24 Burst results for "Amanda Knox"

"amanda knox" Discussed on There Are No Girls on the Internet

There Are No Girls on the Internet

08:32 min | 9 months ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on There Are No Girls on the Internet

"They can be, I mean, they're already so vulnerable. They deserve they don't deserve this. And I have to, I mean, do you think it's possible to have a different kind of media landscape for exonerees? Where they don't feel like they have to immediately continuously retell this traumatic thing that happened to them or else, you know, maybe the tabloids will make up their own story about what happened, you know? Do you believe in a world where a different kind of landscape is possible for these folks? I mean, sure, I'm trying to invent it along the way. But I think that the thing that I'm sort of experimenting with with my own journalism and my own podcast labyrinth is this sort of more like collaborative experience between the storyteller and their subject because I think that there's been this long-standing perspective that if you are at the center of your own story, you can't have a storyteller's perspective of that story. You can't have authorship over your own story because you're going to be biased or you're going to misrepresent things. And you can't be objective. But first of all, I want to point out that the storyteller is not by definition objective. Just because they aren't personally in the story doesn't mean that by telling the story they aren't putting themselves in the story and they aren't approaching that story from a certain perspective. And it's also totally discrediting the idea that someone who's at the center of their own story might have a valuable perspective about it. Like they might having had felt this human experience firsthand have some interesting human things to say that is worth being a part of the story. So I'm just trying to like convey that, yeah, not all of us are professional storytellers, but professional storytellers can help people tell their own stories. And of course, everyone should be held accountable to the truth, like as long as we're not like making up crazy conspiracy theories to account for non evidence. Evidence still matters in the truth still matters. But it's okay for you to give as a storyteller to offer someone the opportunity to voice their own experience. And that's still a valuable story. Oh, absolutely. You know, we're all experts in our own experiences. And I hate this myth of objectivity that if you're close to a story or it's happening to you or to your community, you couldn't possibly be objective. I feel like it's really at least in journalism. I feel like it's really been used to create a really sexist racist, classist narrative that like, oh, it is straight white men who are objective. Everybody else is just going to be biased. You shouldn't even listen. They're not going to be a reliable source of something that happened to them or their community. And it just really erases the fact that people know what's up with themselves. People know people are giving people the space to be experts in their own experiences and their own stories. And don't pretend that you don't have your own baggage that you're bringing to the story by who being whoever you are. Exactly, you know? So just take ownership like be self aware, like do enough like self auditing to be aware that maybe I might be approaching this story or that story from a certain perspective and let that be like acknowledge that in your own storytelling process and as you are encountering the person because they might be coming from a whole completely new perspective that you don't have access to and if you are automatically defining yourself as the objective party and them as the subjective party, you are automatically making like doing a hierarchy of whose prejudice and who's biased counts more than others. I find it interesting that your story is not often framed as a story of someone who was wrongfully convicted and then exonerated, right? I think there are probably so many people out there who think they know the Amanda Knox story heavy scare quotes, but they probably don't know Meredith purchase name. They probably don't know the name of the Italian prosecutors who like bungled this case. They don't know the name of the actual guilty party. And it just so interesting to me how what you went through obviously was a huge part of your life, but the way that that story is told often, I don't know at the same time denies agency of the actual major players of what happened to your roommate while also giving you this outsized role in that story. It's like, why aren't these other hugely huge major parties of what happened? Why are they not household names? Why are they not the names that are connected to what happened there? Why is it just you? Who actually was kind of a side character and all of that? Yeah, that's one of the things that I've always pushed back against with people is like when you think Amanda Knox, the first thing that you think of is murder, because that's, you know, that's ultimately what it comes down to. Amanda Knox murder. And I have never witnessed a murder. I've never participated in murder. I've never been, you know, the closest I've been to murder is I maybe what could have been murdered that night if I hadn't met Rafael a 5 days earlier and was spending the night at his house. That's my experience of murder. And the fact that that action that horrific action that happened to, first of all, my friend Meredith, who is the victim and people don't remember her. The fact that that action is not actually prescribed to her murderer and instead people think of me when they think of her murder, that just goes to show that it really does matter what you call a thing. And when you call Meredith kercher's murder, the Amanda Knox saga, you are doing a disservice to the truth, because I played no role in that. The Amanda Knox saga for me is I'm on trial for something I didn't do. And now I'm trying to reclaim my life in a world that doesn't want me to reclaim my life. You know? That's my experience. But it drives me crazy that it's so, so often that the person who actually committed this crime is referred to as an afterthought. Like he's either not named at all, he's called the other guy who was accused, you know, whatever. No one cares about that. And to me, that conveys that people don't actually really care about what happened to Meredith. They care about the scandal. And they care about the sexiness that they can project onto the sexy idea is what resonates with people more than the actual human experience. Yeah, and it's impossible to not see all the ways that you've become this character. So either it's like she's weird or she's like a American loudmouth or like a temptress. It's like, you kind of become this thing that this character that anybody can project whatever they want onto and it doesn't like who you actually are as a human who went through something traumatic is just gone on the conversation. Yeah, yeah, and then even when I'm it's found out that I'm innocent and I'm held fully innocent. Again, that mystique of who is Amanda Knox really. It's like, well, here's an idea. I have a podcast where I talk really openly about all my ideas and all my experiences. Have you considered listening to that? No, no, of course not because then Amanda is actually authoring her own experience. We want to talk about her. We don't actually want to talk to her. And it's just like, I mean, you aren't, obviously, you're talking to me. And I greatly appreciate that because honestly, like, what a freaking gift in the world to just talk to another human being like a real person. Like I can't tell you enough how much it means to me that you reach out to me and say, I actually care about what your experience is..

Amanda Knox Meredith Meredith kercher Rafael Amanda
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"It's actually a kind of collection of you just poetry? Oh, oh, Chris does poetry. He's literally a writer. He's lit like two master degrees in poetry kind of guy. In our courtship, would be reciting poems to me. That's how it worked. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I just forgot. No, it's cool. It's cool. You didn't know. Why would you know? Yeah, no, so we're big poetry nerds. He above all is a huge poetry nerd and is constantly finding wonderful opportunities to share poetry with me. And he's not much of a singer, so with our daughter, I do a bunch of singing at her. He recites her poetry. All of that, I love that. As I told you earlier, I'm really interested in this field of post traumatic growth. So I kind of want to leave with a question for you. Rabbi Harold Kushner when he was reflecting on the death of his son, he said, quote, I am a more sensitive person, a more effective pastor, a more sympathetic counselor because of Aaron's life and death than I would ever have been without it. And I would give up all those gains in a second if I could have my son back. If I could choose, I would forgo all the spiritual growth and depth, which is called my way because of our experiences. But I can not choose. So one can always think in the multiverse thought experiment, what would Amanda Knox what would it be to who would she be today if this experience didn't happen with her? But you can't choose that and you'll never know. So moving forward, what are some of the areas of growth that you're most excited about and that you think generally came about that wouldn't have come about if this didn't happen to you? That thank you for asking that and gosh. That makes me so sad. Also because it's like I'm a new parent. So I'm like newly appreciating the depths of that sadness. I'm really doing a great job making progress. You are, you're just like picking all the money. Yeah, so I think that my greatest I mean, even just becoming more attuned to the suffering of others, is something that I don't know that I had a good grasp on before all of this because honestly I before everything happened in Italy, I lived a very, very blessed life. I did not have difficulties. My family was very close and very supportive. I had everything, everything going for me. And I don't think I really understood the depths of loss and despair that human beings are capable of and routinely experience. And so it gave me a lot of compassion for people who experienced that and especially for people who experienced that in a very public way. And have that sort of extra dimension of suffering put on them by people perceiving them as and judging them while they are experiencing the worst experience of their lives. So that that is something that I have a new sort of ingrained radar for and perspective on that I have found to be not just useful for myself but also useful for people who reach out to me and feel really alone and isolated. There's like a special special suffering when it comes to people who are not only experiencing tragedy or loss or trauma, but are being judged very publicly in the process. So that's actually a really good point. Does this experience make you a little bit more skeptical when some people are tried in the court of public opinion? So when everyone else is jumping on someone, does it make you more sensitive to 100% and I hate the idea like it really bugs me out the idea that some quality about yourself that you can not control somehow makes it so that you aren't suffering. What are we talking about? Like, no, everyone who is being judged for some dramatic thing is suffering. And period. So I don't know. It also, when people say things like, oh, cancel culture isn't real. I'm like, no, it is. People are constantly trying to sort of pin down people for like one either real or imagined transgression and like define that person entirely by that thing and delete them, like literally cancel them, so I don't know. I feel like judgment in the public's square is not treated with the amount of weight that it actually carries on the person who experiences it. Pile on culture is really real. And mob justice is often devoid of due process and proportional sentencing. And these are all reasons why we have a criminal justice system in the first place and don't just deal with transgressors out in the open. There's a reason for that. And so yeah, I am a firm believer that we should have we should be way more cautious about the court of public opinion and have a lot more skepticism towards it. Yeah, I very much agree. Well, it looks to me like the gestalt media narrative around you is changing. There seems to be something in the air, you know, the Rogan appearance. If The New York Times profile, in our conversation today, my goal was quite simply for you to just show who you are. Just to show who you are. I didn't have to do anything. You are who you are, and I wanted people to see that. Thanks. And well, thank you. You strike me as someone who's very, very deeply empathetic and I would even say a poetic soul. I feel like you have a poetic soul, right? Is that resonate with you? Yeah, totally it does. And the way that I interpret that is I feel like I see a lot of beauty, even in the stuff that hurts. Which is what I feel like a poet is constantly doing is finding the beauty in the pain. And not reveling in it, but just like acknowledging it. I feel like acknowledging is a really important part of my life now. Yeah, so Viktor frankl called that tragic optimism. It's finding the beauty and meaning in tragedy. Thank you so much for coming to my podcast today, man. And I hope you feel like you were seen. I hope you feel seen. I totally feel seen today. Thank you very much. And you've given me a lot to think about. So I'll do that. I'll send you some follow-up nerdy papers and things. What I talked about today..

Rabbi Harold Kushner Amanda Knox Aaron Chris Italy trauma Rogan The New York Times Viktor frankl
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:14 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Because, again, when I think back to my prosecutor, I was never satisfied with the idea that, oh, this is happening to me just because bad people are doing bad things to me. No, that's not what was happening. It was more complicated than that. And so I had to take into consideration, well, is there a kind of confirmation bias happening here when the evidence finally came in that showed that it was Rudy gaday and not me? Was there a conservativism bias where they had made an already assumption about what the case was and they were only willing to tweak it just enough to accommodate a new set of information, but not to contradict their previous theory of the case. Like there are so many ways that even just the perception of me as a human being can be best explained like this ongoing perception of me as like a guilty person is due to the anchoring bias, the fact that PEEP the first piece of information that people have ever heard about me was that I was a guilty of a terrible crime. And so even when new evidence has come forth, revealing that not to be the case, people are biased towards the first thing that they ever heard. And that explains a lot of the why of my experience. It doesn't really explain how to get out of it, but at least I have a better understanding of the human psychology behind. My experience, yeah. Like I said, it's like you got a PhD in psychology through this whole situation. To your referring your prescribed referring to giuliano giuliano menini. Come on, Scott. You used to sing Italian opera. You can do better than that. You actually did it really well. Most people are like, Juliana. What if I sing it if I sing it, I'll do a better job? Yeah. My take of this cat from watching the Netflix documentary is that he sees himself as the modern day Sherlock Holmes. You know, he's like, you know, he just had build up in his mind, this whole I'm going to be the savior of the world. This goes to your point you said earlier, you know, people that do bad things don't think in their head. Oh, I'm doing a bad thing. They think mostly, it's usually I'm doing something for the greater good. But there's a profound narcissism associated with a lot of those instances because you think in your head that you and only you are going to save the world and that leads to hubris. And that leads to overconfidence. And that leaves the subjectivity. Yes. Which is what happened a lot of the kazoom. In your case, right? Yes, absolutely. But is there any chance for a reconciliation with him or? Well, that's an intriguing question because it is something that I have been contemplating and pursuing for a long time. I can't say much about it, but just because it's an ongoing project. But it is something that is deeply important to me. The idea that I can basically confront my accuser and do so in a way that would be not antagonistic, but restorative. Well, good. I really look forward to hearing something about that. Thanks, yeah. Good for you for I'd like to see you. You talked to Rudy someday. Yeah. Incredible. That would also be a very interesting experience. And I'm not very emotional in terms of the lens. Yeah. Yeah. It's not ready for that one. Yeah, I feel like I need a little more time for that one. Yeah. Absolutely. We're not gonna be like, no, we're bringing out. Itchy L drawer. Let's talk about ETL drawer. Love ETL drawer. Yes. I know, I know. And I want to thank you so much for bringing to my attention these amazing amazing researchers. So because you got me down rabbit holes, I was like, oh, wow, their forensic science literature has some really serious problems. Problems. Yeah. He said, I just want to quote something ETL said, which I completely agree with. He said, there isn't a psychologist on this planet. He's referring to cognitive psychologists, which is what I am. There isn't a cognitive psychology on this plan or any other planet who can come and say that judgment perception or objective. It's one of the most basic cornerstones of psychology. Yet the more you start to look into the literature, you realize just how much how many of these techniques even fingerprint analysis have never actually been scientifically validated. They've been used for over a hundred years, right? So my gosh, that's insane, right? That we assume that all these techniques are just completely objective and they don't involve bias when it turns out they very much do, and should we talk about one of the seminal studies that he conducted along those lines where he showed that fingerprint analysts when given anonymous prints from cases they themselves analyzed ten years or so ago, they were asked to judge those same prints as a match or not. And when they were told that the suspect confessed, the results of their analysis often was in the opposite direction of what they themselves had said about this very prince when they first analyzed them. That's shocking. Yes. I hope that everyone followed that. So DNA or fingerprint expert did a study many years ago, determined match or not match, then many, many years later, was confronted with the very same prince and came up with a very different result based upon being told that the person had confessed to the crime. So it's like and this is why Sal Cass's work is so important. Important because whether or not a person confesses is so, so biasing to people. People just can't wrap their minds around an innocent person confessing to a crime, so they assume that that person now must be guilty and even scientific experts are unable to separate their now bias in their own objective looks at physical evidence. And so that's why etail proposes a solution, which is linear sequential screening, or unmask, sorry, linear sequential, unmasking, where you only tell forensic experts as much information as they need to know in order to do their job. The fingerprint expert doesn't need to know whether or not the suspect confessed or not in order to determine whether or not a fingerprint is a match. So just don't give them that biasing information. It's that simple. Yeah, I mean, studies show possible error rates of one to 4% in fingerprint analysis there is an 10% or more in paint fiber and body fluid analysis alone. And then the more I dig into this, the more I realize all the problems with this. So this is a one chord I came across. You don't tell the crime lab scientists doing the DNA, for example, what the suspect's DNA profile looks like until they've extracted the DNA from the evidence profile for the victim first. I mean, it's like, right? You hear that you're like, of course. And yet, that's not what the practice is. Not with a practice. When teeny said that, when tiny, this kind of methodology also helps eliminate unwitting or unconscious bias towards linking evidence to a suspect. So there's so many things that bring in subjectivity into this. And these are real lives that we're talking about. Yeah, and they're being wrongful. And I think that it's important to note that, again, it's an unconscious bias that's impacting these these experts and these detectives, they're not knowingly and willingly making their lives easier and coming up with matches to the fingerprints because they heard someone confess, that just information unconsciously biased them to seeing results objective results very differently. And as a result, it is very, very important to not to acknowledge that that's just the case. It's not saying some kind of moral question about a forensic expert. It's just simply this is a human problem. This is not a you or me problem. It's a human problem. And actually, are you familiar with the psychopath test by John ronson? I mean, I'm sure you have well. So absolutely. So yeah, so one of the co authors of the psychopath test is one of my co authors on our late try on paper. Oh, great, yeah. He came over. He came over to the light side. Yeah, one of my favorite jokes from that book is John ronson said. As soon as I heard about confirmation bias, I started to see it everywhere. Yeah. So good. Yeah. It's also true. And it's so so true. And motivated reasoning, you see motivated reasoning so much, there's a whole line of research I'm writing an article right now for the Atlantic about this on moral tribalism and group narcissism and the extent to which we overlook the moral transgressions of people we see in our in group. But if we have perceived them as being in our out group, we will, in ambiguous information, we'll see mortal transgressions. Absolutely. So this is very important stuff. Very important stuff. Do you still write poetry? Is that still in you? So I have the most recent poetry that I have out in the world is a book of poems called the cardio tesseract that me and my husband wrote together..

Rudy gaday giuliano giuliano menini Juliana Sherlock Holmes Sal Cass Netflix Rudy Scott John ronson teeny
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"With more of an inner presence that doesn't need to be validated by others. Where you don't lead with uncertainty about yourself, but you lead with your authenticity that you always go high on, the more you can just lead with your authenticity. The less you'll feel these vulnerable narcissistic characteristics. Does that make sense? Yeah, no, that's actually really great. And I think that that does ring very true to me. I mean, I'm almost like getting sad. There's hope here, but I'm saying there's hope. Yeah. A thing she's been grappling with ever since this Italy trauma has been. It's just something I think we talked about with LeVar Burton, actually. And that season one episode of labyrinth that Amanda worries that the most notable thing about her forever will be a thing that didn't that she didn't do and that happened to her. And it's a most people don't have the opportunity to deal with that strange circumstance where the whole world associates your name and your identity and who you are and why you matter with this thing that has nothing to do with you. And she often wonders, will I ever contribute to the world in any way that will matter more? And that will have an impact more than this other thing that is not of me. And but I have a radical I have a radical suggestion and this may sound like I've just slipped into Oprah mode, but I have a radical radical suggestion. Had it ever occurred to you that in this precise moment you're enough. No. Like, that's it. Yeah. I do feel like your truth secret entertained that hypothesis for a second. You know, like, maybe this precise moment. It's like, oh wait. Everything else is just gravy from here. Yeah, I'll try that. I'll do a meditation on that today. Thanks. Awesome. Awesome. So Chris, thanks so much for joining us for this. Yeah. Do you have a mandate you have? I appreciate that man. Do you have a do you have another ten, 15 minutes to talk about cognitive bias? I want to be really respectful of yours. Yeah, yeah. I'm gonna hop out and attend to baby. Oh, is she awake? Well, I'm just cool. Oh, okay. Nice to talk to you. Thank you, Chris. Most talking to. Didn't expect to go off in that direction, but I'm actually glad I'm glad it did. No, I appreciate it too. Because I feel like are you okay? Yeah, yeah. I'm okay. This is like an ongoing conversation between me and Chris, because I've often been somewhat astounded by how confident he is in himself in the sense that this sort of things that would get me down. He's just like, well, I know that I'm a good writer. And I know that I'm like this that or the other. So I don't have to worry about whether or not the world is acknowledging that I am or not. And I struggle with that more where I feel like I have to prove myself constantly and I'm not giving myself as much space to just prove myself to myself. Yeah. Yeah, no, I hear you, but a lot of feeling will come from feeling whole inner inner wise. Great. Well, so you've been really interested in cognitive bias. And you learned a whole lesson. Now, you really wrote a nerdy blog post that you could probably submit to a scientific journal. With this bias, I mean, you give, did you hear Mike chat with kahneman on this podcast and by any chance? Have you ever listened to that one yet? Obviously, one of the cofounders leading researchers of the cognitive bias literature. But you had new ones that I had never seen before. Well, I've gone down the rabbit hole. Well, I appreciate you're in a safe nerdy space here. You're welcome. So you look, I thought this was really interesting. You literally coined a new bias that I think is really a good one and it's called the single victim fallacy. Can you talk a little bit about what that is? Because I think people's minds because it's almost dawn on people that can be multiple victims. Yeah, yeah. Well, and I think that just arises from these black and white narratives. But what I observed in my own experience was this false notion that if Meredith, the young woman who was raped and murdered is a victim, then anyone else who is within the vicinity of the story can not be a victim. And similarly, like if people say, well, Amanda's a victim, people have treated this case as if I'm not a real victim that there's a real victim, and then there is me. And I wanted to point out, just because Meredith was the original victim in this case, doesn't mean that there couldn't be other people who are victimized from this story. And I wanted to point out this black and white thinking process where it's like there seems to be this sort of zero sum bias that if there is if there's victimization on my part that that somehow takes away from the victimization on Meredith's part. And I want to point out, that's absolutely not true. But I continually have that thrown at me constantly by people online who say like any time that I am asserting my how I have been victimized, I am somehow diminishing the victimization of Meredith. And I push back against that constantly and I, to the point that I felt like I had to define a whole new bias about it. And I think that that happens a lot in wrongful conviction cases, where there is this tendency for people to say, well, because the family of the original victim needs closure, we can not explore the victimization of someone who has been accused. Yeah. There's such a horrible paradox here that Saul calls cast and has pointed out. And that's that being innocent, literally just being actually can put you in increased risk of not being seen as innocent. You know, you even making this point some British tabloids will be like, oh, defensive defensive Amanda. You almost can't win. It's like, what am I not supposed to defend my innocence? I should just shut up. What's the alternative here? You know, that I just shut up. So yeah, that's tough. Yeah. Are you familiar? Do you know sarcasm? Because I know him personally. And he reached out to you when you were in jail. Yeah, yeah. He's a really great guy. And has done a tremendous amount to help me with to process my experience because what goes on in interrogation rooms was completely foreign to me. And he very much after sort of hearing me out what I what I experience shared his research with me and I was just blown away. So anyway. Well, thanks for telling me about his work because I read some of his papers, found really interesting this paper he wrote on the psychology of confessions does innocence put innocents at risk. He said, recent recent research suggests that actual innocence does not protect people across a sequence of pivotal decisions. In pre interrogation interviews, investigators commit false positive errors, presuming innocent suspects guilty. Naively believing in the transparency of their innocence, innocent suspects, wave their rights. This is hard to say because there's a lot of innocent innocence. Despite her because of their denials, innocent suspects, illicit highly confrontational interrogations. This looks like textbook command and knocks, right? All Eva. Yeah. So grateful for his work. So tell me about your keynote that you did the American psychology and law conference. Oh, I mean, I am interested in how the question of why these things happen. And so when I'm invited to give a talk about this experience, I often will ask people like, well, what about what about this experience actually interests you? And looking at this, I was really happy to go to the psychology and law conference because I this is the part about wrongful convictions that I am most keen on. Why do first of all, innocent people end up in this process and how are these institutions sort of built not to not like Sal Cass's research shows that there are lots of ways that innocent people are simply not accounted for in the interrogation room where like if you make if someone accuses you of something and you say, no, no, that's not, that's not what I saw what I did, like the assumption is, oh, you're a guilty person who's lying. And not that you're an actually innocent person. And so the ways that those course of interrogation techniques, which are very, very effective at getting guilty people to confess to crimes, they're also very effective at getting innocent people to confess to crimes. But beyond that, I'm also interested in not just the psychology of the innocent person, but the psychology of the prosecutor and the detective and why it is that they end up honing in on the wrong person, not out of a sense of outright evil or corruption, but out of a sense of human fallacy. Because, again, when I think back to my prosecutor, I was never satisfied with the idea that, oh, this is happening to me just because bad people are doing.

Meredith Chris Amanda Mike chat LeVar Burton kahneman Oprah Italy Saul Sal Cass Eva
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

08:55 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"So big fan I mean, even the talking about the Nazis from a moment ago, like the whole question of, well, if that Nazi prison guard would happen to be born in Argentina instead of Germany, would he have become that guy? You know, I'm probably not, right? Yeah. How much does external twists of fate determine what our moral path is in life? And when you take that into account, especially neither of us believe in free will is another side of this when you get rid of all conversation, right? Then moral responsibility seems to go out the window in one light, but by the other light, no one's really, no one's really morally culpable because you're just the little meat robot doing what you were programmed to do. Or through the vicis of quantum fluctuations, right? Either way, it's hard to blame people and hate them for their actions. It actually leads to compassion, I think. Yeah, I hear you. I don't know if we want to open that camera. That's a four hour two part. I highly recommend I wish I was listed in my two part series with Sam Harris where we vehemently disagree about this. That's interesting. Yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah. However, I read something in one of your blog posts I think is illustrates your own sense of compassion even for Rudy. So you had said that what you're angry about is that he just won't admit and save a lot of people out of heartache and uncertainty and just that he just won't admit that he killed Merida. However, you say, I doubt he ever will, but if the day he does, I will celebrate his rehabilitation and wish him the best on a new and honest chapter of his life. Yeah. I thought that was interesting. I thought that kind of speaks maybe a little bit to your instincts there for not defining anyone by their worst case, even Rudy. Yeah, yeah, and I stand by that because I think the thing that anyone who has experienced harm most wants from the person who harmed them is an acknowledgment of the harm, because at that point, I can say, all right, we at least are on the same page that what happened was shouldn't have happened and that I have been harmed and that you are not sort of pretending that that harm doesn't exist or that what you did didn't cause direct harm to me. Because when someone doesn't like admit to the harm that they've caused, it makes the person who has been harmed, feel, first of all, like they're being blamed for their own harm, but also it makes them feel unsafe. Like, oh, if you don't acknowledge what you've done, are you gonna do it again? If you didn't do anything wrong, well then who's to say whether or not you're gonna do it again? And so that's the sort of key thing for me. Like people make mistakes and do horrible things all the time, that doesn't mean that it defines them, but what does matter from a trauma standpoint is the acknowledgment of the harm and of the action that caused the harm? Yeah, I truly wish Rudy would do this someday. Yeah. Okay, so back to your dark triad score. So you score very, very low in psychopathy as I already mentioned, which is callousness and cynicism and then machiavellianism you scored very, very well, which is strategic exploitation and deceit. You know, everyone knows the machiavellian person. They're always scheming, right? They're always like, everyone knows that person. Every time you talk to them, they're like, oh, you know, if we move that just part and then we get this out of that person. Right. So you scored very well in that. That's not who you are, according to my test. However, yes. However, this is the most perhaps the most. We've been waiting. I saved this one for last because I suspected this is maybe where you two disagree. Your narcissism score was above average. It was above it now. It wasn't a 100%. It was approaching 60%, but it was greater than average by 12.45% to be precise. Yeah. Now, what do you two think of that? So I think that I because of how much my life has been because I've been accused of things that I didn't do, I potentially have become someone who has been deeply invested in my sense of self. And I worry then that has my narcissism been pushed up by as a sort of trauma response as a kind of like shield response to something, and I do worry about that. Now, Chris, so I want to hear what Chris has to say about this. I think she's one of the most selfless generous people I know, right? Yeah. And I think one of the issues with any sort of self reported test is you have your own cognitive blind spots towards your own behavior, tendencies to inflate good qualities or diminish bad qualities, et cetera, but also there's things like impostor syndrome. He thinks I have impostors. I think Amanda has a deep case of impostor syndrome. And that I think she has a big difficulty seeing her deeply positive traits actually. And if you were to look at the DMs that come in of people saying, wow, you're such an inspiration to me like Amanda reads those and she's like, no, I'm not. You know, she doesn't she doesn't believe that. Even though even if thousands of people are saying, wow, you're so strong and you really helped me change my life. That she doesn't believe that. She doesn't have that self belief. So the idea that she's narcissistic and thinks that she's a savior for people. It's not the manda I see. And I'm actually one of the you know it's better than we do. What are the questions? Well, I certainly can't reveal that. Oh, right. Right. Because that's actually telling the IQ test items. Okay. But there's an interesting link here between that I'm going to send you an article everyone scientific American on the link between a particular kind of narcissism and impostor syndrome. It's not the kind of narcis that most people are aware of, but it's one that I've conducted research for the past decade about. And I've been trying to increase awareness about because it's the one that's mostly linked to psychopathology. And that's called vulnerable narcissism. Now, it makes me think now I want to give you my vulnerable narcissism. But vulnerable narcissists, so most people when they think of nurse and they think of the grandiose narcissist, which is chest thumping, extroverted. Trump, okay, right? Because stereotypical stereotypical I'm great, right? The person that screams I'm great. But and this is something that my own healing process. So this is a very human thing. I'm not, I don't believe in separating narcissism not narcis I think we're all have narcis tendencies. But a lot of people who have gone through trauma develop and we found this we've published papers showing that an early childhood trauma and violation of expectations lead to a vulnerable kind of narcissism where the person feels shame all the time. But at the very so shame is the number one marker of it. And we found we were the first ones to publish a paper showing the linkage to impostor syndrome. So I'm actually going to send you the I'll send you that scientific note to send you that scientific American paper. And that makes me the idea that people are saying bad things or doing things to you and you think, oh, they're doing it because it's me and they think I'm a bad person and you're like, no, they're just, they're just doing their thing and it has nothing to do with you. And so you are being a little bit of a narcissist by thinking that people are being bad to you for whatever reason. It's a smoke and fire thing a bit, I think, when the whole world tells you for years on end that you're an evil monster, right? I think it's hard for anybody to not go, is there anything there, you know? Or and also, but I think it's totally true that I'm guilty of this where I when people are out in the world and I notice that they recognize me. I think are they talking to me because they've heard of this horrible story about me, or they or they just talking to me because I'm happen to be getting mushrooms at the grocery store next to them grabbing a cucumber. I do worry about that. So this is exactly what I helped my clients with. So I feel like do I slip into psychotherapy mode all of a sudden. But can I give you some advice, just to help you with your healing if I can in any way? The number one point of why voltage is at the root of the narcissism is an uncertain self esteem. There's literally literally there's an entire handbook called the handbook of uncertain self esteem. Okay. There's a whole research field on this. I suspect that's what you're plagued with. And if you could find a way of grounding yourself more with self compassion exercises, I love Sharon Salzburg's loving kindness meditations. If you.

Rudy narcis Sam Harris trauma response Merida Argentina Amanda impostor syndrome Chris Germany Sharon Salzburg
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Be released now. Exactly. Yeah, that's the reasonable assumption that's the reasonable assumption. Yeah, I watched an interview that was done with him where he said he first was attracted to you and then Meredith was kind of like the backup thing. So I know, I know. And he obviously he had talked to me before. Do you reckon he was there that day because of Meredith, or he just thought it might have been an empty house? I think that he probably thought it was an empty house. That's what I'm thinking too. It was the holiday weekend. It was understood that I didn't know this, but apparently the day of the dead the day after Halloween is a very common time for Italian people to go and visit their families and spend time with their families. I didn't know that. But that was the reason why so many of my Italian roommates were gone. And I had just happened to be spending the night over at my new, very new boyfriend's house who I knew of several days. And so I think that he went in there to because he knew the house. He had seen it before. He was looking to break and enter and get some money, that kind of thing. Okay. So let's get a little bit of a picture of Amanda Knox before this tragedy happened. So you wrote, you were a nerdy poetry and language student. You, correct me if all these things I'm saying are wrong, you were a non drinker and non smoker, your favorite pursuits include yoga and quote backpacking long distances with people I know. Your favorite films were Shrek and the full Monty and you like The Beatles and reading Harry Potter books. This is all correct. Yeah, the only thing that I would say is I was an occasional drinker and an occasional smoker at the time. But I was not heavy in either of those situations. But I don't think I was ever a non drinker or you know I went to parties. I went and had drinks with people, but I was not strict about. It wasn't out of control nor was I strict about never having it. Well, that's what you roll your MySpace page probably when you're like 14. Well, yes. MySpace who was a while ago, yeah, yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. Exactly. Okay, so I get this picture of a young child, young girl who was just really curious about the world really innocent in a way. I sense a sort of innocence to you know sort of like Naya to have a D, how do you say it? Yeah, yeah. Naivete. Yeah. I think that would be accurate. I was the kind of person who really did well in school, never really got into trouble was I worked a number of jobs to save up money. I was a soccer coach for a young girls team and I was also very romantically and sexually inexperienced, so I was definitely like a late bloomer kind of dorky musical theater ren fair kind of individual. We're a musical theater. Oh, I love you. I was an opponent. You were. Me too. That is so I was a voicemail that Carnegie Mellon, my dream was to be javert and Les mis. That is amazing. I love opera and I don't have the voice for it, but man, so much respect. You could. You could have. You could be trained. I think anyone can be trained honestly. Do you ever sing anymore? I do. I do. Awesome. And I try to take lessons every now and then sometimes I even record something just with this microphone and karaoke music from stars from lamest in the background. I posted on my Twitter before. Cool. Yeah, I was inquire, so it's definitely not opera, but I was inquire and I love doing musical theater. Right on right on. You know, my heart really breaks in so many ways for the story, but one way is that I really can resonate with studying abroad. When I was about 24 25 I went over to England to Cambridge and I remember I just remember that what it was like. I remember everyone awkwardly having sex with each other. Everyone drinking, we're all away from home for the first time. They're really isn't innocence there. The last thing you would ever imagine, people say things like, well, why wasn't she more affected outside why is she kissing? Look, it's not like the first thing you assume. You know, in your worldview, you know, your worldview was literally a psychologist called a seismic earthquake. That's what they call it in the post traumatic growth literature, which is working on my next book on post traumatic growth. So this topic is really fun and center in my mind right now. And there's a whole summit of world theory that I think might really interest you if you want to. Tell me more about the seismic eruption. Earthquakes. Yes. Yeah, it's tied to this idea of a summit world theory where we have these traumas and I like to define trauma very broadly as anything any event because who am I to say, oh that counts the trauma or that doesn't count as a trauma, right? Like who am I to say that? In a lot of ways traumas in the eye of the beholder. And any event that causes this complete cognitive restructuring of, oh, I thought the world was safe. Yeah. We're basically you're a basic assumptions of the world are violated. And this happened to you in a span of an hour. Yes. You know? And the people are like, oh, why didn't she act more normal? Like there's any normal way to act when your entire assumptive world has been violated. I really appreciate you actually saying that because it's something that I've had a really hard time explaining to people. I did not go home that morning to take a shower, knowing that I was going to come across a crime scene. And even when it was made apparent to me that there was a crime scene, I had this like it was so surreal to me that I felt a little bit like disembodied. Like what is happening and also am I certain what's happening? Because everyone's yelling in Italian. It was so, so bizarre that I had trouble processing the experience. And a lot has been made of my behavior in those days. There's that footage of Raphael and I outside of that the house waiting for the police to tell us to go into the police station and he kisses me. And the amount of times that that moment of him just sort of trying to do what he could, which was just kind of hold me and kiss me and tell me I'm going to be okay. How that was twisted and distorted in the media into like, oh my God, she's such a sex fiend that she can't even keep her hands off them outside of a murder House. It's like, what is happening? Anyway, so that makes a lot of sense..

Meredith Carnegie Mellon MySpace Amanda Knox Naya Harry Potter soccer Cambridge Twitter earthquake England trauma Raphael
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:03 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I was like, but I'm in gifting a little doggy but I'm literally taking different things. And it ever changed. So this idea of how gestalt perceptions really influence deeply how we see people not just from just a purely visual psychology point of view, but from a human whole person point of view, it's amazing how it's like an optical illusion in a way. You start to get to the evidence, you start to talk to the real Amanda knocks, which by the way, I'm thinking of calling today's episode the real Amanda Knox. Once you start talking to real Knox, maybe people gestalt will flip. But the point is the media control that gestalt. Yeah, yeah. And I think what's really interesting about your situation is these are people who had direct access to you. The thing that failed you in your experience was the education system not really recognized. I already have a whole my mom is a school teacher and I love her and she does an incredible work and I recognize that it's very, very difficult to be a teacher in this world. But I do have a problem with the education system where it seems like everyone is churned through the system that is very, very specific and doesn't actually acknowledge the different ways that people learn and the different skill sets that people have. It feels like this conveyor belt education. And if you don't fit this very specific role, then people treat you like your lesser. It's very interesting. And I think that maybe it's even more difficult and I have a lot of compassion for people who find themselves having their being sort of misidentified in their own communities because these are people who you know and love and care about, and they're the people who are determining who you are that doesn't match up with your understanding of yourself and with the evidence. In my case, it was thousands and thousands of strangers who had no access to me who were determining who I was for the sake of some kind of morality tale that they were trying to not only determine find a scapegoat to pin all of their horrible feelings about a terrible tragedy that occurred, but also they had like this the thing about my case is that I became this sort of blank slate onto which people could make judgments about women and about sexuality. And very, very much, there was like this morality tale being told about female sexuality where I was the I was the stand in for everything that people hate and fear, but also are intrigued about female sexuality. Oh, absolutely. And I think you wouldn't mind having your Monica Lewinsky moment in a sense where why aren't all the me too feminists jumping on this because it really when you really look at it and you're really honest when people are really honest about what happened. You know, a lot of had to do with your looks. You know, what the same thing have happened if it was just your boyfriend at the time Raphael who was convicted. This is a real I mean, this is a real gender and how we treat beautiful people in our society. Yeah, I mean it's a story here. Yeah, I mean, it is astonishing because on the one hand, Meredith also was a beautiful girl, and she was brutally murdered. And no one really paid attention to the person who actually brutally raped and murdered her. Like what was interesting about and there's also like a sort of tinge of racism here where the person who actually did this was a young black man who was disenfranchised and all of the things and because people at the time were like, well obviously he's just there's nothing interesting about him as a criminal. What's interesting in a criminal is a female who is a part of involved in a sexually motivated, violent crime. So the media totally overlooked the facts of this case in order to pursue a scandalous salacious story. And they're deep rooted reasons for that. Really deep. I mean, the more we keep digging, you know, you start to realize, wow, because it's not just simply a morality, you could easily, by the way, his name was I want to say his name Rudy Gwen, right? Was the one who murdered. Meredith kercher. So and he had been found just a couple even days before in a nursery or something broken and was found with a knife. You know, and it was only his fingerprints that were found in the room where marathon was murdered. So these are facts. His DNA on her body, like, yeah, he was it's interesting because the way that the media treated him as well is also a weirdly off, where one they sort of ignored him. And then whenever they made reference to him, at least in Italy, I'm actually not familiar with how they referenced him in the U.S. and in the UK. But at the time, they always always always referred to him as le royana, the person from the Ivory Coast, which is really interesting because, yes, he was from the Ivory Coast, but from what I understand, he moved to Italy and lived in Italy with an Italian family from a young age. So he really was an Italian. He just happened to be born in the Ivory Coast, but people just really wanted to associate him as an other. And then once they associated him as an other, they sort of sidestepped him and didn't really interested in the facts of his story, which is a young guy brought up in a family, but starts getting into trouble starts breaking and entering starts doing drugs, goes down this spiral of breaking and entering that results in the end with a brutal rape and murder. That story, very, very much got overlooked, and it's one that's worth looking into because that stuff happens. And we should try to stop that kind of stuff from happening. Anyway. Well, absolutely. Oh, absolutely. Had you ever encountered him before? I hadn't seen him around because he played basketball with the guys who lived in the floor below us. And so yeah, so he was around, but I don't think I even really knew his name until he was arrested. I remember like when I was in I remember the moment I was in prison, I was watching the news and they showed him being arrested. And they were like, you know, Rudy gaday, blah, blah, blah, arrested in Germany after fleeing the country. And I was like, holy shit, I recognize that guy. That guy? That basketball guy? That's the guy who did it, and then I kept thinking, oh, wow, thank goodness they found the person who did it. I'll.

Amanda Knox Knox Amanda Rudy Gwen Meredith kercher Monica Lewinsky Raphael Ivory Coast Italy le royana Meredith U.S. UK Rudy gaday basketball Germany
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:11 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I put it in front of me. And I sort of disassociated from it a little bit and helped me at the very least get through the day. Let's see, that's textbook. So for instance, George, but you didn't know it, that's textbook psychology. You just devised it. But George banana, who was recently my podcast, actually, highly recommend listening to our chat. He just wrote a book called the end of trauma. It's all about his one of the leading researchers on resiliency. And he's really shown that self talk is a major major strategy. He has a whole chapter on self talk in his book. So that's really cool for you to hear that he was just he's just two episodes ago. Can you describe to me what he means by self talk because I'd be curious to know if it has to do with the narrative of one's life that one either feels they have control over or they don't have control over. I'd be interested to know that. I think he's more referring to an extent to which you tell yourself that you have deep reservoirs of resiliency that are untapped that you can handle this. You know, seeing just even saying words to yourself, you know, researchers have looked at the difference between just saying yourself, I can do this. You know what? I faced hard things before. You know, there will be a future versus thinking to yourself. This is it. There's no hope. You know? There's a very, very strong statistically significant difference between those two conditions. Interesting. Yeah, I think that that's squares with my own experience because I even would think to myself at certain times I went through a soccer training a lot when I was a kid and one of the things that I told myself to get through very difficult soccer practices occasionally was I would just do the little engine that could mantra over and over my head. I think I can. I think I can. I think I can. And the thing I really loved about that was the uncertainty. I was like, I think I can. I'm not sure, but I'm gonna try. I'm gonna try to get through this day. We'll see. Well, by the way, that's where you got the nickname Fox and Knox. You probably never want to hear that nickname ever again. But just for the record for this is helpful for you. For the record, you got that nickname because what you kind of like, you played soccer like a fox, like you were like, yeah, so good. I mean, I was so I was one of the smaller players and I was very quick and I was I played this position called top of the diamond, which is the first line of defense. And it's a position where you're constantly squirreling around or to try to steal the ball away from people. So in that way, I end my name rhymes with Fox. So that's how that came about. I want to call nickname. Right? I want a better one. I want a better one than what they called me around your age. When I was that age, they called me Scotty potty. Oh no. Is there just because it rhymes? Okay, no, no, I'll tell you. So I'm a little bit older than you, Amanda, but not by that much. Not by that much, but there was something called the sour patch kids cards back in the day. Have you ever heard of the sour patch kids? Eaten many a sour patch kid, but I did not know that they came with cards. I believe they had cards and one of them was one of the names of one of them was Scotty potty. So that was one of the sour patch kids. I'm pretty sure maybe I'm messing up my 80s references. It was called something else, but there were these cards and then they were a whole collection of these funny things. And are you thinking, are you thinking of the garbage pail kids? Yes. I think garbage can. Okay, okay, so that's just came in. That's a candy. That's a candy. You're right. You're right. Garbage. Well, see you. Okay, thank you. So you know what I'm talking about? Okay. Now I've been trying to change that narrative as an adult. I had a girlfriend of her own volition called me a Scottie two hottie. And I was like, okay, okay, I like that one better. I love that one too 'cause it's not even Scotty hottie. She took it to the next level, like MC hammered it. It was good. That's great. It was a great girlfriend. I just want to say for the rest of it. Appreciate it very much. So here's a quote I found when I was listening to your very interesting interview with Joe Rogan. I thought could set a stage for what we can really get into today. You said, I feel like I'm constantly trapped in a conversation with the fake version of me in people's minds that keeps getting recycled over and over again. That is, first of all, that is good writing. Oh, well. You're obviously going to second of all. That's very powerful. That is very, very powerful and I think a lot of us can relate. I can relate to your story just being very young, I was in special Ed and for an auditory disability I had and I write about this a lot and I wrote about this in various of my books. But the point here is that I felt as though I was reduced to how other people decide to put a label on me. And I feel like there's a connection here to probably how you felt and probably still feel to a large degree where you want to be able to create your own identity. You allow to create your own identity, and that's how I felt certainly as a child fighting my way. I had to actually fought my way out of special Ed and then I fought my way into gifted Ed, and then people still saw me as the special at kid..

George banana soccer Fox George Knox Scotty hottie Scotty Amanda Scottie Joe Rogan Ed
"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Doing great. I'm a little sleep deprived, so you'll have to excuse my sleep deprived brain, but I appreciate it. Thanks for having me on. Oh, it's my pleasure. And it doesn't have anything to do with the fact that you just had a new baby girl. Oh my God, yes. We were awake. Yes, last night for a little bit together, just wandering around the house until she fell asleep again. So that's my world right now. Well, congratulations. To the birth of Eureka, muse, knocked Robinson. Congratulations. Thank you. There's a specific reason why you decided to tell the story of weed people on the journey to tell people about your journey, right? You wanted to kind of control the narrative in a way, is that right? Yeah, I mean, so yes, the issue that I faced from the second I got pregnant was the idea that my pregnancy and the birth of my child would like every other private aspect of my life, be deemed in the public interest and therefore not protected by privacy laws and that the tabloids would exploit those very intimate parts of my life to defame me and harm me psychologically. So I decided that I would try to disincentivize their coverage and the and their sort of impulse to go after me with paparazzi by, first of all, keeping the pregnancy journey in the birth journey to myself until I was ready to tell it and to tell it in my own way. So that at the very least, when people did first hear of my daughter's existence, it would be in the context of something that was exploring these difficult positions that I'm in and that I'm and this sort of position that I hope my daughter will be in in the future, which is to not be treated just like the latest scandal content for in the Amanda Knox saga as Tom McCarthy. So aptly put it. Well, look, that makes a lot of sense. So I'm a scientist here and in I really do extensive preparation for all my guests and you were certainly included on that. And what just boggled my mind were some of the things that people would just say online with no factual support whatsoever to it. And not only that, but there are various things I really because I really got really into the case in a really scientifically just no part. Yeah, yeah, yeah, no part in the horse sort of way. You know, I was like, what is the evidence? And I would really and I would wake up in the middle of the night actually at one point. I was like, oh, what about this? And I would go to do extensive Google searches like, okay, that answers that for me. I get it. But then I would still see things propagated over and over again. How do you have so much grace in handling that? Because I noticed you don't even respond to something. I wanted to fight for you. Some people respond my own Twitter page. I want to be like, are you serious? You didn't even look at this objectively whatsoever. Yeah, it's a good question because I feel like you have the same impulse as my husband. My husband is very, very protective of me. And deeply deeply offended when any whenever anyone makes a false claim about me online and vilify me. And he's just so outraged by it. He's like, of all the people in the world, why you like of all the people. And my relationship with it is a little bit different in part because I spent so long not being able to defend myself at all. I was in prison for four years between the ages of 20 and 24 when this was first happening. And I had very, very little opportunity to defend myself at all. So I wonder if, in part, I internalized some feelings of helplessness or hopelessness. I also feel like the sort of mental state that I was in in that time period was one in which I realized that, oh, wow, for so many people, the truth doesn't actually matter. Just the story matters and the characters of that story matter whether or not they correspond with reality. And the story that I was telling myself about my own life, like what I could expect from life, like go to school, find love, have children have a career, like those were all things that were also stories that I had been telling myself, and there had been no guarantee that that was actually going to be the course of my life. And so in the prison environment, I very much suddenly realized that there were no guarantees in life, and I had to instead be very present with what I did have. Be very aware of what I did have. And I didn't have much. So I could catalog it. And then since coming home, it's a little bit different because the prison and trial experience is one in which absolutely what people are saying about me out in the world very, very much impacts my right to live as a free human being in the world. But once I was exonerated, I realized that the game had changed. It was no longer about my freedom, it was about my identity. And that was the thing that remained the missing piece of my life that had been stolen from me. But my freedom and my identity are two very different things. I can live with myself and my identity in my small world and also understand that I don't actually have full control over my identity and the greater world. That doesn't like it does impact me, but it's not the same as someone trying to put me in jail. So I guess it put that into perspective. Yeah, it sounds like you became a PhD in psychology and formally throughout this whole process. Actually, a lot of psychologists say that to me where they're like, wow, some of the strategies that you used to get through that experience are strategies that we try to like therapists will share like one of the strategies that I had, which I wouldn't even consider strategy as sort of intuitively did it was I had conversations with my younger self about what she was going to experience in the future. So in a way I was sort of big sister coaching myself through the experience. In order to feel like less powerless over it, like, and so it sort of took a thing that felt very much on top of me and.

Tom McCarthy Amanda Knox Eureka Robinson Google Twitter
"amanda knox" Discussed on 1A

1A

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on 1A

"Npr. We're talking with exonerate. Amanda knox about the new film stillwater. So she said. Amanda no one reached out to you during the making of this film. But i'm curious what you have been interested in that conversation or what type of conversation which you have wanted to have. Certainly i mean like i said again. I'm not precious about what happened to me in the sense that. I don't think that i'm the only person who can author a story of that is about this kind of issue What i take issue with is the way that tom mccarthy first of all overlooked fact that i might have any perspective about how this film portrays an amanda knox character How this film would portray the experience of someone who was locked up abroad for a crime that they didn't commit And the fact that he just decided to fictionalized away that pesky detail of innocence to make a more compelling fictionalized story But like. I think also i wanted him to consider what it i think. I would love for there to be a more of a conversation in hollywood about the stories of victims because i think that hollywood has a problem with victims victims. Don't like if if you think of a story that about a crime for instance we tend to focus on who had agency the actual killer for instance there. The more plotti driven character and hollywood is usually frames either the victim as someone who had no agency whatsoever or if they did have agency it was because it was somehow their fault that they were victimized. There's victim blaming. And i think that a victim story can actually be very compelling. It's something that. I explore a lot in my podcast. Labyrinths where i talked to people who have had something horrible happen to them. Something overwhelming that they had to just react to in the moment and the process of reacting and processing trauma is actually very heroic tale. But one that doesn't really translate in in hollywood terms to like the guy who shoots him up and respond. You know that kind of thing so you know. I think that. Especially when. I think about how tom mccarthy. Says well amanda. You haven't actually seen the film so you don't know what you're talking about. Well tom mccarthy you made a film about the worst experience of my life. It's not something that i you know would casually go in and and on a friday night to go hang out with my friends and see like this is a very serious thing for me that dredges up very serious trauma so if you're going to be portraying that story consider that first of all it is going to be dredging up that for me but also the way that you represent me is going to be another. It's going to be part of this ongoing story because my trauma isn't just that i went to prison for something i didn't do. It was at the world defined me something that i wasn't and that continues to be an ongoing trauma that i and other honorees face because the stigma of being accused is a very real stigma. That doesn't go away to have your name forever associated with a series of events that you had nothing to do with. That is traumatizing. And i would've told him that if he had talked to me and i would have said. Hey you know what's different story. That's worth telling the story of how someone survives that experience and moves on their life. That's an interesting story that no one has really ever bothered to look into because it's not the audit the obvious story. That was portrayed in the media. The slanderous story. You said man. That that you looking to be litigious about the use of your story. But what are you interested in. Is it just about reclaiming the narrative or is it an apology. Is it compensation. I mean and i i would have to say that when i wrote my twitter third was not expecting the World to blow up about it. Honestly because i have been speaking about this issue for a long time. I've written about it before. How micon like how my life has been turned into other people's entertainment content and the problems with that because it doesn't just happen to me. It happens to other real life people My goal was to have a conversation that would change the culture around real life. Stories that empower people who have been previously disempowered Through the narratives that the media. Or you know hollywood or the criminal. Justice system writes about them so for me. I've i've been tackling this issue from usually from the true crime angle. Because that's the one that i'm most familiar with in my podcast. The truth about true crime and now with labyrinths. I've really been asking myself. Who has the most at stake in a story about a horrific event and i've wanted to put those voices at the center of the telling of those stories because a lot of times those are the people who are erased and i think that this is not just a problem with true crime. It's a problem with stories. In general that are like you said ripped from the headlines Because when you when you hide behind the veil of fictionalization suddenly you don't have to think about being accurate or a humanizing. All the characters involved they can become characters in a morality. Play where you get to decide. Who's the villain and who's the hero and a lot of times. Reality is a lot more complicated than that. So i guess my goal in all of this was simply to continue that same process of addressing what i see as a void in the public awareness. About how stories are told and why they're told and who gets to be the author of those stories And i was hoping that having a direct conversation with the people who had basically violated that or cross the line with that with me would be an opening a cognitive opening for the industry If that doesn't happen that's okay because honestly the fact that you're talking to me today is an opportunity for there to be a cognitive opening for someone else in hollywood potentially and i really hope that that happens. So that's my goal We'll see what ends up happening But i still. My door is still always open to tom. Mccarthy matt damon all the people who were instrumental to the film. Because i'm not in the business of being angry at people very honestly I'm definitely more of a person who believes in restorative justice and who who lives by those principles of building bridges and finding understanding even when There has been harmed committed. And i think that. If i'm capable of doing that he should be able to well. This isn't the first time a film or show is used your story as content. There was a twenty eleven a true crime. Lifetime movie in two thousand sixteen. There was a netflix documentary. How often are you contacted by productions. And how do you make a decision about how you respond. So i was only ever contacted by the netflix documentary. Filmmakers and one of the things that i really appreciated about their Approach to this story was first of all they said. We're not going to tell the story without you because this is going to directly impact you and your perspective matters in this so yes. We've got years of footage that we've been collecting and it would be you know it would be a great loss for us if we didn't get to make this film but we're not gonna make it if you're not if you're not able to make to to be a part of it and i appreciate it that because it really you know they understood the stakes and furthermore when they were talking about this case they weren't just asking me about what happened then and what happened. Then what's the what's the next plot point. They were asking me what i thought and felt about what happened. Which is truly what gets at the heart of the human experience of these tragic stories and they used that they used what i had to say as part of the framing of the netflix documentary..

tom mccarthy hollywood amanda knox stillwater Npr Amanda amanda Mccarthy matt damon twitter netflix tom
"amanda knox" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Hysteria

"All of those interviews that took place at that time are sort of all guilty of the same in this systemic problem of treating people who find themselves at the center of of these big stories as as if they need to be treated like the characters in the morality plays that they have been projected as and not as human beings that legitimately could be your friend or your daughter or you know whatever it what occurs to me today with a ton of perspective and in a bunch of journalistic experience. Now is that just because something has been. Put out there that amanda knox is a deviant sex drug addict in that was what was presented by the prosecution without evidence doesn't mean that you as a journalist must pursue that course of thinking in questioning of that person if there's no reason to believe that in the first place no one should the kinds of questions that lots of people not just chris. Cuomo were posing me in that time period. Where questions that honestly. I shouldn't have ever had to answer. Because there was no evidence that i had murdered meredith culture and there was no evidence that i was deviant sex addict and it was all based upon this false narrative That was presented in the courtroom for the sake of winning an argument in court instead of actually coming to the truth of the matter. So if i were chris cuomo i would not have asked myself those questions. I would have asked different questions. Do i think that he is particularly like a heinous example of it. There were lots of heinous examples of that at the time. So i don't want to just pay him out i know but it's fun because today Has anybody reached out to you to make amends for that period of time for treating you in a way that was like unfair You know it's interesting. It's less the people who found themselves in the position to to portray me and more the people who are consuming those kinds of media so I've had people who followed my case from the headlines and who approached me to say i am so sorry for treating you as entertainment What i have not heard is that from the people who actually created those headlines. I'm sorry for having turned you into entertainment. I have yet to hear that and That would be nice. Going to be honest. I'm not counting on it. I'm not sitting on any kind of guarantee But i am hoping that starting this conversation so that we feel we pause to question. What how we are entitled to other people's lives and stories is something we've become more self aware of as storytellers So i wanted to take a second to pivot and talk about your podcast labyrinths up..

amanda knox chris cuomo Cuomo meredith chris
"amanda knox" Discussed on Hysteria

Hysteria

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Hysteria

"All of those interviews that took place at that time are sort of all guilty of the same in this systemic problem of treating people who find themselves at the center of of these big stories as as if they need to be treated like the characters in the morality plays that they have been projected as and not as human beings that legitimately could be your friend or your daughter or you know whatever it what occurs to me today with a ton of perspective and in a bunch of journalistic experience. Now is that just because something has been. Put out there that amanda knox is a deviant sex drug addict in that was what was presented by the prosecution without evidence doesn't mean that you as a journalist must pursue that course of thinking in questioning of that person if there's no reason to believe that in the first place no one should the kinds of questions that lots of people not just chris. Cuomo were posing me in that time period. Where questions that honestly. I shouldn't have ever had to answer. Because there was no evidence that i had murdered meredith culture and there was no evidence that i was deviant sex addict and it was all based upon this false narrative That was presented in the courtroom for the sake of winning an argument in court instead of actually coming to the truth of the matter. So if i were chris cuomo i would not have asked myself those questions. I would have asked different questions. Do i think that he is particularly like a heinous example of it. There were lots of heinous examples of that at the time. So i don't want to just pay him out i know but it's fun because today Has anybody reached out to you to make amends for that period of time for treating you in a way that was like unfair You know it's interesting. It's less the people who found themselves in the position to to portray me and more the people who are consuming those kinds of media so I've had people who followed my case from the headlines and who approached me to say i am so sorry for treating you as entertainment What i have not heard is that from the people who actually created those headlines. I'm sorry for having turned you into entertainment. I have yet to hear that and That would be nice. Going to be honest. I'm not counting on it. I'm not sitting on any kind of guarantee But i am hoping that starting this conversation so that we feel we pause to question. What how we are entitled to other people's lives and stories is something we've become more self aware of as storytellers So i wanted to take a second to pivot and talk about your podcast labyrinths up..

amanda knox chris cuomo Cuomo meredith chris
"amanda knox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"You and didn't happen to meredith. Yeah i mean. I think part of it is The girl on girl crime aspect a. It's something which almost never happens It's salacious it was tinged with ideas of cult and drugs and sex. And all of that. But i think ultimately comes down to this idea Which is so rare and so horrifying of women attacking and and assaulting other women. We both fetish is that because that idea of a female monster is so rare and yet so compelling It's both sexy and disturbing at the same time and it is the thing that i find. I'm constantly battling. Is this perception of me. As being a fem fit tall a person who craves male attention so much that i'm willing to like murder another woman for it. I think another part of that story is the idea of just being than innocent net girl next door who is caught up in some drug-fuelled lula and like it's and that's also not true. So it's it's everyone has their own sort of sexy vision of it and really. It's i mean. I'm thinking of how the one of the police officers initially just described me as someone who reeked of sacks and i don't know why he thought that there's a lot of projection that was happening to me and i. I think a lot of it just had to do with Misunderstanding of female sexuality. What do you think. Though what do you think i mean. You're a lot closer. To deny. Am i am but maybe that means that. I can't see it very well. Because i'm like in the weeds from above from how do you see. What is this obsession about. Tell me well what i was grateful for. At least when. I read your twitter thread about this experience you had with stillwater specifically was i saw that trailer. I thought weird. They're making a movie kind of about amanda knox way after everything happened to amanda knox. But i didn't ask myself in. That moment did amanda. Knox approve of this soon and reading your twitter thread connected with me because i felt like wow. That's the first question. I'm going to ask the next time i see something like this. I'm glad i'm glad i'm kind of. I'm kind of embarrassed that i didn't ask that question in the moment. You know what i mean. Yeah so. I've i've seen two different responses Or at least two assumptions prior to that sort of motivated me to write this twitter threat. Which is one people see film like still water coming out. They automatically think. of course. amanda was consulted. How else could this possibly go like. Of course she didn't. I bet she got a million dollars for it on good on her or the other is well. Her story doesn't belong her. Of course anyone can have their own take on it. Because she's a public figure and both of those things. I felt were problematic on the one hand. One is not true on the other hand. One is deeply unethical. I believe so. I wanted to point out that we have a blind spot especially in hollywood where there's so much money and so much power that's being thrown around by people who get who get to tell stories right like not. Everyone gets to tell a story and in by being the conduit for a certain for those stories. You have a certain amount of responsibility. I think that people haven't really thought about and it's not because they're bad people who just refusing to think about it. But maybe it's because no one's really pointed it out to them before. Maybe i'm usually benefit of the doubt like i thought maybe i can have a conversation with them and let them know that if they hadn't considered before that their portrayal of me might have consequences. Let me just let them know that these are the consequences that i'm facing and see what they say. Meredith kurtzer was murdered in. I think two thousand seven and shortly thereafter. Your life was turned upside down by what became the global headline grabbing scandal and one positive development between then and now i feel like is that you didn't have a voice in that international scandal. It was perpetuated by a media that was drawn to a seemingly salacious story. But now you do if matt damon or tom mccarthy or malcolm glad well or lifetime had come to. You hadn't said. Amanda we want to tell your story. What would that story be. That's a really great question because there are lots of different entry points. One of the things that i felt like has not happened Since the beginning of all of this is there hasn't really been a story where i'm actually the peripheral figure in all of these events of of all the people who were involved in the the events and the actions that took place i was one of the most peripheral people with the least amount of agency so whatever i did ultimately didn't matter things were just happening to me and a story that really hasn't been told yet is one that centers on the people who had the most agency so the person who did murder meredith culture and the italian authorities who made decisions about who to arrest and when and how and what story to tell the media like these are all people who are making choices that have lasting consequences for innocent people meredith and myself and my co-defendant included like i'm totally peripheral to the murder and i really had very very little say in what happened to me. I'm kind of a boring character when it all comes down to it is what you're saying is if if all these people came to you to tell your story you'd say like there's probably a better story to tell or if you're going to tell my story it's the story of someone who is processing the experience of going through something it is not you know it's not me making things happen right like my a lot of my story is just me sitting in a prison cell reading a book hoping that stuff is gonna get worked out or you know one of the stories that i i would love to tell because it's an interesting one That a lot of exonerates face is the now. What after you get out of prison after spending time in prison for something you didn't do How do you reintegrate into society again. After you're processing the sort of collapse in not just in your own life but also your faith in society your faith that like society has your back and that what you're going to do is going to matter and that you can plant roots. How do you carry on to do even just like the the the really simple things of like meeting people and going on a date and getting job. These are all challenges. That exonerates have a really interesting Sort of surreal. Twist as they enter into the world. And that's been a deep challenge for me of trying to reestablish my identity after it was stolen and after i couldn't ever ever get it back because it's not like i came back to a world where i got to be just amanda knox again..

amanda knox meredith twitter amanda lula Meredith kurtzer stillwater Knox tom mccarthy matt damon hollywood malcolm Amanda
"amanda knox" Discussed on Today, Explained

Today, Explained

07:54 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Today, Explained

"Over a decade now. Tom mccarthy who co wrote and directed this movie told vanity fair. I believe in interview that he was inspired. By your story and that quote he couldn't help but imagine how it would feel to be in knox's shoes That being said he did not try to contact you to find out what it is like to be. You is that right. yeah so in. In no way was i ever approached to better understand what it was like to be in my shoes or to be in my father's shoes and that i think speaks a little bit to the problem of true crime where there's a sense of kind of entitlement to sit back and do this like armchair not just detective work but also empathy work where we just say. Oh i've heard of this person in this context. And i don't really remember them as a person. I just kind of this character. I feel a little bit. Like dracula where everyone gets to have their own spin on it. And i'm dislike an idea of a person that everyone just like gets to have their own take and what's odd about. That is if i were completely off the grid. Say like if i came back from my wrongful conviction and totally disappeared and rebuked any opportunity to speak to my experience. I would better understand the creatives. Not thinking oh maybe a monoxide is going to have something to say about the fact that were like taking her story as the colonel and the in the heart of our story. But i've actually been very very vocal. Since i came back about like i said how my own narrative was stolen from me. How the story has been misrepresented in the media. How the very fact that this is like when people think of the amanda knox saga and there's been a lot of recycling of this mistaken misappropriation of the story in even reviews of stillwater. Is people when people refer to the amanda knox saga. They're referring to the murder of my roommate. Meredith kirchner by this other person rudy gay and yet my name is the name that is associated with that story and my own story is one that sort of is like pushed off to the side as not being as important as that story like my own story is a very different story it's tangential but it's me being an innocent person who is trying to fight for my innocence and get and get my life back for when i am accused of something that i didn't do but i had nothing to do with my roommate's murder i did not incentivize it. I did not have prior knowledge or any special knowledge of it. I did not participate in it and the way that stillwater has chosen to represent my story in their story is that the amanda knox character has special knowledge and was at the very least indirectly involved in the killing of the meredith karcher character which is a myth it is the false narratives that was presented by the prosecution that has been debunked by evidence and yet is the ongoing myth. That is an obstacle towards me re integrating into society in a successful way and And being taken seriously as a person and this is not the first time this has happened to you. Know no no no And you know to their. I guess it's weird to say to their credit. But i suppose i wouldn't say that i i'm sitting here thinking like oh. Yeah damon. tom mccarthy were sitting in a room coming up with the story like cackling behind their wriggling fingers. Going like ha ha. We're going to like do a story at the expense of this innocent person. No of course not. I don't think they even thought that what they were producing was ever going to have an be at my expense. And that's the real heart of the issue is that there's is not the first time that there has been a sort of basing of a story upon my story and also an imagining of it that reinforces that false narrative. So i'm thinking about this proven innocent show which is a show that imagines what if amid knox became a lawyer. When someone goes to prison for a murder they didn't commit. It means the real murderer still out there this well. She's innocent in that story but of course there's that intrigue and of course they did not ask me if they could promote their their show and base their show upon my identity. There's the guilt show. That came out in in britain refined beloved. There's these novels called cartwheel an and so like it's not the first time this has happened and it's not the first time that i've spoke out about this. And if people want to claim that they are just inspired by my story but that they are taking it in a new direction. Then why is it that my name is perpetually used to promote these new imaginings. Like if you're if your story really rests on its own merits than let it rest on its own merits and also like i think that the stillwater is so so close to my own story that anyone who watched it. If tom mccarthy didn't own up to the fact that it was based on my story people would call him out on it. So he's in this interesting position where he kinda wants cake and he wants to eat it to where it's not amanda knox's story but it is amanda knox's story. It's amanda knox's story when i'm selling it and when it's recognizably amanda knox's story and takes all those elements that we think are super fascinating and the sex and the and and the mystery and the twist but it's not amanda knox's story when it has to do with what amanda knox feels about it more with manda in a minute This is advertiser content from linden tree when it comes to finding a mate. Most of us will compare many possible matches before finding our person and we invest our time. I survey found. That millennials can spin around ninety minutes a day swiping on dating apps. Recant find ourselves in a relationship with someone else. If we don't know who we are. I that's professional matchmaker. Margin bobby of three day rule. There's no one-size-fits-all for everybody but shopping around is important. I can feel a little exhausting. But you you gotta go through right. Everyone does in the end. The things you look for when comparing potential mates are unique to you. So why not find a credit card or loan that fits you just as personally. Linden tree is a one-stop marketplace where you can easily compare loans credit cards insurance and more so not only do you save money. You save time and that means more time to spend with your special someone find leading on the app store or go to linden tree dot com to learn more terms and conditions apply in. Mls number one one three six. This episode is sponsored by. Jbl true wireless headphones. I'll call you back later. Ok about the go for a run. Here's what i love about my. Jbl true wireless headphones. I can go from a call with my mom to music that powers my workout. It's.

amanda knox stillwater Meredith kirchner Tom mccarthy knox meredith karcher tom mccarthy rudy damon britain manda linden app store Mls
"amanda knox" Discussed on We Saw the Devil

We Saw the Devil

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on We Saw the Devil

"Has many tweets but she started off with does mind name belonged to me my face. What about my life my story. Why does my name refer to events. I had no hand in. I return to these questions because others continue to prophet my name face and story without my consent most recently the film stillwater and mccarthy were kind of replied to Outcry he said. This is not the amanda knox story just inspired. So how would you describe this. It's a tricky one to describe. I would say coming it lost in the movie. It goes places you don't expect. I hope engaging. Amanda knox though says that well mccarthy. If movie wasn't inspired by my story you should probably keep my name out of your mouth every single time you promote it. She says quote. You're not leaving the amanda knox case behind very well if every single review mentions me. You're not leaving them. In case behind when my face appears on profiles and articles about the and the reactions have been mixed bag to say the least. I could more appropriately. Call it an absolute shit. Show one twitter user. Paul gray said quote. Sorry to be cynical but this comes across as you're not happy about others profiting off your story unless you're profiting off it as well. I wouldn't suggest for a minute. Your life has been easy in the fallout from what happened. The bigger picture is that the true victim is meredith. Others twitter calling her murderer. They are cursing at her calling her a racist bigot. Basically what you would expect from people trying to talk to into knox. A lot of people are not convinced of her innocence. I'm not going to get into the case because again it would take so long to do this case justice if we're getting into like every little piece of it but more or less. She changed her story like five times and she immediately accused her boss and african man and then the second which was ally and the second person that she accused was an african man from ivory coast and he actually ended up doing prison time for the murder. They found his dna At the scene on her and it sounds like they most likely got the right guy there but a lot of people are wondering if she's racist for lying right off the bat and then i mean let's just be honest. She didn't exactly do herself any favors. I think that her case was really interesting. Just as a whole to. Because i haven't seen that amount of vitriol towards a person in a long time especially one that most likely will an american abroad Imprisoned and how could she do this. She's young white middle upper class student. You know you usually usually. The court of public opinion is pretty sympathetic. to people. like her as her housemates body was being wheeled out of the house and a stretcher. The body mutilated ponti. She and her boyfriend were making out in canoeing and kissing standing on the side of the road. It's a very interesting case. I personally do not believe that. A minute knox had anything to do with the murder does she may be no more. I don't know But either way guys. Twitter is an absolute shit. Show highly suggest you had over there and just go to amanda knox twitter profile. Read this entire thread. She goes on for quite a bit more. She has definitely set it off..

Amanda knox mccarthy stillwater Paul gray twitter knox meredith ivory coast court of public opinion
In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

Weekend Edition Sunday

02:08 min | 1 year ago

In 'Stillwater,' an American Oil-Rig Worker Seeks to Exonerate His Daughter

"It's a familiar story. The stereotypical American goes abroad crass and brutally honest, but with a heart of gold, who breaks all kinds of rules to save the day. But while the new movie still Water may wink at this formula, it has its own story to tell about America's place in the world. You're innocent, so we gotta keep fighting. It doesn't matter that I'm innocent Dad. It's not about justice about finding peace. That's Matt Damon as Bill Baker, a former oil rig worker who travels to Marseilles, France, to see his estranged Daughter, Alison, played by Abigail Breslin. She's in prison accused of the murder of a local French Arab girl, but claims to be innocent, and Baker struggles with the unfamiliar language, culture and legal system as he attempts to free her The movie is out now in theaters and its director is Tom McCarthy, who won the Academy Award for best original screenplay for Spotlight in 2016. I began by asking him if the real life case of the murder of MEREDITH Kercher, which sent American Amanda Knox to an Italian prison in 2000, and seven before she was eventually acquitted. Inspired this film. I would say the seed was there. I started the script 10 years ago, Really? And I was sort of fascinated with that case, particularly the idea of An American student being imprisoned and then ultimately focusing on the relationship between as you point out her and her estranged father. So it started there and worked on this first draft of the script with another writer, and I just got into a place where it just was straight up thriller. I just felt it lacked dimension and Maybe authenticity, and I sort of put it down. I made the decision is director not to pursue it. Put it in a drawer for about 67 years and I picked it up again and I re approached it sort of from Page one with two new French writers. And we really talked right off the bat with Tamar. But again, in the way Debray about exploring the sort of you know all the dimensions of this story, the human dimension of it. The thriller Dimension suspends

Academy Award For Best Origina Bill Baker Meredith Kercher Abigail Breslin Matt Damon Marseilles Tom Mccarthy Alison Amanda Knox Baker France America Debray Tamar
Matt Damon Runs Deep in “Stillwater”

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:07 min | 1 year ago

Matt Damon Runs Deep in “Stillwater”

"That take people into unexpected and difficult places. And that's the case in the new film. Still Water starring Matt Damon, I'm trying to get my little girl out of jail. That's all I give a damn about. You sound very American right now. Good. I am. Yeah. And you're also a stranger here. What did you do? You just have to trust me. Well, let's talk about it with Washington Post film critic Ann Hornaday, who joins us on Skype. It's great to have you back in. Thank you so much. Hello. Hello. So the premise of this film seems to have been inspired by real world cases of Americans who have been imprisoned overseas. Tell us about it and how this this film takes it on. And how does it do? Well, it is, um Sean is based on the Amanda Knox case, which I'm sure a lot of people will remember that Amanda Knox was imprisoned in Italy for murdering her fellow exchange. A fellow exchange student and filmmaker Tom McCarthy, of course, who won the Oscar a few years ago for the wonderful movie spotlight took that as a jumping off point, but really only that this does not. This is not a retelling of the Amanda Knox story. He focuses on a father character here, played by Matt Damon, who, as you heard in the clip comes to Marseille, where she's in prison. And and, um, first just on a routine visit, but then following up on a lead to maybe get her released and I think you know McCarthy is a wonderful film maker that's been as well established in his previous work, but He does slip here a little bit only because he wants this to be a lot of different movies in one way. It's an international thriller. Almost in that tradition of taken with a guy you know, trying to do the right thing by his daughter, Um, and then it also turns into a love story. The the wonderful French actors Camille Catan from a terrific Netflix series called Call My Agent. Plays a woman single Mom was whom heap of friends and they have a wonderful chemistry going on that I was very intrigued with, but then it gets. There's also kind of under underlying political

Amanda Knox Ann Hornaday Matt Damon Tom Mccarthy Washington Post Skype Sean Oscar Marseille Italy Mccarthy Camille Catan Netflix
"amanda knox" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

"With you and your husband Christopher? Yeah. It's called The Labyrinth Labyrinth and after the movie a little bit, after the movie a little bit after Jorge Luis Borges Hayes, if you're a nerd like bad, I did not expect you to say that. But yeah. So it's just like basically the the tag line is getting lost with Amanda Knox and it's like all the time zone. No. Have you ever feel like you are overwhelmed and, and lost in your own life? And like, how do you find your way out again, like, those are that, that kind of experience is something that I understand, really, really do believe real. So, when you just for office, like the number of people who reach out to me and even just like, I don't know if you've been keeping up with the money episodes, but like the I write about or I'm talking about infertility issues. Yes, like one of their college. I'm so sad about it off now. Thank you mean, we're moving through it and moving around it but like I've I've been shocked by the kinds of stories that people have been sharing with me and how much how close it feels to being wrongly convicted. Because like she comes at you out of nowhere, like you think your life is going one way? You're going to have kids and then suddenly you can't and you have this existential crisis and you don't know why, and you blame yourself and log. Feel like you're just trapped in this long journey where you don't know like at any point if it's going to be okay. And there are no guarantees and so many people are going through that right now and no one talks about it. So I acted I I mean we there was recently separated but we went through it for years. I mean you know it was like it was dead. It was amazing cuz it really and also really affected our marriage, I think. Yeah. A long time and they don't talk about that. We actually went to a support group. Yeah. The super helpful and like, I mean, we were fortunate that I, you know, in vitro eventually like, third, try work. But like that's like a journey. Oh my God. I'm like, yeah. Because it's a lot of injecting somebody. Yeah. Big ass needles. Yep. Yeah. And and trying to suck out eggs and trying to get confirm my science project going out like twin daughters and frankly she kind of does, was it really worth it? I have to say that but you know how you doing. I will definitely be checking that out and honestly it's it's really like, you're very inspiring. It's such an honor to talk to you. True. Yeah. Thank you so much. Well, yeah. And I really like when I I see like we were following each other and I was like, yep. I want I really wanted to talk to you, but I also just wanted you to come, like a comedy podcast cuz I feel like there's just a cloud over your, what people think of you like, oh no one could ever think you would have a sense of humor or laugh at anything like yours or like condemn me for, having a sense of humor, I can't tell you the number of times I've made jokes audience or on Twitter and people aren't, you know, who can't joke anymore. Oh God, I know you're like there was murdered by someone not that was not. It wasn't me. I didn't do it. Like people are murdered every day and year or so laughing and you're like oh I just wanted you to cuz I know like there's you're a human being and you there's not an ounce of me that ever would think that you were guilty. I mean, I I've read enough about it, I saw the documentary and off and I know there's people in this world that probably disagree with me. And I know, you know, that the people will just hear your name, having read nothing..

Jorge Luis Borges Hayes Amanda Knox Christopher Twitter
"amanda knox" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"amanda knox" Discussed on Doin it! with Danny and Jenny

"Hey Jenny, you know me? You know, I love to gamble. I normally, I mean you know this, right? I do. Yeah. So the biggest gamble, I'll take frequently. I'll take the animals like I will. I'll order. Sushi. That's a big gamble. That's a yeah, it's like airport. Sushi. You know, same or I'll I'll online date with somebody. Who's been really heavily featured? Yes, fair enough. So those are my line Gamble's, but for sports betting, I mean, whether it's the NFL or the NBA or off Major League Baseball, you know, for me the place I go to is betonline.ag, it's the fastest and easiest way depend on all your Sports Action. Oh, you're telling me being a certain Astro fan. I know it's not popular right now cuz the cheating but whatevs baseball season is in full swing. And you can track all the action happening on betonline.ag off. I was so like it's also a great place to get the news odds-on for all of your sporting needs. I don't think they do ice dancing yet, but I think it's coming and but off major sports your major league baseball, your NBA, or NHL, and all your UFC, and MMA action. Which I know you're a huge fan of God, all of it, but I'm here to tell you may get real-time updated odds props on almost anything. You can imagine with that online. A g. Yeah, that'll line has you covered for all the news scoresandodds. That's the best way to place your bets. And here's the thing, do you think that would cost something like a fortune to sign up? But you'd be wrong, it's free to sign up. It is totally 100% free. And I'm here to tell you before, you've even see another picture. Walk on the mound. Yes, head to bed online. On your laptop, mobile device, iPad off. No, whatever, you know, works.

baseball NBA Jenny Gamble Major League NFL NHL
Amanda Knox in Italy for first time since acquittal for murder

News, Traffic and Weather

00:49 sec | 3 years ago

Amanda Knox in Italy for first time since acquittal for murder

"Fully cleared murder suspect amend, Knox explains why she returned here to the country that falsely accused her. I'm ABC's Meghan Williams in Rome, they know. Wooding back in Italy for the first time since her twenty fifteen murder acquittal of British student, Meredith Kurtzer. Amanda Knox said prosecutors in the media, depicted, her as a dirty psychopathic man eater onto, which people could project their fantasies fears and moral judgments. Knox made the comments at a conference on criminal Justice in the northern Italian city of Modena before being cleared in two thousand fifteen she and her boyfriend spent four years in prison in Italy for the murder of Kurtzer, Meghan Williams, ABC news.

Amanda Knox Meghan Williams Murder ABC Italy Meredith Kurtzer Rome Modena Four Years
Amanda Knox, Hodge And Italy discussed on WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

00:59 min | 3 years ago

Amanda Knox, Hodge And Italy discussed on WGN Radio Theatre with Carl Amari and Lisa Wolf

"Costs. Amanda Knox's back in Italy, where she spent nearly four years in prison for a murder conviction, which was eventually overturned twice knock spoke at the Italy innocence project in Modina panel, discussing the media's impact on trials ABC's Julia McFarland, has more. Reporters, and photographers, greeting Hodge. You big on controversial. Visit the thirty one year old describing what she went through and the sensational coverage of the case including infamous media nickname, generally steamy on ring bat of foxy, knock scene, but knock saying, well, full narratives, I'm through the media can undermine Justice. The media can also have the power to find the truth calling journalists the first line of defense against the thirties knocks was a college student in two thousand seven when she was accused of murdering her then college roommate a British student aimed merit. If Kirch her well both studied as exchange students at an Italian university kerchiefs family has expressed outrage over Knox appearance. They're calling it a ploy for

Amanda Knox Hodge Italy Julia Mcfarland Kirch Murder ABC Modina Thirty One Year Four Years
Amanda Knox Returns to Italy for First Time Since Her Acquittal

Gary and Shannon

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Amanda Knox Returns to Italy for First Time Since Her Acquittal

"Amanda Knox is back in Italy for the first time since her acquittal. I just don't know if I go back I don't think I would. She was invited to speak at a conference organized by the Italy innocence project. She said that this thing didn't exist when she was convicted. She says I'm honored to accept their invitation to speak to the talian people at this historic event, return to Italy for the first time one of those things where you, you're not you're not celebrated as a hero in Italy. So I'm not sure that would be I on my trips in terms of getting out and going around to around

Italy Amanda Knox
Europe court orders Italy to pay damages to Amanda Knox

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:34 sec | 4 years ago

Europe court orders Italy to pay damages to Amanda Knox

Years After Murder Exoneration, Amanda Knox Hosts TV Show About Women Who've Been Publicly Shamed

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:53 min | 4 years ago

Years After Murder Exoneration, Amanda Knox Hosts TV Show About Women Who've Been Publicly Shamed

"After last year's mayhem is almost keith eldridge police had a strong presence throughout the day and on into the evening they vowed to do everything they could prevent a repeat of may day two thousand seventeen with a may day march turned violent windows at several businesses were broken and demonstrators were pepper sprayed a total of nine people were arrested for malicious mischief nine officers were hurt got tired of seeing that robert johnson of capital city guitars decided to take back history put on a sidewalk barbecue and jam session we shouldn't have presence and came out and did a barbecue put some music out here that we might determine them people out of join the night definitely noticing the difference between last year and is pretty mellow and inviting the demonstration a peaceful international workers celebration at sylvester definitely by all means for all the people there now may totally peaceful here leadville keith eldridge komo news time seven seattle's amanda knox back in the news try to help other women whom she says have been maligned and the media knox was convicted of murder in italy serving prison time there before eventually being exonerated now she's working on a new project with facebook it's called the scarlet letter reports if she talked with in it she talked with women in the public spotlight who are fighting to reclaim their reputations vilification came through the lens of our societies impulse to vilify women and female sexuality and coming home from that i've seen how that same vilification process happens towards other women and that's what this show is all about is is bringing back compassion and context to journalism and scott reports appears on facebook every wednesday voters may soon run out of excuses for feeling return election ballots komo's carleen johnson with more secretary of.

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