23 Burst results for "Amaya"

"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:38 min | 3 weeks ago

"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Up till 123. Mhm for a Maya. For Amaya. Good job. One of 43 my FM. Here's what's coming up in Hollywood headlines. There was an injury on the set of Black Panther will conduct forever. I'll tell you who got hurt and how they're doing right after traffic right next to the traffic award is sponsored by injury. Attorney Superwoman super lawyer dot com Lanes clear on the westbound side of the one of five Wilmington, everything there after the right shoulder and then up ahead of Nash that questions cleared from lanes as well. Driving the one Oh, five is busy from Lakewood Boulevard all the way to the 405 and also seeing delays on the eastbound side kind of off and on from Long Beach Boulevard over towards the 605 freeway. The westbound side of the tent is tough out of downtown. From the five. You'll see that it's all about towards last and again, an eastbound side just kind of bunching up right at the 10 Freeway over towards Alameda and then better before you get to the 60 and headed for the Dr on the south side of the 57 slow at a diamond buyer from Temple over to about Diamond Bar Boulevard in Bunches up again to get closer to the 91. And speaking of the 91 the westbound side, just past Green River that hit run crashes a big rigs to a lot of activity with CHP after the right shoulder. No lanes are blocked, but solid delays. They're coming away from the 15 still kind of like the 2 41 and then better from there you get into Orange County. It's never too late for a second opinion when it comes to your injuries. Don't settle without talking to injury Attorneys Mary Mary apartment call her 808 169 16 That's 808 169 16 or visit superwoman super lawyer dot com. At your traffic. I'm Tony Jordan with Valentine in the morning and one of 43 my album 143 Hollywood.

Tony Jordan Lakewood Boulevard Orange County Long Beach Boulevard Green River 808 169 16 Alameda Diamond Bar Boulevard 605 freeway 10 Freeway one Black Panther 43 405 Wilmington second opinion Temple 60 Mary Mary 91
"amaya" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

02:28 min | Last month

"amaya" Discussed on Down the Security Rabbithole Podcast

"Whole bunch of things in the first time i get something a little more sensitive the it promising for now there are piece of information right. That's sort of building out that authentication step. We think about like assurance levels. You got a bunch of stuff on your application. You have different different levels of assurance depending on how sensitive the resource or the data that you're trying to work with and you wanna be able to describe policies sort of separate those things right so i can have really friction less experiences but i get into things that are maybe like super sensitive. I need really make sure you are who you are on. The second thing is just on this whole world like factors. And i think that's been the most fascinating thing for me is. I've gotten into this industry as we. There's like three types of factors. There's like stuff that you know so passwords or answers to questions. There are things that you you may possess like your phone or crypto key. And so you know you're being asked to answer a question and present. The crypto device are there. Things are sort of an inherent about you and that's the whole metric space such like your facial recognition and your fingerprints. And you can stack. These factors can sort described experiences. That say they're gonna do. I may ask you for another thing are may step you up into another level of assurance and that's the whole sort of experience of the equation is sort of describing those things applying those to the experiences that you're in custody Sort of experience and then making sure it isn't creating a whole bunch. I like had win tax in the beginning while i had this interesting experience. Recently where We were in the pool. And i had just changed my pen on my phone And i was like on a big deal. Let at i need to go run and grab my phone answer it and get to it and i'm like okay Amaya i'll shoot. I forgot my pin. No worries i can do my fingerprint on crowd. Had the full. Like like wait. How do i get my phone. But that just sort of gives you a a sense of what you had something you have something. You aren't something you know. The password is the thing you know. And i gotta tell you all the talk about getting rid of passwords. I'm not sure. I agree with it. Why do we need to get rid of passwords. I think we need to get rid of passwords as the sole arbiter of access. I think i would let me rephrase. I would like to think that we as a as a developers insecurity professionals have figured out the difference between authentication and authorization..

Amaya
"amaya" Discussed on Trailer Junkies Podcast

Trailer Junkies Podcast

05:49 min | 2 months ago

"amaya" Discussed on Trailer Junkies Podcast

"It's that low hanging fruit that it's just there when you're just kind of thumbing through on them remote and you're like oh america. Yeah i remember that one okay. Let's why i remember. Remember hearing about that so going back forty years. Oh no forty years. Are you kidding me. Forty years yeah no way so i was ten when this came out i would say it was. It was in my wheelhouse. I watched okay. Masters of the universe revolution so he man e man they start off with castle gray skull. It doesn't it's not called he-man no it's masters of the universe. He man masters of the universe. I thought it was he. Man and the masters in universe. Oh the original amaya. Maybe that's lorette. Let's look that up but masters of the universe revolution and this is right in there with under cats. it's like right from that time frame. Yes right from that. I don't know like genre of cartoon. I guess we're it's like a style. It's like a style. They he man was the original right so it it it was the beginning of it all but then they decide the i think thunder cats must have been the first one that they did where they just took the characters and they tweak them they basically turn them ninety degree and they said we'll put together a team and it'll be very similar to this of he man people but with lion heads. Yeah it's a hero's journey against Mothra right and that one. It's like mothra. No was it. No martha's godzilla godzilla. Well it was some mummy dude. Well and i think to transformers was born out of that era meet. Yeah it was somewhere in there. It was it was definitely in that timeframe. but it didn't have this this kernel of a cast of characters. The way that he man and he made a master's universe and and thunder cats did and there was there was a lesser known. One that was actually one of my favorites that you might not have heard of but you might of called silver hawks silver hawk. Silver hawks was the least known of the of this genre. So if i thought. I it's is it more japanese. No it was. It was definitely american or americanized. Okay i would have to see it to know. But i probably have seen some of. It didn't stick the way you know. He man did. I mean exactly you know. I never had the toys. But i had a friend who was a couple years younger and he had the castle gray skull and he had the characters and and Yeah that was it was It was a lot of fun back. Then you know like. I said this came out when i was right around ten ten. You didn't have the toys and you're at ten. You know. I think when you're ten you start coming out of the toy phase but you're still into like the tv phase. Oh i was still into star wars toys though right you still had star wars action figures are. Were you getting rid of those. Well that would ban empire so yeah probably still had some star wars stuff going on for sure. Yeah yeah i would say by jeddah. I was out of the out of the toy business the whole that whole area. Yeah and it's weird. It's like at you hit thirteen fourteen. And it's like to switch goes twelve. Even a switch goes off. And you're just like all right. No more toys girls girls and sports girls in sports right. But yeah i mean. I don't know where this is playing. Or where'd streaming or whatever it is but. I think it's netflix too isn't it oh is it. I don't know maybe. I didn't watch. I will say for nostalgic reasons..

amaya Silver hawks america martha jeddah netflix
Orange County Commissioners to Consider Limiting Picketing

Orlando's News at Noon

00:37 sec | 3 months ago

Orange County Commissioners to Consider Limiting Picketing

"Commissioners will consider limiting picketing reporter Julian Amaya joins us from the newsroom with the latest This all started when Orange County Sheriff John Mina brought a proposal to consider limits on neighborhood protest to the county commission, also following the protests outside the window Mayor vacation home of Derek Chauvin last year. Sheriff Mina learned that he couldn't force protesters to move elsewhere, at least in Orange County. With the support of Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings County lawyers introduced an ordinance to limit picketing and neighborhoods and keeping protesters away from homes. Now Winter Park in Orlando have similar rules in place. A public hearing is set for tomorrow at two p.m. live in the

Julian Amaya Sheriff John Mina Orange County Derek Chauvin Sheriff Mina Mayor Jerry Demings Winter Park Orlando
Nintendo Direct And Latinx In Gaming

LAN Parties: A Video Gaming and Esports Podcast

05:46 min | 7 months ago

Nintendo Direct And Latinx In Gaming

"And welcome the land parties episode fifty eight from the las vegas review journal. I am your host ryan smith and with me always my host and good friend lucas egging. Lucas how are you my friend. I am dealing. Well had a pretty good weekend. Started going back into final fantasy seven remake with my girlfriend. So she's going through it some having fun kind of watching her go through that ready for a nice long game and the the other thing i did this week going as i finally got a new phone so my phone from like five years ago is has been replaced and my goodness when you wait that long. It's ridiculous how much faster it is. Some blindly untreated even one of those people that like i use it till it breaks and finally i can't anymore i just can't was your weekend. I can relate to that. do good. I chill out. We we actually got. We had this like home garden Thing that we had gotten a while ago so we went ahead and planted that this week and And then i just. I just did. Some destiny went did that. Secret mission That was recently released. That was really good super atmospheric. I i i absolutely loved it. Got a solid gun from it and then played some more spiderman. Got the sinister six reveals. So we're grinding away. I'm moving along with that Those fantastic enough about us. Oh please introduce our guests. We are excited to welcome two very special guests today. You know them from the group. Latin x and gaming. You may have seen them honored at the game awards in december as global gaming citizens. We are excited to be joined. By the founder of nexen engaging cristina amaya and co founder and developer relations head. Elaine gomez thank you both to For join us today. How you guys then thank you. Thanks for asking. Yeah thank you so much for having absolutely thank you so much for taking the time and and i'm excited to talk about Talk about the Next and gaming and everything that you guys have done so far sorry. I didn't mean to cut you off there go ahead. You're fine. i was just gonna say we're excited. This is an amazing group. We talk to fernando last year. A little bit about the group. But we're we're super pump to take a deep dive into it but before we get to that. We just wanted to touch on a couple subjects and ryan last wednesday right before the nintendo direct rocked. I was so excited. Because i was almost one hundred percent. Sure that we were gonna get breath of the wild or pokemon or metro news. And we got them. We struck out. We struck out if you haven't you happen to be me on twitter. You saw like like the realization that like none of that was happening. And i look. I'll start by saying this. There were a couple of games. That intrigued me. I'm actually looking forward to the new. Mario golf game of the project triangle. Game looks interesting. I love that art style. But i don't know ryan. I was just disappointed. What about you. yeah. Yeah it was definitely. I felt like it was pretty underwhelming As far as what we thought we were gonna get versus what we actually got So i mean again. There were some some nice Games that they presented and whatnot. But i just thought that especially with it being a thirty five year anniversary of zelda. I thought we would get some some big news as far as with that again. What they said they were gonna port a port over night. Work soared scar. Yeah and i never. I never played that one. So i am excited to have the opportunity to actually go through and run that Zelda but i mean again it's it's been it's been a good amount of years since Breadth of wild came out. They've already we already know that breath a while to is is in the works. I thought for sure going to drop it like it's hot and give us some heat there but you know we. We did not get that so it'll be interesting. I mean again. This could be something that maybe in the second half of the year that they looked to drop then as well again. We know that anytime. People are are rushing games They seem to to very much have a negative impact on their releases. So you know again you guys. They know what they're doing They they always had. I feel like they have a solid plan as far as marketing and getting games out and stuff like that so i still think we'll get it this year Yes i thought it was going to happen then but the years not over is still early. My friend deshaun. Hopefully you're right. I just the joy was getting sucked out of me. The longer let direct went on in the close to the end that we got. That's okay though. That's a good. You're right the year is young christina a u and nintendo fan at all. Did you catch the direct. Yes i did not get to watch the direct because it winds carrying my meetings. But i will say that as a very large fan since childhood i straight up do not understand word sword. I'm just gonna put it out there. I would much rather buffalo wild to or just a teaser trailer. Something anything five seconds. Give me a carina time. At least you know what. I mean like i. Yeah i yeah. I don't even know what that is a series. What was that four. Like thirty something. I

Las Vegas Review Journal Nexen Cristina Amaya Elaine Gomez Ryan Smith Lucas Ryan Fernando Nintendo Zelda Twitter Deshaun Golf Christina Buffalo
"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Tech at this point. Is that the founder but now he is the CEO of Faceoff Bank so he writes billion dollar checks and from. Then we have a series of. If you go to Latino take leaders that org you get to see the stories of the topic you have. They're very young founders selling companies for one hundred dollars a very few people they even feel at. Tinos know that they have done that so to me bringing this ability of the success stories of people that look like me to the next generation of. Tinos is very important. So that's why put together group. That's why we need. And that's why it's easy to when you have somebody graduating from high school and want to pursue a career in tag as a founder or just working intact or one of the mystify Silicon Valley or New York tax or whatever. They found us all the time. They right through us through the website and they said hey you know. I saw this person and that who works at this company or the founder of this company was Latino would be possibility to get to know more about them law right and so you get a lot of emails. E 'cause even just a disability we solve for the visibility aspect of at least featuring them and I'm surprised every so often. There's a unicorn out there by a US Latino founder and you know. I get very excited. Because then we method and we connect and then that's yet another point person for the future generations states to know that they can count them person to know that they can engage with that person. Know that that someone like them made it in the tech space. So that's the reason behind creating the group of the top of two years the US. Yeah and I congratulate you on doing that and I love that you know through our whole conversation today. There's this theme of just awareness and education and community that you're doing beyond you know you're kind of day to day work that I think is really important to note and I loved it. That's just a part of everything you're putting out there. The last question we like to ask on this show to help promote voice technology as a whole is there currently a flash briefing or voice killer experience that you're using or really enjoying right now? I personally like to concur with a bunch of stuff so my home is the thing is a very strong bang so most recently just being playing with motion sensor can trigger Google Assistant to play music in the bathroom when you're watching so that's a project it's interesting. How the Google assistant kindle million things outwardly that it's interesting you is harder to make play from different. It device so I love that kind of challenging automated. Pretty much everything in the home. Nick triggers for everything. I would say you know as I mentioned earlier. My wife works at a global partnerships. Google specifically under Google Assistant in specifically in the What you covered many verticals. A rematch is working on the recipes. So basically if you have like a Google assistant with the screen in your kitchen in you wanna ask you know how to Cook Lasagna or embarrassing enough I ask. Google assistant had boiled. Chicken Little Chihuahua wreck shoes are pretty fast. I felt a little bit dumber that day but I want to make sure I get it right so anyways. So that's one of the you know I would say Leslie's work in the recipe on the Google. Assistant is one that will use allowed. Also because we're Beta testers of bigalow assistant much skills. I don't WanNa say scales but the actions rather yes. I love that you know edits money because that's part of what boys does like you. Can you know how we do? Search now with our phoned of waste will be easier. You could ask those questions you feel silly asking sometimes and it helps educate you so. I think that's a good thing somewhere google. They know that I ask how to boil chicken. That's all right no judgment here and people want to connect with you or learn more about what we talked about today. Where can they do that? that can reach to me directly my email. Ricardo at be like you that com and check out our website B. O. Iq as invoice intelligence. Voice I'd be. Oh I view dot com perfect. Well thank you so much credit for being here and sharing your insight.

Google founder Tinos US CEO Faceoff Bank Ricardo New York Nick Leslie Beta
"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"Learning about what they can use the voice channel. Four I sent example of these type of conversations. How would feel to be on my side when I'm speaking to one of these heads? Marketing has customer service. Had Pretty much any department because voices a channel? I could be leveraged for every single one of these areas odd. The easiest example to share feels from my perspective is. I'm imagining you know. Twenty five years ago early nineties and people are starting to use email to email their grandma or their family members and I start a business and start saying hey you know what you could use email for business and they will ask how right he said. Well you let's say you know use for sales you can use it for customer service? Can you give me an example of how you use an email for customer service? Yeah it would be like this right. Could you give me an example of how we use email for email? That's literally where we are when it comes to a conversational voice as a channel in the world of business so you will definitely take a number of years before I mean. There's some really interesting studies that said you know by two years. Thirty percent of the enterprise will using voice across channels finding. That's a really big number but you talk about six seven years from when chat bots came out to now. Uc pretty much every other website. Having conversation with Chad Bud on the lower right hand quarter right but it took like six years to get there so we're like very early days of adopting a voice using it across multiple channels using it on the phone. Indicates will be like you and I can definitely share with you. You know what type of use cases on the stuff that companies can use it a conversational bought it. Sounds like a human. They can have a conversation with their prospects or customers over the phone. Yeah I think you may to really good points here number one that we are still in the awareness stage and I think we forget those of us that are in the voice space because we're living breathing and talking about it all the time that it's still an issue that we still need to educate and make people aware of what's going on and I like the example you gave about when email I came out that people thought so I can email my friend or my relative but now people have used in across the board for like you said sales and marketing and that now we have to educate very specific examples. I love for you to talk about what your company B o q does. Now you know in twenty twenty and if it's possible if you can share with us what you've been working on maybe what you've learned through the process including some data or feedback you've received from users of Your Voice Service Yup for sure happy to the show so would be Q. We're empowering businesses to leverage voice spots again boy spots bought the sound like humans on the phone it can have a very simple conversation as of now with their prospect customers etc. I can share a couple of USA. Powell voiced by conversation voice by to human works in all happy to share a couple of them. The second piece of your question. Which is what can you share? That is kind of really exciting kind of coming up in this space. That we're dealing with is the having an AI. Boy Spot having a conversation with another a voice box so that far is the I love it because notes alone going the Chat Bot circles Chat Bot the conversation will chat bots member station. Lay I- recessional voice thoughts in this circles. We've been kind of Kinda running joke seeing how this is evolving and saying. Wait a second. This mean that like my voice will be talking to your voice. Fide might shot will be talking to your chat right. That's actually where we are already. Were working with clients. Where they're leveraging our boy spots to speak to another voice by and you know it's kind of hard to understand the use cases were seeing them and we just the more we do them the more we realize that there's also a huge space for this. We can start to see where this is going. Where a a chat. Bot Toxoid shot or voice by Tuxedo boy side. So it's really interesting. Saw a happy to share as well us in that bought two type of space but in the body human they I- conversational voice but to human over the phone. I'll share with you a use case in marketing for example so pretty much every business. That knows what they're doing in marketing and they have content that they have a call to action on their side. Form that you know. They'll ask the the people that are navigating their website that are interesting learning more to fill in so in any of these calls to Action Right. Now there's one amazing company that I know that now is worth I think is a forty billion dollars to salesforce that. It's incredible at sales themselves right. And there have been credible leveraging. The power of phone calls. I in their champions. I don't know if you've ever dealt with a company like salesforce when they tried to get your customer but it almost feels like they know exactly what you're doing because at the time were would most relevancy where you're thinking about when you're visiting their side when you're visiting an email you will get a call from them and you will get a call from human reminding you about hey you know. We noticed that you download any book. We're happy to talk to you reply. That is the ultimate example of what a successful company who is an expert leveraging the phone channel what it does right and how it uses it the majority of business in the do not have the manpower to actually have humans calling people at the right time whenever they interact with their products in some way well voice bots in marketing enables any business not salesforce. Would you know we deep pockets? But any business to engage their customers at the right time with his highly relevant when they're filling out a form when they have that intend to afford. They can trigger automatically. Voice buys that engage their customers for example. If you're looking at to get insurance for your car you go to a website for car insurance you fill out the form. The WanNa know very basic stuff. I WanNa make sure that you fill it out enough. You fill it up. Find me this later of westbound will be able to call you. Say I know. Carrie thank you very much for your interest. In car insurance we would just need a couple of additional questions as your car. Have more than a hundred thousand miles that you'll be able to answer in. That's how they further qualify you and immediately transferred to a human to get you set up right. So that's one very typical use case winning the marketing world of how you can leverage voice spots the sound leg units that call consumers engage him at a moment that is relevant. Very different to the percents. Anybody who knows about sales and marketing knows that you should never use any channel in the non-relevant moment right so cold calls not good. You know cold emails not great. I'd still use the NYGARD. So you definitely want to use all of these channels when the customers win the prospects are interacting with your brand new interacting with your product of the most relevant times in Bass where you can use a voice spot to interact with your customers. That would be one example within marketing. Yeah and I think that's a really good one and I just want to add a side too. 'cause I was on your website and you had a video show an example and I think something. That's so small yet so important. Is these speed at which your voice. Ai Speaks one of the frustrations. I personally have with like Alexa. Google assistant as I feel like I wanted to talk faster. It's so slow but I feel like with yours in the example that is on your website. It feels like a human being. It's it's talking at the speed. That human would be which I think is great at it makes it feel more personal and more humanized in a good way and I also I mean I've personally used chat bots and have found them to be extremely helpful and successful in lead generation and qualifying. Exactly what you're talking about. So it makes sense of the natural progression would be to use something like what you all are doing. That's right so can you share. Have you had any feedback from your clients that are using this as far as like the Roi or feedback? They're getting from their customers. Gate-sharing ended with us. Yeah for sure so. Actually you mentioned something interesting about the speed at which the voice by this week's so one key distinction of what we are. We are a Saas Platform.

salesforce Chad Bud WanNa Alexa USA. Powell Google Carrie Ai
"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

Inside VOICE

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Inside VOICE

"One of the original leaders in speech recognition and. I'm curious where your interest in technology came in and why the degree in politics back then for sure so it has to do with my background so quick answer to that. My Dad was ambassador to the United Nations representing Colombia. And he's been ambassador in multiple places Suzanne. So THAT'S A. I have a high affinity to political science optics government which you can trail in the looking at my professional career you get glimpses of it here and there but the affinity to technology has always been from the beginning of my dad. I'll take you back so I was born in New York. I was raised in Columbia in the outskirts of the capital. Bogota in a farm outside astounded He got and my mom is American. My Dad is very much Colombian and I lived there for fifteen years with my two younger brothers and my family moves to New York because of that it's pointed to the United Nations and they keep going to different embassies. That three brothers stayed in the. Us or be finished school here. I went to Nyu Undergrad. Where I studied politics in our history minor liberal arts around a lake Senior Year of College. I started a technology consulting firm working with companies like best buy customers and the New York Public Library which is one of the biggest library systems in the country of a really cool experience and then I decided to do my MBA nyu which was an auto insurance. After that I worked at the mayor's office the third term of Michael Bloomberg's term in office in York City which was awesome. It was incredible. You get to learn so much about the state of a first inside of a three hundred thousand. Employees ARE GONNA. Station was incredible after that. I helped a friend run for mayor in Providence. Rhode Island. He became the first Latino. Mayor of the capital of the State of Rhode Island in that was running many aspects of the technology for that campaign among them. Virtual call centers and. That's where I got to see how this technology was so old school at using technology ten years prior and nothing has changed. I decided to build the queue in that space that brings me to. I moved to Silicon Valley with my wife. My wife works at Google. Interestingly enough we both are invoice so she works in the global product Theme at Google for the Google assistant and so went to Silicon Valley. My company or I go through Y. Combinator the top accelerator in the world technology investor. And I have incredible mentors Michael Seibel. Ceo of currency O of combinator sold the company to twitch for billion dollars have Casare who saw two of his companies to Google. Nelson's third one Gary who sold his company to twitter. In now he asked a initialized capital of five hundred million dollar fund with Alexis on a hand the founder of read it so these where the mentors that I was able to meet and work with very closely from the moment that you know I pretty much landed into Silicon Valley and went through Y combinator after that you know we raised by million and that brings us year. We'd love to obviously talk about the cue to take one quick setback of my affinity to technology. My Dad got me an IBM. I'm thinking somewhere in the mid eighties and I remember. We had to buy different parts. He had a friend he always claimed that potentially was a Russian spy. She knew a lot about technology so he was an awesome friend to me and with him. We are able to build a modem you know and get the first modem to able dial out from my. Ibm Computer in the mid eighties. So instance Daniel just always been in love with technology. Does the beginning of my affinity to technology. I love that and I love. That voice has not only been throughout your life but now is in your personal life that you and your wife both do. It was just an extra bonus there. So as you've said you've been working in this space for such a long time and you started video. Iq In two thousand fifteen whereas you just mentioned you also raised a five million dollar seed round from Y combinator and other top silicon valley investors. You know why did you start the company and I'm curious? What was your experience with y? Combinator like because people have heard about it but they don't really understand like the process or how it works. I love for you to share that with us if you could for sure. So I the caliber of the mentors of combinator. I guess they call themselves partners and they are partners. It's the best quality seen out there in terms of accelerators. The recent why am moved from New York City to Silicon Valley? It's because Silicon Valley has sixty years of his to show knowledge of building technology products and investing in technology products. So here the mentorship that you get if you are an early stage startup founder. It's like nowhere else. The mentors that you get they all their own companies. They sold their own companies. If not one two three there. Cereal successful entrepreneurs Many failures between rights. So these are the type off mentors that you surround yourself with and you know. I was in New York. I Love New York. I lived in New York for twenty years. And you know in New York. We have the acronym fire of Finance Insurance and real estate. Those are the biggest markets in New York. Technology for sure is going to be a huge industry not only New York across the country but New York does not have sixty years of institutional knowledge of investors founders of build their own technology product company. He has a handful of them and bears successful among the Bloomberg Michael Bloomberg. By if you look at the history of that type of institutional knowledge in venture capital in in building products it really goes back twenty years in New York City. And if you look at other cities again you're looking at ten years as opposed to sixty almost seventy years in silicon valley. So definitely I think Y combinator epitomizes that move is being. The epicenter of successful founders will build product in. They know how to do it. They've done in multiple times. Not only they build it without now. They're investing in other founders. So they understand what it is to invest in founders rather than specific product. Yeah and I know. That voice has such a large role especially in innovating in the business. Space including things like a voice dashboard search voice meeting assistance and more and for those that are either newer to voice or even for those who work in the voice community agencies startups and they're trying to get companies to understand the power of choice technology. Can you describe how and why voice innovation is helpful for businesses from your perspective now for sure so we'll definitely the awareness stage of voice of you looking at from like a marketing sales perspective? You have different stages of a buyer journey. You have awareness consideration in decision stage where you actually know what you want. Now you know that you need it and you need to make a decision. We are in the awareness stage very early on so basically you're looking at ninety nine point. Nine percent of businesses globally do not know that they can leverage voice channel marketing sales customer service channel by voice. I mean a voice conversational voice so super early stages one of the interesting things that when we have meetings with customers in it ranges from you know we have work with small businesses now we're targeting midmarket and enterprise in. We have a handful of the larger type of businesses even the largest type of businesses including the biggest marketplace in the world during the initial meetings that we have with hits of marketing ahead of VP of marketing automation VP of whatever any of these conversations that we have with them one of the things that tends to happen over and over is that they come in very curious would one use case and they said hey we were thinking you know voice have a conversation wait are prospects over the phone for this specific use case and we said yes and then they start you see. They're sort of ideas just bouncing in their head and they start coming up with different scenarios as they wait a second. We also have this issue in logistics where we have thousands of its drivers and we need to make sure that to get their attention. Tax Email doesn't work as fast. Can we leverage voice in e triggered by the fact that you know if you're done with one appointment and avoid spotted medically triggers and have a conversation with them and ask him where they are where they're going to remind light so this are the conversations that we have in every day with prospective customers? We had him with small business. Now we're having the windward market enterprise and what be seen is that is just the day one.

New York City Silicon Valley founder New York Public Library Michael Bloomberg IBM Google United Nations Bogota Colombia Columbia VP of marketing automation VP York City Rhode Island Suzanne Y. Combinator Nyu Undergrad Providence Bloomberg
Lessons From Surah Qaf  Ustadh Irshad Hussain: Patience In This Time Of Crisis

The Friday Circle Podcast

07:04 min | 1 year ago

Lessons From Surah Qaf Ustadh Irshad Hussain: Patience In This Time Of Crisis

"So shallow. We're going to be taking three key lessons from this raw. They shall. We can reflect on in our lives looking at the current situation around us firstly. Unbelievable that we're in a month ago. If you'd said there were in the majority of the world is going to be on the lockdown with massive changes to our social economical financial structure in in this way it would be unbelievable likewise beginning to. Ceuta about something else that. The disbelievers found unbelievable. That's the day of judgement they said had shown a job. This is a strange thing that would die. Become dust That's far preposition. So so this aspect of denying in here here are in a hair after it was president is present now so so that a lot he says to us that have seen the creation around them and would that they can evidences of how the resurrection wants to focus on. We need to use. We need to be able to look at the world around us to make changes to our lives. So let's as a Falungong summer focus. I've seen the heavens. If trump with him how we have made it how beautified did does know and earth how spread out. I'm throwing mountains. We put opponent every different type of punt and then he says that this is a with Vikram Likud Ogden Muneeb. It's a is a way by which a person he's able to see from blindness to to light and it's a reminder for him for every slave whose Mooney Mooney is one who's going to La going back to his his his his focus in life which is to which is to please allow us to to think how can improve myself. Haakan Puma wishing he's always you looking to make a sentence is returning back to? This is the first lesson. Don't we should focus upon and the second key lesson otake call for us. Today is how a law he informs US IN THIS SURA. In this chapter the porcine will decide. Every Friday morning at Pfizer. To remind himself in the congregation is the is how how how hold us in account for the day of judgement and there's a number of ways he mentioned in the sewer in one thing he says what Insana were not monsters will be here not enough so that very recreated man we know what his own soul whispered himself that there's nothing that we think about except that he knows that he say's colon he doesn't say any word except with him is an angel writing away record everything. Nothing is missing along. And then he talks about death. The thing that we fair it talks about the the blowing of the Great Hoon and then how people were driven unless as that. This is the event that people were in Hoffler on in Hillis of look at half Latin Hazza but today we have exposes he can see clearly and the green a the the agenda is five evil. He will this point lead. Try to save himself. You would say Robin Emma value to WHO I didn't call them to become misguided but he himself was misguided so yes he whispered away yes Austrian wishes away but in today's up to us a choice knowing that there's a there's going to be uncountable Which there's no escape so when he's talking to all the way over to say tim say to them that similar the don't argue in front of me because the water's going forth so he soloist. Say That so him and the Korean for Japan so the Boston fire because for every this believer who was reject food obstinate and arrogant. He knew the truth but he wasn't willing to listen but all this accountability is based on the fact that he doesn't do any zoom. Do any transgression. So this is the second aspect I wish to focus upon. The Accountability of us for that day is going to be perfect and the final key lesson is how to prepare for the digital pursuit and and they're in essence three key versus. Osias to focus on I as an how many people before them did. We destroy who are struggling and they. They're great houses and buildings and the gardens in the world but now they go do snowscape for them unless say he's very in that there is an admonition for the one who hasn't hot so we have a clean heart the we can see our history learned from it because history repeats itself or Cassano. Huish and he'd or he puts forth attentive hair really trying to listen trying to understand so if a person contemplates reflects on life it will help to pay for the day of judgement. Because he's he history repeats itself. Secondly says flustered al-Amaya coon with some bit hungrier. Bec- that have patience upon what they say and grow for you load in the morning and in the evenings so part of preparing for the day of judgement is being patient patient. Even in this time of difficulty. We're we're right now we're going to be. We're going to be stressed in terms of finances. Our social lives all the things that we you should do and there are some people who go to simply Craig by. Let's say be patient

Mooney Mooney Vikram Likud Ogden Muneeb Donald Trump Pfizer President Trump Haakan Puma Japan Falungong TIM BEC Insana LA Craig Robin Emma Huish Hoffler Cassano Hillis Boston
"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Toxins is is critical. Not using toxins. To begin with in your landscape is helpful. But there's certain things that roadsides were still driving so we're we're going to have run off using rain gardens and filtration ponds can be a great way to mitigate that it also provides its own amenity a lot of our native plants we think of as being very drought tolerant but some of these plants that grow on along creek sides are very adapted to wetter situations so having a rain garden gives you another place to put some of those species that might like a little bit extra water. Yeah now you are there in Austin. What what zone are you? And what do you know your annual precipitation on average Andrea? We get about thirty five inches of rain per year. The problem is that we get all at once rate might easily five inch rain Within a twenty four hour period so that we're really endanger flash flooding in our area. So all of these water issues that we've been talking about manage how to manage. Water is really important for us. Yeah and What what zone is that? So the Garden Zone that we're in is eight. Be Okay but I also think it's important to look at Because I think that just talks about what the temperature is but we're looking at cold and heat in the summer. A lot of the plants that people bring in from other places to grow in Texas if they're not from Texas they're going to have a hard time adapting to our heat that Safa something but then there's also the water issue and right right and go into that. Yes yes that learning to garden with. Your climate is such an interesting when when I first moved here to Northern California I thought Oh well a lot of my same beloved plants from Colorado should do fine and on paper. They might do fine but in fact they don't love the wet winter. That doesn't freeze quite as hard and they often wrought as you are describing in your Dry but sometimes humid summer conditions. Like it's it's a reminder to all of us that gardening.

Texas Andrea Austin Colorado
"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"Notes. It was a lovely interview some of the primary threads of inquiry while I was researching and writing this book. We're into how the plant world is improved as a result of being more representative not only allowing for more women to excel but also nurturing a much greater diversity of women how the field is far more viable and creative and innovative a career path for women than ever before and how this plant work world is demonstrating greater social and environmental responsibility in large part due to women's contributions and finally on how our human engagement with plants connects us to the natural world stewardship to our communities and to ourselves on powerful intellectual physical and spiritual levels Andrea Delong Amaya works in the metaphorical soil fed by the legacy of another great woman in the horticultural world. Not A horticulturalist herself. But a plant lover Ladybird Johnson. These are good women to learn about in women's history month now back to our conversation with Andrea Delong Amaya. This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden. In the second week of women's history month we're speaking with a native plant conservationist and advocate Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin. I remember visiting. I WANNA say four or five years ago now and just being really impressed with The beauty of the gardens the caretaking of the gardens and how much native plant and aesthetic gardening information. You Got Altogether. Thank you yeah Certainly as part is important because we would love for people to embrace these plants and use them at home most not all of them but most them but then we also use the research that we've done an incorporate those into demonstrations so we've done in the past We've done a lot of work with green roofs as you walk around. You'll see a number of green roofs that Demonstrate different kinds of settings that native plants could could be part of part of the research was to develop a planting media that is designed to work with our hot dry climates and then not just planting succulents and seems which I think most being roofs have. We're incorporating grasses and wildflowers into those areas too so that's one of the things that we have on demonstration green walls where we have screens that will provide some shade two buildings and all different kinds of sustainable practices that we able to incorporate into our landscapes here obviously just using native plants is helpful we have the E N Lucy Family Garden. Yes which is a fairly new addition to our gardens. It's about five and a half years old when we built it though we were designing it to be certified under the sustainable sites initiative that's set of criteria that people can follow voluntarily if you want to go through the system the ranking system and then depending on what kinds of things you incorporate into your landscape and the kinds of sustainable features that you include you can get a rating similar to leads for architecture are familiar with that So we do things like using native materials not bringing things in from a far distance in the construction that helps reduce the carbon footprint that you would have if you're bringing things in from other parts of the country or even other parts of the world incorporating materials that don't have toxins in them so a lot of the metal that we used we didn't use any zinc for example and all the hardware and we're trying to use the for Stewardship Council certified wood products using mulches that are recycled. One of the things that Is a big highlight for kids especially but adults are interested in who is we used crushed glass which the city of Austin collects from our recycling bins. You can crush it and tumble. It's it's not sharp and then use it as a as a mulch like mineral mulch and it has all different colors in it. Because you're mixing all those glass pieces in you have C. You have seagrass beds all over the garden and then maybe not see glass recycled glass. I guess you'd call it rather than sea glass so I have one question about the you mentioned which I think is Kind of a part of the sustainable materials work you're doing when you were doing the research to develop the media for the green roofs of course by which you mean the what you plant. The seeds in on top of that roof. What would did you use what? What was the media you ultimately developed Andrea Actually? The actual recipe is proprietary. And I don't actually even know what's in it It is all recycled and locally sourced materials which is one of the criteria that we're looking at when we developed it then. I know that. They experimented with several different materials. To see what would be both lightweight but also get draining and would hold moisture but not too much you know allowing for the drainage to happen and what's also important to understand that a lot of green roofs are actually not that sustainable. They're using materials. That are brought in from far distances. They May Have Peat Moss in them which is not millions dateable material. So it's really important for us to make sure that we were using materials that were renewable and locally sourced as well as being functional right and. I believe that they're just like here in interior northern California. It's a slightly different climate. But you run up against some very similar issues such as Water Resource Management Both as a run off and as a A precious resource during many months of the year. Talk about your some of your water. catchment and distribution methods in order to use that resource as wisely as possible when the wildfire center was initially built. We had the largest rainwater harvesting system in the country We can harvest to almost seventy thousand gallons of rainwater in store it Which is wonderful that we're able to use that on the landscape it's superior to city water anyway. So that's always been an important piece for us and yes you're right. Water conservation is a huge thing in our community as well. And that's been a really big selling point for promoting native plants because they are adopted to our climate and generally they're gonNA use less additional water in a in a landscape in addition to that one of the other features that we have in the Family Garden. That was site certified. We have a series of rain gardens. And they're all connected so when one fills up it feel flows into the other one the idea of these rain gardens. Is that when you get a lot of rain? The water is directed into these depressed areas. That have a planting medium has soil. That is well draining and so it helps percolate the water into the ground. So it's not just running off but it also directed in stores it long enough so that some of it will go into the ground and then if we get really a lot of rain it'll slow into the next one but we're able to capture more water. Instead of contributing to flooding downstream for example and all the soil will help filtration filter out. Impurities which is probably more important if you were in a parking lot or on the side of the road or something. Not so much the garden. We don't have toxins in here but but that's another function that rain garden one has and it's a fantastic model for the people who are visiting I don't know I I know you have millions of visitors. In a year and in all likelihood many of them are coming from urban areas. Where run off onto urban hard scape that goes directly into open surface water and disturbs the the balance of the water the quality of the water the habitat for all of the aquatic life. Both animal and plant is it becoming more and more important in our world of increasing urbanization. Absolutely filtering out. The toxins is is critical. Not using toxins. To begin with in your landscape is helpful. But there's certain things that roadsides were still driving so we're we're going.

Andrea Delong Amaya Austin Ladybird Johnson Andrea Delong Andrea Actually E N Lucy Family Garden representative Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C Family Garden California Peat Moss Stewardship Council director University of Texas
"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

Cultivating Place

14:21 min | 1 year ago

"amaya" Discussed on Cultivating Place

"This is cultivating place conversations on natural history and the human impulse to garden from nor state public radio in northern California. I'm Jennifer Joel. Were now well into women's history month and International Women's Day was this last Sunday march eighth as we continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she had the native flora of Texas. Talk about the diversity you have there. And how the diversity of Texas which is not which is an enormous place with a lot of micro climates and But talk about that. Diversity is then valuable as a kind of proto type for researching and understanding diversity anywhere Andrea. The State is a big state. And because of that. We're really blessed with many different Eka regions and vegetation zones. We have depending on how you look at it. We might we have about a dozen different vegetation zones and it's kind of a funnel you if you look at how the the geography of North America As things migrate and flow back and forth from north to South America it goes through Central America and through the funnel of Texas so we get plants and animals coming through there that over millennia have really made it for very rich environment which is Super Fun to be exploring and studying and and gardening with those plants and gardening for wildlife the diversity of wildlife that we have what is your current number of sort of native plants in Texas. We have thousands Maybe five thousand native plant species or tax in the state of Texas. But I would have to confirm that number on our site. We have about nine hundred species of native tax on our property here and tax would include species and sometimes subspecies right. I think one of the things. It's really interesting to me. And part of what makes Native Plant Research. So interesting is that You know it's that Great John Muir quote of you can't pull on one thread in the universe without tugging on the whole of the universe but the native plant as you were describing that idea of Texas being this fabulous funnel in migration patterns and and water like large watersheds scope. You get this sense of the complexity and history of that interrelationship between climatic patterns geology. The tectonic plates of our continent and how plants and animals are interrelated with all of that. And it's all co evolved into this fabulous beautiful soup that you know in your region is the big beautiful state of Texas Talk. About how over time the different display areas have evolved there at the center and what they're kind of individual purposes are from the perspective of not only engaging the public but also providing laboratories for research end data and information collection. The gardens themselves have not been The subject of actual research study. I mean informally as gardeners. Were all every time we garden? It's always an experiment you but we do have more of our. Formal research is happening in the natural areas primarily with a land-management research. I would like to progress as we move forward to doing more plant trials and other more formal kinds of horticultural research but just demonstrating these plants. in having them in a garden setting where we can somewhat control conditions. Some plants obviously are pretty malleable and while adjusts to horticultural kind of settings others We found not well suited for gardens. They may be beautiful plants but they may be tricky or they may be really specific in the kinds of areas and conditions that they want to grow and people love. There's a little plant called Mountain. Pink which is super cute. It's Maybe a foot tall and it looks like this. Perfect bouquet of flowers with hot pink balsams on it and they bloom in the summer. They grow in road cuts where it's just basically solid rock almost just COLUCCI and people love them and they want to grow them in their garden..

Texas Andrea Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C Native Plant Gardens Austin Johnson Andrea Botanic Garden Texas President Johnson US wildflower research center Andrea Delong wildflower center University of Texas Native Plant Research California Texas El country Andrea Hi Acre Texas Arboretum Andrea Sherr
Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

Cultivating Place

09:44 min | 1 year ago

Andrea DeLong-Amaya, Women Working in the World of Plants

"We continue cultivating places. Women's history month interviews. Were joined this week by Andrea Delong Amaya director of horticulture for the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center at the University of Texas. At Austin it is also the botanic garden for the State of Texas Andrea has been on staff for over twenty years and has more than thirty years of experience in horticulture. She Guides fifteen staff members in the design and management of nine acres of Native Plant Gardens. Two hundred and seventy five acres of natural areas and in native plant nursery. She teaches classes in native plant horticulture and writes and presents on her passion for the field widely. She spoke with US late. Last autumn to share more about the history and work of the centre including it. Being the legacy of another extraordinary woman ladybird Johnson Andrea shares. Her own enthusiasm for this field of work. Welcome Andrea Hi. How you doing? I'm great how are you wonderful? I'd love for you to start by describing describe the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center as visually as you can for listeners. Who may not have been there. And then we'll talk a little bit about your specific work there Andrea Sherr so we are in a South Austin and in the middle of Texas. We're in a part of the state that we refer to as Texas El country or the Edwards Plateau which is a beautiful beautiful part of the state. Of course Texans will say every part of the state is beautiful but I WANNA say text. The central Texas area is particularly beautiful especially in the spring were really renowned for having excellent wildflower displays including the Texas blue on it which occurs all over the state but the central Texas areas particularly flora for us in the spring. And so we are like I said in Austin and the site that were on is a public garden where about two hundred and eighty five acres. I think we actually added a little bit more In the last year or so and it's a public garden where we feature plants that are native to the state of Texas. That's the site now. The organization is bigger than that But the gardens here. We're demonstrating hell different. Native plants can be used in different kinds of landscapes different kinds of styles. We have collections of plants. From different parts of the State we are the Botanic Garden Texas. So we're trying to increase our collections to represent other parts of the state as well as the central Texas area so we have about nine acres of cultivated gardens and then we have a sixteen Acre Texas Arboretum of trees So those are the horticultural areas in then. We have natural areas in The other parts of the the property And that the natural areas also include some research areas. We have some Areas where we're doing Land Management prescribed fire treatments and different kinds of land-management to see how that influences the vegetation. Yeah we can talk more about that. If you're if you like definitely definitely I will i. I would love to get into some of the specifics of each of those areas you just described but before we get there. Describe your your your job there what it entails and may be the trajectory of your twenty years there. Andrea. Yeah well. I started as a gardener appropriately and really enjoy working outside. I mean I've always been interested in being outdoors and that goes way back to my childhood is probably most people who have an affinity for the natural world That usually starts childhood so I grew up doing things outdoors with my parents particularly with my dad. We'd go camping or canoeing. And I remember having a field guide of of wildflowers weeds that surrounded our area where we lived and that was great. Fun everything from astronomy to birds and lizards and insects. Just everything is so interesting And I just find that the more I learn about things the more I'm fascinated and in awe of the natural world so that's just started early but it's just been a long a lifelong interest in learning more and observing more. I mean I laugh. We have a big picture window at our dining room table. And that's our TV. We don't have an actual electronics of the Inter House. It's overlooking a garden and pond and we just sit there and watch the animal antics and what's blooming and it's great fun and it's a nice way to slow down in our fast paced world That's a that's a big part of what I think. Nature does for me and for a lot of people So you started as a gardener. What year was that Andrea and then tell us about the progression of your rules at the Center Which clearly you progressed in because of your deepening curiosity and ever expanding knowledge base. Yes so I started in December of nine hundred ninety eight and Worked as a gardener I've guarded in most of the areas that we have in Under cultivation over the years and at some point we had Position of gardens manager was available so I moved into that and then I don't know maybe fifteen years ago I transitioned into the direct report culture and Unfortunately that means a little bit less guarding than I used to do. But it also gets me in a higher level of designing decision making which is very exciting and allows me to have more influence over some of the bigger picture things that are happening And then overseeing the natural areas arboretum and the nurseries also been pretty pretty fun and adds different interest to what what I'm looking at. Yeah so talk about Before we get into the specifics of some of the programmatic areas and display areas there and then the research give listeners. A history of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center when it started what it's original mission in scope was of course the wonderful woman for whom it is named and by whom it was founded in its original iteration and So that that people have an understanding of just how much bigger is then. A Garden appreciating wildflowers. Because that is a fabulous mission but it's it is much bigger than that so we're very blessed to have had the visionary Labor Johnson as founder. She founded the wildflower center. Initially as the wildflower research center. The National Welfare Research Center and that was an endeavor that she took on with her friend and actress. Helen Hayes which a lot of people don't remember that part of of the history but it's Kinda Funny Mrs Johnson didn't feel like she had enough name. Recognition Systems of Helen Hayes. And so her mission right from the beginning was to really try to understand an unlocked the secrets of wildfires in native plants and understand how they grow and that was the original research. The the wildflower center did at that time and so that was a nineteen eighty two so the organization started back. Then we moved to our current site as a public garden Before it was more just a research site with some portables but it didn't really have botanical garden kind of exhibits. Someone moved to Our current site in one thousand nine hundred ninety five that was really a big focus of making the space Amenable to guests and having exhibits that people can interact with and having educational programming and really elaborating on that when she first started it. Why we'll just remind listeners? She was of course the first lady of the United States and she Had A as firstly. She had some remarkable initiatives to beautify. I think was the word that was used then. roads and highways across the country and she was taken by the wildflower diversity there in her home state for good reason. Because it's a pretty remarkable native flora. Will you talk a little bit about that? And and why people thought this was not just a pretty project but was worthy of deep research. Even at that time so yeah. Mrs Johnson grew up in a rural setting and without siblings so she was a long time so her best friend is. A child was outside Just the outdoors and I think that was what what instilled upon in her the scrape passion for the for the natural world and then as she became first lady She really had a great influence on President Johnson in terms of Passing legislation one of the things he's known for is the beautification. Act The highway beautification. Act and getting billboards off of the roadsides and cleaning up roadsides and planting wildflowers and the way I understand it you know we talk about it is being beautification and she knew at the time. She was very savvy that at the time. She knew that that was a word that would engage people. The public secretly I. I've heard that she felt like that was actually kind of a word and that it is she. I think she understood. It was deeper than just beautification was away to connect people with the idea that she

Texas Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower C President Johnson Andrea Wildflower Center Austin Johnson Andrea Native Plant Gardens United States Botanic Garden Texas Wildflower Research Center Andrea Delong Andrea Hi Andrea Sherr University Of Texas Texas El Country Helen Hayes Acre Texas Arboretum National Welfare Research Cent
The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

Hostage

03:44 min | 1 year ago

The Woman Who Shot Andy Warhol

"Our first clip is from podcast original female criminals covering the attempted murder of one of the most well known American artists of the twentieth century. Andy Warhol writer in Radical Feminist Valerie solanas befriended warhol in nineteen sixty seven through the New York Avant Garde art scene. He showed an interest in producing one of her plays titled Up Your Ass at invited her into his inner circle of artists and influencers influencers at the factory but in nineteen sixty eight. The pair had a falling out. Valerie became convinced that Warhol was trying to steal her ideas and pass them off as his own in paranoia fueled rage. She confronted Warhol in his studio armed with a thirty two caliber revolver it. She pulled out her gun aimed at Warhol's back while he was on the phone and fired before Anyone could stop her when the first shot went off no one in the studio realized what was happening Amaya. Yeah thought sniper had fired through the window. He threw himself on the ground Hughes on the other hand thought. The sound was an explosion from the offices of the Communist leanest party located two floors above them. More Hall was the only one who realized what was happening. Though her first shot had missed missed him he turned the sound and when he saw Valerie was holding a smoking gun he yelled Valerie. Don't do it no no. Oh but his words couldn't deter her Valerie wasn't discovered marksman her second shot also missed however over the third bullet struck Warhol in the abdomen hitting his left lung spleen stomach liver and sopha guess before exiting his back he collapsed to the ground. At which point Valerie turned to a Maya. He was the only bystander who hadn't taken cover making him a perfect target for Valerie. She fired twice more one shot hit but miraculously passed through Maya without damaging any organs Valerie then approached Hughes pointing the gun directly directly at him. He begged for his life but Valerie told him simply. I have to shoot you. She aimed the gun at his chest at such a close range. It was impossible for her to miss. But fate intervened the gun jammed and as has she tried to get it working again. The elevator doors opened Hughes realizing that Valerie was distracted and agitated told her to just take the elevator and leave. Valerie did exactly that Morrissey and Hughes immediately called nine nine one one. When the paramedics arrived and saw the blood they believed that Warhol was already dead no one could have survived the injuries he'd sustained Amaya had to convince them? That warhol was still breathing and that he needed immediate medical treatment. Finally the first first responders loaded warhol into their ambulance at the hospital. His heart stopped at four fifty one PM. The doctors doctors declared him legally dead but they were able to resuscitate him by massaging his heart and rushed him into emergency

Valerie Solanas Andy Warhol Hughes Warhol New York Avant Garde Writer Amaya Morrissey
"amaya" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

Podcast RadioViajera

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on Podcast RadioViajera

"Social unrest view and Brad Greta Moscow nurse Rita My neon I've been together to bless him on Donald Duck Gumbo fish a day when you in professional indicate overlay material and pressure on people that respiratory runners marie-eve people with him up or Anita Blah he really is that yes he may be our number of this does offense in La nobody ready for every year he fast supermarket. ABC starring I'll momentum cashless like yes thank my finger on Mental Alaska's He Salvia simple advocate within a system by implementing Anassa present information we democrat or million and if you're not that you know and rush analogous the hunter mini steadier say he may not pursue travel nurse Nina San Traffic Orlando Participants Romeo Bob Chimera responsibility plan better squirrelly they'll dappled of their high minogue order Andy Field. ABC I thought I'm being out of steeples ABC's citing oh in Monrovia by packing and he said I am not the shuttles and some other Tube Rhythm Corrado Russian Linda Ramdas ended up in their anti war ferrocarril kill Neha be Colorado is blocked off your mean immutable Ribas train pork Erotica Gothenburg Korean weak or Tito or Ross Cantinas yes show that Reha s we have people that these are Union Therese Tyne Alicante that go yeah Kosta Augusta Yelich or any follow or beefy yes I'm using my cell Ramona shelters this should be better this and that went there the November in not rather than the Casa nausea not as long commercial not Docomo Lancome like just nudo this if you knew MSSP Landaburu Africa the name of Ghana's Canadia.

ABC Union Therese Tyne Alicante Andy Field Anita Blah Romeo Bob Chimera Donald Duck Brad Greta Kosta Augusta Yelich Docomo Lancome Rita My MSSP Landaburu Africa Linda Ramdas Monrovia Nina San Ribas Ghana La Neha Canadia Alaska
"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"This is the story of one of the greatest front man of all time Liam Gallagher has it was charge the dizzying heights in bitter lows of an artist who defines what it is to be a rock and roll star in his own words here how Liam fought his way back turning his fall from super stardom into the launch of a visionary solo career we are invited backstage for a no holds barred look at one of the most talked about and charismatic artists of his generation for the first time ever Liam tells its own story in his own words Liam Gallagher as it was is now available on digital HD and on demand more music to more music more for right wing four three my FM it's one of four three she's the whole world right now she is exploding list truth hurts Amaya found.

Liam Gallagher Amaya
"amaya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Serving army Colonel has become the latest military voice back one Guido, the self-proclaimed interim president of Venezuela in the video circulated on social media, Colonel Ruben Perez Jimenez, has urged he's fellow soldiers to allow US but humanitarian aid into the country, which has been blocked by forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro, Mr. Guido has vowed to open those routes into the country. He's called on volunteers to help distribute the aid and said that he's plans would be ready next week. I've spoken to Victor Amaya whose the editor of the Caracas newspaper Tel quel their position has said that starting Tuesday, they're gonna try to put that aid inside the country. They are planning doing like a protest on the border. They're trying to organize. People have protesters going to the border through speak up forcing the government to let the international head bath in the country. But they have no outlet publicly. How are they going to do this? You mentioned the role of the military does the military appear to be loyal to the Venezuelan government to the Maduro government is far as you can see at the moment. Yeah. They the Heiko man has expressed over an hour and their loyalty towards Madurai and on the lower commands and the troops. There hasn't been any indication that large groups are willing the stub recognizing Ross solid. Precedents commander in chief. We have seen some officers key knob defecting and going to Columbia. Recording videos diversion their positions are recognizing Madero saying that they have to support the Hong wider. But that hasn't been like for alert of active members of the military. In fact, the structure of the institution of the national armed forces are still behind mother Rosa regime. I didn't Caracas where you are. You seeing many more street protests on either side at the moment. No, it's been more quiet on these couple of days, maybe because the organizing with the expectation of how it's going to Bush that humanitarian aid inside the country Victor Amaya editor of the Caracas based newspaper Tel quel we go to Catalonia where on Tuesday long-awaited trials will start of nine political and cultural leaders involved in twenty seventeen outlawed referendum on Catalan independence, some of the accused have been in pretrial detention for more than a year. Tim Smith joins us from the Catalan capital Barcelona. Tim start by reminding us, perhaps who's on trial, and what the charges are here. Yeah. Hygiene say as you say nine leaders from the Kazan per independence movement hookah in front at the Spanish supreme coal and cheese day day in court include oil, June Karas, Jordi Toronto route of era Joseph role. Hurricane four Jordi Sanchez, Judy Kuchar laws passed and comical KC. The heaviest sentence advice would be oil John Karras. He's the full mccaslin. Vice president and he faces a prison sentences long as twenty five years if found guilty said these are serious charges rebellion sedition and misuse of public funds. It's going to be a big event in Kathleen politics. The Charles can be forecast. Live on national television, say you'll see people across Spain watching this process, and it's worth remembering as this price kicks off that people across Kathleen. Yeah. Still have their lives affected by the events that happened didn't take a twenty seventeen when that referendum academy say earlier this week. I went to meet one. Man. He's Ignasi sabota-. The mayor of a smooth town could va- jazz in rural northern Kathleen. Now, he says he's been the targets of an intimidator attack is as a result of his support for Kathleen independence. He was arrested on suspicion of being involved in the protests blocking high railway tracks which no official colts order was issued for his arrest. The Spanish interior minister defended the arrests, but he and others in the independence movement say this police action was an example of why there is so little trust in Spanish in these institutions from prior independence Catalans, he's nice Orleans involvements. And I went to me Ignasi sabotage to ask what happens then. The the NATO your soccer coach chip on the sixteenth of January. I was guessing in the car to go to work just like every day at seven in the morning. And when I left the house, I met a man who was waiting for me saying he had to arrest me for possible. Crime of public disorder on first October two thousand eighteen. On that day. I was working prime high school teacher. So it's very easy to check together with sixteen others who were detained and put them to settle. Inside that there were feelings of sadness feelings of anger. Humiliation feelings of uncertainty because no one taught us what was happening. What was going to happen to us? And I believe we're living in exceptional times retention was totally illegal because they didn't prove that they were police officers will show on murder. So apart.

Kathleen independence Caracas Victor Amaya Mr. Guido Colonel Ruben Perez Jimenez John Karras editor Nicolas Maduro interim president Tim Smith Venezuela Venezuelan government Ignasi sabota President Columbia Vice president Jordi Sanchez
"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

07:10 min | 2 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"What it's Mario Lopez. Marshmallow Bastille with happier. Amaya fan. You. A hobby. On the morning combs. Colada flaming we be. Every. Word. Kevin. Two. My the. Course. Now, we jump together. Speakers Steve away from the wreck. Lawns exchange. Range. Into. So. Two. You too. Doc. I doubt you'll be happier. Then. Skit outages. Tell me now. Last week. Business. So. Ah said, no one has. Me standing in. Nice Erin the songs. Some rosy cheeks. Are you see me even if it's just creates? One. Oh, four three my FM, sixty minutes nonstop. Founded?.

Mario Lopez Amaya Erin Kevin Steve sixty minutes
"amaya" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"That's just baked into the cake. Now, you move beyond that you're in a situation where they hoped that they would be able to get rid of this thing by turning on paperwork. Listen, this is a state of mind question you in this situation. If you're talking about, you know, when you're trying to obstruct you could do the same thing. Nobody says he didn't have the right to the things. He did the question is was it right to do it with doing it for the right reasons, and you only can figure that out it a conversation and till Muller is not going to let this go. And at some point. I think are going to have President Trump say I would rather have this thing fought out at the supreme. Court level to determine once and for all whether I can be subpoenaed in a criminal investigation rather than just sit down. And do what anybody else would do what people do all around the country all around the world and talk to the prosecutor. So what is it like to speak to the special counsel and his investigators? Well, we have someone with us who happens to know from Trump campaign adviser, Michael Caputo who has faced questioning from the special counsels team into Vance point Michael could the president handle it. Well, I don't know any former prosecutor Amaya Turney or any other Turney who's working for anybody as a witness or subject or target in this investigation who would say that it's a good idea for the president to sit down with the Muller team in a in a QA not one, and I've talked to many of them. I think it's a terrible idea a horrible idea, and as a witness I volunteered to sit down with the team and an encountered my own perjury trap. You don't have to look any further than how the FBI treated general Flynn to see how they'll likely treat the president of the United States when they created a perjury trap for general Flynn. I think it's a terrible idea for the president to do it. I would advise him never to even think about it. Quite this all the way to get your point that you don't think the president should sit down for an interview because perhaps he could get caught in a lie, but to call what happened to Michael Flynn, a perjury trap there. Here's a man who was a three star general. Here's a man who was director of the fence intelligence. Agency who lied to the FBI and should have known that lying to the FBI was against the law. In fact, he admitted to them we're gonna talk about this later in the show, but I just wanna make sure our viewers know, he did it to the FBI investigators that were talking to him that he knew that they knew what he had said on the phone, and then he still chose to tell them lies about John go, Gary it's important to clarify that a perjury trap is a specific thing that's different than when a and that's a defense asserted by defense counsel. So that's something that a defense counsel would allege the prosecutors were doing that's very different than a person who was being interviewed and doesn't tell the truth that tell says something that contravenes what other evidence or other witnesses have provided. So there is no evidence on the public record that indicates that any of the individuals who have been prosecuted convicted or pled guilty in this. Case have been caught in any kind of perjury track. There's one other aspect of pamelas reporting, though, that I think is worth examining here, which is Pamela, specifically says that this is the same level of interest that the special counsel team has always had and speaking to the president, and Pamela doesn't have any indication as we sit here tonight that the special counsel will take legal action to force the issue. That's significant it is. Although I'm not sure if it just we simply don't know more about what their next step is. I don't have any reason to think that the special counsel would not be willing to lit a gate a subpoena to the president..

president perjury special counsel FBI Michael Flynn prosecutor Muller Amaya Turney Trump Pamela Michael Caputo United States director Vance Michael John Gary
"amaya" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on Harry Potter and the Sacred Text

"Visualizing injustice to great anger to create energy to use for action is a central organizing technique. I think anger is necessary, especially if we're coming up against enormous structures and systems that are oppressing people in many, many different ways like the needs courage, and it needs kind of non rational thinking sometimes where anger drives us to do things where we just need extra courage or recklessness sometimes because it just becomes impossible to stay within the status quo. I mean, so I think later we see in the books Harry's anger being channeled, you know, with Dumbledore army with her mind, health into something really productive. And right now his anger is only destroy. Active, and I'm just trying to articulate for myself when those differences are in part of it. I do think is like when you're railing against structure when you're using your anger in order to try to motivate a solution rather than to like be in a spiral. I think maybe there's something about Inger in community right when you're sharing your anger rather than stewing in your anger will the something about anger and strategy. Because I think right now a Harry's just overwhelmed by his angers no sins of containing. It does no sense of direction to it, like he's kind of lashing out with this anger and Amaya Ronan kind of the punching bags that he confined to like lay into because it takes an extreme amount of emotional maturity to be able to hold and contain and direct Anga to rile it up when it needs to be riled up and then to be able to manage it when it is getting too much. I mean, I've just been reading about some of the the history of organizing in the very early. Years of the civil rights movement. The way that singing was used really was like a social tool to manage Anga. Sometimes it was a way to bring a group back into some sense of unity, especially if that'd been real different opinions within the group singing together was kind of a way of replacing Papas and unity in the midst of conflict and also redirecting to weather. Conflict should be redirected too, which is one of the things I think we don't see happen very well in this top to really from anyone. You know, no one brings up Cedric. No one brings up Volmer in a way of like, wait, why are we will here? Even though there's a meeting literally of the order of the Phoenix happening downstairs..

Harry Anga Inger Volmer Amaya Ronan Papas
Usain Bolt makes football debut for Central Coast Mariners in 6-1 win

The Rich Eisen Show

04:04 min | 3 years ago

Usain Bolt makes football debut for Central Coast Mariners in 6-1 win

"Did you see you sane bolt debuted for an Australian professional soccer club football club? Maybe as they might call cylical. Yeah, and it got me thinking. Okay, so you same bolts really fast. We all know this could agai like you saying maybe not specifically you say bolt, but a speedster like him. Ever make it on an NFL roster. I know we've tried this in the past skeets Nehemiah. That's the name. You need a Google skeets. The Amaya. Yes. I know we've tried this in the past, but I'm just saying like with the elite speed like that, it made me think, could we see you sane both in a different sport, you know, they're attract stars that have done it in the NFL. Bob Hayes was probably one of the originals of the did it. There have been others Willie Gault that for the Chicago Bears, he from Tennessee an Olympian, I believe. So there have been sprinters, but they played some football, a guy like you seen bolt. He grew up playing soccer, so his version of football. I mean, he's not a strange sport to him, but he groped doing that. You can't just take a track star that's not played football and say, hey, you're so fast. You should just run by people and then we'll teach you to catch the foot of any of the sports. Like I think that football make the most sense American football. Because you have to learn one thing. Well, I mean. Obviously have to learn the ins and outs. Oversimplify I began one thing catch the football. There's no way you could say, put him on the NBA court, say just run by everybody while dribbling the basketball and then lay it up in. No, it's not gonna work. You couldn't go and say, hey, once you get on base in major league baseball, just steal the basis. Well, you gotta get on base. I, there are certain players there, certain things, physical attributes that you can teach somebody to go ahead Manute, bold and play a lot of basketball as a kid, but it's hard to teach seven, seven. So there are certain attributes that you can, but in speed, you think is one for football receiver, but you just can't do it on speed alone. There's so many other elements to it. I agree with you from the standpoint of, okay, now take this great athlete and make him a soccer player. He's never dribbled a ball with his feet. He's never kicked, didn't play organized soccer. Now make this player a great, make this athlete, a great soccer player, make this athlete hitter in baseball, make this athlete, a basketball player. Those. Elements you probably couldn't do it, but I don't. I'm over simplifying played some football. Yeah. It certainly helps for sure would help. I know I'm over simplifying it. I just thought when I saw you sane bolt play in a soccer match, I thought I would love to just see him on what just throw a. Are you same bolt to see what happens now? What he'd probably drop it? Sure. But if you if you let him practice that skill set. 'cause I mean, I know there are a lot of things that go into it, but you just have to run by the other guy, catch the football running. A lot of people right now who don't know you go, that guy is flipping rano of all the spin. I'm here to tell those people. I know John and you are right? He is crazy. What's a kid right off the bat. I understand there's an over simplification of this, but when it does come down to it, you run faster than the other guy catch. Just keep brought it force. Gump it into the end zone.

Football National Football League Soccer Bob Hayes Basketball Baseball Willie Gault Google John Chicago Bears Manute NBA Tennessee
"amaya" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on Reveal

"Hurricane hit when she began getting these tips doctors were saying listen we have a lot of people in the mark's that's not normal it wasn't just the morgues hospitals without electricity were transferring patients who were in really bad shape it to other facilities doctors told her many were dying i was getting numbers from him say got this week five traffic first they all died and a maya said to herself something's not right with the government death count of just sixteen people i think there's something big happening here so i started doing my own accounting amaya began reaching out to hospitals funeral homes and mayors asking if they knew of cases that weren't counted she didn't just want a number she wanted to find specific cases with names and documentation that she could bring to the government as proof that very death count was wrong today we're in cairo lena a middleclass suburb of san juan to follow up on a tip from a woman named miriam rows of vargas we pull up to a small modern home in a gated community mariam is waiting for us though marlins but are that they will need them khomeinism but i'm we sit down in the living room and miriam begins to tell us her story her father formerly a successful journalist and musician had parkinson's disease that be dinio nagorny com the by taking some and he was showing signs of dementia but went hurricane maria struck in the electricity went out his health suddenly worsened the heat is guys lord the humidity now may that was suffocating sofa can think of the yet two olympics roughing that the family would try to fan him to cool him down but he was looking really bad five days after the hurricane they decided to call an ambulance and when they arrived at the hospital doctors told them he was having a heart attack on top of that the condition of the hospital was unlike anything mariam had ever seen combs late i mean they dinos it was completely full there were people everywhere lining every hallway packed in every possible.

Hurricane san juan vargas marlins parkinson maria mariam combs cairo miriam five days
"amaya" Discussed on Upgrade

Upgrade

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"amaya" Discussed on Upgrade

"Anddccomics nowhere to be seen so if you wanna buy dccomics you just gotta buyumalicartethat's just that's just how you gotta do it but anyway that's the digital comics somebody was asked me oh actually in our friend our friends a gray was asking me what what i use to read comics these days and my answer was comics algae marvelon unlimited and chunky comic reader for all of the non dram stuff i have chunky comic reader very nice ios app and i do all my reading amaya at pro chunky comic kharita chunky konic reader that's why you're goods this when the ipadi came out because i was like this is can be grateful comexsap has been around for a very very very long time awesome that'sroku unless we could talk about stickers in what to do if you want to remove his stickers and you mentioned that there was something that you couldn't think of the name of that you would use to remove stickers turns out via upgrade ianjason um that is called google on google done i mean i'm sure there are other other things out there but this is what i was thinking of it's gone and it's a it's like a spray bottle like a like a like a you know a a household cleaner kind of thing but what it's designed for is to dissolve the the the it adhesive said that stiffer she's so few you've got to still use an elbow grease but if you use elbow grease in something like google on you can get you can get that laptop back looking like it never had a sticker on it.

Anddccomics google