36 Burst results for "Amanda"

Fresh update on "amanda" discussed on Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

00:55 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "amanda" discussed on Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

"Amanda for that wonderful introduction as usual. And side note, I'm taking miss Amanda, my wife and I had taken her up to Tallahassee, Florida tomorrow. And she will start her, college, college days, college time, college career at Florida state university. Her brother just graduated from there and she's on her way. So exciting times exciting times. So welcome to the podcast. Like I said, you know the name, so I'm not gonna say it. Let's watch it on Twitch, which we're streaming live right now, of a Facebook Twitch, Twitter, and D live. I stumbled upon this streaming service, it's for gamers and podcasts. It's kind of like Twitch. I figured, you know, just put it out there, put the podcast out there, see what sticks, right? So, yeah, that's what we're doing. And this is who we are and let me bring on my first co host of the night. The walking music encyclopedia so when referred to him as, look like you have a music relish. Now I'm nervous. See, I put it right on you. Right on the spot. All right. Bring it on, bring it on. You got big shoes tonight, buddy. Big shoes. Mock pulled off a two and a half hour podcast with me last week. So he said, you don't need one to fill his shoes. You need two. So let me bring on toss Malone. From the goalpost a podcast. Hey, hi, guys. What's up, Tony boy? Doing pretty good. Pretty good. Little tired tonight. So if I'm not my usual jocular self, you'll give me a pass, I'm a little bit tired. Turbo. Turbo extra turbo. Iced coffee. Yeah. Oh, really? Drink coffee? You drink coffee this time at night? No. Normally? But earlier, I was like, ah, fuck. You know what I'm kind of feel that drag coming and I don't like coming into this with that. So I go. It's either that or through a line of Coke. And there was no Coke available, so yeah, right. There was a lot of Coke in the green room. And we're just at it. I'm up there. So much. So my assistant hooked you up, okay. Hey, Scott, can I ask before you get started? Because I've always wondered about this. Your intro music. You know where that's from? That music that you have playing at the end. I made it. Did you really? Yeah. I made

Amanda Florida State University Tallahassee Florida Twitter Facebook Coke Malone Buddy Tony Scott
Glenn Kirschner on Steve Bannon's Double Conviction

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:50 min | 2 weeks ago

Glenn Kirschner on Steve Bannon's Double Conviction

"Happy Bannon indictment. Yeah. For those who celebrate. And in conviction day, you got them conviction. Right, sorry. Yeah, convicted on both counts. Tell us what was that? That was like being in the courtroom. I loved what you said. Prosecutor and rebuttal. Bannon's conduct is like a child who keeps arguing with a parent after being grounded. That's what it seemed like. I watched it from start to finish. And first and foremost, you know, we keep lots of criticism on the Department of Justice for not acting swiftly enough. But let me tell you, the two prosecutors in the case, Molly Gaston and Amanda Vaughn, those women are rockstars. And they represented the American people extraordinarily well in this prosecution. I got to chat with him for a while afterwards because they come from my former office, the D.C., U.S. attorney's office, and I congratulated them. And I thanked them on behalf of we the people. So we shouldn't lose sight of when the Department of Justice does something really well. We need to let them know. But, you know, Bannon promised to go medieval. During the trial and Steph, I was in there for every minute of the trial, no catapults, no crossbows, no molten lead being pored over the castle turret. Nothing medieval sat there if there was anything medieval. He sat there like a big old medieval bump on a log. The whole time and didn't say one word in his own defense didn't present any evidence and the jury after sitting in the trial for a week. They went back to deliberate. They came back with, it wasn't just a verdict. It was a statement, less than three hours, and they even worked in a lunch, guilty, guilty, go away, Steve Bannon. So now he will be heading to prison, but not until October 21st.

Bannon Molly Gaston Amanda Vaughn Department Of Justice D.C. Steph U.S. Steve Bannon
Abortion Providers and Advocacy Groups Face New Legal Barriers to Marketing Their Services

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Abortion Providers and Advocacy Groups Face New Legal Barriers to Marketing Their Services

"Gracia reporting states move to protect women seeking abortion and providers from prosecutions elsewhere Less than two weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court upended abortion rights nationwide there's a scramble among left leaning states to provide abortion services and protections for women who are denied elsewhere In North Carolina Wednesday democratic governor Roy Cooper signed an executive order to protect abortion providers and patients from extradition to states where abortion is now banned I will never back down when women's health is on the line Colorado governor Jared polis signed a similar order as did the governors of Rhode Island at Maine late Tuesday but in Mississippi the Jackson women's health organization closed its doors Wednesday Starkville resident Amanda black Backwards

Gracia U.S. Supreme Court Roy Cooper North Carolina Jared Polis Jackson Women's Health Organiz Colorado Rhode Island Maine Mississippi Starkville Amanda Black
Hampered Nadal gets past Fritz at Wimbledon; Kyrgios next

AP News Radio

00:30 sec | Last month

Hampered Nadal gets past Fritz at Wimbledon; Kyrgios next

"Although his father motioned for him to quit playing the 22 time Grand Slam champion pulled out a 367-536-7576 victory awaiting Nadal as Nick kyrios who's in a Grand Slam semifinal for the first time after a 6 four 6 three 7 6 victory over Christian garran Simona Halep in Elena advanced to the women's semifinals Alep was a 6 two 6 four winner against Amanda anisimova Dropped her opening set before defeating four 6 6 two 6 three I'm Dave

Nick Kyrios Christian Garran Simona Halep Nadal Alep Amanda Anisimova Elena Dave
Quieter, calmer Kyrgios in Wimbledon quarters years later

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

Quieter, calmer Kyrgios in Wimbledon quarters years later

"After being fined $4000 for cursing aloud in his previous match Nick kyrgios tone things down a bit in a 5 set victory over unseated American Brandon nakashima The 27 year old Australia next plays Christian garin 26 year old from Chile The other quarterfinal on their half of the draw will be 22 time Grand Slam champion Rafael Nadal against 11th seeded Taylor Fritz The woman scored a final set Monday a 2019 Wimbledon champion Simona Halep versus Amanda anisimova and Elena ribena versus islay tumult John I'm Ben Thomas

Nick Kyrgios Brandon Nakashima Christian Garin Taylor Fritz Chile Rafael Nadal Australia Simona Halep Amanda Anisimova Elena Ribena John Ben Thomas
Wimbledon updates | Kyrgios ousts Tsitsipas in 3rd round

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | Last month

Wimbledon updates | Kyrgios ousts Tsitsipas in 3rd round

"Tap ranked egas was beaten in the third round ending her 37 match winning streak One just 6 games and a 6 four 6 two laws to Elyse coronet 11 C coco Goff absorbed a 6 7 6 two 6 one lost a fellow American Amanda anisimova four C Paula badosa beat two time champ Petra kvitova and American Jessica pagola fell to Petra martic in straight sets On the men's side Rafael Nadal was onto the fourth round after dropping just 7 games against Lorenzo America Tanner Fritz won and countryman Jensen Brooks be lost I'm Dave

Egas Elyse Coronet Coco Goff Amanda Anisimova Paula Badosa Petra Kvitova Jessica Pagola Petra Martic Rafael Nadal Lorenzo America Tanner Fritz Jensen Brooks Dave
Jim Hanson and Will Chamberlain Discuss SCOTUS and Defamation

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:19 min | Last month

Jim Hanson and Will Chamberlain Discuss SCOTUS and Defamation

The Show Trial for the Invented Insurrection With Will Chamberlain

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

The Show Trial for the Invented Insurrection With Will Chamberlain

"Well, I'm delighted to be back sitting in for Seb doing America first radio, and even more delighted to now have in the chair. One of my favorite lawyers, which is admittedly a short list. I think it's pretty much you and schlichter. But Wilt Chamberlain is here. And I would love will to get your opinion of just how brutally effective the show trial for the invented insurrection has been at throwing the trader Trump into the brink. He's going to jail, right? Well, I think there's so many different problems. We just start with yesterday what happened with Cassidy Hutchinson. I remember watching Fox News and hearing Brett, tell me, oh, this is devastating. Did you hear? This is devastating testimony, and it's like clearly you've never seen a trial because the first thing you notice is it's hearsay. She's almost very rarely is she testifying even to a conversation she herself heard most of the talk is about someone else told her that Trump said X and that's not just hearsay, it's actually what we call double hearsay. The hearsay statement of Trump being offered for whatever the truth of that it was asserted. And then there's the hearsay statement of the person gossiping, right? So you have these it's the legal standard for gossip. We got hearsay, double hearsay, gossip. BS, which is what it seems. And so, you know, it's not that all hearsay statements are inadmissible. There are actually a lot of exceptions to the hearsay rule. But this is the classic example of why we have a hearsay rule, right? You have this woman saying, well, I heard that Trump grabbed the Stuart, you know, this guy, this guy told me Trump grab the steering wheel, and then you realize, well, that's not even possible. And then within an hour of the testimony, it comes out that the Secret Service agents are perfectly willing to say under oath, no, that never happened.

Schlichter Cassidy Hutchinson Wilt Chamberlain SEB Donald Trump Fox News Brett America Stuart Secret Service
Amanda Milius Tells Us About Her Latest Film Projects

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:30 min | Last month

Amanda Milius Tells Us About Her Latest Film Projects

"Hey folks, happy to be here. We're having fun doing America first. We are talking with my good friend Amanda milius, film maker, extraordinaire, who has an interesting project that I'm dying to see because John McAfee is one of the world's wild men. And his whole tail end demise and all of that, you've got some interesting stuff going on about that. Tell us where the projects it's now. Well, so the company is building a handful of docs at one time. We've got the Doc fund, and then we've got the scripts. And what I'm trying to do instead of doing one movie at a time, I'm trying to create a machine and a company. And we all are trying to create an industry, right? So these things take a little bit longer than just shooting out one movie after another, but I feel like that's my kind of, I hate to say this really my gift to the movement is that I know how to do these things. It's not just about me. It's not just about me making a movie after a movie. I want other directors to be able to make quality movies that can stay on big platforms that can make a huge difference. And that's kind of boring skill that I have. But it's something that I can lend to the movement. So the bigger picture is the company and we have such loyal humans working with us that it's like it's a blessing. I love your crew. You know, my guys. Yeah, they're fun. For a while. And they're great. And I love them. And so we've got, you know, we've got our work cut out for us.

Amanda Milius John Mcafee America
Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:00 min | Last month

Jim Hanson and Amanda Milius Discuss the J6 Show Trial

"Hey folks, it's Jim Hansen. I have sitting here in studio. Oblivious to the fact that we just went live because I was talking to my good friend amazing filmmaker and one of the most culturally elite members of the America first crowd, Amanda milius. Welcome. Thank you. I'm so glad to be on in the new spot. Isn't this cool? This is like a crazy show. It is the coolest thing. I know. No, I almost am like not worthy. I would like like I said, I almost wore sweats. I know. You got to do that. On the bottom. You have to have the top here. Yeah, I'm used to just being able to pull it together on the top, and then everything else is like yoga pants, and I'm like, maybe I'll get dressed today. Yeah. Yeah, well, we did it. And we're on the late night TV talk thing. Now, I want to talk kind of production value. Because I don't know if you notice, there is a giant show trial propaganda fest for the invented insurrection going on. That was pretty, I mean, yesterday was, there are some really good memes created out of yesterday. Like if a day creates good memes. It's a good day. So yeah, it's us. It's our team winning. Yeah, there was this one where like, I think they had like shots from one of those White House down or something movies or and then they had, I mean, it was so with the beast. The grass, like, that's basically what she was describing. I mean, it was absolutely insane. And good on them. But I want to kind of get into your area of expertise because the left decided when they were going to have these show trials that they were going to hire a TV news executive to stage them. Tell us super cool. It tells you a lot. And then you've got legs zelensky going on like every meeting with every celebrity he possibly can. You're like, man, this guy's got a lot of time on his hands 'cause I'm just trying to run a production company, like not run a war. I don't even have time to do that. That's amazing.

Amanda Milius Jim Hansen America White House
AVMA President Speaks out Against FDA Order

Dennis Prager Podcasts

00:58 sec | Last month

AVMA President Speaks out Against FDA Order

"Talking to you about the latest attempt to control people's lives. It is amazing the FDA, which is lost the respect of half this country as a decent, honest broker of scientific help to this country. The association of vapors, the vapor manufacturer American vapor manufacturing association. Their spokesman Amanda Wheeler, actually the president, not spokesman, said, measured in lives lost and potential destroyed, FDA staggering indifference to ordinary Americans and their right to switch to the vastly safer alternative of vaping will surely rank as one of the greatest episodes of regulatory malpractice in American history.

Association Of Vapors Vapor Manufacturer American Va Amanda Wheeler FDA
 'Heightened alert': Abortion providers brace for ruling

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

'Heightened alert': Abortion providers brace for ruling

"Abortion providers are bracing for ruling from the Supreme Court on roe versus wade which legalized abortion If roe versus wade ends abortion providers anticipate protest harassment and other violence will increase in states where abortion remains legal Amanda carefully with the women's center says tensions rose during the Trump administration especially during the pandemic We were besieged by protesters who felt that abortion had been abortion offices had been kept open but houses of worship had been closed Clinics have been on heightened alert since the opinion leaked that roe versus wade may be overturned There is nothing you can do to stop a bad person from finding you So what we have decided to concentrate on is the documentation so that we can go to court and

Wade Trump Administration Supreme Court Amanda
Amanda Wray on Her Case Against the Scottsdale School Board

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:16 min | 3 months ago

Amanda Wray on Her Case Against the Scottsdale School Board

"I am so pleased to welcome to the show Amanda ray, she is a Scottsdale mom who is now suing the school board for compiling a very, very creepy dossier about her and other parents in that school district who were fighting back against mandates who get CRT against all of the things that we rail about rail against on this show. Amanda ray, welcome to the Charlie Kirk show. Good morning, Andrew. Well, good morning to you as well. And you're in the Phoenix area. You are, you have chosen to take a bold stand and to fight back, we just had this story that broke this morning that despite assurances from Merrick Garland that parents were not being surveilled. They were not being labeled domestic terrorists or under investigation by the FBI for opposing such things as mandates. We now know that's not true. There's a whistleblower who has come forward and has shared that information with Jim Jordan, congressman Jim Jordan. Out of Ohio, we now know that that's actually happened in dozens of cases. You are a mom that's fighting back. It's very public. There was a whole press conference last week. You were joined by Dylan law group and Charlie Kirk was standing behind you as well. As well, what's going on here? Are you worried that you're on a watch list? You know, at this point, hearing this news, it's shocking, but I guess I wouldn't be surprised. It's amazing to me that what started in August of 2020 when we were just going to board meetings and asking for in person education for our children and to prioritize kids when we knew that they weren't at risk for COVID. We were met with such resistance and come to find out we were being surveilled by a school board member, his father, and there's even evidence that they were colluding with the school district in order to monitor our social media and to track our comments. And appearances aren't everything, but I don't really fit the bill of a domestic terrorist. I don't have a parking ticket on my record. So to be, it sounds outlandish, but I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere there's a tag on me

Amanda Ray Charlie Kirk Jim Jordan Merrick Garland Scottsdale Phoenix Andrew FBI Dylan Ohio
Victoria's Secret Is Now in the Business of Shifting Culture

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:58 min | 5 months ago

Victoria's Secret Is Now in the Business of Shifting Culture

"But I want to talk about an article. This is by Chris ruffo and Citi journal. It's called social justice lingerie. And the article is just downright funny. It's not intended to be funny, ruthless, not exactly like a laugh, a minute guy, but what he's describing is how a Victoria's Secret. They came under fire from all these left wing activists. They came under fire for no other reason that their basic business model was beauty, right? This is the idea of saying to women if you want to look beautiful if you want to look like a model, these are the clothes you should wear. And of course, to some degree, it's an illusion as all advertising is to some degree an illusion, but nevertheless, the activists were up in arms and they started raging about the fact that Victoria's Secret was transphobic and didn't care enough about the environment. It was doing deforestation and so on. Well, what's happened is Victoria's Secret has sort of completely surrendered, and what that means is they've sort of, first of all, they booted out all their old kind of famous models, people like Heidi Klum and Gisele Bündchen and Tyra Banks, all these people are like out they're gone. They don't represent true social anymore. In fact, they represent an actual social. They don't represent Victoria's Secret anymore. In fact, they represent they probably should represent true social. It'll probably be great for true social. Tyra Banks join truth social. That's where I hang out these days. Gisele Bündchen. Find me on truth social. You might get more than you bargained for. No. Anyway, the point here is that Victoria's Secret has decided to go with a new coterie of models. People like Megan Rapinoe, LGBTQ activist, people like transgender transgender swimsuit model Valentina sampaio. Or Amanda de cadenet. So Amanda, the academy says the point of Victoria's Secret is no longer to sell underwear. It is to quote shift culture.

Chris Ruffo Citi Journal Victoria Gisele Bündchen Tyra Banks Heidi Klum Megan Rapinoe Valentina Sampaio Amanda De Cadenet Amanda
Darren Beattie on Dangerous Power of the Woke Juggernaut

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:34 min | 5 months ago

Darren Beattie on Dangerous Power of the Woke Juggernaut

"We're gonna get right back to Darren Beatty from revolver news because we're talking about the way the corporate entities, the statist elements, and the woke left that believes they want to run our lives, have now formed a kind of a juggernaut that they can use to shut down any ideas people organizations they don't want. And everyone's cheering right now because we're hurting Putin. We're shutting down Starbucks and McDonald's and their credit cards and everything. Well, okay, but they did it to us with the people on January 6th. They did it to the Canadian truckers. And they have exercised this capability now to the point where it is a finely honed crushing machine that can shut down their political enemies. And Darren, I'm worried, man. What do we do about this? Well, it's a very serious problem. And suggested earlier, it's much more difficult to come up with a solution internal to the regime because the ultimate bottleneck is the force of the regime. And I think from that level, you really do have to look at our big tech architecture. I know that there's this whole debate over oh, these are private companies, but ultimately they're instruments of the national security state. And so far as they function on that level. And you see that in how they respond to things like the Ukraine issue, but you also see that in how they deplatform Trump. They do this for the same reasons. And I think this gets to a very kind of uncomfortable dilemma that many dissidents within this country face is especially those on the right is that we're all very dispositionally inclined to venerate the national security state. We want to be patriotic. We want to be America first, and yet we're in this bizarre position where the very same. Ruling class interests that are demanding patriotism with respect to Russia or even China, this is the same apparatus that's persecuting Americans domestically for being conservative politically.

Darren Beatty Putin Starbucks Mcdonald Deplatform Trump Darren Ukraine America Russia China
Darren Beattie's Interesting Angle on Russia

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:14 min | 5 months ago

Darren Beattie's Interesting Angle on Russia

"I want to bring in a guy who has brought us something that I personally enjoy greatly. Revolver news. And this is another vastly needed piece of our counter attack against the vast left wing noise machine. So Darren Beatty is that man. And he's been doing some tremendous reporting. He's been breaking big news and, dude, I just want to thank you for being that guy because honestly, we need you. Well, thanks so much for those kind words and thanks for hosting me on this show. It's my first time. All right, I beat Seb to the punch. Ha ha. Well, let's have some fun with it. Because I was reading some of your things and you had an interesting angle on what is actually happening in Russia with the corporate attacks and the kind of the canceling Russia culture among all those corporate people. And you called it using the George Floyd playbook against him. And I think that's very apt, is this something that now is the go to game for the left because they're kind of organized around it? Yes, and I think it's actually larger than even the left. I think what we saw deployed in the aftermath of the George Floyd saga was a kind of a really robust, comprehensive, full spectrum kind of machinery at work that deployed corporate allies that deployed allies on the financial side and the media side. There was just an incredible degree of coordination combined with the dynamics of sort of mass social psychology that you see activated in the social media age. And all of these things came together for a really remarkable display of activism and coordination. And really, it's amazing how you see precisely the same machinery at work in response to the Ukraine situation. It's just that this is the first time that this machinery in its contemporary form supply to the foreign policy

George Floyd Darren Beatty Russia SEB Ukraine
Charlie Kirk Wants to Win the Civilization Back

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:16 min | 5 months ago

Charlie Kirk Wants to Win the Civilization Back

Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:10 min | 5 months ago

Sebastian and Charlie Kirk Discuss the Latest on Ukraine

"He is the founder of the president of one of the most influential and important organizations in America turning point USA taking back our nation one high school one college campus at a time. Charlie, welcome. Doctor gorka great to be here. Thank you. So we had a kind of two minute grad school session in the break about my take on what's happening in Ukraine. I'm going to take my life in my hands and get your opinion about what should happen. You asked me what we should do. I'm actually just curious. I'm not an expert in that part of my advice that I doubt the senile old man in The White House will take, but if 1776 in masses, guess what? Ukrainians are also made in the image of God and they should be fighting. We should support them in their fight for liberty, not deploy the 82nd airborne, not our job. But NATO should be providing lethal assistance, meaning weapons and ammunitions to Ukraine so they can fight for themselves instead of the Taliban. Second thing NATO could do because of the PLS intelligence capability we have is provide intelligence to Ukraine on how to hurt Russia the most. So the next country invaded is a Poland or the LAT or Latvia or Lithuania. That's my concrete certificate advice. So I'm so busy running all over this place and I'm not like caught up to date. So I saw the map you showed me. What is the latest? I think your listeners would be interested to hear this. It seems like a full fledged invasion. So most commentators were expecting a small incremental increase beyond donets in Luhansk in the east. That's not what happened. For some reason, this man has gone totally for a full bore invasion, strategic bombers, strike attack aircraft taking out Ukrainian runways, even this shows you that the dementia of the cycle that's running the Kremlin. He has taken Chernobyl, which I understand is a Soviet symbol, but it's also a radioactive hunk of concrete. So capturing Chernobyl is not exactly strategic. It's kind of mythical, but it's not strategic. So no, this is a full scale

Gorka Ukraine America Nato Charlie White House Luhansk Taliban Latvia Lithuania Poland Russia Dementia Kremlin
 Poulin leads Canada women to Olympic gold in 3-2 win over US

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 6 months ago

Poulin leads Canada women to Olympic gold in 3-2 win over US

"It's a silver medal for the USA women's hockey team which comes up short against its neighbors to the north the Canadians take home the gold with a three two win Hilary knight Amanda Kessel lit the lamp for the Americans who trailed by two goals for most of the game freeski halfpipe qualifications have team USA in good position to pick up even more medals all four American men and three of the four American woman qualified for their respective finals and team USA's woman failed to make the podium in the alpine combined makayla Shiffrin finished fifth in the downhill portion but wiped out and missed another gate in the slalom portion I'm

Usa Women Hilary Knight Amanda Kessel Hockey USA Makayla Shiffrin
"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

07:12 min | 7 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Highest courts in the land that some of these things right now in these cases are resting on. I think the difference with the United States is that the people are crying out to the lord right now in a way they didn't do in Nazi Germany, meaning like there's way more resistance. There's way more resistance than opening their standing up and saying no more. And they're doing what they should have done in Nazi Germany to stop happening. I agree with you. I think that's right. And that's why I have hope because I really I see that there are enough people praying and resisting. I mean, clearly, most are not, but enough are. And I think there are plenty of people kind of watching from the sidelines trying to see what's going on. And they are coming at certain conclusions. I mean, when you see things as insane as they have been, I think a lot of people, they simply didn't think it could get this bad that gas prices would rock it up that the economy would go crazy that we would be perceived as weak by all our enemies around the world that transgender madness would pollute every part of culture and on and on and on. And that racism would be a thing, right? That you have critical race theory, introducing racism in effect pushing division between the races that wasn't there before. I mean, it's amazing. And I think your average American looks at it and says, yeah, this is nuts. I was not prepared for this. And I believe a lot of those people are going to suddenly open themselves up to what my friend Steven meier calls the God hypothesis. Like, yeah, maybe things are so crazy that I will turn to God. I wasn't really planning on that. But I don't see any other realistic solution. And the only people who seem to have sanity are people who believe in the God of the Bible and take him seriously. So I'm hopeful. Just a few seconds left in this segment I'll give you the last word as they say. You know, we keep our sanity because we know Jesus is in the boat with us. So the wind and the storm may be raging right now, but we have an advantage because we have Jesus in the boat with us. It doesn't mean the store won't cover. It means we have the one in the boat with us that can rebuke it. We're gonna be right back talking to Amanda grace, miracle Monday on the aircraft axis show. Folks I'm talking to Amanda grace, Amanda, I want to get really crazy. You recently was a recently. Heard an audible voice, God speaking to you. When was that? This was a few days ago, actually. Hold on, I can tell you the exact date of it right here. I think a lot of people is just safe to put you in the category to put this in the category of witchcraft and turn the channel. But I don't because I know you. This is real. So you at some point recently, you heard an audible God's voice speaking to you audibly. Yes, so basically I was in prayer and I had for a moment shut my eyes. You know what I mean? And you're not asleep. But you're almost there. And loud. I heard ObamaCare flew up on the couch when I heard this. And I thought, okay. I'm up lord, I'm up. So it's kind of like, I'm wondering now, why am I hearing this? Because normally when I hear, when I'm told this, when the audible voices the lord speaks normally it's shortened to the point. You know? In this manner. And so I started to do some research about ObamaCare and jabs after I heard this because really the battle in the courts right now is like ObamaCare two in a way, revved up. And so when I did some research, now this is interesting. When I looked it up, ObamaCare in these jabs, there is a document that was produced in 2013. I believe it was February of 2013. From a HIP, which is America's health insurance plans, okay? When you go and find this document, the first three pages I have it up right now. Is the Affordable Care Act immunizations, okay? And they talk about this for three pages at the beginning of this document and it says health plans commitment to vaccinating all populations. This is what it says. On their document, that was released in 2013. So they had intentions back then, and that's why ObamaCare went to the courts. And that's why a certain justice tipped it in a certain direction who shall remain nameless. And this is why they had plans way sooner to do this than they did. And ObamaCare was a part of it. It was a part of this is I mean, again, it gets to government control folks. If you understand anything about freedom on the American model, you understand that centralized government control is evil. It is the enemy of your freedom. And that's it's basically, you know, it's introduced. It's the Trojan horse. Hey, we're going to free healthcare. Come on, sign up. Hey, we're going to help you. And you're giving away your rights slowly, but surely. And obviously one of the big reasons so many people were opposed to ObamaCare was because of that. I mean the idea of centralizing power in that way, it's bad, no matter how you look at it. But when you look at it with regard to the vaccines and vaccine mandates, you start realizing this is a way to control people. This is a way to rob people of their God given freedoms. But it's interesting to me that you heard an audible voice because I know that doesn't happen even to you very often. No, and surprisingly enough after I write that down. Can I go back into prayer? And I'm just about again. I relaxed. And I hear another word and it was meta X. I have no clue minorities. I thought I was losing my mind. 20 seconds. What is it? It is a patient health, software system, sharing system of patient information in Ontario, Canada. Watch this company in the middle of all. And wait, you heard this as an audible voice from God? What the word was? I heard met erectile. Oh my gosh. Amanda, you are so much fun to talk to. You're not just informative,.

Amanda grace Steven meier Germany United States Amanda Ontario Canada
"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:53 min | 7 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"It gets pirated. Well, let's talk about you what have you been hearing or what has God spoken to you recently that you think would be worth sharing. Okay. Don't mind me as I put my to lead on here. People have seen me do this before. It's my prayer show. Yes. When I go to things of the lord, I put it on. So, okay. And I'm just going to pray real quick, is that okay? That is more than okay. Let it rip. Okay. All right. By the power of blood, Jesus Christ by the spirit of the one true living God may only the truth come forth for the God from you in Jesus name amen. Amen. Okay, well, we could talk about the dream first if you want. Yeah. Okay, this dream was back in October. Now, I find this interesting because I'm seeing things happen now. That I believe tie into this dream. So it was October 29th, 2021 during the night when this dream happened. And I was literally the way I can explain it to you is that there are dreams and then there's you being taken up in the spirit. So Amanda, you were saying that you had a dream October 29th, 2021, and it seemed significant right now to some extent, but what you were saying was that and I love talking about this because I think it's valuable for people who haven't maybe experienced these spiritual things that it's one thing to have a dream or a vision, it's one thing to get a word from the lord, but there are people and Mike Thompson, whom I've had on this program as well. Has described this where you feel I think Ken fish also described this where you are caught up in the spirit. In other words, you have a sense of somehow leaving your body. Look, Paul writes about this. He says, you know, I was in the third heaven, whatever. These things have happened to people who don't experience it sometimes it sounds crazy or difficult to believe. But I know you're not crazy. So talk about this. You had an experience of what you call going being lifted up in the spirit realm. So this is different from I'm in my room having a dream. This is kind of like you feel that your spirit is taken someplace. Yeah, so it's like the lord comes and takes your spirit someplace, okay? So that's the way it should be. When you see these things. So what it was was, I found myself standing in this stone building that was so high up on a mountain or something. I couldn't even see like you couldn't see anything below. It was almost look like all clouds. And there were these carved openings that were for Windows, but there were no windows in them. And in front of me, stood a very large, pure white horse. And I'm talking about this horse was glowing almost from within. White. And on this very large tourist, because this horse was huge. I mean, this was probably about 1920 hands tall at least. And a normal horse is about 15 hands tall, just to give everybody some perspective. Right. There is a man on this horse, dressed in this leather centurion armor. Okay. He must have been, gosh, he had to be, you know, 7 feet tall, maybe, maybe give or take. He had this black curly wavy hair. That came just past his ears. There was this deep voice that I think was coming from him. Because I was so concerned about doing what they were telling me to do that I wasn't,.

Ken fish Mike Thompson Amanda Paul White
"amanda" Discussed on Purposeful Social Selling

Purposeful Social Selling

04:50 min | 7 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on Purposeful Social Selling

"To just write at the top of the piece of paper the workbook that we had, how much money did we want to be earning in three years? And I had no idea what to put. So I just made up a number and put it there. And then the next step was what thoughts do you have about this number? What thoughts and feelings are coming up for you and immediately my brain said, I don't need that. And that's as far as I got. It was just looking at that number thinking, I don't need that. And so I raised my hand for coaching because that was, you know, I wasn't going to get much further without some coaching on that. Yeah, do you remember the question I asked you? I asked you a few questions. Well, it was one that particularly sticks to mind that I think really hits you. Well, I don't know if I know specifically what you're thinking of. I remember the series of questions that you walked me through of just like, why not? And I do remember one of the first questions you said is you said I just find it interesting that you would invest in this mastermind to grow your business and yet your brain is telling you not to grow, you know, that you don't need to grow your business. Is that what you were thinking? Yes. What was that? I remember thinking that being like, why are you here? I don't want money. You don't want to make more money and really advance your business. I mean, if you want to be here just for emotional peace, sure, we can provide that. Why clean up your business and why focus on these things, but I just remember like you had a lot of stories about money. And particularly, I think it was in the up there in the multi multi 6 figures. And I remember asking you and I said, I really want to know why the Amanda that's making more money in the world is a better Amanda in the world. Like, why does the world need Amanda who makes more money? And I just remember it kind of I watched your face and you were like, oh, you mean like this.

Amanda
"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

09:55 min | 8 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"With more of an inner presence that doesn't need to be validated by others. Where you don't lead with uncertainty about yourself, but you lead with your authenticity that you always go high on, the more you can just lead with your authenticity. The less you'll feel these vulnerable narcissistic characteristics. Does that make sense? Yeah, no, that's actually really great. And I think that that does ring very true to me. I mean, I'm almost like getting sad. There's hope here, but I'm saying there's hope. Yeah. A thing she's been grappling with ever since this Italy trauma has been. It's just something I think we talked about with LeVar Burton, actually. And that season one episode of labyrinth that Amanda worries that the most notable thing about her forever will be a thing that didn't that she didn't do and that happened to her. And it's a most people don't have the opportunity to deal with that strange circumstance where the whole world associates your name and your identity and who you are and why you matter with this thing that has nothing to do with you. And she often wonders, will I ever contribute to the world in any way that will matter more? And that will have an impact more than this other thing that is not of me. And but I have a radical I have a radical suggestion and this may sound like I've just slipped into Oprah mode, but I have a radical radical suggestion. Had it ever occurred to you that in this precise moment you're enough. No. Like, that's it. Yeah. I do feel like your truth secret entertained that hypothesis for a second. You know, like, maybe this precise moment. It's like, oh wait. Everything else is just gravy from here. Yeah, I'll try that. I'll do a meditation on that today. Thanks. Awesome. Awesome. So Chris, thanks so much for joining us for this. Yeah. Do you have a mandate you have? I appreciate that man. Do you have a do you have another ten, 15 minutes to talk about cognitive bias? I want to be really respectful of yours. Yeah, yeah. I'm gonna hop out and attend to baby. Oh, is she awake? Well, I'm just cool. Oh, okay. Nice to talk to you. Thank you, Chris. Most talking to. Didn't expect to go off in that direction, but I'm actually glad I'm glad it did. No, I appreciate it too. Because I feel like are you okay? Yeah, yeah. I'm okay. This is like an ongoing conversation between me and Chris, because I've often been somewhat astounded by how confident he is in himself in the sense that this sort of things that would get me down. He's just like, well, I know that I'm a good writer. And I know that I'm like this that or the other. So I don't have to worry about whether or not the world is acknowledging that I am or not. And I struggle with that more where I feel like I have to prove myself constantly and I'm not giving myself as much space to just prove myself to myself. Yeah. Yeah, no, I hear you, but a lot of feeling will come from feeling whole inner inner wise. Great. Well, so you've been really interested in cognitive bias. And you learned a whole lesson. Now, you really wrote a nerdy blog post that you could probably submit to a scientific journal. With this bias, I mean, you give, did you hear Mike chat with kahneman on this podcast and by any chance? Have you ever listened to that one yet? Obviously, one of the cofounders leading researchers of the cognitive bias literature. But you had new ones that I had never seen before. Well, I've gone down the rabbit hole. Well, I appreciate you're in a safe nerdy space here. You're welcome. So you look, I thought this was really interesting. You literally coined a new bias that I think is really a good one and it's called the single victim fallacy. Can you talk a little bit about what that is? Because I think people's minds because it's almost dawn on people that can be multiple victims. Yeah, yeah. Well, and I think that just arises from these black and white narratives. But what I observed in my own experience was this false notion that if Meredith, the young woman who was raped and murdered is a victim, then anyone else who is within the vicinity of the story can not be a victim. And similarly, like if people say, well, Amanda's a victim, people have treated this case as if I'm not a real victim that there's a real victim, and then there is me. And I wanted to point out, just because Meredith was the original victim in this case, doesn't mean that there couldn't be other people who are victimized from this story. And I wanted to point out this black and white thinking process where it's like there seems to be this sort of zero sum bias that if there is if there's victimization on my part that that somehow takes away from the victimization on Meredith's part. And I want to point out, that's absolutely not true. But I continually have that thrown at me constantly by people online who say like any time that I am asserting my how I have been victimized, I am somehow diminishing the victimization of Meredith. And I push back against that constantly and I, to the point that I felt like I had to define a whole new bias about it. And I think that that happens a lot in wrongful conviction cases, where there is this tendency for people to say, well, because the family of the original victim needs closure, we can not explore the victimization of someone who has been accused. Yeah. There's such a horrible paradox here that Saul calls cast and has pointed out. And that's that being innocent, literally just being actually can put you in increased risk of not being seen as innocent. You know, you even making this point some British tabloids will be like, oh, defensive defensive Amanda. You almost can't win. It's like, what am I not supposed to defend my innocence? I should just shut up. What's the alternative here? You know, that I just shut up. So yeah, that's tough. Yeah. Are you familiar? Do you know sarcasm? Because I know him personally. And he reached out to you when you were in jail. Yeah, yeah. He's a really great guy. And has done a tremendous amount to help me with to process my experience because what goes on in interrogation rooms was completely foreign to me. And he very much after sort of hearing me out what I what I experience shared his research with me and I was just blown away. So anyway. Well, thanks for telling me about his work because I read some of his papers, found really interesting this paper he wrote on the psychology of confessions does innocence put innocents at risk. He said, recent recent research suggests that actual innocence does not protect people across a sequence of pivotal decisions. In pre interrogation interviews, investigators commit false positive errors, presuming innocent suspects guilty. Naively believing in the transparency of their innocence, innocent suspects, wave their rights. This is hard to say because there's a lot of innocent innocence. Despite her because of their denials, innocent suspects, illicit highly confrontational interrogations. This looks like textbook command and knocks, right? All Eva. Yeah. So grateful for his work. So tell me about your keynote that you did the American psychology and law conference. Oh, I mean, I am interested in how the question of why these things happen. And so when I'm invited to give a talk about this experience, I often will ask people like, well, what about what about this experience actually interests you? And looking at this, I was really happy to go to the psychology and law conference because I this is the part about wrongful convictions that I am most keen on. Why do first of all, innocent people end up in this process and how are these institutions sort of built not to not like Sal Cass's research shows that there are lots of ways that innocent people are simply not accounted for in the interrogation room where like if you make if someone accuses you of something and you say, no, no, that's not, that's not what I saw what I did, like the assumption is, oh, you're a guilty person who's lying. And not that you're an actually innocent person. And so the ways that those course of interrogation techniques, which are very, very effective at getting guilty people to confess to crimes, they're also very effective at getting innocent people to confess to crimes. But beyond that, I'm also interested in not just the psychology of the innocent person, but the psychology of the prosecutor and the detective and why it is that they end up honing in on the wrong person, not out of a sense of outright evil or corruption, but out of a sense of human fallacy. Because, again, when I think back to my prosecutor, I was never satisfied with the idea that, oh, this is happening to me just because bad people are doing.

Meredith Chris Amanda Mike chat LeVar Burton kahneman Oprah Italy Saul Sal Cass Eva
"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

06:59 min | 8 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Be released now. Exactly. Yeah, that's the reasonable assumption that's the reasonable assumption. Yeah, I watched an interview that was done with him where he said he first was attracted to you and then Meredith was kind of like the backup thing. So I know, I know. And he obviously he had talked to me before. Do you reckon he was there that day because of Meredith, or he just thought it might have been an empty house? I think that he probably thought it was an empty house. That's what I'm thinking too. It was the holiday weekend. It was understood that I didn't know this, but apparently the day of the dead the day after Halloween is a very common time for Italian people to go and visit their families and spend time with their families. I didn't know that. But that was the reason why so many of my Italian roommates were gone. And I had just happened to be spending the night over at my new, very new boyfriend's house who I knew of several days. And so I think that he went in there to because he knew the house. He had seen it before. He was looking to break and enter and get some money, that kind of thing. Okay. So let's get a little bit of a picture of Amanda Knox before this tragedy happened. So you wrote, you were a nerdy poetry and language student. You, correct me if all these things I'm saying are wrong, you were a non drinker and non smoker, your favorite pursuits include yoga and quote backpacking long distances with people I know. Your favorite films were Shrek and the full Monty and you like The Beatles and reading Harry Potter books. This is all correct. Yeah, the only thing that I would say is I was an occasional drinker and an occasional smoker at the time. But I was not heavy in either of those situations. But I don't think I was ever a non drinker or you know I went to parties. I went and had drinks with people, but I was not strict about. It wasn't out of control nor was I strict about never having it. Well, that's what you roll your MySpace page probably when you're like 14. Well, yes. MySpace who was a while ago, yeah, yeah. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. Exactly. Okay, so I get this picture of a young child, young girl who was just really curious about the world really innocent in a way. I sense a sort of innocence to you know sort of like Naya to have a D, how do you say it? Yeah, yeah. Naivete. Yeah. I think that would be accurate. I was the kind of person who really did well in school, never really got into trouble was I worked a number of jobs to save up money. I was a soccer coach for a young girls team and I was also very romantically and sexually inexperienced, so I was definitely like a late bloomer kind of dorky musical theater ren fair kind of individual. We're a musical theater. Oh, I love you. I was an opponent. You were. Me too. That is so I was a voicemail that Carnegie Mellon, my dream was to be javert and Les mis. That is amazing. I love opera and I don't have the voice for it, but man, so much respect. You could. You could have. You could be trained. I think anyone can be trained honestly. Do you ever sing anymore? I do. I do. Awesome. And I try to take lessons every now and then sometimes I even record something just with this microphone and karaoke music from stars from lamest in the background. I posted on my Twitter before. Cool. Yeah, I was inquire, so it's definitely not opera, but I was inquire and I love doing musical theater. Right on right on. You know, my heart really breaks in so many ways for the story, but one way is that I really can resonate with studying abroad. When I was about 24 25 I went over to England to Cambridge and I remember I just remember that what it was like. I remember everyone awkwardly having sex with each other. Everyone drinking, we're all away from home for the first time. They're really isn't innocence there. The last thing you would ever imagine, people say things like, well, why wasn't she more affected outside why is she kissing? Look, it's not like the first thing you assume. You know, in your worldview, you know, your worldview was literally a psychologist called a seismic earthquake. That's what they call it in the post traumatic growth literature, which is working on my next book on post traumatic growth. So this topic is really fun and center in my mind right now. And there's a whole summit of world theory that I think might really interest you if you want to. Tell me more about the seismic eruption. Earthquakes. Yes. Yeah, it's tied to this idea of a summit world theory where we have these traumas and I like to define trauma very broadly as anything any event because who am I to say, oh that counts the trauma or that doesn't count as a trauma, right? Like who am I to say that? In a lot of ways traumas in the eye of the beholder. And any event that causes this complete cognitive restructuring of, oh, I thought the world was safe. Yeah. We're basically you're a basic assumptions of the world are violated. And this happened to you in a span of an hour. Yes. You know? And the people are like, oh, why didn't she act more normal? Like there's any normal way to act when your entire assumptive world has been violated. I really appreciate you actually saying that because it's something that I've had a really hard time explaining to people. I did not go home that morning to take a shower, knowing that I was going to come across a crime scene. And even when it was made apparent to me that there was a crime scene, I had this like it was so surreal to me that I felt a little bit like disembodied. Like what is happening and also am I certain what's happening? Because everyone's yelling in Italian. It was so, so bizarre that I had trouble processing the experience. And a lot has been made of my behavior in those days. There's that footage of Raphael and I outside of that the house waiting for the police to tell us to go into the police station and he kisses me. And the amount of times that that moment of him just sort of trying to do what he could, which was just kind of hold me and kiss me and tell me I'm going to be okay. How that was twisted and distorted in the media into like, oh my God, she's such a sex fiend that she can't even keep her hands off them outside of a murder House. It's like, what is happening? Anyway, so that makes a lot of sense..

Meredith Carnegie Mellon MySpace Amanda Knox Naya Harry Potter soccer Cambridge Twitter earthquake England trauma Raphael
"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:03 min | 8 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I was like, but I'm in gifting a little doggy but I'm literally taking different things. And it ever changed. So this idea of how gestalt perceptions really influence deeply how we see people not just from just a purely visual psychology point of view, but from a human whole person point of view, it's amazing how it's like an optical illusion in a way. You start to get to the evidence, you start to talk to the real Amanda knocks, which by the way, I'm thinking of calling today's episode the real Amanda Knox. Once you start talking to real Knox, maybe people gestalt will flip. But the point is the media control that gestalt. Yeah, yeah. And I think what's really interesting about your situation is these are people who had direct access to you. The thing that failed you in your experience was the education system not really recognized. I already have a whole my mom is a school teacher and I love her and she does an incredible work and I recognize that it's very, very difficult to be a teacher in this world. But I do have a problem with the education system where it seems like everyone is churned through the system that is very, very specific and doesn't actually acknowledge the different ways that people learn and the different skill sets that people have. It feels like this conveyor belt education. And if you don't fit this very specific role, then people treat you like your lesser. It's very interesting. And I think that maybe it's even more difficult and I have a lot of compassion for people who find themselves having their being sort of misidentified in their own communities because these are people who you know and love and care about, and they're the people who are determining who you are that doesn't match up with your understanding of yourself and with the evidence. In my case, it was thousands and thousands of strangers who had no access to me who were determining who I was for the sake of some kind of morality tale that they were trying to not only determine find a scapegoat to pin all of their horrible feelings about a terrible tragedy that occurred, but also they had like this the thing about my case is that I became this sort of blank slate onto which people could make judgments about women and about sexuality. And very, very much, there was like this morality tale being told about female sexuality where I was the I was the stand in for everything that people hate and fear, but also are intrigued about female sexuality. Oh, absolutely. And I think you wouldn't mind having your Monica Lewinsky moment in a sense where why aren't all the me too feminists jumping on this because it really when you really look at it and you're really honest when people are really honest about what happened. You know, a lot of had to do with your looks. You know, what the same thing have happened if it was just your boyfriend at the time Raphael who was convicted. This is a real I mean, this is a real gender and how we treat beautiful people in our society. Yeah, I mean it's a story here. Yeah, I mean, it is astonishing because on the one hand, Meredith also was a beautiful girl, and she was brutally murdered. And no one really paid attention to the person who actually brutally raped and murdered her. Like what was interesting about and there's also like a sort of tinge of racism here where the person who actually did this was a young black man who was disenfranchised and all of the things and because people at the time were like, well obviously he's just there's nothing interesting about him as a criminal. What's interesting in a criminal is a female who is a part of involved in a sexually motivated, violent crime. So the media totally overlooked the facts of this case in order to pursue a scandalous salacious story. And they're deep rooted reasons for that. Really deep. I mean, the more we keep digging, you know, you start to realize, wow, because it's not just simply a morality, you could easily, by the way, his name was I want to say his name Rudy Gwen, right? Was the one who murdered. Meredith kercher. So and he had been found just a couple even days before in a nursery or something broken and was found with a knife. You know, and it was only his fingerprints that were found in the room where marathon was murdered. So these are facts. His DNA on her body, like, yeah, he was it's interesting because the way that the media treated him as well is also a weirdly off, where one they sort of ignored him. And then whenever they made reference to him, at least in Italy, I'm actually not familiar with how they referenced him in the U.S. and in the UK. But at the time, they always always always referred to him as le royana, the person from the Ivory Coast, which is really interesting because, yes, he was from the Ivory Coast, but from what I understand, he moved to Italy and lived in Italy with an Italian family from a young age. So he really was an Italian. He just happened to be born in the Ivory Coast, but people just really wanted to associate him as an other. And then once they associated him as an other, they sort of sidestepped him and didn't really interested in the facts of his story, which is a young guy brought up in a family, but starts getting into trouble starts breaking and entering starts doing drugs, goes down this spiral of breaking and entering that results in the end with a brutal rape and murder. That story, very, very much got overlooked, and it's one that's worth looking into because that stuff happens. And we should try to stop that kind of stuff from happening. Anyway. Well, absolutely. Oh, absolutely. Had you ever encountered him before? I hadn't seen him around because he played basketball with the guys who lived in the floor below us. And so yeah, so he was around, but I don't think I even really knew his name until he was arrested. I remember like when I was in I remember the moment I was in prison, I was watching the news and they showed him being arrested. And they were like, you know, Rudy gaday, blah, blah, blah, arrested in Germany after fleeing the country. And I was like, holy shit, I recognize that guy. That guy? That basketball guy? That's the guy who did it, and then I kept thinking, oh, wow, thank goodness they found the person who did it. I'll.

Amanda Knox Knox Amanda Rudy Gwen Meredith kercher Monica Lewinsky Raphael Ivory Coast Italy le royana Meredith U.S. UK Rudy gaday basketball Germany
"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:11 min | 8 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"I put it in front of me. And I sort of disassociated from it a little bit and helped me at the very least get through the day. Let's see, that's textbook. So for instance, George, but you didn't know it, that's textbook psychology. You just devised it. But George banana, who was recently my podcast, actually, highly recommend listening to our chat. He just wrote a book called the end of trauma. It's all about his one of the leading researchers on resiliency. And he's really shown that self talk is a major major strategy. He has a whole chapter on self talk in his book. So that's really cool for you to hear that he was just he's just two episodes ago. Can you describe to me what he means by self talk because I'd be curious to know if it has to do with the narrative of one's life that one either feels they have control over or they don't have control over. I'd be interested to know that. I think he's more referring to an extent to which you tell yourself that you have deep reservoirs of resiliency that are untapped that you can handle this. You know, seeing just even saying words to yourself, you know, researchers have looked at the difference between just saying yourself, I can do this. You know what? I faced hard things before. You know, there will be a future versus thinking to yourself. This is it. There's no hope. You know? There's a very, very strong statistically significant difference between those two conditions. Interesting. Yeah, I think that that's squares with my own experience because I even would think to myself at certain times I went through a soccer training a lot when I was a kid and one of the things that I told myself to get through very difficult soccer practices occasionally was I would just do the little engine that could mantra over and over my head. I think I can. I think I can. I think I can. And the thing I really loved about that was the uncertainty. I was like, I think I can. I'm not sure, but I'm gonna try. I'm gonna try to get through this day. We'll see. Well, by the way, that's where you got the nickname Fox and Knox. You probably never want to hear that nickname ever again. But just for the record for this is helpful for you. For the record, you got that nickname because what you kind of like, you played soccer like a fox, like you were like, yeah, so good. I mean, I was so I was one of the smaller players and I was very quick and I was I played this position called top of the diamond, which is the first line of defense. And it's a position where you're constantly squirreling around or to try to steal the ball away from people. So in that way, I end my name rhymes with Fox. So that's how that came about. I want to call nickname. Right? I want a better one. I want a better one than what they called me around your age. When I was that age, they called me Scotty potty. Oh no. Is there just because it rhymes? Okay, no, no, I'll tell you. So I'm a little bit older than you, Amanda, but not by that much. Not by that much, but there was something called the sour patch kids cards back in the day. Have you ever heard of the sour patch kids? Eaten many a sour patch kid, but I did not know that they came with cards. I believe they had cards and one of them was one of the names of one of them was Scotty potty. So that was one of the sour patch kids. I'm pretty sure maybe I'm messing up my 80s references. It was called something else, but there were these cards and then they were a whole collection of these funny things. And are you thinking, are you thinking of the garbage pail kids? Yes. I think garbage can. Okay, okay, so that's just came in. That's a candy. That's a candy. You're right. You're right. Garbage. Well, see you. Okay, thank you. So you know what I'm talking about? Okay. Now I've been trying to change that narrative as an adult. I had a girlfriend of her own volition called me a Scottie two hottie. And I was like, okay, okay, I like that one better. I love that one too 'cause it's not even Scotty hottie. She took it to the next level, like MC hammered it. It was good. That's great. It was a great girlfriend. I just want to say for the rest of it. Appreciate it very much. So here's a quote I found when I was listening to your very interesting interview with Joe Rogan. I thought could set a stage for what we can really get into today. You said, I feel like I'm constantly trapped in a conversation with the fake version of me in people's minds that keeps getting recycled over and over again. That is, first of all, that is good writing. Oh, well. You're obviously going to second of all. That's very powerful. That is very, very powerful and I think a lot of us can relate. I can relate to your story just being very young, I was in special Ed and for an auditory disability I had and I write about this a lot and I wrote about this in various of my books. But the point here is that I felt as though I was reduced to how other people decide to put a label on me. And I feel like there's a connection here to probably how you felt and probably still feel to a large degree where you want to be able to create your own identity. You allow to create your own identity, and that's how I felt certainly as a child fighting my way. I had to actually fought my way out of special Ed and then I fought my way into gifted Ed, and then people still saw me as the special at kid..

George banana soccer Fox George Knox Scotty hottie Scotty Amanda Scottie Joe Rogan Ed
"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

01:47 min | 9 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"The stance <Speech_Female> of I didn't <Speech_Female> do anything wrong <Speech_Female> and there's nothing <Speech_Female> wrong with my name. <Speech_Female> And so if anybody <Speech_Female> has a problem with it, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that's their problem. <Speech_Music_Female> It's not <SpeakerChange> mine. <Speech_Music_Female> So <Speech_Female> Amanda Knox <Speech_Female> thank <Speech_Female> you so much for being here <Speech_Female> with us. We <Speech_Female> really appreciate it. <Speech_Female> Thank you <Music> for having <SpeakerChange> me. It's <Music> been great. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> I'm Norma mcinerney <Speech_Female> and this <Speech_Female> is terrible thanks for <Speech_Female> asking. Our <Speech_Female> production team is <Speech_Female> me, nor McEnany, <Speech_Female> Marcel <Speech_Female> malaki, Jordan <Speech_Female> turgan, Jacob, <Speech_Female> Maldonado Medina, <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Female> Megan Palmer. <Speech_Female> We are production <Speech_Female> of American <Speech_Female> public media slash <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> 8 p.m. studios, <Speech_Music_Female> not sure which one I'm <Speech_Music_Female> supposed to be saying <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> God forbid I ask a <Speech_Music_Female> question. <Speech_Female> Episodes of Amanda's <Speech_Music_Female> podcast which <Speech_Music_Female> is called labyrinths <Speech_Music_Female> in <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> our show notes. <Speech_Female> I'm normac <Speech_Female> Ernie. I've <Speech_Female> been thinking, <Speech_Female> I did write some <Speech_Female> books. I don't know if anybody <Speech_Female> cares, but <Speech_Female> you can <Speech_Music_Female> find my books wherever you <Speech_Music_Female> buy books. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> What a sell, <Speech_Female> what SL? <Speech_Female> I've read many books. <Speech_Female> Many <Speech_Music_Female> funny sad books <Speech_Female> about sad things. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Their titles are. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> It's okay <Speech_Female> to laugh crying is cool <Speech_Music_Female> too. <Speech_Music_Female> No happy endings. <Speech_Music_Female> The hot in widow's <Speech_Music_Female> club and <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> the novel bad <Speech_Music_Female> moms. <Speech_Music_Female> Terrible things for <Speech_Music_Female> asking is a production <Speech_Music_Female> of APM studios <Speech_Music_Female> at American <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> public media, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> executive <Speech_Female> producer and editor, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Beth Perlman, <Speech_Female> executives in charge, <Speech_Female> lily Kim, <SpeakerChange> Alex <Music> schaffer,

Norma mcinerney Maldonado Medina Megan Palmer Amanda Knox Jordan Amanda Beth Perlman lily Kim schaffer
"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

03:04 min | 9 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"I have faced is, you know, from the beginning, have said, I am not defined by this thing that happened to me. And then the rest of the world's like, yes, you are. And I'm like, no, no, I'm not. He's a C, look at all this work I'm doing. And look all these, you know, and they're like, no, you are. That's it. And so it's this ongoing struggle of like, oh, not only do we have to breach that conversation with ourselves like am I defined by this thing that happened to me? How is it changed me? How have I grown inevitably because of this experience? And can I be the author of my own growth or am I just the victim of my circumstances? These are all important questions that anyone who has gone through any kind of traumatic experience has to ask themselves. But then on top of that, to have the rest of the world saying, oh, and by the way, you live in this little box in our brains. And anytime you try to poke outside of that box, we're going to slam the lid shut on you again. That's what it feels like. The details of Amanda's story are entirely her own. And the truth of it is so relatable to so many. Those questions she brought up are ones that so many of us need the time and space to consider. How am I defined by this thing that happened to me? How have I grown inevitably because of this? And how can I be the author of my own growth? Or am I just the victim of my experiences? I've been fortunate. I really am grateful for the people that are in my life who recognize my humanity and who support me because there are a lot of times where I don't feel like I can just be the person who stands up to it all the time. There are sometimes where I just want to hide and I just want to disappear and I feel like there's nothing that I will ever do that is ever going to define me as much as this thing that happened to me that I had nothing to do with. And I have a partner and I have a family and I have friends who continually remind me that I am a valuable person in my own right and I have a valuable perspective. And I am not just what other people define me as I get to be an author of my own life. And I should be the most important author of my own life. And I'm acting as if that is the truth and hoping that eventually that reality will catch up to that. Another thing that I noticed and admired is that you got married and you kept your name. Yes. In fact, my husband was really tempted to take my name. But I think that would have upset his family a little bit. You could have been Amanda Robinson. I could have, but, you know what? My name is baller, and there's nothing wrong with my name, and I could have changed my name back in the day when I first came home. And I very, very stubbornly took.

Amanda Amanda Robinson
"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

07:49 min | 9 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"When do you realize that not only is your story not your own, but that even being exonerated doesn't give you back your story. That is an ongoing problem that my parents knew was going to be an issue for me coming out. I could not have imagined and anticipated how real that problem was going to be. I was aware that in the courtroom, I was a character because I was given nicknames. I was called luciferin and I was called foxy knoxy. And these were all character names that are being talked about in the courtroom and a person that is not me who is being described to a jury and having words put literally into her mouth, like my prosecutor was like, Amanda probably said, oh, this is what you get for being such a pure and innocent girl. Now we're going to force sex on you. Like literal words being put into my mouth as this character. So I understood that there was a character that I was going to be combating in the courtroom. I did not realize how pervasive that character was going to be and how much of a feedback loop there was between the courtroom and the media and the outside world that really gobbled up this character. It really resonated with people for some reason because it was such an easy character to hate. It was such like a cardboard villain. Disney could not have come up with a better evil person than foxy knoxy. And they have tried. They have tried. And you know what? Maleficent could never. She couldn't. And I find that so interesting because you said I didn't really get a chance to have my 20s and I did and they were a shit show Amanda. I hear that. Disastrous. Yeah, you know, it's interesting. One of the running jokes in my family and also between me and my husband is of all the people in our family and in our friend group to have gone to prison Amanda went to prison. She's, you know, so to be represented as this mythological stereotypical girl gone wild, trying to do everything to get male attention was this incredibly misogynistic fantasy that was projected onto me based on nothing whatsoever. So that was unfortunate. And I'm in conversation with that to this day. It is misogynistic because even a true girl gone wild. This one. It contains multitudes, right? Even a girl who will dance on a bar to pour some sugar on me, who will do a keg stand in a dress. And you know what? Like in your 20s, you're being playful, you're experimenting, you're figuring yourself out as a person. I went to parties too. I don't think I've ever done a keg stand in a dress. But like there's nothing wrong with that and one of the things that I also wanted to point out to the world is like, I could have been a professional dominatrix and it shouldn't have mattered. I could have been a girl gone wild and it shouldn't have mattered because the evidence wasn't there. I didn't have anything to do with this. And so the idea that just by virtue of being associated with deviant sex or being associated with alcohol or partying automatically means that you're the kind of person who would rape and murder your friend is a huge leap and is totally unfair and not realistic and it's just amazing to meet the leaps that we can make about someone's guilt based upon something as divorced from murder as cake stands. Having survived this kind of judgment and prosecution in the public sphere, Amanda is very attuned to the way that it shows up in society. How our knee jerk reaction is to divide each other into neat piles of good and bad wind, mostly we're both. And what built up that reserve of nuance or empathy or whatever you want to call it was prison. Yeah, I mean, there's nothing like playing cards with the drug dealer and cooking together with someone who has murdered their own child to put some things into perspective like mental illness and drug addiction and neglect how many women that I encountered in the prison environment who were products of their prior environment, which was very much an environment of abuse and neglect and poverty and that was all they knew. And so I was in this environment where I was one of the few people who had all of my teeth. I was one of the few people who could read and write. I was one of the few people who actually had family who cared about me. I was one of the few people who knew that the earth was round. Who could tell time on a clock? Like this was how much neglect of large number of the women that I encountered in prison were exposed to. And they were survivalists who had made bad decisions in a bad environment and wound up in prison. And how much of that was their fault versus everyone's fault? Doesn't excuse their crimes but does put them into context. And it does speak to how we should treat them because dealing with these issues head on means not just locking people up and blaming them for their mistakes. But addressing the causes that led to them making bad decisions in the first place. I mean, even when we want to keep ourselves separate, and not just from the suffering of other people, but from the badness of other people or the mistakes of other people, we are so connected. There is nothing that happens in a vacuum. Yeah, I agree. And there's a lot of problems in society that we just have decided collectively that we don't want to deal with. So we're just going to let the police and the prosecutors deal with it. And we've only equipped those police and prosecutors with so many methods for dealing with those issues. And those methods are mostly punitive. So are we in a sense reinforcing our own problems by just being punitive because we're choosing not to understand where they're coming from. And are we then making our own society more unsafe because we're putting a band aid on a festering wound? Is it a question I'm constantly asking myself? Yeah. And probably not a question that you would have been asking, had you not been forced into this immersion of this, right? Yeah. I never would have thought of this. First of all, even just true crime as an idea was not something that was on my radar. Again, Voldemort was the closest I got to true crime. I was not at all involved or interested in that subject matter because I grew up in an environment where I just didn't really have to think about that, like that was what bad people had to think about. And I never had to think about that as I just followed the rules and did my thing and again, the police and the prosecutors would deal with that aspect of society that had nothing to do with me. And I very much became awakened to the reality that we are like you said all interconnected and we're all influencing each other. And to this day, I feel like I'm kind of a bridge between those two worlds. The world that I came from where I was totally oblivious, and I felt like I was totally disconnected..

Amanda foxy knoxy Disney Voldemort
"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

02:22 min | 9 months ago

"amanda" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Is energizing. It is a place to put all of our ire. A face to put to the name of evil. And for years, that face was Amanda's. And before it was Amanda, there have been plenty of people and plenty of women who bore the rage of an entire society. And maybe times have changed. And maybe they haven't. That this happened in the early aughts is so fascinating because were this to happen in 2021 or even 2017 really any sort of more recent times, it might not have been better for you, but it definitely would have been different. There would have been a different cultural critique of the projections of character assassination that were put on me, I think. I think people would have been more attuned to being critical of that. Because we've had that cultural moment of thinking, oh, maybe we should question the way that we've always thought about women who are portrayed as train wrecks or women who are trying to talk about the power differentials that are happening in the work environment while those power differentials are also existing in the courtroom environment. And in the police department, like all of these things are a part of how innocent people get taken advantage of and exploited and I think that we're better able to recognize that today, but at the same time, today we are also our hyper judgmental of each other. And as much as people are able to recognize that there was a problematic misogyny in my case, there's also people who continue to judge me for what happened in my interrogation who blame me for a false confession that I did not author the police authored. And that remains an issue to this day because there is that sense of well there's just something about her that I want to judge negatively. I just feel badly about her. And some way this is her fault and she deserves it. And I have determined that she's a bad person based upon this feeling that I have. And I can't even pinpoint where that feeling comes from, but.

Amanda
"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"Okay so you get this word. People wanna read the word by the way. Where can they read the word so we have a blog. We all the up on the teachings. And it's amanda grace the number four him h. m. dot blog spot dot com. Okay let me under grace for number four him. Amanda grace four him dot blog. Spot dot com. Yes okay so let's get into the word. This is the word you gave. People can watch the video on your youtube channel and you know that there are people. I gotta say that people are annoyed with me. Because i'm not gonna shut up. But i gotta tell you this cure people who take your videos and take other people's videos like robin bullock or whatever somewhere videos yes and they imply that you just said something. That's like hot new like three months ago and those people people should not watch their videos. They should go to your youtube channel. It really is upsetting because it's confusing and it. It's hard to go after all you know what i mean. It becomes difficult because there can be so many of them. And so what we've tried to start doing is either saying the date or putting o'clock in the background with the date so people know you. Okay so the in this word you said there's gonna be a breaking point. That's going to occur during the jewish feast. We just got thirty seconds in this Talk about that okay. So this is interesting. Because the lord compares it to win gideon had to great the clay pots that signified the destruction of the army of the media nights. God gonna break them. Okay so he compares it to this now. When a breaking point happens it's a change something opposite lily fractures or breaks that situation and forces change or forces a situation to take a turn in a certain direction so the breaking point is coming during the jewish fees. Okay we're gonna be right back. And i'm going to let them in to talk. What do you think about that. Hey folks erkmen taxes here. Joe biden and the democrats have laid out the most socialist agenda. Our country has ever seen instead of following president. Trump's blueprint that had the economy booming. The dams are going to raise taxes increase regulations and skyrocket and.

amanda grace Amanda grace robin bullock youtube gideon army Joe biden Trump
"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"amanda" Discussed on The Eric Metaxas Show

"I say this is a big week because this saturday is the twentieth anniversary of nine eleven And did you know that. Nine plus eleven equals twenty. I just did that in my head. That's good even though as a humanities guy. I'm like a savant that way nine plus lebanon's twenty so the th anniversary of nine eleven as we all know. The occasion of this twentieth anniversary is dramatically different than it would have been. Let's say two months ago or a month ago even yeah It's very somber difficult anniversary to think about so sean foyt f. e. u. c. h. t. is holding a prayer event. This is not a rally. It's not a political things going to be. No trump flags. This is about a basing ourselves before the god of history and saying lord We need your help We really need to ask the lord for help because we are in such a dark place in america. I don't care what your faith is. Folks i hope you have enough faith to think that there is a god who here's our prayers. I know that that's true. And i know that when we gather on the mall in dc right to pray. That's what this is. This is not you know era of vent. This is just to pray. it's a solemn assembly. It's going to be the mall in. Dc it's the evening of Nine eleven twenty th anniversary so it's really important thing it's going to air on day star-tv live. I think it's the only place to see it. But i just want to say that If you can't come tune-in and no matter what. Pray because this is time. We need to fast and pray We're i'm going to speak at this event By god's grace. Finding their six o'clock on saturday this saturday. I'm going to speak at the end and i just think it's so important. The twentieth anniversary of this dark dark dark day and we've now entered another dark period. That's incomprehensible to most of us so we went off her hope So we're gonna pray we're gonna gather on the mall to pray to the lord of hosts and he. Here's our prayers folks. i just encourage you so We also have to announce our grand prize winners for food for the poor right. Thank so we're not gonna do that today but very soon. Stay tuned if you gave a penny to food for the poor. Your name is in the hat and we're gonna give away three wapping grand prizes I'm trying to think alvin. What what else do we have to mention before. We go to our guest amanda grace. Oh we have mike thomson. I'm sorry yes yesterday. Chris read today. Amanda grace tomorrow mike thompson but also this week. Yes we have. I think today. Mike lindell lindell a should be following a mayo. My gosh mentioned that you know mike lindell folks Mike needs our help. I'm not going to go into the details. But you're gonna hear today after grace. I'll talk.

sean foyt lebanon dc america amanda grace mike thomson Amanda grace alvin Mike lindell lindell mike thompson mike lindell Chris Mike
"amanda" Discussed on Negotiate Anything

Negotiate Anything

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"amanda" Discussed on Negotiate Anything

"So, that was for me, a really helpful distinction is not, it's not conflict. That's the problem is, you know, it's the kind of conflict that brings out our worst insult things particularly in really emotional Collective conflict. This is interesting. And so, Amanda from your perspective, the distinction between high conflict and good conflict. Would you say it's more in the process or the outcome? Would, I would say as much more about the process? Yeah, it's much more about. It's less about what the arguments about and because I've seen, I've seen good conflict be about really hard thing off. And I've seen high-conflict be about really silly things, you know what I mean? So it's much more about the, how do you are you able to retain city is a word that comes to mind your own and the other person's that doesn't mean you don't criticize them. It doesn't mean you don't agree, you know do you have to agree? And and this is a distinction that I think It's frustrating to me. How, how often we get trapped in thinking that we either have to have high conflict. Let's say, in politics, like we've got now or bypass in unity, you know, like, I don't think those are the only two choices and you can see that, right? Like we're we're trapped in that kind of false dichotomy off whereas in good conflict. You know, I've seen I've I've, you know, as a reporter been able to sit in on conversations between, you know, people talk about having really deep difficult conversations about, you know, the Confederate flag or who really disagree. Deeply, right? But do it in such a way that doesn't collapse into, dehumanize, dehumanizing each other, you know, that keeps open the possibility. However, remote. That they don't know everything. This is really interesting because I think so many people are focused on the destination that they don't think about the journey and what it sounds like. Is that a new? Correct me if I'm wrong here. The destination could be the same place. So for example, in good conflict, you could ultimately walk in a circle where you you address. The issue in different ways, you share your asking questions, you learn from them, they learn from you. There's a variety of different emotions and then ultimately you should settle in more or less the same place but it could be good conflict then you could have the same situation but it's bad conflict and everybody is approaching it in a only experiencing a narrow set of emotions which would be anger. Hostility discussed like that narrow set of negative emotions toward each other. There's no curiosity. There's more just attacking and then they end up being more or less job. Same place. And one could be good conflict and one could be bad conflict, even though, in terms of the Practical outcome, it's looks from the outside looking in that. They ended up in the same place home. Yeah. And I think you you might be in the same place but you've got your peripheral vision like so in in good conflict. You can see things that you miss in high-conflict off, right? Like just as a quick example, right now, Democrats think that there are twice as many Republicans who have extreme views on various things then actually do and vice versa. Republicans think there are twice as many Democrats have extreme views. Also, both sides dramatically overestimate. How much the other side hates them? Right. Yeah..

Amanda
"amanda" Discussed on Best Before Date: Pandemic Alternative to Dating

Best Before Date: Pandemic Alternative to Dating

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"amanda" Discussed on Best Before Date: Pandemic Alternative to Dating

"And we started. You have to go by for this. My actual fine okay. Whiches amanda welcome. Have you done a podcast before now. I've never done a podcast before. Because why would i. That's a question that i ask michelle every day every time you do it not more than every time to like everyday. It's interesting to me to have people on that have listened to episodes agreed to do this. Still the funny thing. Is i think mike case might be different..

amanda michelle mike
"amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

Anna Faris Is Unqualified

09:09 min | 2 years ago

"amanda" Discussed on Anna Faris Is Unqualified

"Closer direct relationship than they did in the past. I mean there's always been this feeling with phantoms that there is like A. There's a kind of personal vicarious relationship with the celebrity but I do think social media just makes that more literal. Do you think certain generations of celebrities are much better at like someone? Forty plus tends to be a little more tone deaf. I don't think so or are we all just ding bats. I mean I think about someone lake share who has like the most amazing twitter account. I think the most amazing celebrity twitter account so I think it just kind of depends on what your aptitude is. I mean there are always lake. We're using the the term celebrity broadly I think but there are always people who are more interested in that part of their public persona in existence than other people. And so. That's a part of it too. I think but I do remember the first time when I found out that a celebrity hired. Someone like an assistant to do their social media. This was like in the early days of Instagram and I had signed up for instagram and I was like. Oh it's this fun toy that I can use and then when I realized that someone was outsourcing. Its someone else I was like. Oh isn't that fun or is it something that I feel like I have to do and I'm someone hire someone to do it like it can't be that fun and now I think we're all sort of also in this backlash period towards social media just after understanding how much power it has. So that's shifted to. She used cite some examples. And we don't have to go into it necessarily but do you think this is a tough question because it requires you to imagine what these celebrities are imagining but in terms of tone deafness is it true sort of oblivious nece and worries me is that. I do shit that could be perceived as tone-deaf. I don't post that much but because other much. Bigger celebrities are clearly tone deaf in some cases. I assume that they're not realizing how their life is being perceived. That's the generous assumption. I make I think I mean I sympathize with them and say that in a lot of cases like wealth or somebody is like beautiful home. Are Things that people want to see? And that have been broadcast to people who really liked to see those images in sort of like vicariously live through that and we're just in this completely unprecedented national trauma that I think it's taken everybody a while to figure out what it means and one thing it means is that it's hitting some people in very different ways in it's hitting other people so like. I'm very lucky position where I'm employed. I'm employed in a job where I am not put at personal risk by typing my columns from my apartment and you know there are people who are out of work or who are working grocery stores. And that's just I mean we're all living through this thing but some of us are living a totally different kind of reality so yeah. I think maybe it sort of took some celebrities by surprise that CEO Aleki every his this. Maybe not as big net people really want right now. But there's also you know there are like really corrosive aspects to celebrity culture to where they're always is this push and pull between admiring someone in loving someone in resenting someone in hating someone you don't know so maybe we're just we're in the backlash in it might come back. Yeah Bob do you remember when we were at the Bowling Alley? Probably two thousand and three. Maybe two thousand to it was Christmastime. We were the Luma Bowling Alley and I got in my memory. I got kicked out but I think I just got cut off. I was trying to order another beer and the grumpy bartender was like no and I said the words to even know who I am. I know I know I know. I know I was debating whether or not to tell you. Amanda I love it thank you. That's not the only time I've ever said that. Yes yes okay. No no not forgivable but it was. I woke up the next morning. Feeling like Oh fuck just mortified and I just remember thinking. Have I been intoxicated by the you know the nonsensical attention that suddenly that felt like a head rush? That's just my own story and now regretting that. I reminded my brother of it because look at that grin that he has on his face. He's like I know I'm GonNa get a Lotta Shit for that. But did he did? Did he know who you are? No through so I was so it was appropriate that I it was if I was going to go there. At one point in my life was perfect juncture because it was the perfect person to shut me down. I think it's forgivable because of where you were in in your career no. I don't think it's ever forgivable. There's a huge difference between being and becoming and you were becoming at that time and that is a radical transformation social psychological track. Transformation becoming is liberty. It's way different than being what I've always felt like becoming famous has got to be one of the most. You know social psychologically traumatising really the most transformative thing you could imagine. But it's this is the suddenness with which those changes occur I think is could have some parallels to trauma and I don't want to. I want to make the pity party for the rich and famous. But it's such a radical shift in self concept that it's hard to to keep a level head to keep maintain perspective Basically Nova doesn't think suddenly being valued sort of your presence is valued more than say other peoples in the social environment or something. It's very complicated overwhelming. Feeling I think yeah. I think there's some research that shows that actually on average these. These transformations are accompanied by reductions in empathy the capacity for empathy but also cognitive impairment. Back my notes yeah. Social status could make stupid in a nutshell. That's so funny because I mean I don't spend a lot of time in like this celebrity Ron but occasionally you know I'll like for my job I'll go to dinner with someone and I'll see everyone looking at us and it makes me feel terrible for the person that I'm with I don't know it just seems doesn't feel that great the few times. I think that that it happens. It feels very intense. I feel very careful with my words are I. I think maybe at first when you're young it felt great to walk into a restaurant or a club and it feels very heavy and it feels like you've won something but it is hard to be watched. Some you're playing a different character or something. Amanda have to think about that question for a minute but my my short answer is now a little bit. You know as a proud big brother. I remember one of my favorite times Walking down the street in Bourbon Street in New Orleans was getting such a kick out walking down the street. You know watching people you know coming by then watching that recognition moment like grabbing their friends and stuff that that will kick out. It's a lot of ammunition for making fun of your little sister. Just donate yes. Yes one hundred percent. Bob Would you tell us a little bit because Amanda in her article also talks about the Guillotine Twenty Twenty Hashtag. Ut's twenty twenty. Which I hadn't heard about because I don't know anything until I read your article you asked me. I think your original question was is it a good idea. What should celebres be doing or something like that to that effect with respect Social Media My feeling is that you know clearly. People are not reading the room and part of it on on some of these platforms. Are there are? You've always got a bunch of trolls. Who are nasty. But even before corona virus we had I think fomenting Jacobson kind of faction on social media twitter as far as I can tell you explain to our listeners. A little bit. What Jacob Van Jacobson's worthy were among the most radical factions during the French Revolution? And they're the ones bringing people to the team. That was aware that has died. I'm guessing I guess the meeting but yeah so there's that so that that was already going on. I think to some degree and now the corona viruses only magnified. That magnified the socioeconomic differences. And I think you know so so. Celebrities have just been a lot of liberties have been completely clueless without that kind of athlete. Because it's Kinda like a analogize it to like the fat guy who goes out in like black face at Halloween or or at a Nazi.

Amanda twitter Bob Instagram Jacob Van Jacobson Luma Bowling Alley Guillotine Twenty Twenty New Orleans CEO Ut Aleki Ron
"amanda" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"amanda" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Amanda do you all right one seven thousand three hundred fifty six more to go all righty now who's the biggest airlines already is never going down we would come back with you yeah I got you man I got this eighties actually prevent Russian no player yeah all okay yeah okay all right you know who the biggest I had on to go on your radio if you I'm like a walking you know if you stand close but they have you whenever you go.

Amanda