Audioburst Search

14 Burst results for "Amanda Sort"

"amanda sort" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

05:09 min | 3 weeks ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"W W because I wanted to do this. Friday. Everybody especially. I left my. House like. We need to get healthier and that's the reason why we're doing. This is just to make you aware of what's happening in the community. During that clip their shots of Amanda and she's like giving a weird face. People were interpreting that face as shade and she was like. Had to release video unscrambling like do not read into this. I am not making fun of Lonnie like nothing but respect for Lonnie. Create some falls dissension between me and the CO host, the real y'all so fucking corny. There is a whole pandemic an uprising going on, and you still can't find. Shit Elsa do but try and create some conflict that doesn't exist. I did not on final follow Lonnie lab I haven't followed anybody. Shut Out! The genie shut out the town's shut. Alana large out to Adrian. which I understand is grown gone. Grown women do grown women business that's John Understand what I do with my business ain't got nothing to do with them sisters and so if you actually do the research. Just not far after or before that video came. They were interviewed by the host of extra. WHO's extremely rude to her? By the way, the host of extras like being very rude to her in this city and his video, and she says something mean to her allies. To Lonnie to amid a seals and Amanda sort of like brushes it off, and then if you look closely, the video that I saw exhumes in Lonnie like grabs, Amandas hand, and like gives it a like a friendly squeeze. All I'm sorry, Girl. You. Ingenious butted heads in a couple of different time. We just kind of goes out. No! Right. That's not the territory we're coming from. We're not butting heads and I think it's very very important. especially at a table of diverse women to very clearly delineate the difference between having difference in opinion, then biting, you'll know when I'm biting heads. Yeah, because when I butt heads, only going to be what head stand and as you can see. And I also think that as times change. Our show has changed, so we've gone from. A show that was a lot of fluff and bubbly, and now we're taking on topics the only about ourselves, but what's happening in the World S so. That's why we brought on Amanda, because Amanda has a masters in African American Studies Yeah but she's also a great comedian and you want to change. Refresh the show their friends. It's fine. The actual reason she left is she says let's quote the actual thing. It doesn't feel good to my soul to be a place where I cannot speak my mind to people the way they need to be spoken to, and where the people that are speaking to me into sparing ways are not handled. I'm not at a space whereas black woman. I can have my voice and my co workers also have their voices, and where the people at the. The top are not respecting the necessity for black voices to be at the top two, so she's saying this is not the people at the table. This is the people at the this is exactly what happened with Neymar literally to a T. and I remember, and I read about it again, but I remember it at the time as well when Taymor was fired from the real team are went on the view Taymor went on Wendy Taymor went on. Watch what happens like Tamer went to all these places to and talked about her experience, and there was a moment where there was something posted by Tamer that she ended up, apologizing for deleting that implied, that was the other women at the table that had fucked her over essentially that unlike gotten her to leave, but ultimately what kind of came out, and they spoke back on the show they did. They were like you can come on the show whenever you want like this is not about us and like we. We were really upset that you kind of imply that it was about us at the table like we support you whatever so the point was as bad came out behind the scenes that had a lot more to do with her husband at the time who she's now divorced from like that. Guy Vincent I think was his name or is his name, and about like kind of her attitude in dealing with advertisers or something, which to be fair. This Daily Mail article kind of is fucked up because it's like. Like she swore, and they were mad. Because the the the segment was like hosted by Pinterest or something, so they were like she was acting inappropriate their stuff in here. That's like actually kind of like fucked up in terms of the way that she was like she was like to quote unquote ghetto literally in this article negative feedback on her quote unquote ghetto. Ghetto persona given by focus groups. This is one the Daily Mail is saying so fucked up, but yeah, but of course the the that describing that is way more complicated than saying all these women are bitches, and they hate each other. You know so. That's what the gossip rags sort of lean on. It's like Oh, it's just because they didn't get along because. Like. That's what. It, the same thing happened where everyone kind of assumes that like somebody was. They got together like we gotta get her off the show like we're voting her off the island when it was like it is so much more to do with with production also for seals. It's actually a different story because she quit, she wasn't fired, so it's different. She chose not to renew her contract and also meanwhile, meanwhile, Lani love is releasing a book. Did you see this? Yes if you go to lie, you love, Book Dot Com, you.

Lonnie Amanda Wendy Taymor Tamer Lani Neymar John Alana Pinterest African American Studies Vincent Adrian.
"amanda sort" Discussed on The Big Picture

The Big Picture

16:17 min | 4 months ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on The Big Picture

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well made right. And that's all that actually is enough for me. Sometimes if something is really well made if it feels like. They're those choices are being made. That helped character helped story improve upon. What's on the page? Which sometimes it happens sometimes doesn't mean where did you fall on the nineteen seventeen? You know debate we we use. We just went through it so weird because of nine hundred seventeen. You know what I just mentioned we. We did a long tracking shot for one episode. Mister robot and I guess because I know too much about what goes into pulling that off. I saw every stitch and to weirdly every such that felt so obvious where I felt like we would have tried to be a little more creative and not I mean even. My mother-in-law was pointing out the stitches and my mother-in-law does not know very much about filmmaking So so I think I got in my head way too much with the film so I don't think I can have passed judgement on but yeah I was. I was pretty much more watching. The technique was following the story and that that is not as success. I don't mean to underestimate technique. I have no technique and it's very hard to pull those things off. I I just find that when it gets in the way of like fuller. I do find that well-made is so often code for I didn't like anything else about it but I appreciate the fact that things are put together. Well it's like saying film is interesting you know it's like I will I will say with the one of our though. Mister robot the best compliment I ever got on that episode and multiple people came up and said this day didn't even realize that it was a winner until like until halfway through some people didn't even realize until later after someone else told them so for me. That was like exciting. 'cause I with you in general. I don't think the filmmaking should ever get in the way but at the same time I don't think it should be. I don't think it should get completely out of Norway. And a Lotta Times. I think movies do that. They lean in the opposite direction. And if you're just watching coverage you know you're just watching a master shot close up close up to me the better example to have this conversation and we don't get a chance to talk about. He'll much here is an insult. Because you're here but it's homecoming which the way that that. The U shot that really more informed atmosphere character story. And obviously there are. There's a lot of all mosh to maybe some directors. We'll talk about here and some films that you like a lot. But also without that filmmaking style. That story would not have worked as well if it hadn't been quite so Intimate with a shot. If you didn't have your sort of your Dutch Angles Your Ellen. Peculiar style rum a shadow and distance from certain characters. It's interesting you know. Rob Reiner and can we talk about. Rob Reiner absolutely what an interesting beginning to filmmakers career and then just serve it just sort of. I don't know what happened just sort of dissolved. But you think about like. I was gonNA bring them up when we were talking about the eighties but This is spinal tap..

director Mister Robot Amanda Sort Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Rob Reiner Esmail Sam Shawn Batman cary Fukunaga El Camino Amazon twitter Kathryn bigelow Pta Gertler Spielberg Ryan Kugler Copacabana Sean Mr Buzzing
Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

The Big Picture

10:08 min | 4 months ago

Introducing the Movie Director Game with Sam Esmail

"We have a special sort of conversation. Here we're joined by Mister Robot. Creator the Creator of the film comet The director of Amazon's homecoming. Yes Sam. Esmail saying what's up. Hello how are you? I'm so excited to be here. I'm such a fan. Oh that's very sam. You wanted to play a game with us. I did now. I want to know why you wanted to play that game with us and I also want you to explain the game. Well explaining it okay. I'll let me start by saying I'm a huge film. Learn as I think anybody who listens to the watch probably already gust. And I've always played this game with all my film nerd fans and so I figured one when I started listening to your podcasts. Which obsessed with a huge fan of I figured especially with Amanda Sort of counterpoint? To talk to your thinking Shawn's like I just thought this'll be a fun game to play the game. Basically and again. This is sorry for listeners. Who are not going to be in on this because it's so inside. It's not even that insight. It's but it's it's really not OK okay. I won't apologize here. We go is a good game in and you deserve it. It's the best director per decade and the best director who die who had their debut. That decade does that make sense. Did I explain this? Should we use an example to help people understand it? What's an example that we won't? Won't you trample on the choices that we've made here? Well we look at this decade. We had we had like a number of actually great film. Directors made their debut Jordan. Peele with get ou- Greta Gerwig with Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Man. This favorite with El Camino until nineteen many wonderful. Thanks well actually. Gertler made no thanks. But it's it's it's it's it's. It's good to bring up Vince. As an example because he actually that was his feature directing debut which is all coming up. Now the thing is it's not necessarily not saying what's the best directorial debut? Just the director that we appreciate. The most made that debut made their debut in that decade so I think that there's a couple of semantic complications around now and you know as well as I do that there are student films. Their short film features so. Let's lay the groundwork. Because Vince directed episodes of Britain. He directed the pilot breaking bug which I think was in the prior decade but we're talking feature directorial debut so that seems easy to Parse. It's not as easy to Parse as it seems. Now tell me why well. Are you talking about dual are GonNa be Spielberg is is a particularly complex example? Because of nine or you're talking about nine gallery 'cause that's TV while he made a movie when he was seventeen called firelight for five hundred bucks and is that a film. Is that a feature film even his parents saw. I wouldn't say a featured like a debut meaning. It was released in movie theaters got it. Okay commercially available. Commercially available attack. Those are good ground rules. I'm glad that we established that play into my less later on. I do consider to be because it didn't get released in theaters. Well it is a feature film but it was not this little guy but that is considering his feature debut his first full length movie right what. What's the movie after that? Then Land Express okay all right so yes we'll stick to that okay before we play the game now. The people understand the game I want but just add one other thing the interesting thing about this game and I think will when we go through. We'll see it's where the decades are hard because there's just so many amazing options and where the decades are not A. There's not a lot of options. I just find the conversation around that to be interesting because lanes a little bit about where movies are and where they're doing exactly specifically the nineties which I thought was just a burst of like creative inspirational film makers and then the very decade after the ONS which I struggled I struggled to find. I have some counterpoint to that point but I I wanna use this as an opportunity to pick a bone with you. Oh Wow okay I resent you. I resent your your appearance on this podcast because what I what we need. What this podcast needs is people like you making movies and television shows will but you love movies and you film in a very discreet way. Yes but and I mean I guess we're going to get into it right now. It's gotTa think about think about indie filmmakers. What happened let's say Ryan Kugler? Who Loved Fruitvale? Right mazing what happened to him. After he made fruitvale he went into the machine he went into the machine. And that's what's happening with a lot of these other directors and that. That's the difference between the nineties and now so I think. Pta came out with holiday today. Is he making you know Batman in two years and by the way no not dissing on Batman? I'm excited for When Matt Raises Version of it? Because I'm a fan of his but I think it's just the industry is dictating a lot of what directors are doing now and you know and not to 'em this point that's the machine that we're in right now so and that's more reflective of the decade so t to to get to my TV point. Tv's where you get to make the interesting shit. I don't know if I could have made mister robot as a feature in fact I tried well. That was my fault. Got a little long winded. With how long was that? That forty five. Our film now That feature from I wrote ninety pages of wasn't even into act tune. That's when I realized I was in trouble. Was there a divergent path for you where after comet you could have just doubled down and said I'll stay. I'll continue to stay kind of broke but I'll keep making movies will. Yeah I mean that was the plan I was going to make Mr Buzzing indie feature and got stuck with it and Steve Golan Who You know owns anonymous content who Read the pages of Missouri Button at the time detective had just come out and he just He had just produced. That and I thought women that will this is fucking coal. And I don't need to do anything with this. I don't need to refashion the script that I had in mind and fitted into this to our box and honestly I was just really more. I remember thinking I was way more excited about true detective than I was about anything. Elsa came out there. Trust them into. What are your thoughts on true detective because I have no idea? I don't love thank you. Yeah I think I think I see yes. The first season I think true detective on its face is like a accomplished piece of television filmmaking and also I'm a huge fan of cary Fukunaga always and forever Perhaps not for the same reasons. Assess it to me actually wrap. It was such a turning point. Anything his best thing that he's done. I'm not even going to say Jane Eyre Okay. I haven't I haven't seen that I haven't seen the new Bond movie I but I'm really looking forward to it because I'm also a bond person and also I just you know I think true true detective as this carries best thing. I think that's probably true but my issue with detective is not actually true detective itself. It is the dialogue around your detective. And also I think that's a pivot point in terms of when and how we started evaluating TV in terms of tracking shots and the actual just the athletic like filmmaking as a way to bring the an experience. What is this athletic yet? Flex now and then on twitter people are now saying slaps what what is all? I don't understand that you want to explain the Internet. Let's start with the athletic because Amanda I. I've heard you use a lot and I've I've been on a lot of sets of never heard anyone say the words. I think the first person he was at my friend on the TV critic Philip asking and I think it puts its finger on this idea of money that you bring her up because she wrote this she wrote. It was a harsh. I mean whatever I respect her reviews she dissed my one episode of Mister Robot whereas all one tracking shot. I assume yes is what you mean by athletic because I do think that Filmmaking and TV and everything is more than cameras and more than where the camera is and there is such a absolutely station online. The damore as more aspect of filmmaking and I think that the tracking shot is caption of that and just like. Oh Wow. Did you see what he did. That was so cool. Oh my God. The camera is moving. You know don't you think it but don't you think has a to me every every sort of choice that you make with the camera has an effect and yes to some extent it it takes you out of it and draws attention to itself but to some extent. I really I mean what do you think of the Copacabana Sean? And I and I and I do. Actually I think even tracking protective is effective. But you know we're doing a podcast right now. That isn't essentially about how we talk about. Film and like establishing a Canon of source. And the cannon is so reliant on where do we put the camera and what did they itch on showing us an either. Don't respond to that artistically at some point. I'm just like Yay like fancy camera. Shots you got it. Congratulations to you but I do also think it distracts from the other equally important. I feel making that. Don't get enough credit. I think code is also a specifically athletic is code for Masculinity. You know it's code for this sort of The might of the male filmmaker. Now that's not always true if you watch like strange days for example. Kathryn bigelow is doing a lot with the camera yet. It is unorthodox and cool and might have what would otherwise be deemed kind of masculine energy. But I do think that true detective and largely the dialogue like you're saying was about a lot of dudes being like Yo. This is sick now. Personally I thought it was sick. Oh okay but I I would. I was not a fan of those scripts and I don't think that story is very strong but I thought that was really well

Director Mister Robot Lady Bird Vince Gilligan Amanda Sort Esmail SAM Batman Kathryn Bigelow El Camino Amazon Cary Fukunaga Shawn Gertler PTA Twitter Spielberg Ryan Kugler Mr Buzzing Britain Copacabana Sean
"amanda sort" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

07:04 min | 5 months ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Visit with little close to home games coming up this week I got the Wake Forest here on Wednesday and then the Virginia Cavaliers come in on Saturday to take on the cardinals another nine o'clock game on Wednesday I don't mind of as much Coachella don't have to get up at four o'clock in the morning but but to the nine o'clock he was armed to make for a long a long day away doesn't it does you know I was asking about it on the conference call this morning about you know sleep habits and do you prefer earlier and and R. E. our guys are used to being up yeah but I remember what it was like in college you know nine o'clock I mean they're not thinking about anything by the hand so you know someone they play the game the same times for the phone in four or good I know it's a little bit late for shock people during the week but come on man you can sacrifice a little bit yeah come on yes all all all for great fun your guys have really do seem to have fun with each other we talked before about the commission on the bench alike and we're now just in early February as we said we barely into the second half of the conference season and yet they do seem to be pretty freshen up beat I don't see signs of guys going through an ordeal or grind how do you make sure you can keep it that way well I think it starts with you know what what what your practices are shaped like by the time the season's over we're gonna practice a hundred ten times you know I think today was practice eighty or eighty one and you know by time seasons over that's what you're looking and so as we get into the month of January February and you have the bulk of what you're gonna have into the rest of the year I think you have to be you're really cognizant cognizant of you know your guys bodies how much they've been through how much travel even you've you've gone through and you know being able to be on the practice floor and do what you need to do to improve to prepare for the same time you know not be out there for two and a half hours you know what we get on the front and we're gonna lose on the back and and we want to be a team that's playing very very well marked so it's a fine line the end loudly for coaches do it all different ways but you know that your recovery and then being in the weight room twice a week how so we can maintain our strength is really important practice and conditioning anymore go on essentially year round you really get into some fairly serious practicing as early as September I think and and I think in September you're thinking more charge you kind of planning things out stage by stage to know when you get more yeah I mean okay I get this huge excel spreadsheet out and put all the days and then try to figure out you know where we want to be in terms of how much stuff is in what we want to do introduced to maybe our new commerce as they come in the door as freshmen and at that you know at the same time you bounce and you know what the experience guys already know so there are some work out in the summer that only the freshman of their or your new players and we don't have the older guys come with a they might be there but they're not gonna get that the majority the wraps is your is your sword unveiling your defense of system of play and you know we just keep putting it in stages and and and try to sharpen it as we go along and I think you're always learning about your team and personalities but the biggest goal that I want for our team he is to be excited to come the practice in March and I can tell you you know from past experience is that that's not always the case in the best time of the year the time you can really and do some special things in you know it's it's it's amazing that there are some guys around the country they want to season over there when you first bring in your new players and they usually come in around sometime in may I think it'll take for the for the next coming year the end of may right around the world when you first start working with him how long does it take you to get to know them and and what they like what buttons to push how good they are at comprehending new things that how fast the elegy taken on that one couple months Amanda sort of spit ball and I guess I would you know it it's changed because we have so much more access to our players now than we did ten years ago you know we were so restricted years ago that he really couldn't get a great feeling to you T. started classes in the fall and you are allowed to do a lot more and now we are allowed to do a lot more in the summer so I think that throughout those workouts whether their individual or team driven you learn a lot about guys in the weight room and conditioning where they can follow instructions when they push themselves when they quit early on it's it's it's such a different level hi you know this level from high school and it's amazing and guys usually learn the hard way you know I always get asked you know you say all these good things to recruits to get and they get here and then you have to tell on they're not that good you know now they just have to go to the gym and they get their tails what the name figure out like damn this isn't like high school anymore quick and hopefully they're quick learners are you a fan of summer trips which you could do what every four years or so you can take a summer tour thank not really really I mean I think it's an incredible experience I mean it depends on what you want out of it if you if you if it's basketball and you know you're you're taking your team to like male drill those guys in terms of learning your system and you know we're we're going to develop a style of play in and all that stuff and I'm not a big fan I think you burn guys out and then they get tired of you know taking charges in July and you know it's it's just a long season to begin with but if you're taking in there for an experience and you know you're taking kids to maybe part of the world that they've never seen before we took our our our savior team few years ago few years ago to Rio de Janeiro Brazil and stayed on Copacabana beach for for seven days and play various nice awesome I did that because I I did that as a player with athletes in action and it was something that that I'll never forget and I wanted my players to sort of have that type of experience so you know we visited stadium where they held the World Cup you know it was it was an awesome trip for guys who got to go to the Christ statue you know we went to we played three or four different club teams while we were over there and we never had to leave the merry out right on the beach in on some of these trips you know you take your suitcase you're in one city for two days you when you're gone and you know I don't know sometimes these guys don't have an appreciation for how going to different parts of the world so I wanted to be an experience to remember for the rest of their lives if we do something like that and those are usually great bonding experiences for talented immediately can be yeah yeah all right the next time you go to real I'll be happy to look into it I got yelled at by the travel guide said to danger or the world and I said I know that he said it's right it's a beautiful spot we can afford to go to get to a lot of questions we have for the people here the freezer museum will do that when we come back this is for the basketball from their field I am G. college.

Wake Forest Virginia Cavaliers cardinals
"amanda sort" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:27 min | 5 months ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of calling more witnesses seem to be listening the most closely in the room it is notable that while senators are paying attention far far fewer centers actually seem to be taking copious notes with the exception of those six stand out so we've been talking about all week long Susan Collins is just writing nonstop next two days of senators asking questions of both sides that will begin tomorrow the president's lawyers insist they did nothing wrong in his dealings with Ukraine they accused Democrats of over reaching the forget state to to WBZ newsradio tonight at seven wheel of an hour long special on the impeachment trial Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas says a thousand knows to president trump's proposal for Mideast peace in trump unveiled his long awaited Middle East peace plan standing with Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the White House for the first time in many many decades I can say it will work it's going to work if they do this it will work the plan calls for the creation of a state for Palestinians but they would have to meet requirements Palestinians would get a capital and what the president called eastern Jerusalem but he also insisted Jerusalem will remain Israel's undivided capital Karen Travers ABC news the White House the military is being tight lipped about a crash in Afghanistan the US military is confirmed that it was an Air Force aircraft that crashed in Taliban controlled territory in eastern Afghanistan Monday but not much else is known a military spokesman said the crash is under investigation and there is no information on casualties the spokesman did say there's no indication the aircraft was brought down by enemy fire as has been claimed by the Taliban and Afghan forces were sent to the crash site and were ambushed by the Taliban that is correspondent bills them for the United Nations says Saul of the Iraqi trials of captured ISIS fighters may have been on fair Iraq has tried thousands of cases under its anti terrorism laws but the you and says it has serious concerns about how some of these trials were conducted it says in some cases defendants merely sold food or prepared meals or even acted as human shields for ISIS out of necessity or under coercion there have been allegations of torture during interrogations some of these trials involved foreign defendants from eleven different countries in many cases death sentences were handed down by the services can be McCormick a federal appeals court appearance skeptical as civil rights groups sought to allow legal challenges to the president's ban on travelers from predominately Muslim countries to move forward judges today noting there's already been a twenty eighteen Supreme Court ruling upholding the band the twenty seventeen band Sparta international outcry from advocates who said it was rooted in religious bias the justice department is looking for the fourth US circuit court of appeals to dismiss the lawsuit citing a Supreme Court ruling in a separate case that found the travel ban as a legitimate grounding in national security concerns three forty eight hello Amanda sorted held after being arraigned for murder in the shooting death of a Lawrence man Anderson cruise is charged with gunning down one but he's still my Shia areas in June of twenty eighteen will be back in court next month some of those who survived and those who saw Monday's deadly marina firing northeastern Alabama say they are struggling I'm Jim chrysalis Scottsboro Alabama witnesses to the deadly boat dock fire along the Tennessee River including Valerie more won't soon forget the early morning **** she woken disagreements for help and Schulz so fire all I could see was just a solid sheet of flying.

"amanda sort" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

04:17 min | 5 months ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Eighty KRLD continuing coverage of the impeachment trial it is now one twenty CBS news special report we know that what this is is not about a president pausing aid to Ukraine it's really not about a phone call the president's legal team is more than an hour into its final day of arguments that the Senate impeachment trial there in a brief recess right now for much of the past our attorney Jay secular was had the floor you can view this case in a vacuum you are being asked and I say this with the utmost respect you are being asked to remove an elected duly elected president of the United States what happens once the president's team concludes opening arguments CBS's Steven Portland picks up the story tomorrow it's expected the two sides will begin taking questions from senators query supposed in writing will be read aloud by the Chief Justice this Q. and a period could take two full days then each side will argue whether the Senate should hear witness testimony that key vote is likely to occur on Friday the path after that is uncharted CBS news special report I'm but Michigan next special report coming up at one thirty one and we are streaming the impeachment trial live for you at K. R. L. D. dot com a first of its kind of event is underway in Dallas it's the Texas camp convention Amanda Hughes here's a local cannabis educators she joins us on the KRLD news line and Amanda this is a pretty big deal exciting I think it's one of the largest if not the largest event of its kind certainly in Texas but I think nationwide so far it is that the cold Bailey Hutchinson convention center and they say they're expecting between seven and ten thousand people over the next three days that runs today through Thursday who are the attendees for this event are they from the industry are who are they with just curiosity up into you know industry professionals so you'll have information besides you know dozens and dozens and dozens of Jesse B. deep companies there are vendors exhibitors speakers that are including topics on growing and farming equipment and extraction and legalities and not just state wide but federal there's investment companies and it's stress I think there's something for everyone like I said from just simple people that are just simply curious to people that are making a living this way and help has not been legal in taxes for very long right correct just since last spring actually one of the speakers at this week's convention as state representative Tracy king and he introduced that house bill thirteen twenty five are handled so he's speaking on this week as well as you know the multiple other people I have a few exhibitors and speakers that I'm excited to hear I'm actually really excited to be an attendee so I can give my full attention and sort of pick and choose do events like this Amanda sort of educate the public and let them know one that help and marijuana are not the same thing absolutely and you will hear a lot of crossover discussions because you know in the farming and agricultural world there's a lot of similarities with the potentially to kind of the same plant but they'll be like I know local attorney Chelsea Spencer is speaking on a Texas temple legal panel and that should be real informative for people who are well informed on what our Texas laws are so there I think for sure they're going to learn the difference and and and yes they specifically use the word him because we are in Texas and that is what legal but I think that people will get a lot of exposure to the marijuana and industry and the similarities in the two just to fully understand the difference is Amanda Hughes again the taxes help convention runs through Thursday in Dallas.

CBS
"amanda sort" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on Bigmouth

"One that stands out in the whole album which is quite weird caitlyn go collage but it's beautiful i mean really interesting they constructed recco with all sorts of weight on stick signatures going on in say off the trash paused after you and and it will ended a little bit more protests protests is only gonna put we put together eight playlist of of of that world on big mouth so if at nyu neophytes skin investigation on find out whether it missing lieutenant wilbur quite central to the whole quiet this thing i don't like the sort of like they staked out a place full challenging uncle does musical but also kind of sonically export tree yeah i think i think that's one of those key labels frustrating probably more john the me to be honest but i see them as mute smy kind of love it billows time and i saw siebel like you say i'm the label you could trust me nothing will kind of took electronic music in the nineties in in this way muted in the in eighty eight season late seventies i think for me it was all let's talk about that kind of like fragmentation of music and i when i was a kid at school no goes into will stuff the totally it was all those into i felt anything like that everyone was in the jungle brit pope who is this sort of weird things will quiet light and it was fine i want free credit 'cause that was such a gateway for me for discovering old music yeah 'cause i'm not as cut and uncompromising i've been amanda sort of the the nfl pilots i will say hits on the confirmation on radio won't move this wreck there should be a lot of people out play on the radio and they still found a way of getting of going even further with in in the thing down struck but he's almost kind of a you know a challenge see it as well as a as a as a groove yeah i'm sure people ever allow come start playing that when i was first back to back going into clubs in london and they just wanna wall is this i need to find out and and and dive in reading scott brooch wasn't it yeah and that's that's what i mean sometimes i think some of that stuff is a little slow plight for me like i like my dance music to be quite brutal and freak definitely a does up in a very sexy why is well yeah i think you think there and especially northern label when they appeared in owes the student athletes and these reckless will be sold primarily locally dead excising that you hear in nineties the list from the very familiar town and it is it read a quote by job is cookery other day a which i'm not completely go look sloppy i'm paraphrasing but he said everyone wants to identify this music with sheffield and gone about stadium happens but if some things were bright and you so it sounds like fish and chips with somebody like i would love to be in chino will i mean the brighton labels oughta be fishing chippy in a bit seesaw dealmaking a wall of sound and skins vinegar kind of ended up slightly i kind of candy from i think i think this is from old testing jumpstart these run but i i just i really associated effects were komo on oh i'm john lawrence just like do cars were just won the prize frigerator program about effects and columbus mythology and then which kings new book the locker sending he talks a lot about english postal rumbles of canada and so i i think that's interesting things i've i find about well it sounds british but from all over the place it's it's already like that it's not just a bun music it sounds it sounds like it's from everywhere thinking about komo those closest to the south in that really it's the north of the south you.

"amanda sort" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on KQED Radio

"President of the United States of America. Yes. A spasm of outrage. Just as there was a spasm of outrage. Over the forced separation of children from their parents at the border, just as there were spasms of outrage at conditions in the archipelago of detention facilities and at the president's rhetoric and at the naked racism of cable TV hosts, but like most everything else in the ongoing cruelty of zero tolerance it quickly evaporated replaced by a succession of other grotesque series, literally as we record this. The president is threatening to shut. Down the US government unless he gets five billion dollars for a border wall. And so on our Bogado is an immigration reporter for reveal the news site and podcast from the center for investigative reporting. She's been covering immigration for a decade and doesn't have the luxury of intermittent attention to an ongoing nightmare. Our welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Bob when Jacqueline died, I said to myself, surely this will capture and hold the attention of the press and public surely Americans will go out on the streets and demand an end to cruelty in our name. You didn't think any of those things stadium when I saw this. I was completely horrified. As I think everybody else was. But I did think I wonder how long this will pass particularly given that holidays are coming and people will have something else to pay attention to. I don't wanna discuss politics or policy here. I want to ask you when asylum seekers or other migrants surrender or are caught. What are the conditions? They experience no matter if you turn yourself in at a port of entry or you're apprehended for crossing without authorization. You will be placed into what is called a year later an icebox freezing sell. It's always concrete. Sometimes you just hardly have places to walk in between all of the people that are either sitting down standing up or laying down concrete floors hard benches. No beds, and for some reason cold why cold the may tell you that that's in order to control infectious. Diseases contagion is less likely to spread when it's colder instead of hotter. By the way, contagion is. Less likely to spread when you don't crowd people in inhumane conditions. I often get to see the medical records of both adults and children who have spent time in you. Let us very often. There's swollen lymph nodes which indicates infection. They may be sick before they get their me sick. Once they're already there for a few days. But it's very common that kids are sick. The children are often placed in other jails called Las Pereira's data are probably the images of people are most you do those have the chain link fence, there's sort of a small mattress, they tend to be a little less crowded. However, they sometimes are very very overcrowded and low Pereira, it means dog kennel. These are the words that people use to describe what happens when they cross iceboxes and dog kennels people don't ask if unfamiliar with the word, they're just like, oh, and I was in the let me put me in it goes back and forth. Our tell me about the smells of captivity over and over again further you, let us in particular, people will tell you that they know how long other people have been there because of the way that they smell, you can't bathe. And so what people try to do is they use the little sink water that's attached to the toilet that they just use. And so did everyone else us women have told me about this over and over again, they smell so bad. They develop sores consistent with not having been able to be bathed. Sometimes you do get like little hand, tell people tell me that they're very grateful when that comes you're supposed to get that. Right. When you come in. It's not always the case when you do decide to wipe yourself down. That's another thing. It's. Had to had to wash myself somehow, but it was so cold. The other thing is you get zero privacy. There is no door period. If you're lucky you get a little plastic sheet that opens back and forth. A lot of times people describe not wanting to touch it. Because it's it's got poop on tell me about drugging children earlier this summer. We broke the story of a place called the Shiloh treatments center just outside of Houston. Texans. What happens is children who arrive unaccompanied? And then for some reason where defied to have certain psychiatric issues at the shelter can handle they are then sent to a place called a residential treatment center. In this case. It's called Shyam for Shiloh source had told me about court records that alleged for struggling with Pels and injections without the consent of the child or the parent for me it became important to really track down children. Who were there? I didn't want just the court record with anonymous names it did talk to several children who were there. There was one family in New Orleans who did allow me to spend time with them and to talk to them about what happened to their ten year old, you know, he wound up there because he repeatedly said that he wanted to run away and then he did try to run away. Once he knew that he was in the United States. And he knew that he wanted to be reunited with his mom that was enough his evaluation which found that he needed more professional help them with shelter could provide. He was then sent to Shiloh and forcibly dragged for four months his mom over time. She was able to do video calls with him. And she found him to be just absolutely. What you're describing could be the consequence of medical authorities paying close attention to the psychiatric wellbeing of those in custody or some sort of Soviet warehousing of prisoners under a flimsy pretext of psychiatric issues. Do you have a sense of which of these things is taking place in my non medical professional opinion. I think he really wanted to be with his mom if he had to run away in order to be with her. That's what he was going to do. I can tell you that as I kept digging. I found that the psychiatrist who writes all of these prescriptions and invalid evaluates saw the children. His name is Dr REEs the government had testified that he was board certified to treat adolescents and children. I looked into the record, and I found that although he is fully licensed he actually lost that board certification about ten years ago. You had another story this summer about kids being held in a vacant office building in Phoenix. We got a tip that someone said that they're putting all these kids in this vacant office. And here's a video the first time. I saw the video I was like is this a setup this just looks to unreal. I watched about two or three times. And I want to say I was on a fight out like five in the morning. The next day to Phoenix the children were no longer there. But this neighbor, and I we walked right up to the door. And we saw a medication schedule for one of the children. We saw a box that was labeled baby shampoo, which was consistent with one of the toddlers that we saw being filed into this week in office in the video we moved really quickly to figure out that a private defense contractor called MVM Inc. They've operated in Iraq and Afghanistan one time obey. They are now charged with transporting children. They were holding children in this office overnight. They wouldn't admit to doing so, but. Children had at least spent at least two nights there, if not more we don't know the number of kids that did. So because the company won't tell us I smoked tell us this little boy who I was able to track down, you know, he came with his mom he spent time in the letter with her. And then he was taken away. By a defense contractor, and then he was held in the psych vacant office. He says that people were nice to him there. He got three sandwiches a day. He didn't think it was a bad thing. He knows violence in different way right to him violence isn't necessarily having to sleep on a floor with a whole bunch of teenagers in an unauthorized vacant office. And nobody knows about violence is knowing that some of his friends have been killed by gang members in this totally rural area of what I think that sometimes things are relative to people, right? People are leaving situations for certain reasons as an institution. What is the press just getting wrong here, and we have any responsibility for the public's fluctuating levels VAT, Rick, I can tell you that we absolutely have a responsibility in the Trump era, especially to include the perspectives of. People who are most affected by the policies that we write about we can only do that. When we start to consider that the people who are dying from some of these policies are high level sources, if I have a source who's high up and the government you bet like I am texting them for random things that have nothing to do with immigration check in how they're doing might grab a coffee for in the same town. We sort of are always in touch most of the reporters on my beat have no such sources and the immigrant community. I've heard a lot of times reporters ask a random person at a bus stop that was just released from detention like why did you come to the United States? That's a fair question. I think it betrays the originating reason of why did you leave your country being deeply immersed not just in the national security? Our being well, well immersed in the communities that we write about. That's what's missing. So Finally, I want to come back to something that did not happen at our southern border. But happened in Turkey when a three year old Syrian boy. Alan Kurdi washed up on the beach. He was dead. He was part of an attempted migration into Europe. Fleeing the holocaust in Syria. That did horrified the world. And I wonder if there were a picture of seven-year-old Jacqueline's dead body. Would that spur us out of complacency? A different question to ask is why would it take that? Knowing everything that we know if we listen to people who have sustained these conditions for more than a decade in that doesn't bring us to reconsider what's really happening in the way that we think about people's movement, particularly when fleeing violence sometimes as a result of long term intervention by the United States, the rescue group that NGO that scours the desert for missing loved ones. You know, one of the bodies that they found the volunteers estimate that it was a little child about six years old. And it's just it's just talking with Amanda sort of leaves the screw he just paused. Not unlike you just did. And it's like.

United States President Jacqueline Phoenix Bob reporter Shiloh treatments center Shiloh source Syria Las Pereira New Orleans Europe Pereira America Shiloh Alan Kurdi MVM Inc Turkey Amanda
"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Place the blame. Where it belongs the tone and tenor of all of this starts at the top the president of the United States of America. Yes. A spasm of outrage. Just as there was a spasm of outrage. Over the forced separation of children from their parents at the border, just as there were spasms of outrage at conditions in the archipelago of detention facilities and at the president's rhetoric and at the naked racism of cable TV hosts, but like most everything else in the ongoing cruelty of tolerance it quickly evaporated replaced by a succession of other grotesque series, literally as we record this. The president is threatening to shut. Down the US government unless he gets five billion dollars for a border wall. And so on our Bogado is an immigration reporter for reveal the news site and podcast from the center for investigative reporting. She's been covering immigration for a decade and doesn't have the luxury of intermittent attention to an ongoing nightmare. Our welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Bob when Jacqueline died, I said to myself, surely this will capture and hold the attention of the press and public surely Americans will go out on the streets and demand an end to cruelty in our name. You didn't think any of those things stadium when I saw this. I was completely horrified. As I think everybody else was. But I did think I wonder how long this will pass particularly given that holidays are coming and people will have something else to pay attention to. I don't wanna discuss politics or policy here. I want to ask you when asylum seekers or other migrants surrender or are caught. What are the conditions? They experience no matter if you turn yourself in at a port of entry or you're apprehended for crossing without authorization. You will be placed into what is called later an icebox freezing sell. It's always concrete. Sometimes you just hardly have places to walk in between all of the people that are either sitting down standing up or laying down concrete floors hard benches. No beds. And for some reason cold why cold this VP may tell you that that's in order to control infectious. Diseases contagion is less likely to spread when it's colder instead of hotter. By the way, contagion is less likely to spread when you don't crowd people in inhumane conditions. I often get to see the medical records of those adults and children who has spent time in you. Let us very often there's swollen lymph nodes which indicates infection. They may be sick before they get their name me sick. Once they're already there for a few days. But it's very common that kids are sick. The children are often placed in other jails called Las Pereira's data are probably the images of people are most you Stu those have the chain link fence there's sort of small mattress, they tend to be a little less crowded. However, they sometimes are very very overcrowded and l'opera it means dog kennel. These are the words that people use to describe what happens when they cross iceboxes and dog kennels people. Don't ask familiar with the word. They're just like oh. And I was in the let me put it goes back and forth. Tell me about the smells of captivity over and over again further you, let us in particular, people will tell you that they know how long other people have been there because of the way that they smell, you can't bathe. And so what people try to do is they use the little sink water that's attached to the toilet that they just use. And so did everyone else us women have told me about this over and over again, they smell so bad. They develop sores consistent with not having been able to be bathed. Sometimes you do get like little hand, tell people tell me that they're very grateful on that comes you're supposed to get that. Right. When you come in. That's not always the case when you do decide to wipe yourself down. That's another thing. It's. Had to had to wash myself somehow, but it was so cold. The other thing is you get Sierra privacy. There is no door period. If you're lucky you get a little plastic sheet that opens back and forth a lot of times people describe not wanting to touch it. Because it's it's got poop on it. Tell me about drugging children earlier this summer. We broke the story of a place called the Shiloh treatment center just outside of Houston. Texans. What happens is children who arrive unaccompanied? And then for some reason where. Identified to have certain psychiatric issues at the shelter can handle they are then sent to a place called a residential treatment center. In this case. It's called Shaolin for Shiloh source had told me about court records that alleged for struggling with pills and injections without the consent of the child or the parent for me, it became important to really track down children who were there. I didn't want just the court record with anonymous names it did talk to several children who were there. There was one family in New Orleans who did allow me to spend time with them and to talk to them about what happened to their ten year old, you know, he wound up there because he repeatedly said that he wanted to run away and then he did try to run away. Once he knew that he was the United States. And he knew that he wanted to be reunited with his mom that was enough for a psychiatric evaluation which found that he needed. More professional helped with the shelter could provide. He was then sent to Shiloh and forcibly dragged for four months. His mom over time. She was able to do video calls with him. And she found him to be just absolutely lethargic. What you're describing could be the consequence of medical authorities paying close attention to the wellbeing of those in custody or some sort of Soviet warehousing of prisoners under a flimsy pretext of psychiatric issues. Do you have a sense of which of these things is taking place in my non medical professional opinion. I think he really wanted to be with his mom if he had to run away in order to be with her. That's what he was going to do. I can tell you that as I kept digging. I found that the psychiatrist who writes all of these prescriptions and invite evaluates all the children his name is Dr the government had testified that he was board certified to treat adolescents and children. I looked into the record and I found that although he is fully licensed. He actually lost that board certification about ten years ago. You had another story this summer about kids being held in a vacant office building in Phoenix. We got a tip that someone said that now they're putting all these kids in this vacant office. And here's a video the first time. I saw the video I was like is this a setup this just looks to unreal. I watched about two or three times. And I want to say I was on a flight at like five in the morning. The next day to cenex the children were no longer there. But this neighbor and I walked right up to the door. And we saw a medication schedule for one of the children. We saw a box that was labeled baby shampoo, which was consistent with one of the toddlers that we saw being filed into this week in office in the video we moved really quickly to figure out that a private defense contractor called MVM Inc. They've operated like Iraq and Afghanistan. One time obey. They are now charged with transporting children. They were holding children in this office overnight. They wouldn't admit to doing so, but. Children had at least spent at least two nights there, if not more we don't know the full number of kids that did. So because the company won't tell us I small tell us this little boy who I was able to track down, you know, he came with his mom he spent time in the letter with her. And then he was taken away. By a defense contractor. And then he was held in this like vacant office. He says that people were nice to him there. He got three sandwiches a day. He didn't think it was a bad thing. He knows violence in different way right to him violence isn't necessarily having to sleep on the floor with a whole bunch of teenagers in an unauthorized vacant office. And nobody knows about violence is knowing that some of his friends have been killed by gang members in this totally rural area of what they think that sometimes things are relative to people, right? People are leaving situations for certain reasons as an institution. What is the press just getting wrong here, and we have any responsibility for the public's fluctuating levels VAT ridge. I can tell you that we absolutely have a responsibility in the Trump era, especially to include the perspectives of people who are most affected by the policies that we write about we can only do that. When we start to consider that the people who are dying from some of these policies are high level sources, if I have a source who's high up in the government, you bet I am texting them for random things that have nothing to do with immigration check in how they're doing might grab a coffee for in the same town. We sort of are always in touch most of the reporters on my beat have no such sources and the immigrant community. I've heard a lot of times reporters ask a random person at a bus stop that was just released from detention like why did you come to the United States? That's a fair question. But I think it betrays. The originating reason of why did you leave your country being deeply immersed not just in the national security sources, but being well well immersed in the communities that we write about that's with missing. So Finally, I want to come back to something that did not happen at our southern border. But happened in Turkey when a three year old Syrian boy. Alan Kurdi washed up on the beach. He was dead. He was part of an attempted migration into Europe. Fleeing the holocaust in Syria. That did horrified the world. And I wonder if there were a picture of seven-year-old Jacqueline's dead body. Would that spur us out of our complacency? A different question to ask is why would it take that? Knowing everything that we know if we listen to people who have sustained these conditions for more than a decade in that doesn't bring us to reconsider what's really happening in the way that we think about people's movement, particularly when fleeing violence sometimes as a result of long term intervention by the United States, the rescue group that NGO that scours desert for missing loved ones. One of the bodies that they found the volunteers estimate that it was a little child about six years old. And that's just it's just talking with. Amanda, sort of leads us group. He just paused not unlike you just did. And it's like the bones are so small just so small. So that is who's already dying on the border. I don't know that that seeing the remains will necessarily change.

United States president Jacqueline Bob reporter Shiloh treatment center Syria Europe New Orleans America Shiloh source Las Pereira VP Phoenix Shiloh MVM Inc Turkey Amanda Alan Kurdi Houston
"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:37 min | 1 year ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Place, the blame where it belongs the tone and tenor of all of this starts at the top the president of the United States of America. Yes. A spasm of outrage. Just as there was a spasm of outrage over the forced separation of children from their parents at the border, just as they were spasms of outrage at conditions in the archipelago of detention facilities and at the president's rhetoric and at the naked racism of cable TV hosts, but like most everything else in the ongoing cruelty. Absurd. Pro-tolerance it quickly evaporated replaced by a succession of other grotesque series, literally as we record this. The president is threatening to. Shutdown the US government unless he gets five billion dollars for a border wall. And so on our Bogado is an immigration reporter for reveal the news site and podcast from the center for investigative reporting. She's been covering immigration for a decade and doesn't have the luxury of intermittent attention to an ongoing nightmare. Our welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Bob when Jacqueline died, I said to myself, surely this will capture and hold the attention of the press and public surely Americans will go out on the streets and demand an end to cruelty in our name. You didn't think any of those things did you when I saw this. I was completely horrified. As I think everybody else was. But I did think I wonder how long this will pass particularly given that holidays are coming and people will have something else to pay attention to. I don't wanna discuss politics or policy here. I want to. Ask you when asylum seekers are other migrants surrender or are caught. What are the conditions? They experience now matter if you turn yourself in at a port of entry or you're apprehended for crossing without authorization. You will be placed into what is called a year later an icebox freezing sell. It's always concrete. Sometimes you just hardly have places to walk in between all of the people that are either sitting down standing up or laying down concrete floors hard benches. No beds. And for some reason cold why cold this may tell you that that's in order to control infectious. Diseases contagion is less likely to spread when it's colder instead of hotter. By the way, contagion is less likely to spread when you don't crowd people in inhumane conditions. I often get to see the medical records of those adults and children who has spent time in you. Let us very often. There's swollen lymph nodes which indicates infection. They may be sick before they get there. Once they're already there for a few days. But it's very common that kids are sick. The children are often placed in other jails called Las Pereira's, a data are probably the images of people are most you Stu those have the chain link fence there's sort of a small mattress, they tend to be a little less crowded. However, they sometimes are very very overcrowded and low Pereira, it means dog kennel. These are the words that people use to describe what happens when they cross iceboxes and dog kennels people don't ask if I'm familiar with the word, they're just like, oh, and I was in the lead on I and it goes back and forth. Our tell me about the smells of captivity over and over again further you, let us in particular, people will tell you that they know how long other people have been there because of the way that they smell, you can't bathe. And so what people try to do is they use the little sink water that's attached to the toilet that they just use. And so did everyone else us women have told me about this over and over again, they smell so bad. They develop sores consistent with not having been able to be bathed. Sometimes you do get like little hand, tell people tell me that they're very grateful when that comes you're supposed to get that. Right. When you come in. It's not always the case when you do decide to wipe yourself down. That's another thing. It's. Had to had to wash myself somehow, but it was so cold. The other thing is you get zero privacy. There is no door period. If you're lucky you get a little plastic sheet that opens back and forth a lot of times people describe not wanting to touch it. Because it's it's got poop on it. Tell me about drugging children earlier this summer. We broke the story of a place called the Shiloh treatment center just outside of Houston. Texans. What happens is children who arrived unaccompanied? And then for some reason why. Identified to have certain psychiatric issues at the shelter can handle they are then sent to a place called a residential treatment center. In this case. It's called Shyam for Shiloh source had told me about court records that alleged for strugging with pills and injections without the consent of the child or the parent for me became important to really track down children who were there. I didn't want just the court record with anonymous names it talked to several children were there. There was one family in New Orleans who did allow me to spend time with them and to talk to them about what happened to their ten year old, you know, he wound up there because he repeatedly said that he wanted to run away and then he did try to run away. Once he knew that he was in the United States. And he knew that he wanted to be reunited with his mom that was enough for a psychiatric evaluation which found that he needed. More professional health than with the shelter could provide. He was then sent to Shiloh and forcibly dragged for four months his mom over time. She was able to do video calls with him. And she found him to be just absolutely. What you're describing could be the consequence of medical authorities paying close attention to the wellbeing of those in custody or some sort of Soviet warehousing of prisoners under a flimsy pretext of psychiatric issues. Do you have a sense of which of these things is taking place in my non medical professional opinion. I think he really wanted to be with his mom if he had to run away in order to be with her. That's what he was going to do. I can tell you that as I kept digging. I found that the psychiatrist who writes all of these prescriptions and evaluates all the children. His name is Dr release the government had testified that he was board certified to treat adolescents and children. I looked into the record, and I found that although he is fully licensed he actually lost that board certification about ten years ago. You had another story this summer about. Kids being held in a vacant office building in Phoenix, we got a tip that someone said that now they're putting all these kids and in this vacant office. And here's a video the first time. I saw the video I was like is this a setup this just looks too. Unreal. I watched it about two or three times. And I want to say I was on a fight at like five in the morning. The next day to. Six. The children were no longer there. But this neighbor, and I we watch right up to the door. And we saw a medication schedule for one of the children. We saw a box that was labeled baby shampoo, which was consistent with one of the toddlers that we saw being filed into this week in office in the video we moved really quickly to figure out that a private defense contractor called MVM Inc. They've operated like Iraq and Afghanistan. One time obey. They are now charged with transporting children. They were holding children in this office overnight. They wouldn't admit to doing so but children had at least spent at least two nights there, if not more we don't know the phone number of kids that did. So because the company won't tell us I small tell us this little boy who I was able to track down, you know, he came with his mom he spent time in the letter with her. And then he was taken away. By a defense contractor. And then he was held in this like vacant office. He says that people were nice to him there. He got three sandwiches day. He didn't think it was a bad thing. He knows violence in different way right to him violence isn't necessarily having to sleep on a floor with a whole bunch of teenagers in an unauthorized vacant office. And nobody knows about islands is knowing that some of his friends have been killed by gang members in this totally rural area of what they think that sometimes things are relative to people people are leaving situations for certain reasons as an institution. What is the press just getting wrong here, and we have any responsibility for the public's fluctuating levels VAT, rich, I can tell you that we absolutely have a responsibility in the Trump era, especially to include the perspectives of. People who are most affected by the policies that we write about we can only do that. When we start to consider that the people who are dying from some of these policies are high level sources, if I have a source who's high up, and then government, you bet like I am texting them for random things that have nothing to do with immigration check in how they're doing might grab a coffee for in the same town. We sort of are always in touch most of the reporters on my beat have no such sources and the immigrant community. I've heard a lot of times reporters ask a random person at a bus stop that was just released from detention like why did you come to the United States? That's a fair question. But I think it betrays the originating reason of why did you leave your country being deeply immersed not just in the national security? Sources but being well well immersed in the communities that we write about. That's what's missing. So Finally, I want to come back to something that did not happen at our southern border. But happened in Turkey when a three year old Syrian boy. Alan Kurdi washed up on the beach. He was dead. He was part of an attempted migration into Europe. Fleeing the holocaust in Syria. That did horrified the world. And I wonder if there were a picture of seven-year-old Jacqueline's dead body. Would that spur us out of our complacency? A different question to ask is why would it take that? Knowing everything that we know if we listen to people who have sustained these conditions for more than a decade in that doesn't bring us to reconsider what's really happening in the way that we think about people's movement, particularly when fleeing violence sometimes as a result of long term intervention by the United States, the rescue group that NGO that scours the desert for missing loved ones. You know, one of the bodies they found the volunteers estimate that it was a little child about six years old. And that's just it's just talking with Amanda sort of leaves us group. He just paused not unlike you just did. And it's like the bones are so small just so small. So that is who's already dying on the border. I don't know that that seeing the remains will necessarily.

United States president Jacqueline Bob reporter Shiloh treatment center Shiloh source Syria New Orleans Europe America Las Pereira Phoenix Shiloh Pereira MVM Inc Turkey Amanda Alan Kurdi Houston
"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

12:42 min | 1 year ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Outrage at the border tonight over the death of a seven-year-old girl. I place the blame. Where it belongs the tone and tenor of all of this starts at the top the president of the United States of America. Yes. A spasm of outrage. Just as there was a spasm of outrage. Over the forced separation of children from their parents at the border, just as there were spasms of outrage at conditions in the archipelago of detention facilities and at the president's rhetoric and at the naked racism of cable TV hosts, but like most everything else in the ongoing cruelty. Absurd. Tolerance it quickly evaporated replaced by a succession of other grotesque series, literally as we record this. The president is threatening to shut. Shut down the US government unless he gets five billion dollars for a border wall. And so on. Our Bogado is an immigration reporter for reveal the news site and podcast from the center for investigative reporting. She's been covering immigration for a decade and doesn't have the luxury of intermittent attention to an ongoing nightmare. Our welcome back to the show. Thanks for having me, Bob. Weir Jacqueline died. I said to myself surely this will capture and hold the attention of the press and public surely Americans will go out on the streets and demand an end to cruelty in our name. You didn't think any of those things stadium when I saw this. I was completely horrified. As I think everybody else was. But I did think I wonder how long this will pass particularly given that holidays are coming and people will have something else to pay attention to. I don't wanna discuss politics or policy here. I want to ask you when asylum seekers or other migrants surrender or are caught. What are the conditions? They experience no matter if you turn yourself in at a port of entry or you're apprehended for crossing without authorization. You will be placed into what is called a year later an icebox freezing. So it's always concrete. Sometimes you just hardly have places to walk in between all of the people that are either sitting down standing up or laying down concrete floors hard benches. No beds. And for some reason cold why cold the may tell you that that's in order to control infectious. Diseases contagion is less likely to spread when it's colder instead of hotter. By the way, contagion is less likely to spread when you don't crowd people in inhumane conditions. I often get to see the medical records of those adults and children who has spent time in you. Let us very often there's swollen lymph nodes which indicates infection. They may be sick before they get there. Maybe once they're already there for a few days, but it's very common that kids are sick. The children are often placed in other jails called Las Pereira's data are probably the images of people are most you Stu those have the chain link fence there's sort of a small mattress, they tend to be a little less crowded. However, they sometimes are very very overcrowded and low Pereira, it means dog kennel. These are the words that people use to describe what happens when they cross iceboxes and dog kennels people don't ask if I'm familiar with the word. They're just like, oh, and I was in the letter. Put me in that period. I and it goes back and forth. Tell me about the smells of captivity over and over again further you, let us in particular, people will tell you that they know how long other people have been there because of the way that they smell, you can't bathe. And so what people try to do is they use the little sink water that's attached to the toilet that they just use. And so did everyone else us women have told me about this over and over again, they smell so bad. They develop sores consistent with not having been able to be bathed. Sometimes you do get like little hand, tell people tell me that they're very grateful when that comes you're supposed to get that. Right. When you come in. That's not always the case when you do decide to wipe yourself down. That's another thing. It's. Had to had to wash myself somehow, but it was so cold. The other thing is you get zero privacy. There is no door period. If you're lucky you get a little plastic sheet that opens back and forth. A lot of times people describe not wanting to touch it. Because it's it's got poop on tell me about drugging children earlier this summer. We broke the story of a place called the Shiloh treatment center just outside of Houston. Texas. What happens is children who arrive unaccompanied? And then for some reason, we're identified to have certain psychiatric issues at the shelter can handle they are then sent to a place called a residential treatment center. In this case. It's called for Shiloh source had told me about court records that alleged for struggling with pills and injections without the consent of the child or the parent for me became important to really track down children. Who were there? I didn't want just the court record with anonymous names it talked to several children who were there. There was one family in New Orleans who did allow me to spend time with them and talk to them about what happened to their ten year old, you know, he wound up there because he repeatedly said that he wanted to run away and then he did try to run away. Once he knew that he was in the United States. And he knew that he wanted to be reunited with his mom that was enough for a psychiatric evaluation which found that he needed more professional help than with the shelter could provide. He was then sent to Shiloh and forcibly dragged for four months his mom over time. She was able to do video calls with him. And she found him to be just absolutely lethargic. What you're describing could be the consequence of medical authorities paying close attention to the psychiatric wellbeing of. Those in custody or some sort of Soviet warehousing of prisoners under a flimsy pretext of psychiatric issues. Do you have a sense of which of these things is taking place in my non medical professional opinion. I think he really wanted to be with his mom if he had to run away in order to be with her. That's what he was going to do. I can tell you that as I kept digging. I found that the psychiatrist who writes all these prescriptions and evaluates all the children. His name is Dr. The government had testified that he was board certified to treat adolescents and children. I looked into the record I've found that. Although he is fully licensed he actually lost that board certification about ten years ago. You had another story this summer about kids being held in a vacant office building in Phoenix, we got a tip that someone said that they're putting all these kids in this vacant office. And here's a video the first time. I saw the video I was like is this a setup this just looks too. Unreal. I watched about two or three times. And I want to say I was on a flight at like five in the morning. The next day to Phoenix the children were no longer there. But this neighbor and I walked right up to the door. And we saw a medication schedule for one of the children. We saw a box that was labeled baby shampoo, which was consistent with one of the toddlers that we saw being filed into this week in office in the video we moved really quickly to figure out that a private defense contractor called MVM Inc. They've operated like Iraq and Afghanistan. One time obey. They are now charged with transporting children. They were holding children in this office overnight. They wouldn't admit to doing so but children had of these spent at least two nights there, if not more we don't know the phone number of kids that did. So because the company won't tell us I swapped tell us this little boy who I was able to track down, you know, he came with his mom. He spent time in the letter with her, and then he was taken away. By a defense contractor. And then he was held in this like vacant office. He says that people were nice to him there. He got three sandwiches a day. He didn't think it was a bad thing. He knows violence in different way right to him violence isn't necessarily having to sleep on the floor with a whole bunch of teenagers in an unauthorized vacant office. And nobody knows about violence is knowing that some of his friends have been killed by game members in this totally rural area of what the they think that sometimes things are relative to people people are leaving situations for certain reasons as an institution. What does the press just getting wrong here, and we have any responsibility for the public's fluctuating levels VAT, rich, I can tell you that we absolutely have a responsibility in the Trump era, especially to include the perspectives of. People who are most affected by the policies that we write about we can only do that. When we start to consider that the people who are dying from some of these policies are high level sources, if I have a source who's up in the government, you bet like I am texting them for random things that have nothing to do with immigration check in how they're doing might grab a coffee for in the same town. We sort of are always in touch most of the reporters on my beat have no such sources in the immigrant community. I've heard a lot of times reporters ask a random person at a bus stop that was just released from detention like why did you come to the United States? That's a fair question. But I think betrays the originating reason of why did you leave your country being deeply immersed not just in the national security? Our sister being well, well, immersed in the communities that we write about that's with missing. So Finally, I want to come back to something that did not happen at our southern border. But happened in Turkey when a three year old Syrian boy. Alan Kurdi washed up on the beach. He was dead. He was part of an attempted migration into Europe. Fleeing the holocaust in Syria. That did horrified the world. And I wonder if there were a picture of seven year old Jack Lynne's dead body. Would that spur us out of our complacency? A different question to ask is why would it take that? Knowing everything that we know if we listen to people who have sustained these conditions for more than a decade, and that doesn't bring us to reconsider what's really happening in the way that we think about people's movement, particularly when fleeing violence sometimes as a result of long term intervention by the United States, the rescue group that NGO that scours the desert for missing loved ones. You know, one of the bodies that they found the volunteers estimate that it was a little child about six years old. And that's just it's just talking with Amanda sort of leaves us group. He just paused not unlike you just did. And it's like the bones are so small just all small. So that is who's already dying on the border. I don't know that that seeing the remains will necessarily change anything..

United States president Phoenix reporter Bob Texas Shiloh source Shiloh treatment center Syria Las Pereira Weir Jacqueline Europe New Orleans Pereira America Shiloh Alan Kurdi MVM Inc Jack Lynne
"amanda sort" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

The Fighter And The Kid

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on The Fighter And The Kid

"And then so then i went to send your leg gandhi topi played santa monica know what's like a huge candy ville i'm sure amanda sort of it i don't even kids know it they have like these huge statue seems to be a modern art like huge statues made of candy you have a whole mushroom pool yeah it's pretty cool there's candy for all the kids that's cool it's pretty fun houses klopp all weekend and it's good to see him i wish he'd lived to i know i must look to and you got sick you ate what did you eat everything name something name name a product at giro's oh yeah this the prom the klopp klopp is like me right and keys always on a diet and then i was like dude john died at disneyland you know starts one person who is what he let's do it so cops have big dude and he's always on died i said dude no diet today right kids are here this stuff i'm going to get find healthy food anyway so let's eat whatever i've been pretty strict so i think it makes it worse when i'm straight great and so i just went to not side a truro my son need a water so into the spice like we need to buy something like what are you offer chili cheese dogs i'll take it eight that had chicken tenders had loads of coffee could candy cotton candy more churlish and then by the time prayed came out there's no cinnabon i wish there would've oh you kidding me i'd live for you just crazy if it's dough and sugar you're going crazy you're calling which i haven't been i've been good but then prayed came around and we got the beauty and the beast part of it which we've been waiting two hours for mind you pick sars.

disneyland truro amanda two hours
"amanda sort" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

09:20 min | 2 years ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on Sunday Sitdown with Willie Geist

"Enough. So there were there was a sense that maybe this can have a little bit of a life. Should we though like is that enough of an audience to really warrant, you know, coming on out again and saying, hey, we're here again, and there was a concern about there would be a big, like who cares, which to a certain extent there was there is, but at least there's enough that cares where we're not wasting our time. I'm glad we didn't do the movie because that would have been a big, you know, like, well, we're worth a movie and I think box office results would have been depressing. Well, it's impressive that you had the self awareness to know that most people don't. Well, it's drilled into me. Humility is a deep part of my soul, your planes taking office tired away. Cop told them to keep moving. You talked a little bit about net flicks red envelopes. What's that experience like as an actor to have that level of creativity where you're not agonizing over every half a data point in the demo and all those things you have to worry about it network? Yeah, it's for for the portion of your audience that doesn't understand or care about ratings, basically, you know, usually you need to have x. number of people watching your show to to keep the lights on with net flicks. It's more about pleasing enough of the subscribers to warrant the budget that they're giving you. So it's kind of a a, an apples to apples metric and and that's that's really comforting because it's it all ends up just becoming about the merits like show keeps going because that portion of the audience still likes the show or they hear Moore's coming. So they keep their subscription up today and it's not about checking the overnights and seeing have we. Have did did we build on our lead in drop off after our show? Is there not an which is a correlation to add revenue? And so without getting into the weeds, it's it is great that you can just concentrate on what it is it. You're making four specific people. You're making it four as opposed to constantly trying to get more and more ends so that your ad rates can go hire a couple of experiences with net flicks. Is this the best creative experience you've had in your career? Yeah, the their, their reputation is very, very well earned. You know, they, they have a very light touch without also being a doormat. You know, like there isn't a, there's a healthy level of of indifference in that they deferred to the creatives that they hire, which makes a lot of common sense, but it's surprising how how rare that is they'd let the creatives to the creative work and they do all the other sort of adult stuff that we didn't bat. You know, creatives need like figuring out how to how to market the show and and how to distribute it and and make sure the lights. Town Ozark was for me seeing you in that show. Yeah, knowing you as a great comedic actor watching through arrested development, not good, tough transition. No, I was right there with you because the Bateman of it all was still there, your demeanor and the way you delivered lines, but obviously in completely different and much darker context. When that script came to you, did you think? Yeah, I can pull this off or was that like a little bit of scary departure for you? Well, I mean, it wasn't scary just because I don't take real big comedic swings or big, dramatic swings. I'm I, I really enjoy playing the guy that's us. So in a in a in a drama thriller, I'm the guy running from the guy with the knife and in a comedy on the guy reacting to the person who saying something funny. So my roles kind of stay close to the median. And so targeting between the two is usually not not not much of a big creative challenges is good because I, I've, I've a limited skill set. The Ozark was really a an an attractive thing to me as as a director. I was like, well, this is something with a lot of mood, and you know, would would demand that it be shot and scored and edited and lit in a way that like the films that I love to watch. TV shows that I love to watch. I'm a big David fincher fan or Paul, Thomas Anderson and these guys have very keen visual sense and and really enjoy working with multiple departments to create an environment that fits the content and there's a, there's a sonnet component to that and that visual thing. And and so I thought, well, if they let me direct all these, I'd I'd I'd love to do it and they said yes. And ultimately we couldn't create enough time for me to prep all the up Assode. So I just ended up doing for the ten. But as a executive producer, I get to oversee the whole thing which which kind of satisfies some of some of the same kind of creative challenge. I was looking for, you know you, you know, it's one of those things. I'm sure for you where you think something is good and he puts. Something out there, but you never know how people are going to respond to it. And unlike arrested, which had that sort of slow burn found its audience down the road. This thing was a hit quickly. Well, I mean, I don't. I don't know. I mean, net flicks is not share their data. All it is. It's it's well. You get another season or you don't, but it's in the cultural bloodstream. People talk about it. They watch you perhaps. I mean, again, I don't know. Maybe it's just me then well, but I mean, but but your what your feedback is really valuable to me, like what you hear because you're going to hear people that don't like to show people who don't like to show shut up when they walk by me. You know, I only here for the people who liked their show, so I'm in a hundred percent bubble. And so I have to, I have to kind of bake that into what I'm what I'm thinking about, whether it's it's landing with people. But yeah, I didn't know if it was if it was going to catch on, there's so much good stuff to watch and how you manage to cut through the clutter is is kind of. In the I, I don't know how I mean that flicks being such a powerful company and have has such reach and resources to build kind of a profile that drives kind of a social pressure to to watch something sometimes because of the saturation sometimes with marketing is is really helpful that other companies might not be able to do for you, and we're, we're, we're very grateful that they lend some of that to us and you're going to do a bunch of directing season two as Well. I, I did only the first two of the season. We just finished this the second wrapped. Yeah, last week, anything on it, at least where they are in the third episode. I don't know if that might might be a spoiler. Good. Yeah, no, yeah. People are going to care about that. No, I still make it through Linney makes it through. But yeah, there's there's, there's some bloodshed and there's obviously there's a big esscalation in plod and in steaks. And in that general sense of unsettling. You know domestic, it's it's not a comfortable ride for them there and the writing staff that are really great job at at ramping things up without putting that typical and predictable throttle drop like a second season. We got a stuff's gotta go sideways, it's it's, it's it's a pretty disciplined on and off there, and we don't want you to get desensitized to danger or or violence. And so the really great about now this episodes just going to be about laying some domestic pipe and then the next one, it's it's well. Now we're back with the money and the gun, and I, I don't know how they do that, but I'm lucky to be part of a lot of good people doing a lot of good work there. This is like a parody of doing an interview, New York, rain, reverse lights, beep on the truck, please inside. It's just we don't get to versity and it's this. Yeah. Drink frothy green tea. I like children, so I don't want keep you out here in the rain too long, but arrested development, the first time around two thousand three. When it came, you said along with your wife, Amanda, sort of like rescued you from a place you'd been for a while in the wilderness after huge career as a kid? Yeah. What were those intervening years like from like teen wolf to to arrested development? Yeah, it was a lot of shaving. That's a great deal of hair in that movie, but I got it off. Eventually. I ended up going for. I just went for laser, tired ever come in bed. Yeah, let's take it all off. The days were quiet because work slowed down, not as a result of teen wolf too, but just sort of probably just a natural ebb and flow. I was. I was fortunate to continue working someone enough to pay the bills, but certainly it was a decline as far as relevance access notoriety from from my kind of ten to twenty was was, was active, and then twenty to thirty was quite during the day, but very, very loud at night. I went out and caught up a bit, and that was really, really fun. And then fortunately, Amanda came along at thirty arrested development came along at thirty and it made it very easy to transition out of kind of. Playing and partying and doing all that stuff into. Okay. Now it's time to stop with girlfriends. Go with the wife stop with, you know, just doing

Amanda Assode Moore David fincher Bateman director executive producer Linney New York Thomas Anderson Paul hundred percent
"amanda sort" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"amanda sort" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"And we will make you bar did the radios steering Magna these are walking amongst us spreading his terrible that's where every go is anyone listen this program down a Bosco is there anyone there so is it is it is a well ten this guy that owns I write Johnny Wells him that's a guy's name right that Sam bats that's a guy I've got to get Weddle did on the phone does a Bosh goes your local alas going comic book Steeler behind out behind the counter they have all of these sorts and it is fading and and just an prudent at this time but you make your way to boss goes and just Amanda sorts be Su to you if you're up legal age and you bring the the Scot all for shy Lebeau my saying his name Wright is a Chia shot Shannon Le both Shilo both yeah so you know you were Mack at you were you will not almost at all remember him from his tag along our roles in Transformers in which the very attractive gal and the robots were the only I can be and a movie that was designed to give you know so electric seizure you also may recall him as the perfectly accurate by definition descriptor Bastards son of Indiana Jones in Indiana Jones and the terrible search for the Chris Paul Scott here's what I wonder everything to an apparently is hitchhiking for the sake of arch per The State Of Alaska this is our champs we got Osama Bin lob we got so Dom who say it isn't comfortable and listening audience of the day steer and show to close out the axis of people and bring it this goal shy of the ball I think Phillips is making their way into the studio saying that the FBI is calling asking but I don't advocate for violence Byrd for the actor Shilo both I'm not they're radically amusing air quotes here right now five two two zero seven.

Alaska Osama Bin Indiana Amanda Sam Byrd FBI Phillips Dom Bosco Chris Paul Scott Indiana Jones Mack Wright Lebeau Weddle Johnny Wells