn't actually write the introduction until she had finished writing all the chapters for the book because she knew if she wrote the introduction I and included all these amazing new discoveries by the time she had finished writing the rest of the book that would be old news because so many quickly so many new discoveries are coming up all the time and sh- because so she's kind of on the inside she alludes to later in the book that she knows what's coming down the pipeline and it's it's going to blow you away. She doesn't mention it of course because he classified Auto Mall not classified but you can't really talk about it. You don't WanNa blow your peers a big reveal well. It'd be classified though it's linked him with the military of all using it doesn't really go there so Sarah says well. He's the lightest. This is what she includes the insurance the lightest there's a recent nature publication that came out <hes> a team team led by archaeologists Yoenis Gregorio Desouza announced eighty-one previously unknown pre Columbian sites in the Amazon Basin area of Brazil based on their findings. They estimated thirteen hundred other sites right starting to between twelve fifty and fifteen hundred A._d.. In just seven percent of the Amazon basin this potentially more than eighteen thousand other sites in total eighteen thousand more than a million people may have lived in areas areas today that a completely inhospitable like there's no way anyone would live there. It's too dense is that just because the jungle is taken off yeah but you know just a thousand years ago of course yeah it was a million people and she says to me what is extraordinary about this discovery is just how much oculus and all those had taken for granted about what might or might not be there in the rainforest they just assumed because it's so unoccupied pot bombings in Spain that no one's ever been but she said satellite data allowed the archaeological team to such lodge areas in a matter of months the job on the ground the traditional way would have taken decades and she says this this is from a sub-field that Bailey existed twenty years ago so a lot of the book is really looking towards the future and projecting out discoveries that may change the world certainly change our understanding of history so she says right right now as I write this introduction I'm downloading brand new satellite imagery of Giza in Egypt of course it's the the side of the law standing wonder of the world and she says the main thing I've learned is to expect the unexpected she he says knee science and features appear we hadn't previously thought to look or in cases like Geza have the potential to overturn long held assumptions about major sites and time periods and she just says like a mansion nine hundred thousand years from today as wishy really starts to speculate out she claims that this technology in the future will be used by human beings who go out into the solar system yeah that would make us and they'll be a using this technology to do space archaeology on other planets. It's really kind of exciting SCI FI stop from her perspective but it also makes you think cry because the things like the face on mas and other structures that are supposedly you've been there and people that are debating about and saying it's paranoia or whatever else imagine applying that technology to some images though of Mas wasn't advice on Mas from nineteen seventies data. I'm not sure whether it's from the seventies nineteen eighties but imagine engine if that data all that technology and if you can find a thousand year old silman in the middle of the jungle yeah wall could could you find evidence that they possibly being civilization among the stuff they're doing now is incredible so she lays out a few interesting foundations dacians about archaeology in the chapters like she talks about how archaeological sites elect film strips not photographs and let me explain the metaphor she starts with the case of Pommery so the AH pommery.

Mas Amazon basin Geza Sarah Bailey Yoenis Gregorio Desouza Brazil Spain Egypt nine hundred thousand years thousand years seven percent thousand year twenty years
"amazon basin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:21 min | 2 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning. The McDonald's corporation is facing allegations of rampant sexual harassment yesterday. More than twenty new complaints were lodged against McDonalds. The allegations includes sexual harassment of low wage workers and retaliation for reporting it either lease Rodriguez one person who's come forward. She worked for a McDonald's franchise in Connecticut for ten years. And she told NPR that she was sexually harassed by her supervisor, he got into habit. Inter cutting me every day, you know, rubbing on my back he wants to grow in the company. So I feel my American dream, you know, money together for house on credit for my family. So he started assuring me that the only way to grow into company. What's sexual favors numbered reassess, she reported this, but he was allowed to stay. She says she was later assaulted by another supervisor. And she left McDonalds after that she thinks this is probably happened to other people who are afraid to come forward out of being -ployees has temporary visas and a lot of them are documented, and unfortunately, they are targets. Many of them are fake reporting because they fear that they may put issued pets at risk Rodriguez, and others are being supported by the time's up legal defense fund. Sharon, to Johnny is director of that fund. She's in studio this morning. Thanks for coming in. Thank you for having me. So this new wave of complaints. What stands out to you? Well, the times of legal defense fund has been involved in this issue for since we started about eighteen months ago and the fund which is hasn't administered at the national women's Law Center helps fund cases of workplace harassment, especially for low wage workers, and this situation, we're walking alongside fight for fifteen and the ACLU and the private attorneys are bringing these cases within out for me as a number of cases that are being bought and how it's all over the country. And how the stories well the details are very specific to the women involved. What happens is just generally over and over again, workers are trying to earn a living. These are low wage workers, they're interested in helping their families. They've got rent to pay. They've got car payments to make, and then the sexual harassment starts an often starts with a few comments or a few gestures. Maybe some tax and then it escalates and becomes physical sex harassment as you heard an example we just talked about. And then what happens is it depends on the worker. Some of the workers tried desperately to just make it stop. And that can be trying to change your shifts trying to change what you wear trying to just ignore it laugh, it off move along. But it doesn't stop when that happens. And then what happens is, when workers are willing to come forward frequently they retaliated against, and what is retaliation look like so for low wage workers, it can take many forms for some of them. It's their shifts get cut summer told there's no work for them. Some of them are. Disciplined for things that before this would never ever a problem, and then still others flat out terminated. But we also see frequently the hasher's or simply transfer to another store. Mcdonald's has about fourteen thousand locations in North America, and many of them are independently owned, they are franchises. So legally does the blame lie with them or with the McDonald's corporation. So certainly McDonald's claims that this fact that the fact that these are franchise owned means that they're not responsible for it. But really I challenge anyone to walk into a McDonalds and eat the food and tell me whether or not it's a franchise Jewish in, or a owned by the corporate entity. Everything about every McDonald's, you enter into is so much the same. And in fact, that's something that McDonald's sells when you have a Big Mac, anywhere tastes like a Big Mac somewhere else. So the fact that McDonald's controls all of that, about these franchise locations, but suddenly says, oh, we can't control things about sex harassment. These franchise locations that just doesn't seem credible. But then. If a worker wants to sue, theoretically with the worker, bee suing the franchise owner or the corporation, it can do both. Okay. Mcdonald's yo- Steve Easterbrook his said the company has improved. It's harassment policies. He has mentioned things like training for franchise owners, creating a new complaint hotline, or these things meaningful steps, do you think was he always happy when employers are willing to do more, and that's always a good thing. But the things that they're outlining came out in a letter that came out a few days ago, right around the time of all these additional charges being filed. What we did yesterday in Chicago. We did that last year in Chicago, as, oh, where lots of people came forward, and we had a March and workers who had come forward talked about what had happened to them. So the idea that they're putting out a letter a year later and there's actually more charges filed even before that. It's just it's a little too little, and it's a little too late. And if you look at what they're talking about, they're talking about, you know, we've had a policy we've got training. But what they haven't done is sat down and talked to the workers involved. And that's what they really need to do these workers are on the ground. They know what needs to get done. And VERA Pinon should be taken into account and another thing is that letter does not talk about how they're going to work with their franchises. And again given how much they control, they should be able to work with their franchises on this as well. Sharon, to Johnny is director of the times up legal defense fund. Sharon, thank you. And we should note, we reached out to McDonald's for an interview, but they did not accept that invitation. Next. We have a dispute over the ownership of a name. Amazon is one of the world's largest companies. Amazon is also the name of the giant rainforest in South America. So who gets to use the internet domain dot Amazon? Go starting to twelve when Amazon company applied for older domains that could be dot Amazon dot com. Achilles allure is director of technology promotion at Brazil's ministry of foreign affairs, Brazil, and other countries in the Amazon basin. Do not like the idea that dot Amazon would belong to Amazon, the lower sees a chance of confusion of a guy searches the internet and sees Amazon is he finding this Amazon or that Masan when he sees hope Amazon Amazon, or equal do's and Amazon. I was gonna phone does it has endorsement of the of the states that share the the zone region? I can, which is the nonprofit that manages internet domains encouraged both sides to negotiate. Here's icons Rodrigue patta. So I can provide provided you know, the platform for for the discussions, these whenever there is Dacians. He also has been Kevin to get to these mutually acceptable solution savvy, the talkative of not succeeded. So now I can pick decide it is for the company that sells a huge variety of products despite the appeal of the forest that's home to an incredible range of plants and animals. There is still a public comment period before the company gets the domain, Amazon. The retailer says it recognizes the concerns of countries in the Amazon, and that Amazon will work with Amazon nations to preserve the culture and heritage of the Amazon. This afternoon all things considered President.

Amazon harassment McDonald McDonalds Amazon basin dot Amazon supervisor Rodriguez Sharon Connecticut director Mcdonald NPR Johnny North America ACLU Rodrigue Brazil Chicago
"amazon basin" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"Just like Venus, the temperature of the ocean. Would you know? Yes. Be two hundred degrees. It'd be two hundred degrees hotter. I mean, there's these gigantic dust storms that blow through Africa's Sahara desert, and then leave the African continent on the wind they carry over the Pacific Ocean. And then they eventually are dumped twenty two thousand tons worth dumped into the into the dirt of the Amazon basin in South America. Sixty two hundred miles away to fertilize the Amazon basin with all. Almost the exact amount of soil that the loses every year that's washed away in rain and flooding. Almost the exact amount. It needs just wild coincidence. Like that. Of course, there's the Gulfstream and air currents that keep our temperatures mild. Moderate fluctuating and a weird stellar Kalou collision that occurred between the earth and another planet, of course, four billion years ago. The other planet that just happened to be next to us at the time called thea and win thea crashed into the earth. It knocked the earth off its axis at just the right angle for our seasons to change and pleasant weather weather patterns to take place. So that one half of the earth wouldn't freeze every year. And by the way,.

Amazon basin thea Pacific Ocean Sahara desert South America Africa Kalou two hundred degrees twenty two thousand tons four billion years
"amazon basin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:01 min | 3 years ago

"amazon basin" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"They did was to gather all these composers together. And to ask them to write pieces inspired by the work of different scientists from all kinds of disciplines from sociology to astronomy to in this case biology. I was impressed by the scope the project, but also by the results and. Lots of interesting composers took part sour lip state. The the Gambian kora player Foday Musa sue so Uganda from Chievo motto and lots of others, of course, Graham Reynolds who actually contributed to pieces, I'm John Shafer, and this edition of new sounds is my long overdue look at what I thought were the ten best new music releases of twenty eighteen and we start at number ten with this album called the sound of science. This piece by Graham Reynolds is called pasta. An excerpt from a longer piece by Graham Reynolds, called pasta, inspired by the work of the biologist. Barry chernoff, and his study of freshwater fish in the Amazon rainforest in the Amazon basin rather and this taken from an album called the sound of science numerous composers all working with or inspired by various scientists some the scientists actually were involved in the pieces on the record the album credited to golden hornet, featuring Jeffrey Ziegler Ziegler is the former cellist of the Kronos quartet now off on his own golden hornet is this composers lab based in Austin, Texas, which is where Graham Reynolds is from. And as I mentioned at the top of the show. This is a long overdue. Look at my top ten for twenty eighteen on this edition of new sounds normally I do these shows each year in the first full week of January which would have been last week. But if. If you were with us last week, you know, we were spending the whole time revisiting our new sounds live concert series and our celebration of David Bowie's, Berlin trilogy. So that took up the whole week, and I was just thinking. Well, that's it. No top ten show. Couple people started asking where is it? Where is it? So here it is. And it number nine on my top ten for twenty eighteen is an album called Doron by the guitarist bumpy. No bombay. No. That's a stage. Name is a Touareg musician part of the the so-called desert blues scene bands like to narrow when you may have heard that has become such a big part of the world music scene in the past ten years or so Bombini no hasn't been around that long on the scene, but he has quickly made a name for himself as a prodigiously gifted guitarist, especially playing the electric guitar. Although on this song called media, Juan my friends. He shows that he is just as good at playing the acoustic guitar we also had the chance to hear Bombini in a live session. This past year. He did one of our soundcheck podcasts here in the new sound studio. You can find that on our website. You can watch it too. At new sounds dot org. But for the moment listen to this song from his album Doron. This is Bom beano the guitarist singer and songwriter from Nizhny air..

Graham Reynolds Bombini Doron Jeffrey Ziegler Ziegler Amazon basin Nizhny air Uganda Foday Musa Barry chernoff David Bowie Kronos quartet Chievo Amazon John Shafer Texas Austin bombay Juan Berlin ten years