2 Episode results for "Amanda Dell"

Bonus: Schmaltzy

Israel Story

35:13 min | 8 months ago

Bonus: Schmaltzy

"Hi this is rachel fisher and this denikin and we host the hollywood crime scene podcast. We're really excited to tell you about the best christmas ever on amc. Plus we're every day feels like christmas morning. It's the holiday season and that means it's time to see old friends like buddy the elf heat miser and clark griswold plus you get a stocking stuff with highly acclaimed. Amc series like the walking dead and madman new series like gangs of london and the walking dead world beyond. They're all here on amc plus so celebrate the best christmas ever anytime anywhere. Amc plus is the gift that keeps on giving all year long sign up today at amc plus dot com amc. Plus only the good stuff. Israel's story is brought to you by project kishida project. Cashier is a nonprofit organization that empowers invest in women. They develop jewish women leaders and interfaith coalitions in belarus russia ukraine and israel. They deliver torres. Two women who've never held one before broadcast women's health information on ukrainian public radio and help russian-speaking immigrants to israel advocate for equal rights. Learn more at project kiss. You got you like our show. We think you'll enjoy another awesome. Podcast passport helps you understand the world one place at a time every week. Neil innocent undress barcus bring you great music incredible interviews and local gems from around the globe. Discover why ufo hunters love peru. Go backstage with jerusalem's hip hop artists and much much more. Subscribe to passport. Wherever you get your podcasts. Hey guys it's me. She will be back in a couple of weeks with a brand new israel story episode. but today we're excited to introduce you to a new podcast that launch this fall. it's called schmaltzy and it's created by the jewish food. Society schmaltzy explores the intersection of jewish identity and food through live storytelling like the dishes. These tales revolve around the stories. Come with a complex mix of flavors joy disappointment laughter longing and love what i love about schmaltzy. What makes it. Special is how it celebrates the unique power of storytelling to unite us. Even were far apart just in time for hanukkah the episode will be sharing with you. Today is called midnight. Lakas with liz newmark. One night twenty years ago loses kids pleaded with her to abandon bedtime and make lots kisses. Liz couldn't resist today. Lack gaps in the memory of that night old a deep meaning for her. If you enjoy this episode of schmaltzy. I highly recommend you. Check out the rest of their episodes in subscribe to their feed their next episode features israeli tv food personality. Gil hovav a new york-based israeli chef. Not that the money okay. Enough for me. We'll be back soon with new israel story episodes and till then is schmaltzy. Do you think that you're able to reveal your lock goes secret ingredient. When we get to a certain level of subscribers we will post the secret ingredient what level is described. As do we need to get to. The gauntlet has been thrown down. Kane netted lynch the from the jewish food society. I'm amanda dell and this is schmaltzy each schmaltzy podcast episode revisits. A personal story told a jewish food society live event. Pull up a front row seat to hear the original live stories from the stage. Then we'll go behind the tales with the storytellers for more today on schmaltzy liz newmark. Liz is a chef and the founder of great performances in award winning catering and events company that she started as a waitress staffing agency for women in the arts in two thousand six. Liz establish catch ski farm in kinder- hook new york and founded the sylvia center a nonprofit organization dedicated to addressing issues in children's health lose is a third generation manhattanite and was named one of the one hundred most influential women in new york city. Business by crain's new york some stories. You just don't wanna stop in the middle and this is one of those stories so today we are going to break with the schmaltzy podcast tradition and listened to loses entire story before she joins us in the studio. Here's liz from the schmaltzy stage at the new york city wine and food festival where she shared a very personal story about loss living in the moment and resilience so about twenty years ago my catering business was really starting to take off and it was such an exciting time. We had just moved into a great facility in hudson square. And we're getting to expand within that footprint. We had signed the contract with ian schrager and we were operating the hudson hotels so we were really cool. And every day was a combination of meet with customers and clients and internal planning and of course events and all. This was really great. But for the fact that i also had for young children at home under the age of ten and my husband constantly worked laid and when he was working late he was traveling so as you can imagine it was really hard to find balance in my life trying to juggle work and home so i realized really early on that the key to my success both privately personally and professionally was secretive schedule and a routine and stick to it now. I knew about planning. Because i was from the event world where everything has a plan and a timeline and you stick to it no deviation i had waited a really long time to become apparent and i did not want to be an absentee mom. So most days. I took my children to school race downtown. Flew home at the end of the day in order to join them right at dinner time and then we would do baths and story time. And that was the routine heels off sweatpants on and after they went to sleep i would of course get back online and get back to work and try to finish up. Whatever i'd started that day and sometimes they even out to parties so one winter nights started out like most accept this night. I had a really big presentation to finish a deadline for client. So i got home with the baths and the ready for story time. I'm kind of thinking. Let's get this done. So i can get back to work and nelson katie. My nine and eight year old daughters were in their room. They were playing and chatting and wait information. Finish up with the little too and get to them. Sam who was eight and sylvia. San was five and sylvia. The baby three had picked out. One of their favorite books called a story felina in the book. Lena's grandma shares a family fable about apple strudel. So how can i describe what happens next. You know the book if you give a mouse a cookie thing well talking about apple strudel. We started thinking about apples. And talking about apple's of course led directly to apple sauce and the mention of applesauce little sylvia's green eyes lit up and she looks at me and she says why. Don't we make lockers right now and we can eat them with applesauce. Okay so let me tell you about lakas in my family. It's not a special event food. It is not just for. It's kind of like peanut butter and jelly. But it's not because peanut butter and jelly is really quick. Lakas is all the ingredients and it makes a mess and you need a lot of time and then you gotta clean up. And i'm thinking. I gotta get back to work. And she's looking at me like and then sam starts in Grew up to become his high school debating team champion so he tells me they're hungry. Says mom will do it really quickly. And we're going to help clean up and you know what tomorrow night. We will skip stories and we will go a bit early and you know what were starving and sylvia's just egging him on and looking at me and thinking so course i said yes and off to the kitchen we go and all the ingredients come out and with expert and eager little hands. They get started and sam's peeling the potatoes and they're taking turns put into the cuisinart. Great in the onion and sylvia's cracking the eggs on the bowl and mixing in the flower and the seasoning. And she's starting to stir and it's exactly what you expect for cooking with a three year old there are eggshells. The batter and the flower is everywhere. Especially all over her pajamas and she's just chattering away and surreptitiously dropping little treats on the floor for the cat. It was great and lo and behold lot closer fried outcomes the applesauce and the feast began so with full bellies and a sink filled with dirty dishes. They finally march off to bed really self-satisfied and just reeking of cooking oil and it was a perfect night so a few short years later about four years later the unexpected happened. We were upstate. A at our neighborhood celebration. August night when sylvia starts running into a complaining of a really really terrible headache. I took a ride home and my best friend. Who's a doctor came along with us. We got home. She collapsed and lost consciousness. We raised to the hospital and they told us. It was an aneurysm that there was nothing that we could do. She was put on life support and two days later. My beautiful sweet daughter was gone so there really are no words. It's nothing you could describe. I wish that the earth could open me up and just swallow me whole. But i had three young children who needed a strong a mother and father to study their world so i got up and got out of bed every single morning. When i did my shopping. I would sometimes go down to the greene market. And what i discovered was when i was there sort of it was able to escape my pain somehow being with the vegetables and the agriculture and all that life was very healing. Now that summer. I had been taken salmon. Sylvia with me every week to a putnam county farm to pick up. Arcia say share. And i'll never forget. There's one week were there. And they are playing in the dirt with the bugs and the rocks at my feet. And i'm talking to farmers odd and i tell him you know. I really wish i could have a farm of my own and sam looks up at me. And he says big dreams so a few months after sylvia's death. I woke up one morning. And i knew what i had to do. It turned to my husband. And i said we are going to buy a farm. And we're going to create a legacy for sylvia sylvia who really more than anything else wanted to become a helpful human and had. She had the chance she would have done. Something really remarkable so we bought. We started a company and we called the big dreams and we bought land started our farm which was home to the sylvia center where kids come and they learn about healthy eating and good food because we teach them how to cook. Now kids learn by doing so. When i'm there and i'm watching these kids and they are cracking eggs and laughing and chopping vegetables and cooking together and eating together. You know what i feel. Sylvia's spirit and the joy and everything wonderful and good about the world that she really embodied and that year. We started a lot festival as a fundraiser. For the sylvia's center. Now yes. it's a little odd of fried food festival for a healthy eating program but is really a great event and it's eleven years later. Hundreds of people come celebrity judges music lots and lots of lot goes and it is a night of joy of celebration of community and it's the best night of the year. It reminds me of that night many many years ago when i could have said no it's bedtime and instead i chose to say yes. Thank you you look tired. I take it the caffeine toothpaste and adrenaline face serum aren't working. Well maybe you should ask santa for a nectar mattress this year. And if the big guy brings you another unicorn finger. Puppet don't worry because mattresses start at just four hundred ninety nine dollars and she gets three hundred ninety nine dollars in accessories thrown in as well as three hundred sixty five night home trial and a forever warranty go to nectar sleep dot com today. If you're enjoying this episode of israel's story you'll also want to check out another podcast coming out of israel a dasa uncall- new frontiers medicine is an interview. Show that good behind the scenes at hadas world renowned hospital. You'll meet healthcare superstars such as the team that the first surgery assisted by two robots the cornea specialist who reverse total blindness and many others subscribed to dasa on. Call it haddassah dot org or wherever you get your podcasts. This episode is sponsored by better help. A worldwide network of licensed professional therapists with a great variety of expertise committed to making counseling more affordable and accessible. Better help will match you to a counselor. Best suited to your needs with whom you'll be able to schedule a weekly video or phone therapy sessions as well as exchange written messages whenever you need visit. Help dot com slash. Israel's story today to get ten percent off your first month that's b. e. t. t. e. r. h. e. l. p. dot com slash. Israel's story highlights what a powerful story. We are so honored to have you in the studio with us today. I'm really honored to be here. And i haven't heard that story since we told it at the event last year. Yeah new york city wine and food festival as a century ago. Thank you again for sharing such a. Poignant schmaltzy story and being so vulnerable on stage. What drove you to tell that story in front of an audience enough. There's a few parts to the answer. I think there's two parts one is what drove me. And then the second is when lee schrager the organizer the wine and food festival told me about the program and said be great if you had a story And i first pitched the idea. It was to raised eyebrows. Like could we tell such a sad story and that sort of dovetails with why. I think it's important to tell the story because one of the things i've learned is that life is not perfect. life is complicated and it's messy and we see that in this current environment now. And that i think everybody carries a story. I have mine realized that i'm not alone. Being apparent to lose to child burri parent as we call it. So i think we should not be afraid of telling sad stories but it's also a very uplifting story and the power of the human spirit. It's a schmaltzy story for sure. Isn't that what small zach lowe you laugh you cry you know. He went to highs. You wanna run outside. It's everything it's life. It's life and i think it is these challenges that led to find people definitely so now. Your kids are older in the story. We hear about the bedtime routine. And that is the finish line for most parents. Daily parental duties on some level. I can imagine you're probably looking forward to some me time as well though on those nights so so really what went through your head when your kids you know asked you for this bedtime laka party. I'll tell you. Essentially i'm a pushover when it comes kids especially as a working mom i. I don't think they'll say if you ask them to rate me how strict i was or was not. I don't think they would think i was terribly strict but they were really good. Kids eight and i started my kids. You know when. I was in my thirty submit thirties So he found it still. Losing of control has long since disappeared from my life. And i don't think i had it then. So when kids are really they're authentic self and you see their personalities emerging. And i always thought better to have them gang up together and feel that power that they have that me to try to deflect it so when they get their act together and make a credible pitch. I might not cave instantly. I know i'm going to give it that so funny that you mentioned that because that's the unsaid rule that i have with my sister it's always us versus them and we never stray from that. So that's interesting that you thought about cultivating that with your own children but still bring me back to that moment for just one second third hanging on you. They're begging for the lot your presentation that you want to work on like. Was there a big decision in your head or it was instant and you said you know what. I'm just going to do a little resistant. Just because i think that's important not to cave to instantly. But i i. I knew we were going there. Because you know what it was a treat for me to have to have that special moment with your kids is is incredible and still sorta related. They grow up. They move out. Life happens life intervenes. You don't regret it wasn't a ridiculous requests. It was just so juicy and so perfect and so in character with everything about us that it was it was just great another fascinating piece that i picked up on from your story at least to me. Was that you set. Lanka's warrant only a hannukah food in our family it was communist. Pb and j. How did that come to be a good question. they're just so delicious and we do have a secret ingredients. There's a reason why people should have made lockers more often a little a little messy but making a lot of different things for messy. Bacon is messy but lock the so delicious. But it's yes. Do you think that you're able to reveal your lock. Goes secret ingredient. Maybe it's it's you know. It's not up there with truffles and things that come from the dark side of the moon. It's it's really not exotic. So marinate on that one. Okay we'll check back in with you. Don't worry you or something. You grew up eating in your own family when you were a child. My mom i was. I'm one of four. My mother only learned how to cook when we all got married or moved out so no they with the world's worst lots of my mother did not enjoy anything about cooking. You know. I always say was sixteen before i knew the difference between light meat and dark meat and chicken. Do you think that part of your childhood inspired you to become a chef. When did you discover your interest in food. When did i discover even real food. I had We grew up in a very multigenerational families so my grandparents a really super close to all four and my grandmother And we spent a lot of time in the summers everybody's lived together One of my grandmothers my will call her. My russian grandmother nellie Whom i eldest is named for now. She was a very intuitive cook. And if you asked her what ingredients were as she would say a pinch a touch. You know this and that you know sort of floundered around on some kitchen table making her thing. So i knew what home cooked food looked like. We would have to go out to get it to one of our grannies and this was in manhattan where your family lived on the west side. We come across a lot of recipes. That are like oh pinch of this and like one teacup of this. So that's you know that's part of what we're doing here to shoot society trying to capture those beautiful things i. I wish i knew how my grandmother nellie made them. I wish i knew her ingredients. But i don't think she knew you know it's like okay. Let me let me improvise. I mean she's the perfect chef for today. When we think about full utilization of ingredients because nothing went in the garbage can imagine not so the sylvia's center the nonprofit you started in sylvia's memory. Children learn to cook. What have you learned from watching children. Cook show it's a the kitchen is really a magical place. I always when i talked to parents and adults about cooking with kids in the kitchen. I always quote miss frizzle school bus and you know what her matas get messy. Make mistakes and that to me should be the motto of being in the kitchen with kids. It's not about control if you're squeamish about a mess don't go in. You're you know if you if you can't stand failure. Don't go in. I've been this basic rules. You gotta watch you know how you handle a knife you say from the stove you want to establish that. It's got to be a safe environment. But within that context it's it's supplies for for final and learning and it's it's where you fall in love with the ingredients and flavors and tastes and the most amazing thing that happens afterwards is and we do this at the sylvia's center maybe not a during covid But before and after that we sit together as a community and we eat. And i will say one of the maybe. It's an indirect legacy of my mother's not really caring about the food itself. She really cared about the table. And the emphasis was on oncoming together and being together and the conversations and the multigenerational give and take that happened food. Okay that was a detail. She just wasn't into which is fine. But the tables looked gorgeous. My mother who died about three years ago probably could use a different dish three times if for every single meal for the rest of eternity and never use the same twice. She had a lot of stuff and loved setting a beautiful table. So you know everybody has a little different aesthetic. When it comes to it but i i have meandered love just picturing her cover amazing amazing amazing sets upon sets upon sets of everything before before we get to the table. I was you know thinking about another part of your story that that struck me as you were grieving. You said that the greenmarket was a place of incredible comfort for you. Why do you think that that was and what was it about the greenmarket and it was the fall so august september october which is really the most beautiful peak season. You've got just fall. Vegetables collided with end of summer. And of course tomatoes and peppers and people fight for their harvests and things happen and mother. Nature comes in upset. Soul your plans for the growing season. Or it's really this microcosm of of what we have is in our human lives. There's something life-affirming abouts saying how nature works and that seasons turn one from the other and being there was also a place to escape out of a community or people knew me and just look at me with sad eyes and stuff like that and the vegetables didn't do that and and i could engage with the farmers and now is just a a refuge. That was strangely comforting. You enter story with a very powerful line. Before i ask you one last question i want to replay that part of the story one more time cover minds me of that night many many years ago when i could have said no it's bedtime and instead i chose to say us thank you today. We're living in a time where the boundaries between family life and work have never been so blurred and parents are constantly having to make a choice like you did that night. What advice would you give them as they navigate these hard decisions. Sa- a great question and really. Nobody ever wants advice on parenting. So i don't offer it now. I think there was the head of the school. My children went miranshah. Rosca at the hessel. School used to say that choosing a school was a values clarification tests and the phrase has really resonated with me. I think these decisions we make day in day out. There's times you kids push your buttons and you just ready to lock them in a closet and throw away the key and you know you just can't control your emotions and that's that's very real especially i think when you were on top of them and his all the uncertainty and said very stressful time to be doing anything no less parenting but when you can get ahead of your emotions if you can you know you have to sometimes just count to ten and run that value clarifications tests. I'm apparent because you know and just knowing that not only that life is fragile. You can't live with that every moment but but just knowing that they're going to grow up and they're going to be out of the house and it's gonna be gone so these are moments that we never get back so sometimes just have to deep find that little extra bit of patience if you can and try to say yes. I guess liz. Thank you once again for sharing your story and for being on the schmaltzy podcast. It's a real honor to be here with you and thank you for letting me tell the story. I really that that that means a lot. It's one. I think about often to be honest. Well i will give you the ingredients offstage and maybe as encouragement to your listeners. When we get to a certain level of subscribers we will post the secret ingredient has subscribed is do we need to get to. Wow the gauntlet has been thrown out on the schmaltzy podcast. Liz will be giving us her secret lot ingredient. This is a person could lock us at the james beard foundation. She has a lot of festival she will be giving us the secret ingredient. So you better tell all your friends download and listen. You can get it anywhere. You get your podcasts. Good deal hannukah to utah. Schmaltzy is a production of jewish food society made with love in nyc. schmaltz produced. An edited by alan bennett. Our our executive producer is nama sheffi and our theme music is by yuval semo until next time. I'm your host. Amanda del if you enjoyed this episode of the schmaltzy podcast. Don't forget to check out the rest of their feet. Just search for schmaltzy wherever you get your podcasts. If the twenty four hour news cycle leaves you feeling like you know everything but understand nothing. You need to listen to deep background hosted by harvard law school. Professor noah feldman noah who is like a brother to me is hands down one of the smartest most creative and most original thinkers. I knew each week. He interviews experts and policymakers to explore the context behind the headlines is the supreme court nomination process and the election dominate the news. Noah's expertise in constitutional law is more relevant than ever this fall. He presents a special five part series deep bench which tells the inside story of how legal conservatives gained power and now find themselves in the grips of a civil war among conservatives about the future of their movement. Listen to deep background on apple podcasts. Brought to you by pushkin industries. One for mom and one for me. Hey beautiful ulta beauty invites you to see the joy this holiday season with top gifts for everyone on your list including you discover great last minute gifts like menia shadow palettes from julius place fragrance sets from plumbing gift cards and more shop in store online or trey curbside pickup today also beauty. The possibilities are beautiful.

sylvia liz newmark israel sylvia center Liz rachel fisher denikin clark griswold Amc amc Lakas Gil hovav amanda dell new york hudson square nelson katie eight year twenty years sam apple
The 100 Most Jewish Foods: Ep. 174

Unorthodox

1:31:32 hr | 2 years ago

The 100 Most Jewish Foods: Ep. 174

"This episode is brought to you by NCAA March madness. You've prepared all year for this. You've perfected the office computer sneak and the dinnertime digital side. I you're ready to run your place to make sure you don't miss any of the big games. NCAA? March madness is here with games running all day starting at twelve pm eastern time, watch them all on TBS, CBS TNT and true TV today. Hey, take real this is Molly a with an important forum. Public service announcement please remember to brush the insides of your Hamad Tashin with egg lash before folding them into shape and baking, otherwise they might explode and Heyman winds. Enjoy the show. This is an orthodox the world's leading Jewish podcast. I'm Stephanie Budnick joined by my co host tablet, senior writer. Leo liebowitz is hungry and tablet editor at large who needs no introduction. Mark Oppenheimer fueling at large today. Feeling large charge calling you at large so taking control of this episode. The podfather is in so tablets book. Be one hundred most Jewish foods. A highly debatable list is finally here. And to celebrate. We have a very special episode all about Jewish food the good the bad the Bauge. You'll be hearing interviews with people involved in making the book you'll also hear from contributors to the book like cartman, Guilhou vob, Amanda, hesser and Merrill, Stubbs food, fifty two Sholom ostlund or and more who will be actually reading their entries from the book will also be talking with the folks behind the Jewish food society hearing from a doctor who wrote a book about the healing powers of baking kala, and we'll chat with a listener whose bring kosher beer in Portland. But before we get to all of that. I'm kind of hungry. Just just talking about this stuff. I had my Starbucks croissant. So I'm just perpetually Hungary's keeping with me again, relate the highbrow tone of the show, I should say, by the way having had nothing to do with the making of this book. This is a tablet project that nobody asked me to be involved in having just observed over the past year or more the one hundred most Jewish foods, I exist as a as a gorgeous interactive website. And now as a book that I you know, in galleys an advanced copy, and now as a bound beautiful thing that's on sale this week, right? It's extraordinary and I spy. Just in amazement of what you and a lotta and just my colleagues in in the writing world have done with this book. I think it's a a beautiful and literate work of art. I feel like last week we covered furniture in the. I want food now. So look, which is eat so growing up. I will say that I am uniquely positioned to not have a role in this book. Right and a lot. What makes us book? So wonderful is that it's not about fine. Cooking folk cooking this cooking. It's about all kinds of cooking, but really their emotional role in inner Jewish life or in Jewish heritage. Like, what do what makes foods most Jewish right? I grew up in a household. That was religiously secular, but definite, strong, Jewish identity. My father had this sort of classical reform German identity. My my mother's parents had been sort of, you know, Litvak communist types, but Joey Joey Joey in lots of ways through we did some holidays, we had a lot of family lore. None of it touched on food. There was no recipe that I said that I mean, my mother made a good fried mozza. I learned at the age of twenty seven people called it, not surpri I had never heard that term always out of college. It was called fried mozzarella bread. Yeah. And she did that well and her mother had Kentucky Fried Matsuo. Know, my mother, I mean, it was my grandmother did once in a blue moon like brisk. It was among twenty dishes. She made, but the others were like fried chicken and steak and spaghetti and macaroni and cheese. They was kind of American palate. Growing up we had seven meals in rotation. One was friendliest. The other was dominoes. And then one night there was like a tuna fish, and then another night, there might be over a pot roast. But he was very like American. There was nothing ethnic. But there's another thing to say about this, which is that my mother whom I adore and who influenced me greatly strong second way feminist. She wouldn't have said second wave. She wasn't into those titles like she was a product of the women's movement. She got out of college in nineteen sixty six. You know, what was a friend of feminists fucking Domino's. Like, I come out of feminist people who my mother and her friends who did not slave away in the kitchen. They didn't think there was anything progressive about using this organic this or that they basically wanted not to cook. So that said I love eating well, I like food. Jewish food. My favorite Jewish food is is not surpri because I was probably because it has a fried monster has a place in my heart. And when I ate meat. I love brisket. I loved corned beef. I love appetizer. I love smoked fish. But that said like, I doesn't speak to me the way other quote arts do so Leo, what's your what's your Jewish foods as real just look every food food is my Jewish food. Is there a Jewish food that I don't love. I mean, it hasn't we interesting because a lot of the foods in the book are, you know, as Rayleigh our foods that are eaten in Israel. And like would you consider like growing up eating Homus hummus homicide Jewish? I mean, I'm just so curious the way Isreaeli foods function in the larger larger conception of Jewish foods. Like, you were you growing up eating like chicken soup? I grew up eating everything I can't stress enough. Like the things that we ate in. My household would repulsed you like every Friday, we would buy like six Hollas one was for Shabbat and the others. With your hands. Take the inside you would excavate the Hollas the whole thing. So my friend Derek and I play Atari. He liked having a holiday excavate. No, no. But that is sound normal. What we did we excavated the whole thing made it into one giant ball dipped his sat on it in sour cream. It into my mouth then discuss to. Fundamentally undo. So so I I have so many obsessions with so many of the of the foods in in that book. Right. Sour cream being. So and Jewish was when made with cool, right? Because like, yeah. So, but then we're go to desecrate it. South punk rock at a touch of whiteness. There are so many foods in this book that that are mazing in so many that that play a crucial role I feel in kind of Israeli cuisine. But the genius thing to us about Israeli cuisine is all these distinctions that coming here. I realized had this deep political cultural, meaning actually meant nothing in Israel because they were just normal food, and no one who'd necessarily thought, oh, this comes from the immigrants from Iran, and this comes from the, you know, from the people who came from COPA and this is Russian. It's like, it's all it will be the most normal thing in the world to sit down have hummus, and then some herring. And then some USCCA Lau from you know, Bihar injures like it just made perfect sense. Because that's kind of how the country looked growing up. It's like if people from everywhere, and it's still kind of the way the country is and I come a love at it. Also feels like you didn't think of it as Jewish food. He thought of as food, right? You Stephanie what was Long Island cuisine? It's interesting because I grew up on Long Island where like everything was Jewish bios Moses in my particular. Oh portion of obviously, that's not entirely true. I so there was like the Catholic girl in my grade and stuff like that. But there was a way in which a lot of my friends were Persian. So I would go to Maxine house after school, and she would have these like trays of Persian rice that her parents just like had in their second fridge after having a party. We would just like eat it. And it was amazing. I have this very visceral memory that. I think a few years after college. I we were all learning to make my grandmother's ca filter fish recipe. And this was like the recipe that had come through Auschwitz, and you know, all this thing and right before that. We're going to my aunt Nancy's apartment funding to fish. It's funny. It's down, and it's like open paper, and it's it's been scanned. And it's it was obviously Britain after Auschwitz. But it says like one of the directors is just keep adding salt tastes, right? Like, that's like how it was. So we always always have these stories about how somebody's smuggled out a page of a sitter that was like in several body cavities interviews, and in this was different because it was a recipe. But you know, we were going to make the recipe at my aunt Nancy's how apartment, and we're all all the cousins, we're going go meet there for that had to break up with my college boyfriend. I basically it was like, you know, I could do it after I could do before. So I basically break up with this guy and then go to make my grandmother's could fill to fish. And there was something like you put the carp in in the in the process, and it like a meat grinder, and it comes out, and then you like mash it with your hands. And there was something like so deeply grounding about this experience. It's bizarre. Like, I don't know if the to have anything to do with each other. But I was just like these are my people like meat, fish bones. Just like this third-generation feminism death. Feminist situation. Survivor feminism's yet. The feminism is not a thing we should make it felt a feminism I'm in. There was something so nice. And then we were all joking that like our blood, our, sweat and tears went into the thing. But it was nice icon Passover, we ate that memory. A memory of your loser exploit it was like a communion wafer. But yet, that's my weird story about tuition food. But I think there's a way in which I so deeply find comfort in food. I really like food. I find it comforting. It just doesn't have any emotional resonance. When I want like a hot fudge sundae. But it's not like but is hot fudge sundae. But this is why the bagel idea is very real to me because it's like I do feel like I'm connecting through something to filter food. Yeah. Filter feminist you to get this episode started. We are going to welcome. A we already. Got this episode started Stein. We are sorry. We are. So so far away. I want to welcome in tablets editor in chief Alana Newhouse. She's the editor of this collection, and she can shed a little bit of light on what it was like making it a lot to tell us about tablets new book that you edited the one hundred most Jewish foods a highly debatable list, the book was creatively. One of the most unin gratifying and meaningful experiences. I've had in the last few years. It started with an idea which was. What would the foods be if we were to create a canon of foods the way that we create canons of books or movies? Could we look at food the same way as a cultural product that Jews have created over millennia? And if we did look at it that way, and we saw each of these individual products as part of a larger collection that was at were an inheritance what would be on the list? And so we started to ask ourselves these questions, and then reach out to other people, particularly food people and historians and the list that we came up with. I think is actually I I don't think it's perfect. I think we called it a highly debatable list in part because we never stopped fighting about it. But at some point we had to go to press. So what you see is what we eventually committed to. So I will say this rarely did I have more fun. At work and rarely would anyone have more fun at work than working on that book? We do. But, but then there's food I want I want I want to step away from all of this. I I wanna play devil's sous-chef for second and say, okay, great. Devils. No devils similarly and say, okay, look. There's something going on culturally in which people pay way too much attention to food. Right. This all this kind of food he culture, and people obsess over it and people put on a pedestal of forgetting that it is at its course, something very kind of, you know, Ella mental de feel. It's a fair criticism. Do you feel that by looking at food were maybe neglecting to look at other kind of cultural things that are more important, or is food actually kind of the mystery magical path into discussions and thoughts that we actually can't have otherwise, which you know, secret, Madeline unlocked. You know, I think that look a lot of questions you asked me the answer is Nina neither or what's wrong. No. I feel like my answer to that is. I do believe that food is a. Way to talk about Jewish identity that is that feels both at once safe at a time when a lot of other ways of talking about Jewish identity feel scary or challenging, but also deepening. I think it forces you to ask yourself complicated. Questions about abundance, scarcity insider, nece outsider nece about the role that women play and played in Jewish life. I think those those questions are all here, and they're all in the book. There's no right or wrong way to to understand food of the role that food food did play or frankly food did not play a certain role in your life that may have played and others for many many generations of Jews food was inextricable from Jewish experience. And it it was inextricable from the Jewish story that everything was built on you have it literally the story of the first human drama. Starts with an apple then you have a stew at the heart of Jacob and Esau, then you have cows that get fat and skinny for Joseph, and then you have matzo, which is literally how Jews create the or understand the concept of liberation is around a food. The idea that food could ever be leached out of one's Jewish experience not identity, but experience I think maybe a very modern. See I hear what you're saying. But I would actually and I think that's true. There's another way in which y'all's experience of food is very American in modern, which is that when it's talked about as as foodie culture, when we when we exalt chefs, for example, that is super contemporary American and would have been completely alien to most self identifying Jews throughout history in a way that it would not be completely alienating or alien to most French people for say several centuries. It's an American glomming it's an American attachment to an expectation of like, the chef or the food magazine or this or that that it didn't exist in the eastern European shuttle or in Yemen, right? But I would say that actually one of the things about this book, which I think is different from other collections is we love our chefs. And we are so happy to have them as part of the book. I'm in addition to them, though, a lot in fact, I would. Say most of the entries are by people with rooting in history. It's a Jewish history book, it's not simply a book about how to make a cool appetizing plate. It's actually a book about how food functioned in eastern Europe in fifteen hundred how it works more converse os and the idea like the converse of the FINA entry fee. No was a Sabbath stew that was made by converse os or confess owes in Gabeira in peninsula, people who had been Jewish. So they were people who had been Jewish and they had Christian is d- either under duress or voluntarily many of them maintained their connections to their Jewishness. And one of the ways that the authorities would monitor whether or not Jews were secretly still maintaining their Jewishness was through food, and they would find out which people were making this. Particular stew on Friday night and the giveaway, and the thing that people actually had to really be vigilant about was not using the Iberian salt, pork, then everyone used which because many people had slaves or housekeepers or servants of some kind in their homes, even people who are not particularly well off those servants would monitor whether or not the people who they were working for actually we're using salt, pork, which they were supposed to if they were doing. Christian. Like being a premature antifascists, correct? Right. So. That story. How do you take food out of that whole community experience when they used food as their so tether to something that they felt they lost. Let's hear a little bit from the book. I'm Jill cartman, and this is wine. There are so many beautiful Bronco to the blessings that make us. Appreciate the simple gifts. We enjoy. So what are my fav-? Hebrew words to sing. But Ray pre Goffin bitches. I love that my people cherish wine enough to make special carved chalice for it toast each life cycle phase during a circumcision wine is sipped when the Weena snipped a bar mitzvah, boy drinks as he becomes a man a bride and groom partake of the Cup as they joined in holy matrimony. In much is consumed on visit to the inlaws. So many of our holidays include one including our weekly Chabad. And of course, Passover when I was little long before. I drank I already loved chanting the ten plagues and making the droplets on my Seder plate dumb blood. That was the first one and the wine actually looked like it as the symbolic other nine came down the pike. I remember trying to keep them apart. But eventually my. Plagues all ran together. In a cattle disease Lok is depth of the firstborn red puddle later when the four questions were far in my rear view mirror. I was delighted to actually partake in the guzzling. Speaking of which call me, a highbrow own file, lots of people do, but this chick loves manischewitz when I drink it. I imagine Dushi. No Cal similarly dramatically swirling it in a glass, noting the tremendous knows of flamboyant cherry history oak this Jimmy table wine has top notes of concord grape in Robitussin kind of a lot for Jews to pound four glasses of this stuff. But God commanded us to. So look, I m. And this is cool. Be there are many things to say and dried in favor of Kobe. But there is no doubt that it's best advantage is the fact that it gives Jerusalemites another reason to look down on televisions. Tel-aviv is a coolest city simple as that. No Kubat restaurants in Tel-Aviv. How do they live in Jerusalem on the other hand? These are the jewels in the crown these magic dumplings the dough made from vulgar's, Lena potatoes or rice, and then stuffed with minced meat and herbs are grandma's table. They may be called Kubay Kuba or keep big. It's all the same momma. Kuban options are endless you can go Iraqi and each your Kubat in beechwood soap, round, purple and sweet, oh, go Cordish and heavy in a yellow sauce sour and flat. Or be an era and fright or be a snob and aids. Tuft with SeaScape beef confetti or maybe go to the extreme and eat only Baharom giant version of the dish. That was actually invented in Montana Huda market in Jerusalem. Anyway, whatever you choose to eat. They important part is to say, they don't have it until Aviv. Of course, they don't how could they feeling Kuba? So the DOE does not tear requires craftsmanship that they can never achieve. It's all in grandma's wrist. And please don't tell anyone that we all cheat and feel our Kuba the easy way role tiny meat patties freeze them, and then cover with this is that your Roussel might secret. Hundred of these foods, which one touch t the most which one kind of made you actually stop and think. Wow, I've never seen pechanga quite like this. The entry that surprised me in part because it was simply a story that I hadn't heard was Marcus Milton's entry unlocks Marcus Amazon isn't wasn't THEO paean refugee northern Europe. And he was adopted by white parents. He's wonderful autobiography about the story, and he talked about how his grandparents had years before he was adopted had adopted a little girl from concentration camp. And he explained that part of the reason he realized later that part of the reason why it wasn't weird for his parents to have adopted him was because the family had a history of bringing in refugees. And then he talked about how the role that smoked fish, and particularly locks played inside of this very modern family that in some senses had at its heart the refugee experience that is a story. That I don't think I ever expected to stumble on and maybe I should have. But when I did I found that incredibly moving something that comes up having with you on the book and read all these entries so many times and still being moved by them. Even even now in the book is out that comes up on a lot of these entries is this idea of being weird for what you brought to the lunchroom like Ruth, racial writes about bringing rye bread sandwiches, and that the pungent smell being so embarrassing when all of her, you know, all the other girls had all the other kids, white bread sandwiches, and and actually how later in her life. She comes to love Ribe read after just thinking of it as this weird smelly thing and Gabriel Stillman writes about Mefleh toe, which is the Moroccan food. The Moroccan delicacy you eat in Muna, which is the Moroccan and of Passover celebration, and he basically talked about basically his mother would send him to school every day with a mutt. To sandwich for all of passenger not just the beginning. And even his Jewish friends. But like, that's crazy. And he talks about like the crown how hard it is to make a sandwich on mozza. And then to be sitting in a. A cafeteria eating it's so clearly Marxist other. And it's so it's sort of interesting to me, even sort of what you were saying earlier, Mark like whether or not, you know, it these sort of experiences are ingrained in you. And this idea of like being in a lunchroom feeling weird about what it is that your particular. Parents packed you in your lunch is so fascinating. I was weird because my parents packed me lunch. Everyone else at the school on up -solutely. It was a poor school. I mean kids came for government lunch. So if you brought a lunchbox you were one of the the middle class white kids, and I definitely remember that? I mean, I get it. I totally got. Thank you. Thank you. I'm hungry now. Josh. Hey, it's Josh here. Phil, listen. We don't just make a podcast together. We hang out to recently, Leo came for dinner, which was great because we both like a good meet meet fricking. This meat fricking. Now, I'm very particular about meet my butcher feared a bowler hat and bowtie. And his offerings are free range well-fed well-treated animal, less delicious. However, the L keeps postering butcher's meat is not. So where could I find a butcher is delicious mine, but kosher for Leo? Whereas it from the answer is our latest sponsor, coal foods. You know, that Meller company that had talked to us coal. That man. I like maybe I like to go to my butcher I like to buy fresh delicious meat. I eat this, dude. Bill lamb chops that my kids ate the other night. They're like can we not go to our butcher again? It's not my star shut up taste this. Oh my God. So some Brandon good, right? Phenomenal. I gotta tell you. This is some of the most amazing meat of. So here's the thing. A lot of smart. Nice people cared. If there'd beef as grasping and that just grass-fed but a hundred percent fit. The also wanna know that their poultry has pastured their meat v of antibiotics and hormones and pesticides and GMO's and also baddest people also care if the farms are family owned, and if they treat their employees fairly that's a really important thing. Yeah. And coal foods does all of that. This completely true. But let's be honest. But I really care about is that I walk into your home. Josh. And I smelled the most amazing meet incredible smoke, and I love knowing that it's one hundred percent. Kosher million percentages Passover coming. It will be great to be able to serve food. That's kosher. That's delicious. That's ethical also go to col- foods dot com. That's kate. O L foods dot com and use the code on orthodox for ten percent off your order. Then check out the recipes and cooking tips because before you know, it, but you have the best thing in the world. You'll have a box of tasty. Kosher meat delivered right to your door. Perfectly packed perfectly ship perfectly. Delicious perfectly. Kosher. Seriously, one of the greatest ducks I think I've ever had this stuck tastes like it had a very good life. We are here at the magical Gabriella Gershon. She's a food writer and editor in New York City. She's been on staff at Saverne magazine and Rachel Ray every day, and she's a fun food column in the Wall Street Journal. She's the recipe editor of the one hundred most Jewish foods book and she moderates a series of food talks temple emanuel's striker center. Welcome gabby. So happy to be here. So you're the recipe editor for the one hundred most Jewish foods book. But before that, you were the project editor on the web version, which is how you and I met I was it was it was my first big club ration- with tablet. I was just remembering that I had written for next book in like an earlier life. And then suddenly I'm doing this big project with tablet Alana, and I met on a panel about cured foods in the Jewish tradition, which seems like a very entree into this world like. It's like smoked and salted. And I'm more of a person mice also had a lot of anxiety going into that panel. I grew up with grandparents who are immigrants in the country. They did a lot of yeast dough baking. So I grew up loving the Bubka which everyone loves now. But I'm not going to be like was the OJ Bob Glover because we all know that that's not really a thing. But I I liked the dry yeasty Baca, you know, accept non chocolate Bubka as canonical, Bob. I prefer it in. Yes. Ars chocolate Baabda is a new world thing. I I like the flavor of the cinnamon, I wait. So that's like a thing that came to that. We'd cited in America, we were doing we're cinnamon the old school thing. I just decided that sounded really definitive. New. Slovenia I really liked poppy seeds in desert. So like, a yeast sto, poppy seed, Hamad Tashin is is probably my deathbed food also very timely right now, we're in the customer, and does it offend you. When you go into the newfangled bakers like HAMAs with call in jalapeno sauce. Like is this like, I I'm not I'm not really hard core. I don't make other people like what I like. So I really like how Jewish food advances. My actually a couple years ago. I wrote a piece in defense of the rainbow bagel because I think that as long as Jewish food is a living breathing part of the culinary world that that's a good thing. So yes, the jalapeno traditions that you have seen in the Jewish food world that you said, you know, what the buck stops here. I'm not putting up with that. I don't think it's very cute to wrap him off the ball and bacon. I don't think all Jewish shoot has to be kosher. But I don't like. The situation just for the sake, right? It doesn't have you kosher. But it shouldn't give middle finger. Keep kosher xactly. I'm kind of with that sort of exactly I feel though I will say that. And I'm not I'm not a food person anyway, shape or form, but I do have a kind of snobbery when I see rainbow Hala something about like taking the just make you to chance to sort of get your color palette, right? That I think you've moved away from the full more in the world of cigarettes. Yeah. I'm I'm with you. I mean hollow is sacred bread. Yeah. So I think the difference between a rainbow bagel with like the fun Feddie cream cheese, which is gross but interesting, and then the rainbow Hala, which may be for some people crosses that sacred line. So what were some of the recipes that you struggled with? I think that we think of as icon EQ that everyone's going to be like, my grandmother's recipe is different than this. And that's why it's wrong. Well, we already know we're gonna fail everyone in that regard. So we just need it to taste Hamish. And to look exactly like what you're going to expect. When you open the book, we have chicken soup on the cover was shredded chicken, and we have some nice, carrot coins. We have some parsley that's all going to be in the recipe. And it's taken for granted that it's going to taste good. I also have a whole crew of Bella boost as my crew it's like Winston funny and her whatever crew she takes around everywhere with her. I've Abella boost crew all. Jewish grandmother developed all of these recipes, which who are the relatives of yours on. My mother developed ten recipes for the book, she happens to be an excellent talented food professional, but Rebecca Flint Marx, Mira of nine Olga Maslov, Molly, gay, Anna Gershon, and we have recipes from Joe Nathan from early is Bella boasts is there like a like a male version of Belarus STA. Offenders beijing. It's an amazing word. I'm so that you're using its master of the house all base, right? Master of the house. It was an accident. But I'm so happy impressed. You know, it's one of my favorite words. And so yeah. Master of the house actually has come to me in a woman who runs a serious kitchen. Oh maker is a master of the house. So that it's not that husband. So I mean, it's actually a masculine word all base. So yeah. Use it for both. Sure. Bala busta. So we had a crew of women who all are Jewish. It wasn't a prerequisite. It did feel that there needed to be some kind of meaningful history with the recipe developer and the food. They were making that they could capture the flavor of these foods. So you also wrote a bunch of great entries for this book wrote poppy seeds, take lock which is a great word cottage cheese. Like, what's your all time favorite? Classic Jewish food. I know already shout it out to the poppy seed pastry, but it is a yeast dough pastry with poppy seed, it doesn't have to be anti Schnitt can be in the streets of strudel. It can be like a Hungarian style and the shape of a horn. But I really do enjoy that poppy filling how much has your family's history. Played into like your specific Jewish tastes the Jewish. This closest to my heart has everything to do with what my grandparents have made as growing up in. I'm a first generation American. So I really had like a fresh off the boat food experiences. I reference my father's father. He made cottage cheese when I was growing up than he would make. Oh, yeah. Hardcore cheesecloth and the way and my mom drink the way, which I thought was really itchy. When I was a kid. But now people sell away in bottles. One thing we all decided as a group when we were doing this project at tablet with to call this the one hundred most Jewish foods, not the one hundred best Jewish foods because I personally didn't want anyone pigeonholed into having to extol the virtues of each food. And I think it really resonated with a lot of the writers because it gave them room to be like actually have a very tormented relationship with this food. But I have a lot of thoughts about it like children. Yes. Thank you so much for being here. How do we follow along with you? How do we RSVP for that event? How did we just see more of you? Well, gob a rights is my Instagram. That's probably where most active GAB, I w r I t e s and temple Emanuel striker center if you just Google that you can look at the event. In the programs. They have a musing amusing events they have like every week like Helen Mirren and Gloria Steinem interviewed Phil Rosenthal a couple of weeks ago. So it's never disappoints. Thanks so much. That was Gabriella christianson. The recipes editor for our book, the one hundred most Jewish foods. Jeffrey us quits, and this is goose if you asked get in from the old country about they're most electable ultimately special meal, the answer it most certainly have included goose goose was the racial eastern European and central European Jewish protein. Not chicken not beef in Romania Jews made that now famous pastrami we associate with Jewish deli by curing goose meat, then rubbing it with spices than smoking roasted goose was the coveted main during German eastern, European Hannukah feasts with potato Locke's fried in goose fat served alongside the liver from the Hanukkah goose aka flog, raw was usually stored for Passover goose was essential feature of Yiddish culture and its food traditions. The classic Shalam them story from nineteen Ninety-two fittingly, titled geese, the female Jewish protagonist takes the reader through the process of purchasing young. In October and fattening them up for winter for the meat fat and down feathers. The realities of twentieth century America, however, forever altered Jewish eating beef was cheap chicken was even cheaper in nineteen forty eight A N P brand supermarkets hosted the chicken of tomorrow contest to the -veloping. New breed of chicken pretty close to what we're eating today. Unlike he's the chicken of tomorrow could be held in captivity and had nothing but corn and grain stalwart Jewish goose lovers attempted a legally raising geese inter tenement backyards in the Lower East Side, but eventually the forceful powers of America's -ation and sanitation one out. As industrial farming took root goose went from being the choice meat of the Jewish community to a relic, the old world something referenced by cranky old Jewish men. Lamenting the state of the world and erstwhile dickens novel or Sholomo them story. But that's indicate the importance of geese to Jewish gastronomic history. Hi, I'm Wayne Austin. And this is the used t back. One of the most common features of the Jewish kitchen isn't found in a pantry or a cupboard or refrigerator. It's a tea bag specifically a used teabag air drying on the counter or creating a tiny puddle on a saucer. For my parents who were otherwise coffee drinkers a Cup of tea was a nightly ritual when I was growing up. They didn't go for anything fancy or herbal or decaffeinated. It was Lipton all the way they share a single teabag between the two of them. And then leave it on the counter for the next night. I didn't keep track of how long they'd make it last. It's entirely possible that they had only the one teabag. I've heard similar stories Jewish households for decades. Maybe it's a reflection of the ancient communiqu principle of bow touch. Tweet preventing needless waste, or perhaps it's a more generation Lee specific tendency among children of the depression growing up poor in Jersey City, my mother and my aunt pick this up for my grandmother who lived through the depression would never have wasted something as precious as teabag. When I moved away to New York. I kept a small box of Lipton in my cupboard for my parents. Anyway, we can visits once when my parents and my aunt were all at my apartment. I made them t- being careful to use one tea bag to make all three cups. But when I tossed us bag in the garbage afterward. They howled it's still good. They shouted. You can use it again. I don't drink tea. I protested to me t- his exactly how you'd expect like hot grass clippings. I only make it once a year for you. I said and you're leaving tomorrow, they relented grumbling, but I can almost hear them wondering if it would be so bad to keep the bag on the counter until the next year. I'm Amanda has and I'm Merrill Stubbs. And this is I get why her to Schick says writing about brisket for collection about conic Jewish foods because we are jealous jealous that we didn't grow up with brisket. Laurie sleep fatty juicy supple brisket. It's the perfect brazing. Beef risk is full of flavor. With a thick layer of fat that naturally based the meat as it cooks making it impossible to ruin we wasps were raised on pot roast parched cut, the seems to beckon inexperienced cooks to boil it dry and roast beef which leaves every cokes nerves frayed until the first lice reveals whether or not you succeeded in coaxing it to just the right pink nece, and you probably didn't wasps love their unforgiving meets just as they relish Doni silences at the table, choose smartly embraced meets that like to actually be enjoyed. Brisket welcomes acids like vinegar tomatoes veraciously absorbs herbs and spices. And get so tender you needn't own a sharp knife to slice it. And it's great for holidays in parties. You can cook it in advance lay the slices in a serving dish soaking in the cooking juices and reheat it to serve it will even be better this way, if you have leftovers you'll have the makings of epoch steak sandwich. And now Brett worship explains the difference between pastrami and corn beef. Hi, I'm Brett worship. And I run a newsletter cold. What's the difference or lead us issue delves into that vaccine question? What's the difference between pastrami and corned beef? Well, you may have some vague understanding that the strumming corned beef or two different things in that one might be better than the other. You may be stuck on the how or why you're the major points of differentiation between the two because no meat should ever. Be mystery strumming has two possible ancestries either Romanian worth predecessor pastrami was made with pork or mutton or Turkish or it'd be a descendant of hysteria made with beef corn beef hills from Ireland which is wise eating on Saint Patrick's Day today's corned beef and pastrami or both made from beef, albeit different parts of the animal. Corned beef is made from brisket which comes from the lower chest of the straw me is either made from cut. All the Dekel lean wide firm shoulder cut for the naval smaller juicier section right below the ribs these days, you may also see strumming with brisk the straw mean. Corn beef are Brian before they're cooked. They're either rubbed with or submerged in a solution of salt and spices to infuse the meat with moisture inflate Bryant the mixture of salt sugar pepper poofs for Andrew leaves juniper, berries and dill as well as the preservatives, sodium nitrate or sodium nitrate after Browning pastrami gets coated in a mixture of black pepper, coriander mustard seeds fennel seeds, and sometimes fresh garlic that spice, cutting is what gives it its blackened appearance corn beef is no spice myths, speak. The strongest smoked over hardwood. Oftentimes at the pan of water nearby helps create Steve and keep them eat voice, then cooled than steamed before serving corn beef is just oiled sometimes cabbage and other accoutrements in the mix. If you like this, you can subscribe to what's the difference at tiny letter dot com slash what's the difference. Thanks for listening. Jay, we talked a lot about drinking bourbon, scotch whisky all sorts of things on this show. But at the end of the day wine wine is is your basic. That's that's what we all need. We all love it. And from South Africa comes a unique take on kosher wines. It's perfect for your Seder. Your simple, your Shabbat meal your dinner table any night of the week any month of the year. Unorthodox comes from his on V wind farm which dates back to the seventeenth century the farms nestled on the southeastern slopes of the parl mountains, the vineyards enjoy a superb wa which captures delicacy and flavor of both red and white grapes of light, you could buy sauvignon Blanc Shamim Bank or merlot cabernet sauvignon Bordeaux type blend. The winds are all metal shawl kosher for Passover, and they're certified kosher by the orthodox union and the Cape Beth jets, you've got South African cautious and worldwide respected. We also give an hour. Yes. The unorthodox northern for being delicious. You can get the wine at all. Good wine stores in the northeast mid Atlantic or Florida, you can check your local listing. So before you head out unorthodox wines dot com and find out which of my local wine stores will have this wine and for a limited time period. You can go to bitty dot com slash on north wine for free shipping on all orders. That's bitterly dot com slash north of wine by the wine glass, turn on your favorite podcast and have. Next. We talk to Beth naughty. She's a doctor and the author of braided a journey of thousand Hollas about the healing power of baking bread. Welcome beth. Thank you for being here. Thanks. I'm very excited. This book is so refreshing, an amazing and just like suppressing I would actually love for us to get started. By you reading a bit from it terrific, the act of making the the mixing and the needing the watching in the waiting can heal your heartache and your emptiness your sense of being overwhelmed. It did for me you could bake bread. Once a week every week. I did you can make it alone. Or with other women like I have done the smell of fresh baking bread turned our house into a home. So go ahead. Get down those ingredients grabble and call me in the morning. I'd love to hear how you are doing. Amen. So your doctor, obviously. But this book is about Hala. How did you come to haul to baking Hala? And then how did you connect that to your your larger practice about ten years ago when I was practicing medicine and raising three small children and slowly losing my mind, a friend suggested at the Jewish new year that I make hollow which was a laughable suggestion because I didn't make anything baked brownies. You know, the kind of the box where you had the that. I'm really good at that. Exactly deli my favorite, okay? Still my favorite the best Brown. However, I took her up on her suggestion, and I baked bread and tala, and it was the most amazing thing. Imagine six ingredients on the counter Abol and me no pager's going off. I wasn't picking up Legos. I wasn't doing anything else. But my hands in a bowl of dough. And at the risk of hyperbole. I think it changed my life. I just stopped for twenty minutes and made bread. And then we had it that night. And it was the coolest thing. Right. These two lopsided braids and the Casey we're doubting your life decision. Like at some point. You start smelling that smell. That's right. That's absolutely, right. It's the most incredible smell, and it turned our house into a home. It was really profound. So I did it again the next week. And then I did it again. And before I knew it. I was rearranging my life to make Hala meaning to get home from work on Fridays by three pm instead of seven. Or I'd make it first thing in the morning. I was finding all these creative hacks to how to figure out how to make hollow on Fridays. Correct. Because I have to say I've actually done the same thing over the past eight or ten months, I said, my wife is a wonderful Baker. But breads not for thing. She knows how to make all. But I said, well, if we're going to have hall every week, I guess I'm the follow Baker. I don't make anything. It's now the one thing I bake, and I probably get to at once or twice a month. But like those are times, I get home from work two or three in the afternoon Friday, and it is it's so easy. Right. And that doesn't mean it's going to be the best hall in the world. But to make a competent Hala, and the smell is going to be great, no matter what. So I totally with you there. I think that's right. And it it's it's there's a kind of simplicity to this particular, Brad. So, but but for me it hasn't meant moving onto any other breads, which I think is fine. What about for you gateway drug not for me? I. It's all about Hala. But did it didn't change anything in sort of? I don't even know how to call without something. Silly like, the spiritual makeup of your home. Did you find floating more tells absolutely? So on a couple of different dimensions. One just for me personally to be grounded in time and space on Friday, making bread is a really powerful thing. And it's a great way for me to get a weekly reminder that that there's sort of a larger purpose in a larger meaning, and I really liked that. And now we have Friday night dinner as a result every Friday, which was really beautiful. I didn't grow up that observant. And so it's been really fun to to bring that into our lives and to our kids lives and their friends. I'm really grateful for that. How old are the kids? Now just about nineteen seventeen and fifteen tomorrow loving Friday night dinners with the family, actually, it's really awesome. Because they do very cool. How's the hallo-? Yeah. It is only the hollow. Yes house there. Follow baking practice. Actually, it's getting rather good. My my middle. One is starting to make hollow pretty frequently. This fall, it's quite fun, and our younger one is she coined the term. That's in the book painting. The she used to stand with me on her chair when she was little and paint the holler with the wash. I'd love the right. And splatter the Jackson Pollock like. And so she also helps to so beyond the the smell and the bring everyone together and the and the time to yourself, right? Like, that's sort of. That's that nice escape. I imagine. There's something about the needing and the pushing that actually is physically good for us. Oh, absolutely. I need for my needs. As I write in the book because it's an incredible way to handle stress and just get yourself focused in the moment. And you're right. It's a nice workout. I don't use a mixture. I it's a bowl and the counter what I love about making Hala that I've learned since making it for for so many years. I didn't. Out this way, appreciating is it connects us to our heritage. And when I'm making hall, I know that my friend here New York meredith's making Hala, and I know that Allegra making it in London and Miriam's making it Intel Aviv, and we're all making hollow on Fridays all for the same reason and have been doing. So since the time of Sarah, I think it's incredible. Do you have any special tricks or tips for what what's like Beth recognize abject? That's special sauce the special sauce. Wow. I do one rise. And I do that specifically because I want to keep it simple because I think that to to maintain its behavior modification right at the end of the day and to keep it sustainable, and so that I can do this weekend and week out. I only do one rise in it keeps it short. And sweet. And I know that I can do it the next week if it's a long complicated process. And it's going to take me all day. I'm not going to do it again. I might do it once. But I think that we all need ways to manage stress. Our lives and to to find ways to be present. And for me, it's making Hala. And therefore, I keep it really simple. Can you explain what one rise means for someone who maybe has has only made Hala once on this? Absolutely. So I mix all the dough together. That's all done. I put it in a bowl, and I put it aside to rise. So that's when the east does it's magic, and it's going to double in size, which is fantastic. What you could do at that time though, when when that's ready to braid you could let it rise again. And then I e you could breathe it and put it to the side and let it rise for another hour or two or however long, and I don't do that. I let it rise for an hour and a half. I brought it and bake it and I'm done and it's perfect. So I get what I need. But I also move on for people who are inspired by your book as so many will be to try it out. Is there a recipe? Yes. Recommend in the front of the book is the recipe that my friend gave me ten years ago. It is still the recipe I use and it's actually. From here in New York City. It's from the J C on the Upper West side of Manhattan, our home from home. I love that Marleen Meyerson JCC. Lutely, absolutely Beth. Rick. Thank you so much for being here. Three D book. I made me realize that I actually do want to start peaking Holly. Even if I knew they're going to be bad at first. Oh, no. There's no such thing as bad Hala. Right. Trust me put like the idea that that that there's it's about more than just the product is such a moving idea. It's so obvious, and I kind of love the Jewish calendar. Beaks this speak in this time. It's very smart. So even sort of if you're not religious if you don't have about dinner, you can still do this thing each week. I love that. that MD talking about her book braid it a journey of a thousand callers. Gail Simmons and this is pickles. I'd like to say never met a pickle didn't like, but that will be slightly untrue. As far as I'm concerned sweet pickles don't count in the category. Gladly accept any other salty. Well and preserve vegetable though, in fact, as far back as I can remember full sour dill pickles have been the single most important food in my life. There's no other flavors satisfying, nor the defines my family, my Jewish heritage as perfectly as a pickle allow me to explain mother was a fabulous cook growing up in Toronto. I was spoiled by the freshly made meals she prepared every day, my father on the other hand could barely boil water. But somehow he managed to become our family pickle maker each year in late summer when Kirby cucumbers came into season, my father drag home, a giant bushel from the market and for two days. My mother's kitchen would become his pickling lob. I can't imagine our fridge or seller without a jar or twelve his full sour dill weed infused lip smacking face puckering pickles. We ate them all year round after school or as a midnight snack with burgers or roast Turkey piled onto platters served. Every Friday night for Chabad but also in Russia, Shana Passover Hanukkah alike. No holiday table was complete without them in my early twenties. I moved to New York for culinary school one afternoon time. At homesick went to the Lower East Side looking for pickle to curb my craving after tasting few from the area's last remaining pickle sellers. I land on one that did the trick. It wasn't quite as sour as my father's. It's crunchy exterior didn't give way to a softer intensely from ended center exactly as I had hoped but came close and so for the next ten years loyally slept jars home to my Chelsea apartment. Whenever time allowed when I got married in two thousand eight to fellow pickle enthusiast. It seemed only fitting that my father made a hundred jars of pickles to give to our guests as a memento, but the logistics of importing so many pickles across the border from Canada in the precious liquid proved futile. So I've pleaded with my pickle dealer to sell me jars of his pickles to custom label for the occasion. He reluctantly agreed. The wedding went off without a hitch. A few years later, we had a daughter as a wash my friends struggle with picky eaters and infinite demands for candy and sweets. A slow and steady fear to cold. What if my child didn't like pickles, faithfully are predisposed taste buds passed down yet? Another generation and at five years old pickles are among her favorite foods. We eat them together. When I get home from work on every Jewish holiday, and whenever we see them on a restaurant menu. She demands in her lunch and once in a while for breakfast too. I couldn't be more proud. She acquaints them with her grandfather. And in time, I hope come to think of them as I do a vital link to our past into the generations of Jewish pick leaders who came before us. I'm tracy. And this is Hebrew national hot dogs might hear insta- kosh route growing up was late that saying about whether you should button the buttons on three buttons suit. Sometimes always never sometimes milk with meat always shellfish. I mean, I lived in Maryland, never, pork. I still never pork. Regards to bacon. I am confident. I am missing out big time. But I take pride in my allegiance to kosher hot dogs. They're better. Anyway, or so I've been told I wouldn't know great hotdogs to me are delicious juicy without the dangerous smokiness. I can only imagine the once stuff with poor have my dad would get second avenue deli dog shipped frozen in bulk when my parents and brother were away on Saturday afternoons for soccer games. I would stay at home with the George Foreman grill squeezing the top down at those charged dividend. Into the dogs lightly. Splaying the buns on the grill near the end deli. Mustard a coke, I can't believe people eat them with up. My father told me about the Hebrew national ads. We answer to a higher authority. A more concise statement of American Jewish assimilation. I have not found our hot dogs are better than your dogs because they must satisfy demands not only of your profane laws of man, but our own Sigrid laws of God, Jewishness it works. Infants circumscription could take a page from this marketing strategy. But of course, the implied boast was unprovable because those making it would never eat the other dogs, the slogan combined confidence in the reason superiority of one's faith with an orthodox commitment to that faith. Regardless of reason, many group has refused to copy the American mainstream. But it takes something still known by its. Dish name chutzpah to insist. No, actually, you will come up. I'm really hukou. And this is Persian rice. For all the love lavish upon lumpy Eskenazi darlings such as the big oil cocoa or multiple it is indeed the Persian rice that if it came down to it for it always does could serve as the Jewish. People's most fitting alimentary metaphor, lean distinct, grains, negligible on their own become Castro nominally substantial win together on a spoon or in amount on the train come. What may be herb Bill leak parsley or spice, cumin, cinnamon Cardamom or being Favel green or the black-eyed variety while the palatable repast might lead the epicure to believe that mere lightness accounts for the taste the crusty. Bottom of the pot concoction offers tough rebuttal leaving room for many interpretation. Nhs. For instance, this only with so harden the bottom the such lightness on top become possible and can one make this dish from Mia recipe, Queen Esther would advise against it. If she could it takes serious education to learning by decide of culinary home to create the crusty fluffy paradox without involving the local fire chief, not so metaphorically speaking. Wage crew if you like what you're hearing. You should buy this book, you can find it at Taba. Amac dot com slash one hundred Jewish foods. Now back to the show. We are here with NAMA Sheffi. Amanda Dell they are with the Jewish food society nonprofit that works to preserve celebrate and revitalize Jewish culinary history. Which if we realize is amazing and should be loved and supported by all of so to start you both introduce yourselves. Tell us what your role is at the Jewish food society. And what it is. Sure. Hi, everyone. My name is nam Sheffi, I'm Dave founder and executive director of the Jewish food society. And I think about the society is as the new home for Jewish food. I think that Jewish food deserves a home, and we hope to be that place. I'm Amanda dull, I am the program director for Jewish food society. So I have the amazing opportunity to bring our digital recipe archive to life so through our programming. We really got to bring the stories and recipes off the page and into an act. Title experience that people can have for themselves to see and taste, listen, we're these are coming from all over the world archive generations of buddies throughout time, essentially, yes, we have a website, which we were call digital recipe archives. So basically on the archive, we're preserving family recipes that we have collected by cooking with people and then recipe testing, and then presenting it on our archive Duva fever from from that archive like one that you could say like God that is perfection. I'll turn NAMA for the favorite. I think that's hard. Okay. So I really love the Mexican Jewish recipes the twit of with a lamb stuff lamb shoulder dish from a chef that grew up in Mexico City, and these dishes really brings together is grandma's. Heritage. Foam, Aleppo and hair new home in Mexico City. So it's slavers dis. Tom arraigned and all leaves and Hala Pinos. And it's it's so unique cell's amazing someone reach out to you and say like, you know, here's where my family's from. I have this amazing Persian rice dish that was was made every Friday night. Like, how do you how do people find you guys? And how do you find the recipes? So think it's two ways. So we are constantly actively searching for interesting stories recipes, and by the way, we we we care a quarterly about the deliciousness of the recipe and about the interesting story behind eight so that's like the two main criteria. So we have an amazing team of people collaborators that you know, going after those stories and they can come from celebrity chefs or from grandma's. Or from anyone really with talent in the kitchen and good story to tell. So that's one way and the other way is really people submitting through the website. So we have a submitter recipe form, and we get all sorts of weird and the leashes and great stories our signature event that we do is called schmaltzy. It's a storytelling tasting of it. So it's a little bit modeled after the storytelling style of the moth people tell a really personal story that in some way. The schmaltz is on the pop Gorman people, I commend we've never had a story specifically about schmaltz. But last in the the Foley future, the scholar and cookbook author Dr goal to be in. And she wanted to tell the story about the CIA. So for me, it was really interesting because I I actually am Russian and polish. I had never heard of pechanga once I finally understood what it was. I think the best way to describe it for people that would maybe want to eventually to like gel. Tool. Yes, jello. But it's meat texture is a little bit difficult for people. Sometimes. Okay. So it's kind of like, I also think it could become a gay trendy because it's like a bone broth, but it's just frozen. More more Gelt. So you know, when we got to serve that schmaltzy. We really tried to present it in a beautiful way with some parsley on hardboiled egg, some horseradish some thought gone the side. So that people would be enticed to try it and efficient. Yeah. I think it just speaks to what we're trying to do which is trying to showcase traditional foods and recipes that maybe people don't necessarily know that are not part of their everyday understanding of what Jewish food is. But our concil really delicious and have a story behind it. And the fun. I was at that multi event. And so everyone there's a bunch of story tells and then you go in the new eat the foods. So basically, there was a story Lear lesser 'cause who's in the book ready by kosher salt. He had a story about Kyla. And then after you went over to his station eight his Kyla, and I was it was a maze. Ing it's this like what a Tunisian beans, literally spin it. Yeah. Really what I fit into last night for real. Wow. Jars of those finish. So why is food? I love the idea of it's a storytelling event with food. And then you get to eat the food, which is such a perfect concept. But why is foods such a good vehicle for storytelling? Do you think? I mean, I think it's so such an immediate to medium so sensual. So like, I think everyone's like even Indies through like if we think about what's our memories from childhood. I bet like all of them will be connected to food, right? Like, it's such a vivid sense. And I think like working for many years add as rally consulate promoting Isreaeli culture. It was it was challenging in many ways, you know, to communicate s- music programming and dense and all sorts of cultural project, but food was you know, such in and easy and affective medium to get people curious an interested. I'm also curious you guys have a tote bag that I have I love it. It's a list of foods, and it's like in this, very cool font. And it says schmaltz Laka Sabine Sabine. Let's my par- my question polish shoe, good herring. And so I'm I'm wondering we we get Shala Challah. We get accuse a lot of being normative. And so I'm wondering when you make up Topaz that has a list of foods is it important that like, okay? This one's from here. This one's from here. This one's to be choose what you're representing. And how much is that? How much does that play into your thinking about everything you do with this organization? A lot. And so our mission is to communicate a way more diverse and delicious representation of Jewish food. So to means that it's from all over, and it's global Jews lived literally all over the place. So yeah. So you know, Sabih definitely should be there. And I think that the story of Sabet in particular is so interesting and so- Jewish. So it's in Iraqi Jewish abet breakfast, basically. So it's a spread of pita and tahini and fried eggplants and parsley and Ombu, which is and unripe mango condiment if people wanna find out more organization or contribute recipes to the archive. How can they get in touch? How can they find you Jewish food society org and follow them on Instagram because the best thing is like the photography is beautiful and lush, and it's these like. Old old old recipes put on beautiful food photography. Thanks so much guys. Chef in Amanda, del of the Jewish food society. Hey, J crew. I have a question you personally, are you happy? Do you feel satisfied and what you're doing? Or do you think maybe you're called to something more? Maybe you wanna take your passion for Jewish life Jewish learning and Jewish people and take it in a new direction because you know, what you only go around once in this lifetime. We Jews don't spend a lot of time talking about the afterlife. And we don't believe in reincarnation. So this is the one shot to do something meaningful. And for some of you that call might be to the Ravin at a lot of broken justness world. Hebrew, college knows that. And they're vibrant enjoys pluralistic community helps people find their passion. And they're calling as rabbis as teachers hill professionals as pastors as social activist community organizers and more the rabbinical school is open to second career folks as well as those just starting out, and I think that describes some of you so drink deeply from the well of Jewish tradition in a rigorous academic environment merged with Sheva. Learning extraordinary, faculty and leaders will lead you they will take you by the hand, they will help you become the kind of Jewish communal leader that you want to do the president rabbi Sharon Cohen, spelled someone very dear to me. She performed my wedding to sit Froemming now sit Oppenheimer about thirteen years ago. Everyone goes to Hebrew, college dot EDU slash unorthodox will receive a copy of Farren anastos piece, the beginning of service, which is very moving and inspiring essay on the long to live a life. That matters. This episode is sponsored by Hebrew college. And we're happy that it is because the Jewish community needs rabbis who are creatively. Engaging with Jewish tradition and the Hebrew college rabbinical school is currently accepting applications, maybe one of them should be from you. Go to college dot EDU slash unorthodox. Right now. I'm Leah came. And this is Yemen night breads as a community with limited resources Yemenite Jews mastered. The art of transforming the simple ingredients of fat flour and water into a repertoire of Boreas baked goods this resourcefulness. A Mark of great Jewish home. Cooks across cultures has resulted in tempting everyday breads, like flaky fried Malala as well as a host of decadent Sabbath breads, there's coupon a- a- pull apart centerpiece. That's as rich as brioche with a deep Brown exterior, and Jeff noon, a crepe like pastry made from dough that gets stretched ultra-thin smeared with clarified butter than folded, enrolled endlessly onto itself, both are baked overnight at very low temperatures emerged from the oven, Downey and caramelized. They're traditionally served after synagogue on Saturday mornings paired with hard boiled eggs, you Greek condiment pulled hill. Graded tomatoes and scoop the Yemenite salon throw chili hot sauce, the dip certainly brightened things up, but a carbon news Shibat, nap is all but guaranteed. The follow another Mark of Jewish cooking success. I'm the boards. And this is burnt offerings. Aaron Franklin of Austin, Texas, probably the world's greatest barbecue pit master smoked his very first. Kosher brisket and two thousand seventeen he wasn't having a religious awakening. He was honoring. Ari white and Izzy Edelman to Jews who have respectively captured the coveted brisk king NYC title, the king of quote, unquote. Kosher bacon in twenty sixteen and twenty seventeen the sinewy cut, of course, has long been a staple of both Jewish cooking and American barbecue. But the latter's love affair with pork pulled ribs. Or otherwise meant the Jews were largely absent from the barbecue pits not anymore and Amen to that. If you're looking for the world's first recipe for grilled meat after all look, no further. Than limitless. Which instructs Israelites how to build a pit and roast the burnt offering with the bond between beef and holiness secured early on and with caution pink close attention to slaughtering cattle in a specific way sanctifying the moment of their sacrifice. It was only a matter of time before Jews return to the four of the meat. See? Shalom slander, and this is. People talk to me about challened. I don't know why. But they do at parties at book festivals at coffee shops. They really shouldn't. You should come over there. Say comic challenge. It's like running into Oliver twist forty years after he left the workhouse in inviting them over for a nice bowl of gruel. I hate Chilin a hate the sound of the word, I hate even saying it, and I'm going to have to shower as soon as I'm done recording. This. It reminds me of everything I hate about my history. It's a steaming hot bowl of childhood and just for the record. I'm severely challenged intolerant. Come on Oliver gruel, you remember gruel assholes? It's not challenge fault. What's to hate? After all, a stew made of beans meat potatoes in bones. It's delicious. But the whole is more grating than some of its parts a sensibly. It was way around the prohibition of cooking on Shabbat. The only thing rabbis love more than challenge is a good loophole. But my mother was enabled to bring the ball out to the table without reminding us that Jews were poor and miserable. They were peasants into the poor and miserable Jews had nothing to eight. But this poor miserable peasants Stu no-doubt while fleeing somewhere to somewhere else from which they would soon flee again the smell loan is enough to make need oppressed. My mother made with chickpeas, they tell me really mind made it with guild in bil-. I prefer the jelly donuts. Hannukah? They're white and bright in sweet and sugary in hindsight. I'm surprised I wasn't taught that the jelly represents the blood of my poor miserable ancestors the powdered sugar their tears when I die. No doubt. Go to hell you will to trust me. We all do God will meet me at the gates with a steaming bowl of that load. Some too. Juice stew in his hands in evil grin on his best face camman. Shallow, challen- you. Remember challened asshole? All right. Our next guest is someone who is very close to my heart literally because I have companies T shirt. It's sonia. Marie Leica of like Bruin as their slogan puts it you can't help. But like him that's L E, I K and she is an unorthodox superfan. You'll see her all over our Facebook page. She brought us beer in Seattle amp. She brought me a shirt that proudly announces on the back that like him brewing. Puts the brew in Hebrew here. We are with Sonia. Marie. My name is Sonia. Marie like him. And I am one of the owners of like brewing a kosher craft brewery in southeast Portland, Oregon. I began brewing beer six years ago. Because I fell in love with a man who was a home brewer and decided to leave his job as a CPA and become a professional brewer. And I figured I'd better know how to make the product that I'm going to sell and my husband THEO began brewing about twelve years ago. We wanted it to reflect our family and our family identity values. So we decided to become a kosher brewery because being Jewish is a huge part of our family identity. Although we don't keep kosher, and my husband is not Jewish being identified as members of the Jewish community is really important because for years, I have worked strengthening the Jewish community here in Portland, and when I decided to leave my job in order to help support the beginnings of our brewery. I wanted to make sure. That are density is Jews was evident in what we were doing. Traditionally made beer is absolutely kosher in its ingredients. And how it's made what you may not know is that some beer is kosher fide with gelatin or fish bladders. We clarify our beer with algae. Also, we only use one hundred percent pure fruit. No extracts, and everything that we use has a Heckscher and comes with kosher certification from the grain all the way to the use. And that's really important to us not just from an identifier of being Jewish. But also from an ethical point of view. We wanna make sure that our ingredients are all sourced in an ethical way. And having a Heckscher helps us feel like we're tracking our ingredients better one of our main principal ideas for like Umbrian was to be as inclusive as possible to as many people as possible. So one of the things you may not know about our beer is that we. Are what is called gluten reduced? We use an enzyme during the fermentation process, which is lates gluten protein and kinda chops it up until little bits. And then we filter that out. So when you test our beer, we actually have less than ten parts per million of gluten, which is below the FDA's tolerance for gluten free food. But we technically can't call it gluten free because of those wonderful federal regulations. So that's another way that we really try to be as inclusive as possible in our beer. So to find out more about us. You can follow us on all the social media Instagram Facebook or go to like him brewing dot com, that's l eat. I k m brewing dot com, we are small artisanal brewery and currently don't distribute outside of Oregon. But if you're interested in getting a hold of beer, send us an Email and will connect you with our distributor, and we'll see what we can do. That was Sonia Murray like him and say, we tried her beer at our show in Seattle them. We liked we're like them. A month ago? The team got a frantic Email for Mark asking if someone could get to Pittsburgh the following day. There was important pie. Delivery coming all the way from Minnesota. Anyone one of us there to cover the event, none of us could make it. We find a local reporter Sabrina Boden. Who's able to help us out after hearing the tape? That's Brennan recorded so and Josh decided that rather than tell the story of that night. There was a different deeper story. They wanted to share. I'll let Josh Lynn. On February eighth twenty nineteen rose. Mickey and Wendy Goldberg, both from the Minneapolis area arrived at the root of Shalom synagogue and Pittsburgh along with a shipment of pies sweet potato pies to be exact. Feroze the sweet potato pie is about comfort so much. So that she runs a charitable organization aptly called sweet potato comfort pies. Wendy, her longtime friend is Jewish educator, and advocate for social Justice, the delivery, and Pittsburgh and their experience, creating it is the perfect lesson on how food not just within groups, but between groups can really be the bond that can tie us all together. All at them. Tell you the rest of their story. Rose speaks first. I grew up with the superseded by always being at every major event, whatever that was and see the south just as every culture has tradition. Sunday's were very important. So you'd be in church all day law NC, she in church all day, long them as you're gonna bring food. Right. So there'd be these times. When people bring these boxes of food because to going to be there all day, and then they spread out people could share eek and people would want to eat. So and so's this in I want aunt, so and so's that and cousin so and so's that's so sweet potato pie would be one of those very very particular kinds of things of whether people wanted and my grandmother was her sweet potato pie people out her nameless. Rosie. I was named after people what I want ain't Rosie's by what Rosie sweet potato pie. when I left my grandmother's house, and I went off to college. And then I ended up moving to Colorado. And then I got married one day. Some reason I decided I wanna make sweetie pie. I never had to make them because I had my grandmother and everybody else to make them. And here I am. Now, I have taste tip on how to make. So I call my grandmother, and I've botched up bad. It was horrible. And I tried it again individually I did get kind of decent and over time. It became a one of those things people say can you bring the sweet potato pie. So those. You know, tell you the truth. I am not a cook. But when Ferguson was happening of sitting there watching television, and I saw the faces of hopelessness and I wanted to do something. But I wasn't sure what that something was. And something said go make some pies and take them down. So I did I made about thirty sweet potato pies loaded them up in my trunk and drove down, and I was able to connect with the pastor in that area. But what I discovered when I got there for so surprise shock. You're bringing a sweet potato pie from Minnesota. After all, you know soup Tatum pies southern dish traditionally, but after they saw the pie beautifully packaged in they could smell. You know, the the Loveliness of it coming the first person we gave one to there at the Michael Brown memorial site there in. St. began to cry. She couldn't believe that someone was actually bringing this kind of gesture and from that point on a felt I needed to do something with this in Minnesota. That came back home in contacted my mayor and some community folks, we met right there in my living room to determine how can we take what just happened there? The emotional impact that this made on me, and I really felt that for community such as ours, which tends to be white, but in denial that there are any racial issues, which there are needed some way to bridge relationship gaps. So what we did was start planning the next Martin king event. So that weekend that Saturday volunteers came in and made the number of pies, Dr king's age would have been and then the next day people came and have his tough conversation around race. But they also had a competition around who would gift those pies to in the community that within its self was relationship building. Because not only are you. Now having this conversation with people in a circle, but you're carrying something. To someone. And now someone is receiving this. And that's how it started. And one of the next things that we responded to Charleston, South Carolina in mother Emmanuel AME church after the killings there responded to standing rock. So he we are now in Pittsburgh. Years wendy. The ccording to rose we met when we were at a synagogue in Minnesota that was doing a service for the focus was on housing because the Jewish community has a lot on social Justice in you were focusing on fair housing and all that, and I was fighting for my home. Jewish community action, which is a social action branch of the Jewish community in Minnesota was going out and door knocking on homes where people had letters from the Bank saying that they would be closed upon, but they were largely homes where people may not read that male may not speak English or read English or just may not have known what all this legal jingo was. And so we started doing these door knocking 's rose with speaking about it, and then we door not for rose to make sure that she stayed in her home, which she was a huge leader catalyst for doing what he called non-violent action. I guess and whenever there was a hearing about Rose's house all the people who could come down to the Hennepin county court house in the middle of the day with expensive parking which show up to just be there with her and she spoke for herself, she did all the speaking. We just showed up as warm bodies. Who said we believe in this woman, and we believe in her store. Sorry. I just got into the habit of following her around, and we started doing evening walk arounds in north Minneapolis where the Jewish community had roots and had fled as the Jewish community. It was the immigrant community. The Jews in Minnesota were in a ghetto so to speak because there was redlining in most of the deeds in the Minneapolis area that the deeds red persons of African or Simic heritage may not own this house. It's just not known as much about the Jewish community. But my father grew up in what we now call the Jewish ghetto. It was just twelve square blocks where all the Jews lived. But as those people earned more money and moved out to bigger homes outside of north Minneapolis, some feel it was very strictly white flight. They sell the first African American person living on the block and they've started leaving. I don't know that that's true in my father's case. He said, oh, we went to school with African Americans with white shoes. They never called us white in those days, but the Jews, and they don't don't think that they would say that they left because the neighborhood was turning in that way. But we have the shared neighborhood when the Jews left north Minneapolis African Americans moved in. So we were really going into the place where our people had left and knocking on doors to help people stay in their homes there and one time that rose I just felt like I would follow her anywhere. Rose called me and said, I wanna go to Pittsburgh. I wanna go to the to community, and what is it gonna take? And I said, well, we have to do a kosher kitchen, the bacon, kosher kitchen, and she said can you find new one, and I right now in the assistant director of Jewish life, and a Jewish elementary school called Highlander said we have a kosher kitchen, and we have kids who can bake and we can set up a baking day. So we could be your workforce, and you kosher kitchen, and you can be our head chef. And so we set up a day where parents boiled sweet potatoes all day. And then on the second day we had children in the kitchen with rose in the middle of food snowstorm. We made sixty three but our goal was to have fifty cent here, which is what we did. We should fifty year two or taken for an African American elders group to have this dialogue around racism. I realized you know, how interesting that would be to pull to pies from for this batch for African Americans who are having a conversation around race buzz have been made by Jewish children to go to Pittsburgh. There's so many layers one out this week potato pie because potato pie is so complex. It's not the desert that anyone can just go in the kitchen of whip up just like that it's a little more complicated than that. What we're seeing? And what we're learning is many of the Jewish people in this country around the world are people of color to separate them is not something that I want to support anymore. Yes. There are cultural things about the Jewish community and their cultural things in black culture. But to save the Jewish community and the black community if they are two separate and nut interspersed interwoven communities is not really something that I want to support anymore or except in that way. It's a piece of what keeps our Jewish people of color from coming into mainstream. Judaism, how do we not acknowledge that we are or and they are we in? We are they do you know what I'm saying? And it really is whether it's her skin color or not we don't have to wait next time for the Jewish community to be impacted rose showed up not as a Jew say we need to Pittsburgh. And then now it's next Archer n- when it's not someone who looks to or who is Jewish for us to show up for them. I just think that we've opened more doors, and there's more of a ripple effect than just that. We did a nice thing for Pittsburgh. This ship. Desmond Tutu helped us learn a word wound to which means I am because we are. We are all in this together very much so very much. So. What are your thoughts Jewish food? Tell us your food related memories. Brag about your favorite deli and share your great, grandma's Kogel or Koubek recipe. Email us with all your food stories at unorthodox tab, amac dot com or leave a voicemail nine one four five seven zero four eight six nine. Brought to you by tablet magazine on the web at Taba MAG dot com, a special thank you to the one hundred most Jewish food contributors read their entries on this week's episode shell also enter cocky, Amanda hesser Merrill, Stubbs Wayne Hoffman feel who've Joe carbon the accounting real liebowitz Simmons, Mark, Tracy, and Jeff yes, quits, you can buy the one hundred most Jewish food's highly debatable this at Amazon Barnes and noble or your local bookseller the music. You've heard this week is by the klezmer group far enough. You can find out more about them at dot Li slash klezmer bureau. Follow us on Instagram at unorthodox podcast and on Twitter at unorthodox underscore pod. While you're at it. Join our Facebook group this episode was produced by me Stephanie along with Josh cross. Our soci- producers are Sarah Friedman ater, and no eleven in our editor is Sophia Steiner evily the injury with rose MaGee, and when Gobert was recording Pittsburgh by Sabrina. Bogin, our work is by Esther ward ago. Our social media internet L. Czar abrahams. Our theme music is by Golam online at golden rocks com. Rabbinic supervision this week by the luck slicer Russ and daughters. We come to you from Argo studios, which only eats chocolate Bubka. Shallow friends.

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