35 Burst results for "Amana"

A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

The Vergecast

06:52 min | Last month

A Conversation About Section 230 and the Future of the Internet

"Week. Senior reporter addie robertson. Who have heard on the broadcast many times before held an event about section two thirty. That's the law that says platforms aren't liable for their users publish. It is a critical lot. The internet also just turned twenty five years old last month. So addy held an event with a keynote by senator. Amy klobuchar democrat from minnesota is one of the sponsors of the tech act. That's an act that would reform section to thirty as well as a panel featuring michael chia. Who's the general counsel video sedan. Harry is a researcher writer. And a strategist human attack and amana keeping general counsel at wicca media which runs wikipedia. Talking about where section two thirty is where might go in the future. So we're going to run some highlights of that event for today addie and russell are gonna join talk about how it went and what they heard what they thought and as it happens here right now. Russell has done good. Love it addie. Congratulations on your event. It was a good one. Hey thank you so. Tell me how you think. The event went. And then i'm going to hand over the episode to you and we can listen to some highlights and talk it through. But how do you think of went. I thought it went well. One of the things i like about. Section two thirty is that. It's just a really weird conversation that people kept asking okay. What sides her can there are like fifty different sides and we had a really pretty interesting spread of perspectives and senator klobuchar speech was really good scene. Setter and i'm overall pretty happy. Yeah you know. What i thought was really interesting. Just as i watched the whole event senator klobuchar has some very strong perspectives. About what can be done in those perspectives. We're definitely not shared by the entire panel. In fact the safe tech act is it's it's always interesting to me to hear. Senators talked about their own legislation. 'cause they always make it seem so common sense but it's actually quite controversial. Some of the changes that she was proposing. Oh yeah absolutely well and also like you know. She addition to talk to thirty. She takes a pretty hard line on antitrust. I was actually surprised by how sort of enthusiastic she was about it. And i sort of imagine. The video guy is sitting there easter like. She's talking about breaking up google. He's like yeah. Okay a lot of the sort of civil society tech people which this is part of what we wanted to introduce the conversation like. They don't have a problem with antitrust. They are mostly hoping that section two thirty doesn't get changed in a way that makes it impossible to have wikipedia exist and then bringing up things like misinformation also just throws its own kind wrench into things because that's actually not largely problem that addressed with section two thirty and so you end up slipping weird stuff like first amendment reforming there. Yeah this was. I think is the panel went on the combination of we think facebook too big but if we changed to thirty to punish facebook we might end up punishing ourselves and then senator klobuchar talking about an inch. Just dead ahead. And even to some extent bringing up the idea of breakup as a potential remedy. All of that is a swirl and we've been talking on swirl for for some time and it was just really interesting to hear the spread of perspectives during this event. So at russell. I'm excited for this. Why don't you start and take us through this event and what we heard. Yeah absolutely. I think the one thing i want to start with this sort of like the chronological beginning. But like you know. I always like it when these things make a little news. And i think i was very interested to hear santa club. Stars line on antitrust. She sort of coming to the fore of like the democrats antitrust policy. She wrote a book called antitrust and is the chairman of the subcommittee on competition policy antitrust and consumer rights which is basically the senate home for antitrust policy so she's really sort of at the forefront of it and i thought it was interesting she a lot of time she gets gloucestershire's like this moderate voice but she was pretty harsh on facebook. Here we have. We have this clip at the root of this problem lies the ability of a few companies to act as gatekeepers and as we see when they dominate markets exclude rivals buy out their competitors. We've got a problem. In the emailed words of mark zuckerberg. These businesses are nascent but the networks established. The brands already meaningful. And if big go to a large scale could be very disruptive to us they could be very disruptive to us. I always about the tech industry was about disruption it's about disrupting the status quo and bringing in new good ideas that basically blow up the marketplace in a positive way we can't have monopoly stopping disruption so in a way the work i am doing is simply a reply to that email so the interesting thing so this was this was something that we had on the site like dual casey and nikolai byline. When the antitrust hearing happened he's talking about instagram and path so instagram they bought path proved not to be disruptive to facebook. I think it's fair to say but this is not a public statement. He meant to make. And i do think i don't know i mean do do we do. We hear this. And think like amy kluber. Shar is on team break-up facebook it feels like it will qualify that by saying at the very least it's team don't let facebook acquire anybody else. Yeah but team break-up facebook. I don't know it definitely seems like it's on the table ray. Which is very interesting so there have been on the left. A lot of really aggressive sort of pushes for stronger antitrust like we need some new like we need to empower the justice department. We need some new legislation that will enable us to kind of go after these businesses more heavily. And it's fairly recent that closure is trying to to kind of lead that i mean she just. She's only now coming to the to the lead on this committee. And i think because she ran in the democratic primary sort of as a moderate voice. She's been glossed as like. Well she's not in the end gonna like usher in this new era of trust busting but then elsewhere in the keynote. She's talking about well. You know it worked pretty well when we did this against. At and i mean. I don't know. I'm still kind of undecided. It's always hard to know how committed people are going. It's going to be a really politically difficult road to walk. If they move on. you know.

Senator Klobuchar Addie Robertson Addie Michael Chia Wicca Media Facebook Amy Klobuchar Russell Addy Santa Club Subcommittee On Competition Po Wikipedia Minnesota Harry Nikolai Byline Amy Kluber Google Mark Zuckerberg Senate
Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

The Voicebot Podcast

06:05 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance

"Joe. Petro welcome to the voice podcast. Thanks to be here. Glad to have you really cited for me to get someone from nuance particularly. Who's been there as long as you have. a dominant name and the voice of the i industry over decades and things are a little different. Now because there's also other big names in this space i think there was a long time when nuance only big name. And the voice. Today i space but we we have some other household names that creep into the conversation from time to time. So i've been looking forward to this for a long time. Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this kind of interested in your your time and eclipses to media bars evolved for certain since since you were there obviously was in it was a really dynamic time when you were there to fifteen years ago You know what are your thoughts about how that space has evolved electronic medical records for those who are listening or ernest space. How that's evolved over time because we've got a couple of big players spent some really big concentration of some players but then there's all these satellite systems of engagement and specialty assistance. Which what are your thoughts. On that general. I think in some ways things have come a long way in in some ways. They're very kind of the same I got to be honest with you that that role that i took there when they called me i was actually in a in a distress. Kinda startup company that we we were turning around. And you know when i got the call was an odd call because i didn't know anything about healthcare at the time and they convinced me co executives. They are in the board of directors. Convince me oh you don't need to know much about healthcare. We need some the deliver good product. And i didn't know this at the time but it was. The a lot of people were kind of recycling their way through like healthcare's small community and yes it basically convinced me like we've interviewed everybody. We know who's out there. We need some of outside the industry. We'll teach you healthcare.

Petro Electron Data Systems Amana JOE Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

The Voicebot Podcast

04:06 min | 3 months ago

Joe Petro CTO and EVP of R&D at Nuance talks about his role at the company

"Why don't you tell people just to get started a little bit about who you are what you do on a regular basis day-to-day basis in nuance. Sure so on the chief technology officer of nuance and i've been here for about twelve twelve years or so. When i came in joined the organization. I was coming criminal Medical record bender company. And and i joined a nuance to basically run research and development for healthcare and i think that division at that point in time with something like i want to say two hundred two hundred twenty million or something like that in revenue you know after the last twelve years on that now be close to a billion dollars in five hundred hundred dollar enterprise organization as as well which show. We'll talk about but see. Te'o i'm responsible for all of the products and all the technology and all the research you know that. That nuance does both amana prized healthcare side. And really over the course of the last two years i transitioned from healthcare. Are the svp to the cto a. We pulled it everything our company together and when we When we did that a lot of it's kind magic started to happen. You know we made a lot of progress. You know both Both in the market as well as you from an innovation point of view. So it's been a super exciting a couple years you know as a cto. I basically lead the entire organization. So we worry about you. know how. Innovate and wood products. Bring to market in you. Know how talking to the market our creating messages around the product. How the products connect with you know the value propositions we spend our money as well at the at the same time so this kind of operational responsibility as well. It's been a good ride less twelve years. Yeah i think about it as as looking at your background you are you as an iraqi i think originally and there's not a lot of people i mean in your role. Who have mechanical background. Usually it's doubly computer science something related to that occasionally linguists So so that was low surprising. So how did you get from a mechanical engineer earlier. In your career. What you're doing back into that like full software into eclipses. Emr like a graduated from chemical engineering in the early nineties and And i was graduating in boston. It's kinda distress market at that moment. A moment in time in i was really fascinated with computer aided engineering so the application of computers to really hard engineering problems time. A company called electron data systems was was hiring. It was ross perot company. They had they had a program called c. Four technologies and basically what they did is they. They lived with general motors a michigan in all over the world and they did all of their it but they also did all of the computer aided engineering finding element. Analysis computers factor. It was a it was very much like an inflection. Point because compute was just getting to the point where it's becoming super powerful. So cad system solid modeling So i immediately kind of went out of school in directly directly into that and i was using computers to solve really hard mechanical engineering problems. In really what happened was i got a. I finally got involved in software companies involved with the application engineering. Some leaders in those companies realized. I could talk to clients so i spent a lot of time to doing that. And then you know it's just it feels like it's been a twenty five year journey journey. is kind of really really quickly. I just kind of progressed and kinda migrated up through you know. Increasing levels of responsibility you know had the lucky app stance of running some really really big organizations which eventually position me for you know for roles like this

Amana Electron Data Systems Ross Perot General Motors Boston Michigan
The Curious Case of Frank Gore

ESPN Daily

04:23 min | 4 months ago

The Curious Case of Frank Gore

"Tim kunin you recently. Wrote a profile of frank gore for espn dot com. So what inspired you to take him on as a topic at this particular moment. It's interesting follow. Because i've watched his career forever. I i'm in the bay area. So i followed him when he was with the forty niners and he's always struck me as someone who's sort of exists outside of our current time. Espn's tim. Qa has been writing about the nfl for three decades. Like he's this guy. That's the third leading rusher all time and yet he doesn't really seem to be appreciated or highlight that you can point to. He's just sort of this guy that has just existed forever in our consciousness and right and the fact that he's he's on the jets. He's he's i mean he's their lead back still. It just became this thing like how. How remarkable it is for someone. His age thirty seven years old From the two thousand five draft class as a running back is still not only in the league but productive and you spoke to him on the phone for a long time for this story and as you say despite him being this guy with a resume that might be worthy of consideration hall of fame consideration. He is fairly anonymous. So tell us what he's actually like. As a person he is amana few words and he is We did have a very long conversation. And you know he's he just is a football guy. I know that sounds like a cliche but everyone you talk to about. Frank says that he's this vont. He's one of those people that that can do these things but isn't particularly good at explaining them. And i think it's partly because what he does is just as is a product of of work and study and just feel and it's another reason why why he's one of a kind. I'm not talking. I'm really not a talker. I know i've been blessed with the bullied. Play football at a high level. I'm glad there every day you know. Give it up all on field in the game. And we'll give my teammates mall to i take advantage of it and why i take advantage of occurs got got taken away from you at college so i know that knows this game not promise nobody as we say in that press conference clipped him. His injuries in college an enormous part of his story early on had come to the university of miami out of nearby coral gables high school as a freshman. He was a backup on that iconic team. That won the two thousand and one national title scoring five touchdowns that year and really impressing people as this up and comer tell us what played out over the next few seasons. You talk about remarkable. I mean he had to l. tears at the university of miami and was on those uteem's with guys like mcgahey in clinton portis in one star after another in the backfield and he pushed himself to overcome these injuries and to compete with those guys obviously for running back. Acl tear is among the worst. And have it have twice in college. You know it would seem to be insurmountable. It cost him some speed as a freshman. He was kind of a revelation as a speed back down. You know what we think of him now isn't necessarily that. It's it's the tough yards and it's the inside yards. So i think he had to adapt a little bit to what he could do when he lost a step or to get the poor right gore riding out what again the man out of coral gables brings the big to the miami hurricane he just wilt himself to become a third round draft. Pick of the forty niners in two thousand five. Only a handful of guys from that drafter still playing in most of them are quarterbacks and kickers.

Tim Kunin Frank Gore Espn Bay Area Football University Of Miami Jets NFL TIM Uteem Mcgahey Frank Comer Portis Clinton Miami
StartUps And Loans

Loanclopedia

03:40 min | 5 months ago

StartUps And Loans

"One of my principals is. I hate spending money until i'm making money. I hate spending money until i making money because anybody can spend money right anybody you can go out and take out that loan and create a training center and expand julie business. You could spend it on a million different things. It's so easy to spend money but not everybody can make money. That's the hard part. And so i want you to be making money before you go out and spend money really depends for me on what state. You're businesses okay. You're not just the startup. you're not just hey. I have an idea. This is the mistake. Most entrepreneurs make a lot of entrepreneurs make hey have an idea. I'm going to start a jewelry business. I'm going to go out and get a store. That's the first thing. I need right to store. And then you blow through all your cash cause you make so many mistakes because you don't know what you're doing you haven't perfected your process and so your company fails shutdown and you've lost your savings. You may lose your house. You mortgage your future for this big bet. That didn't work out because you didn't keep yourself the best chance at success. That's what a lot of entrepreneurs do what you need to do. Is figure out a system that works you start small you build up you get customers you understand your product you you get traction. The reason you want to be expanding. I don't know what you're starting now if you're at home you have a little stall whatever you want to expand when you're busting at the seams when you can't handle any more business in your location that's when you want to expand and that means taking on a loan to finance something bigger fine but you gotta be busting at the seams right now if you're not there yet then don't go and expect because a lot of people think. This is a huge mistake. A lot of people think. Well if i had a store if i was in this location things it'd be bad. You can't count on that location to save you. It's not going to save you. You have to figure out your process your products. You're planning now and make it work on a small scale wherever you are until you can't handle it anymore because you're growing quickly then. Ready to expand young clip. -pedia jenna dugas a satisfied public accounting in florida. I six clans with the preparation of business plans which will represented to banks when applying full camacho loan show grease with the fact that that's by this ruling sounding counter intuitive it is true the banks to loan someone with stable funding. She said banks needs to reach certain benchmarks in order to lend money responsibly. Although being unemployed is not dill breaker other factors can weigh heavily on the loan application. If a bar barwa is unemployed received no other source of income is expecting a lot on secure business loan. The viewed as highly risky venture for the bank cash flow is an important concentration to a banka so primarily a steady job represents a sauce for reach. The bank can be repaid aside from that it can indicate a level of experience and success in set an industry all aligned off business known another way to acquire. Funding is to demonstrate a viable idea. Borrow needs to present a well-developed business plan and provide adequate financial history for a lenders review. The third step for borrower is to illustrate a logical plan for repayment banks. Mainly focused on the risk factor and having a amana of repayment is paramount.

Julie Jenna Dugas Barwa Camacho Florida Banka
Mark Jackson is the reason why Mark Jackson isn’t an NBA head coach

Dual Threat with Ryen Russillo

06:12 min | 6 months ago

Mark Jackson is the reason why Mark Jackson isn’t an NBA head coach

"Joe. Lake. Up after mark was let go had a bunch of quotes This was one of them that I found co part of it was that he couldn't get along with anybody else in the organization and look you did a great job. I'll always compliment him mini respects but you. Can't have two hundred people in the organization, not like you. Okay. and he said when I say the organizations whole I don't just mean the team just fifteen players that are involved in the coaching staff I mean everybody there's two hundred employees here. So we look at the organization going forward and the kind of coach we want and not just the performance everything else all these factors matter. We took all of that into account. So we have the player part of it. We have the owner part of it. We knew the front office didn't like him when one of the assistance. was busted for recording Jackson in meetings to play for the front office, which again that actually becomes a pro mark Jackson part of it. The Mark Jackson staff was not good enough the ownership in front office told him repeatedly, the staff is good. Enough Mark said we have the best staff going he and scalping apparently got into it and scalloping he was reassigned the front office didn't like that part of it. So we have the players have the staff we have the ownership we have the front office. Let's also talk about some of the other stuff that's just let's face it. Weird Jackson's Amana Faith I. Don't question anyone's faith. I just say to you leave me alone and I'll do my thing That's the way I've always operated and that rubs people wrong way when he was a head coach but also would find time to get to La whenever he had a convenient off day to go and do that. It's tough to tell a man of faith. Hey, you know what don't be that interested in God? That's that's an almost impossible conversation but if I was at ESPN or anywhere and said, Hey, you know what? I can't watch football this weekend. Because I have this higher calling eventually it worked they'd be like, Hey, you know what? Man Like this is all part of the job being availalbe around is very difficult in tough thing to navigate as I'm not even hundred percent comfortable doing it but I'd have to say employer at the time being frustrated by it actually makes a little bit of sense and I think there's other things that just bumped people out when curry had his ankle issues he was brought up in it was kind of a playful thing curry's brought up they put the holy oil on his ankle and. Jackson's wife at the time and Pete Jackson was like look like he had chronic ankle problems and now he doesn't. So you figure it out. That's one of those things where people like wait what Jackson also had some issues off the core where he was caught up extortion deal and I'm not even really getting on his case for that because I think a lot of things happen to people that are public figures that goes on normal people's lives. But the public figure becomes the of jokes on and on and on. He also said when asked about Jason Collins availability years ago. He said not in my locker room. So it came off as if he was a homophobe because there's evidence that he is, and then when he was asked to clear that up, he said look I know Jas I know his family and I'm praying for them right now. Hey, man you save your fucking prayers. Okay. That's the kind of stuff that just doesn't play no matter who you are and I think the. Most important part of all of this because I guess I'm still maybe a little surprised that he doesn't have a job because other people have been on TV and not been great on. TV. I've looked at other coaches that haven't had great runs and there's been plenty of people that have gotten second chances by the way both black and white. So when I see people out raged that he's been blackballed or as. Shannon Sharpe said White Bald or Kendrick Perkins recently, just saying like all of these things that I just going off on the idea that Mark Jackson doesn't have job it really feels like, okay. Are you informed and but yet you've made up your mind decided not to change your mind or are you uninformed and I think so many people screaming about this or like Oh wait that's right. You know maybe either moments you had just now listening to this like Oh, that's right. I've nothing personal against Mark Jackson. He's one of my favorite college basketball players of all time all-time. You guys know how huge of a Saint John's Fan I am and I actually was you know as a little kid be like dude I can't believe he's going this late in the draft is GonNa be awesome and he was awesome in the knicks I felt so vindicated I was. Like and I could refer team right one day I love Mark Jackson and I was right. But when I listened to him on the broadcast Van Gundy I, think him being on the broadcast Van Gundy chances of getting a job because if I was worth a half a billion dollars or more and had the opportunity to own a team or owned a team right now and I'd go. Van Gundy's on all of these little things like, Hey, look at how they blind me Anthony Davis on free throws already have them on the other side of the court. So he can seal for Deepak smaller offender will there be an adjustment. Hey, what's going on with the substitution? Hey, this rule's actually wrong. Why are they doing it? This Way Jeff Van Gundy will say, here's Hey Jason tatum something's wrong with him. He's the first pointed out it happens multiple times every single broadcast Jeff Van Gundy is easily the best NBA analyst in the game right now. Mark doesn't do any of those things and I. Don't know if that's just him not being comfortable in that role but he's a coach. He's a former player and he doesn't do any of those things. He'll say, Hey, this guy's not just a great score. He's a great individual. He's a human being. Okay. So and so doesn't get enough credit for shooting. Okay. In everything is results based. If the shot goes in, it was a great shot at the shot doesn't go in Hey, that's the guy that shouldn't be taking the shot. It's very. It's very minimal depth and when. You have people that make these decisions. You're almost instead of looking at the resume in Golden State which is on its surface again resume. You'd say Yeah. What like six years? Nicholas gives Scott his shot young team garnered play defense that's hard to do. But I think being next to Jeff. When Jeff runs circles around him on the broadcast. It it might remind go wait why why is this one guy way better talking about the game than the other guy so I think the best thing market do would not be on the broadcast with Jeff and who knows what might happen. So I just think the more we look at it and hey man trust me this is not white guy decide to push back on racism segment because I've. Probably done with those the rest of my life. I'm seeing specific to this one because the NCAA numbers are atrocious. The ABC's the head coaching. Diversity that we have in the pro sports leagues still is not what it needs to be I'm not pushing back on any of those things. But when it comes specific to mark Jackson, there are the informed in the uninformed, and hopefully if you've resisted this, you're more informed now.

Mark Jackson Van Gundy Weird Jackson Mark Jeff Jackson Joe. Lake Jason Collins Curry ABC Ncaa Espn Knicks LA Basketball Extortion Shannon Sharpe Football
A conversation with Lilli Gordon, founder and CEO of First Aid Beauty

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:21 min | 7 months ago

A conversation with Lilli Gordon, founder and CEO of First Aid Beauty

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of open nineteen. Today Billy Gordon is our guest on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of First Aid beauty a clean beauty company on a rescue mission to solve skin challenge. This first aid beauty has also recently announced an initiative to rescue college graduates from their student debt through a new million dollar commitment called the FAB. Lily, thank you for joining us. Welcome to skin from the couch. Thank you. I'm excited to be here. Let's start with the question that we ask everyone, which is skim your resume for us well, I have to. Degree in math from potent college and. Graduate Degree in MBA from the University of Chicago my first job was in the operations research section of Arthur D. little, and then I left there to work for a startup company called analysis group in Economic and financial consultant firm where became a partner Asking me to go way way back. This is how we learn interesting things. Okay. So then at the time business did not late nineteen eighty s early ninety nine Hayes corporate takeovers were giant thing shareholders and boards of directors. CEO's of major pepper corporations were battling with each other. So I got into the business of corporate governance was giving advice to large companies institutional investors I was doing a lot of writing in academic journals. I was truly a talking head during that point Amana joined the Bass family. For the best family from Fort Worth Texas in we raised over almost two billion dollars to do corporate governance investing activists investing it would be called today. From that point I made a totally unexpected segue into the beauty business and became a partner for fresh well-known. Company, into that for number of years we sold to your May. I moved on after a couple of years did some consulting hop back into the worlds of corporate governance? As a partner in a startup hedge fund, the founder of the Hedge Fund was killed in a tragic accident about a month and a half after I started and I was like, why am I gonNa do and I decided to start my own duty company in that was first beauty and this has been my last job and here we are so we're GONNA get into a lot of that. But before we do that, I'm just curious like what is something we would all be shocked to know about you. Know How shopping this is, but I'm totally addicted to sit DOCO and. Meditate but pseudo going Ken puzzles are literally my meditation when I want to turn off all the noise. That's interesting because that part of my brain that would really stress me out I always think it's interesting when people are really good at pseudo 'cause I am not will I said it's not surprising because given my analytical in my math background figures that would be doing something like that for relaxation. WanNa Kinda dig into your career. You've obviously you quite dirty that switched such industries, which roles and really just curious. You've spent half of your career in finance economics. As you said, your math major, how did you find beauty? What made you feel like this was the right category for you. You know a good friend of mine is always advised me to be a river in open to opportunities and when I was in that fallen with the Bass family, it was actually winding down and I had a lot of time on my hands. And I was a big fan of fresh, which is a Boston based company in literally on the weekends but was rainy debt. Let's go visit fresh because just loved to smell everything and see the store and I got to know the founders.

Founder And Ceo Partner Bass Family Founder Hedge Fund Billy Gordon Boston CEO Lily First Aid Arthur D. Little University Of Chicago Fort Worth Texas Amana KEN Consultant
"amana" Discussed on Today in True Crime

Today in True Crime

02:24 min | 7 months ago

"amana" Discussed on Today in True Crime

"Definitely possible <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> that the killer <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> was a drug <Speech_Music_Female> abuser, but that's still hasn't <Speech_Female> led investigators <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anywhere <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> conclusive. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> To this <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> day Roger <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and roses killer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> could be <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> anyone <Speech_Music_Female> for all. 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Why Fast Fashion Needs A Makeover

Food for Thought

09:48 min | 10 months ago

Why Fast Fashion Needs A Makeover

"In the last fifteen years, production of clothing has doubled, and at the same time, the number of times something is worn, has haft now that means that over eleven million garments landfill every week in the UK alone. Ultimately the novelty that fashion promises causing irreversible harm to both planet and people. This week's food for thought sees presenter and climate activist Venetia Amana. Join me to discuss why it's time for the wasteful fashion industry to clean up his act highlight Venetia Halloween. I think today's episode has been so I've Jew and I. Now I've been wanting to record it with you for so long. I think in a way we kickoff by discussing the fact that fashions wastefulness I mean. It's almost on a par with single. Use Plastic really if we're looking at the impact that it has. Yet it is. It's hugely not only wasteful industry, but also polluting industry. It's actually kind of looking to get into sustainability and thinking about the planet. functions of really good way to think about it, because it's very accessible way of thinking how a piece of clothing. Goes from from the US ultimately when you when you grow, grow, crops or something caught in, it comes from the S.. And then it's Picton. Soon and. All of these different things all these different prices which make up the supply chain before it's packed and delivered in lands on your doorstep Orlands in the shop future to buy but yet it. It's a huge. Carbon footprint the fashion industry. It's supposed to be one of the top two or three polluting industries and yeah, in terms of waste it's it's incredibly wasteful. we live in a timely fashion still of as. Something disposable fashion is incredibly cheap now and in other places, and because it's so cheap way often fail like it doesn't hold much significance, so we send a lot of close to landfill and a lot of clothing incinerated. All, at the same time, it's really really important is Barry Mind is that? Someone somewhere is paying. The paper will making a clothes or so, if not paid a living wage and eighty percent of them a female when we think about women's rights and bang feminists, we have to think about that with all cloudy, because we want to support all women right, and we want to support the woman who making all clouds goodness I mean. So many connections to what you've just said that intense of what I've done in my previous life. I'm thinking when I was at university and. I used to shop with these such and websites where claiming was so cheap, and I never made I never made a connection that it came from the earth I would I never even thought to the fact that impact to the environment and I definitely probably what I know I didn't. I didn't think about the chain of people and somebody somewhere that was involved with the price of making his clients and I. Think what you're doing on social media, environment is fabulous. You've recently raised Alana's with charity campaigns. You've been at the forefront to claim suggesting that the bronze behind them greenwashing customers. Could you delve into that I? A little bit? Yeah, absolutely. greenwashing as something that we say a lot in fashion, especially at the moment comes from the time whitewashing, which is basically when white people kind of whitewash industries like film, industry's takeover, different ways and Often, it's symbol creations when we as white people kind of commodified live. By coaches make are I might try and day and don't give credit where credit J. it's also kind of a marketing ploy, and it's the same with greenwashing companies often kind of telling us trying to tell us that during something good when they already notes. See this recently with kind of plastic auto companies telling US everything's okay, because that bottles are made from recycled plastic when Rabi. To bustles if we're in a position to do so like you know hair in. The U. K. is just refill will to right. It's like a much more money during it so with function. We see Fush Bruns. Greenwash. In lots of different ways and I, yeah I I've I've taken to social media to cool when it because. I have a when I want to use it and kind of tired of the nonsense, so bronze like eight am and Zora have a kind of conscious collections, so they'll bring out a small range of clothes that a made from various things like orange juice, pope and unical tears, or whatever is. And they tell us let's go, and I'm not gonNA deny that and say it's bad. It is good we should be using. Natural fibres when we might close, but the problem with Sutton fashion bruns. Is that sure that using a kind of planet friendly planet friendly dies and materials, but what about the people making the clothes and also? The share amount of clothing that them making doesn't make up for the good that I think the goods that doing concert. No point, not percent. If their entire business H. M. so is a drop in the ocean for want of a better phrase. On Yeah. I mean recently. We've seen a lot of charity in slogan, T. Shirts. During, the pandemic and this is this is very much a kind of. nuanced debates, and I I take quite a hard stance on it, but I I also really appreciate that. We have to look at both

Venetia Amana UK Fush Bruns United States H. M. Barry Mind Orlands Alana Rabi Zora Sutton
Kashmiris struggle to get Coronavirus news in the wake of communications blackout by Indian government

PRI's The World

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Kashmiris struggle to get Coronavirus news in the wake of communications blackout by Indian government

"For many people like you. Perhaps stuck at home spending lots of time online. The nonstop flood of news about the pandemic might feel like information overload. Imagine though not being able to get any updates about Cova nineteen or how it's spreading or how to protect yourself. That's the reality right now for millions of people in indian-controlled Kashmir here's the world's Lydia Amana lead with that story is you who are. Vanni is an attorney in New York but in the wake of cove in nineteen. He's found himself being asked to play public health. Experts from time to time. People are very highly about the information. Vanni is originally from Kashmir a disputed region between India and Pakistan. He's still has lots of family there. I have my elderly parents. I am really worried about them. And my siblings worried. Because he says they haven't been able to get good information about cove. Nineteen the reason terrible Internet. It's been bad since August. That's when the Indian government crackdown on Kashmir and imposed a communications blackout. No Internet no phones. Nothing since then. The government has restored some access to the Internet. But it's really really slow. That's by von is family is constantly turning to him with questions about the corona virus. They are they are. They are very much confused about it. So a few days ago Vanni had an idea. He teamed up with a relative who works as a scientist for the CDC the Centers for Disease Control and made a short video social distancing. Turn GOING TO DUMP truck on your wireless wearable video. Which they posted on Youtube walks people through some basic information about the corona virus. Like how do you get it? And what can you do not to get it? Vanni says they made the file very low quality so Kashmiri with poor Internet connection could still watch it for many people. It took hours to download. My friends have told me that it has taken them indicted night. Some people couldn't view it at all. And there's all kinds of information that people across Kashmir can't get like updates from the world health organization videos on proper handwashing the latest news about where the virus is spreading so it's falling to people in Kashmir people like Heck Zubeir to fill in the gaps. My entire show is now about corona virus and do a four hour long show. Zubeir hosts the breakfast show for radio. Mir t ninety eight point three in Kashmir. Her shows usually pretty light with fun stories. Local celebrity guests occasionally news recently though. It's been all corona virus all the time because the internet speed is very very slow. We have to make sure that we do not leave out anything. We have to make sure that we give out information as much as we can. But that's really hard to do because she herself has trouble. Seeing the latest news and videos. Local officials are posting. I don't know how to do it without Internet. I genuinely don't she says other news outlets. Tv newspapers have also stepped up their corona virus coverage. But the situation is not ideal. People might miss a broadcast not rediscovery. They can't look things up on their own time. When you don't have the correct information what happens is misinformation that means rumors are spreading and people don't even know what their local government is doing to prevent the virus from spreading and that's caused a lot of panic. People are suffering in Kashmir. It's really hard for US mustard. Sarah is twenty six years old. She's a photographer in Kashmir. She's that almost everything is closed. Streets are empty. People have been asked to stay inside though sometimes. Zora says she can't help herself. She wants to go out and take photos but my mom stops me everytime she told me that down. Your car don't out. It's really hard one of the things that's really hard is feeling cut off. It's difficult to post on social media. People can't video chat with family members. Some people can't even text. We cannot do anything. People are really festive. There is anxiety every slow. Internet is also hurting the more than one million students forced to stay home. Schools have been closed for about two weeks now and there's no way to offer online. Classes people in Kashmir are not the only ones dealing with government imposed Internet restrictions. Right now that are happening in Ethiopia en Marche Bengladeshi according to the advocacy group access. Now many people are calling on these governments to restore Internet access because the slower the access the slower response to this pandemic

Kashmir Vanni Heck Zubeir Cova Zora Lydia Amana Sarah CDC Ethiopia Attorney New York United States Scientist Marche Bengladeshi India Pakistan
The best male and female MMA fighters of the decade

MMA Junkie Radio

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The best male and female MMA fighters of the decade

"Recapping the top hopton fighters of the decade so slowly. We have been working our way from number ten to number one number ten. Was Max Holloway number nine nine Josie Aldo number eight Habib. Her Mago made off number seven. Ronda Rousey in our most recent was a man of Nunez. She's The a number six fighter of the decade and think about it goes Amana Nunez. UC featherweight and Bantamweight Champ Twelve and one in the AFC five five title defences. She's number six. The beasts that are waiting for us from five to one rate is female fighter of all time the goat not arguably the go which we say for a lot of the male fighters. Yeah Yeah we got hurt six rousing who broke all all kinds of records. She had five or six title defences and she was waxing. Girls like in less than one minute. Habib never lost Almost thirty fights. He's number eight Josie Aldo an amazing fighter. He's nine Holloway. Beat although twice ten man. I can't wait to see what comes up from five to one and again we're working our way to number one as we close out this decade so keep an eye on that and again shout out to the riders videography. I gotta give those guys love. They're the ones that make everybody. Look good the editors the ones that look over all of this work Keep an eye on video franchises. This is the spinning back. Click every Monday. We tape it on. Its put out just hours after that possibly on Tuesday excuse me the rankings report for we put that out every week as well The off guard series as well. And then we're GONNA have a treat for you guys as well we're gonNA discuss these Top opt-in fighters decade. We'll be doing some of that taping as well. So that they'll be some discussion. That goes along with each individual isolated isolated story with video highlights. We've been producing here in this past week. So check that out.

Josie Aldo Amana Nunez Max Holloway Ronda Rousey Mago AFC UC
A Crash Course in Business Model Innovation

Digital Business Models

08:42 min | 1 year ago

A Crash Course in Business Model Innovation

"Technological innovation and business model innovation are really the same thing and this is really pervasive found in the high tech stuff that word where you might have have technical founders which initially might believe that all they need is technology that innovation to succeed in the marketplace but in reality what you need it's really business model innovation which comes down in understanding your customers and the problems that they're facing before you've been provide technical a solution so what i'm saying is that by believing that technology innovation. He's the same thing of business moderation. You believe that by providing a technical solution generally ever accompany back if you have a technical solution that nobody wants. You don't have a company so this is very important to understand business. Model innovation starts by defining the problem has clearly as possible embalmed standing the customers esley possible amana standing would existing sitting affinities. They're using and then after that creating technology product that can help them actually saw that specific problem not. Let's get it forward. Let's understand what's to be smarter than it's really made the different abilities locks and it can be defined as an only stick repeatable and scalable week to create and capture value now. Let the stanford what's the mindset behind the business model innovation business model innovation. It's about using experimentation in the entire british ship world so we're enterpreneurs use to make most of the decisions based on gas. Now we the business model innovation. We won't introduce a bit of experimentation so that we can actually speed up the process of launching successful businesses and and especially if we want to minimize the time that we waste and financial resources that we waste in the businesses which will never beat successful so again be smaller than innovation is about experimentation and a business model is just unexpected meant that an interpreter he strained to implement in the real world so so if scientists have actually you know experiments in the lab to test their ideas an entrepreneur can actually manufacture a business model to see if this is gonna work in the world and if it does this is going to be an opportunity to build a viable business so where scientists is gonna cry to prove let the <unk> interpreter actually gonna try to grab a market opportunity and these different <unk> otherwise is very easy to confuse enterpreneur for a scientist. Those are very different girls with very different objectives now. Let's forward and lessen the stand that difference between just digital as a small end the so-called platform business model i won't do i like the french vehicles settled misunderstanding around the topic so as in the digital allege many companies have a website as soon as they actually open up their website. They call themselves apply for a waiver of lot from business this model. It's something more complex than that. Let me give you a weak example when you go on amazon and you buy a product chances are this product is not a actually relative the made by amazon but is the product which she's <hes> sand by a third party seller on damage platform therefore amazon is not just johny homers amazon is a platform is about from business model because on needs website it all third party sellers which are actually selling their products products through amazon and amazon is using these inventories to fulfill to actually delivered the sprouts for since in many cases so again in this case as ahmanson platform because it's managing the bhakti products so is not just setting its products so he's not selling. It's france in linear way way so just like a normal basis but it's managing the interactions on the platform and the mortar company manages in deductions the more it is about from business model it is also leveraging on data and it is leveraging on technology which is able to process the state up to actually create what we call in the business world network took effect to mean that the more users free might join a bat from the more the platform might become actually valuable that for if you have a website and you start to build your product and savvy to your customers. This is a very linear business end as sach. These is not latte from business model. You can always start a new governor. Wastelands form your company in the platform obese model if it makes sense because in some cases blood from mrs models actually a very high degree of scabby and because they can take advantage of what we called network effects but in reality in most cases you want to focus initially on building your linear business zone offering products or services that you own or that you can actually deliver alert unless of course you're building marketplace which is different kinds of business on now. Let's say really quick glance and understanding between the into business models amazon google facebook now if we look at john actually look like as ecommerce business model from the outside. If luke luke winning company we can see the company's seven when it -sition strategies from a._w._s. Which is a lot from which is an ecosystem which is different from the main platform <hes> which targets free since ski customers accompanies and depth of winning companies like seals and so the existing looks quite different from in the ecommerce spot from and then it also has another -tising machine which targets free since a third party sellers which sells items on the platform itself so again <unk>. If at it superficially we might conclude and if you look at the meditation we met concluded that i'm he's primarily an ecommerce. It's not then if look at google which is cold alphabet the the primary company. If you look at the money decision again we might conclude the google is still a media business but in reality if look more indepth weekend realized that google really is a diversified as when in fact it says police since android platform which is mobile up from that is stem that has different logics compared to the other parts of the business and again even if he makes most of its money still from the product it's alerts business although steve primarily a media company including a company like facebook facebook three neverthe- advertising machine and if you look at the news feed which is the primary asset to the company and that's where most most the money's made and today named percent of all of his grandma's are coming from advertising invisible the products like messenger or <hes> eastern ram which also add up to the monetization strategy company so if you ask me what's miss molly. We'll see stephanie facebook. It's still primarily under -tising businessman now. If you look at the door that you have available to actually uranium business that are similar to say you can use emmy allied three tools the first one the business model canvas by alexander also wonder these of any <hes> do which can be used and it's made the <unk> blocks that can help you understand any candle handle business. <unk> of the business model canvas called the lean canvas by ash manja. N._b._c.'s also useful for companies which are starting from scratch because it suited to focus on understanding the key customers and the problems that they're facing with existing <unk> tentatives existing democracies have their in which is called scaling cam which extracted from the book the skating by golden by rid of mine co-founder of lincoln. Actually it is a a tool that looks modern ovation by leveraging on for growth factors and avoiding to vote leaders now without going join do much into that. Those are some of the tools that you can use of course you can find them on for week m._b._a. But now just to finalize and a few key takeaways these reasons modal innovation. It's really about experimentation. He tweeted about you know manufacturing experiments reward so that you can minimize the time takes to build a successful

Amazon Facebook Google Scientist France Stephanie Facebook Amana Alexander John N._B._C. Co-Founder Lincoln Steve
Kale Yeah, He Did It!

Plant Strong

12:39 min | 1 year ago

Kale Yeah, He Did It!

"The long awaited day is finally here and for those of you who have been listening and following the podcast and stay one. You know that joe inga bronx firefighter has come an enormously along way to be toned up at the starting line today in six months he has figured out how to navigate eating plan strong wrong and staying plan strong in what i would consider the most hostile environment on the planet which is a firehouse where he is surrounded rounded by foods that are off plan accrue guys who are less than enthused about his food choices so i've gotta give joe major major kudos it has been super exciting to cochin and watched joe from the sidelines as he's grown and matured and and now ultimately decided to own this plan strongly style now before i share the actual triathlon with you today today. I want to invite you to drop in on a recent conversation that i had with a plan strong brother. His name is james lightning lightening wilkes and he and i talk about protein and specifically what this lifestyle does and eating this way <hes> <hes> can do to fuel your performance and i think it will help explain to you a little bit why joe and for all of you at home why you're able to do a a triathlon a five k. a. marathon and recover so well for those of you that don't know james is the producer of the much anticipated upcoming film the game changers it is gonna launch <hes> globally in over two thousand theaters on monday a september sixteenth and it is going to be nothing short of a game changer. James is a former m a fighter later turn plant strong crusader and as you're going to see in the film he discovered the truth about plants while he was recovering from two you need injuries that took him out of the ring for several months and what he learned launched him on a quest to expose the most dangerous myth on the planet and in the process james has become one of the greatest experts on protein and the power of plants in the world. Let's listen in. I think that <hes> one of the things that you address. It's probably the primary thing is what i think you you guys have dubbed the world's most dangerous myth what is the world's most dangerous myth well. I think the underlying with the most dangerous myth is real men eat meat. There's there's all these myths above that you need me for protein or too strong strong to be healthy but especially in that male demographic that real many meet methods is really strong. <hes> <hes> and i mean you look at your her year. Background is mixed martial artists. <hes> probably one of the most masculine subliminal you know face to face combat sports and here you are you you get injured and now you go on the search for the truth and nutrition following. I think some of the principles that you learned from from bruce lee right exactly i mean you know he was always in search for truth and combat which i was on the same path right and his philosophy was research experience absorb what is useful reject what is useless and add what is specifically around raleigh just listening to and this is what i used to do as a listen to what was written about in bodybuilding magazines fitness magazines or online you really got to cut through all of that and start looking at the research wjr and when you look at the research is really quite clear. Especially in the last ten to fifteen years has been a better understanding of the components that are in animal foods that are bad for you and the components plant foods that are beneficial <hes>. It's really very clear that are applying based is optimal not just the health but also athletic performance. I think one of the one of the great saying i heard originally from you was to drop the the bro science right that you're going to hear at the g._m. Yeah you're gonna hear all sorts of stuff at the gym but that's just again stuff people have read online and then <hes> perpetuated in the gyms so what what's bro science. What are some of the things that these guys in the gyms are are being told well one of the biggest things obviously is you know how much protein you need but more specifically it's like weady protein protein from and there's this really strong myth and this pro science that you have at protein from animal foods whereas in reality you know all protein originates implants can't animals are just the middleman and basically animals are doing you a disservice. They're taking all of those beneficial nutrients that you could be getting and in return giving you all of these inflammatory molecules so it's all about the package right you can get protein in animal foods. You can get a protein implant foods the original source but the package which it comes with fiber fell late <hes> these antioxidants versus an animal foods. You've got these inflammatory compounds like <hes> t._m._a. Oh and agee's new five g. All these things that it was fun to learn about these lost sort of ten fifteen years in the literature heme iron he mind yeah exactly you say him. I say him <hes> yeah so we're starting to realize that even the he minded self is inflammatory and even the animal protein protein the amino acid profile of animal foods is also yeah. I think what is so fascinating to me. Is that in america erika. We've had the discussion about good fats bad fats. We've had the discussion about good carbs. You know kinda bad carbs but really what's never been put on. The table is good protein. Bad protein is just like well protein. You can't get enough of it. The only way to get it is from animal products vary products and it's like that's why to me. It is truly the world's most dangerous myth because everybody's convinced that you know if <hes> if i don't get enough protein amana wither up i'm adine ivine <hes> or i'll be hospitalized for protein deficiency in you. I mean you you guys delve into that in a beautiful a film it's not just the protein is when you start eating like that. You're reading obviously animal foods which are the leading cause of of death in this country in the western world up primarily due to what people are eating so it's not just the proteins that package and everything that people are eating so the leading cause of death in the western world a priority caused by what people eat right and so it's killing more people than anything else and it's also really bad for the planet and also you'll the animals also dying as well so it really is the world's most dangerous man i could not be more excited about the game changes film. I know it is going to move the needle and helping people wake up to what is marketing hype in what is factual actual if you think about joe and the overhaul that he has done in his life the idea of training for any athletic feat seemed virtually impossible people at the beginning of his journey he had zero energy he had tried and failed numerous times to adopt a regular fitness regime in the the past but he would either injure himself or he be so sore for a week or more that he would then abandon the idea and move on but during our time together he was able to consistently put one foot in front of the other and his fuel source was so clean and plan strong long that he has not had any setbacks along the way and his recovery time has been accelerated immensely so when thinking about joe's joe's experience. I want you to now imagine professional athletes. If joe can train and get stronger in recover faster while on a plant strong diet just think what that could mean for these professional athletes well wait until you see the game changers because we show on on the big screen real impactful and visual results with some pretty reluctant experimental subjects including pro football players yes and with my help a group of new york city firefighters from brooklyn. Now let's turn this over to james and hear what he he has to say about what he's learned about blood circulation and how it's affected by what we eat you another thing to me. That was so brilliant about the way you laid out. The game changers was what you did with these n._f._l. Athletes the receivers for the at the time the miami dolphins and you were able to show again what can happen with with your blood in just after eating a a meat vate meat-based meal versus a veggie based meal <hes> <hes> can you talk a little bit about that. Show i mean so that you can draw the blood offer meal and separate it out using a centrifuge and it's called post-prandial post-prandial i._p. May which means fat in the blood after eating and you can really see a difference when the when there's not much fat in the blood is sort of looks like olive when he separated out and when they found the blood it looks much more like elmer's glue in so <hes> so once translucent right and when you can't see exactly and so with the animal animal based foods you can see within an hour or so and then getting locked up for six or eight hours you can see that the the plasma in the blood when you separate out the red blood cells from the plasma very cloudy and when the happens reducing endothelial function. It's been up to fifty percent on ultrasound. You're going to see reduction of the arteries on dilating openness much which means less blood which that oxygen must nutrients to the muscles and all the organs in the body so you just not functioning as well right the plant based meals. Don't have that effect in the doctor that helped you. That was dr robert vogel. Who's the co. Chairman woman is the coach of the cod clues <hes> committee on cardiovascular health right right. I mean again incredibly powerful scene and i'm just will open up. I think people's is tremendously another thing that we did and this was utilizing myself as we went into a firehouse firehouse right right in <hes> in new york city and i think we had about thirty five thirty five new york city firefighters and we wanted to show them what what happened with their weight their blood pressure and their lipid panel in just seven days right. I mean you've been getting those results over and over again right outside of that just keeps each replicating itself. You go plant based for a week during this whole plant based foods and you're seeing a drop in allie-allison you're dropping total cholesterol improved blood blood pressure dropping triglycerides. It's you know so if you didn't if the experience hasn't been done and it hasn't been tested you would think it's almost unbelievable to happen in such a short short period of time. It's amazing how your body has the ability to heal itself and much better when you're putting in the right fuel. So why did you in. Joseph and louis decide that doing this with a bunch of firefighters would be good for the film. I think it's a great group of rio brioni meet with you know like we talked about before and you know so firefighters athletes soldiers those types of people that traditional additional sort of male role models and so we thought it'd be a good group and you. You are <hes> going out to that talking. Put him on that trial a great thing to film and i think it it worked out really well yeah yeah well. I was honored to be part of it. Thank you for that

Joe Inga James Protein Deficiency New York Cochin Bruce Lee Producer Miami America Rio Brioni Agee Raleigh Elmer Dr Robert Vogel Chairman Joseph Football
Man Arrested for Plotting to Detonate Grenades in Times Square

Investor's Edge

00:16 sec | 2 years ago

Man Arrested for Plotting to Detonate Grenades in Times Square

"Amana under arrest for allegedly plotting to toss grenades in Times Square. The unidentified man arrested by the. FBI's joint terrorism task force. They reportedly caught wind of the man's intentions, while tracking is purchases of grenades.

Amana Times Square FBI
"amana" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

05:18 min | 2 years ago

"amana" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And a lot of the Amana semina-, try and say this delicately, a lot of these mortgage brokers like to beat up on banks in the sense that they say, we'll banks don't know what they're doing when it comes to mortgages, and they, you gotta deal with us. We're going to give you a better deal in this kind of stuff, and I've never really liked that because I think that, you know, in, in any kind of business, I think that you should always focus on the positive things that you do. And here you are you're saying that market Bank is going to celebrate their seventy fifth year obviously know what you're doing. And obviously, you don't stick around for seventy five years unless you're invested in the neighborhood, unless you're community oriented. And one of the things you talk about is the fact that your Bank is more human, right? You're. You're more connected to the people that you serve, perhaps than just some mortgage company. That's in an office of, of a low rise or something like that. Absolutely. Absolutely. So we're obviously, like you said a local neighborhood Bank, so we have local decision making. When you apply for a loan with me. It's being processed is being underwritten locally here in Orland park. It's not being, there's not a computer generated approval. You're dealing with somebody halfway across the country to process and under a your loan. Right. Right. You've been doing this a long time. There's been a lot of changes in the whole loan process. Right. When it comes to things that you need. I mean, certainly some regulations that you as bankers now and mortgage companies mortgage brokers have to follow very different than it was ten or fifteen years ago, are there things that people maybe are listening or thinking about doing some type of transaction like that, that they need to consider, you know, either before they come give you a call or during that process. We'll a couple of things. First of all, obviously. Right. There's a lot of regulation changes. It's constantly evolving. One thing that we strive on here at Marquette Bank is to make the process very streamline were available responsive. We have a team of experts we're lending aggressively throughout Chicago land. You know, whether it's a home equity line of credit, whether it's a residential mortgage, owner-occupied investment commercial real estate mixed-use multifamily apartment buildings were definitely lending aggressively. And we are putting the customer first I would imagine that there is a fair amount of pride in a lot of transactions that you maybe are part of in helping people, whether it's loan consolidation or home equity line. To be able to help achieve that, right? And show them how to go. So take me through the process. Let's, let's say let's say somebody, you know, they've been living in their home for a while. And maybe they want to consider a refinance or maybe a home equity line of credit. What's that process like? Well, first of all, like I said, I take pride in the fact that I'm available and responsive. So whether it's the weekend, whether it's the evening okay to take some time off. Mike gotta have balance in our life. We can't just work all the time. Look at these people we'll never get them to leave unless we give them tickets to the game. That's, that's what my family tells me. Listen to that. But I mean, what's that process like they call you up and say, okay mic. I need a home equity line because let's say they call you on a Tuesday to Saturday. I'd like to call Mike on a Tuesday. And a what's the first thing that you tell them what's going to happen in that process? Well, first of all, I listen to what their needs, are, you know what their situation is the process would be very easy, and typically just a quick conversation over the phone. Whether it's ten twenty minutes listening, their situation, giving my recommendation taking the application, the, the process can be done very easily over the phone Email through our secure online portal, and the entire process for home equity line of credit can take as quickly as two to three weeks. Wow. That's great. And where are we right now as far as the market goes? I mean is is money, still affordable in the respect of I mean interest rates, obviously, come and go up and down, and we certainly have a lot going on in the markets, these days, have you noticed some consistency in, in rates for people obviously, rates are still historically, very low and, you know, our product is very competitive. So I mean we offer a six month fixed rate promotion for one point nine nine, which is incredibly low, and then it would revert to the primary, which is five and a half still relatively low as well. Right, right. One of the things I know with Marquette Bank, we were talking about in the notes is the fact that the Bank itself when he talks about community and availability, ATM's, nobody carries cash anymore. And, and you guys which I was really surprised to see.

Marquette Bank market Bank Mike Amana Orland park Chicago seventy five years ten twenty minutes fifteen years seventy fifth three weeks six month
The Hypnotic Effect Of White Noise

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 2 years ago

The Hypnotic Effect Of White Noise

"Today. White noise machines and sound apps abound. For those in search of a better night's sleep background white noise can help some people sleep quality by minimizing the length of time. It takes them to get to sleep. So what exactly is white noise on consistent signal? That's produced. Equal intensities across all frequencies, Yale at least across those that we can hear when we're trying to fall asleep. White noise can create a masking effect that block sudden changes in sound that's interesting because usually our brains only arouses from sleep when a sudden rupture of sound creates an inconsistency in the room or somewhere nearby. So white noise helps to cancel out those bursts of noise benefit benefits, people most when they're settling down the sleep and a two thousand seventeen study researchers at Harvard found. That subjects who listened to white noise while falling asleep actually fell asleep and around sixteen to twenty minutes, this sleep onset period was about forty percent shorter than for those who didn't listen to white noise while they does off that tunnel Amana time that these people slapping didn't change based on whether they listen to white noise a fan or rain shower sound loop might help some people get to sleep, but it won't help them sleep longer. The real benefit of using white noise to improve your sleep is that reduces amount of time. It takes to does off if you have trouble falling asleep. Why noise can also promote deeper and less fragmented sleep because it insulates against noise outside. So that you get better quality wrist. This moment of science comes from Indiana University on the whereabout a moment of size dot org. I'm Don glass, and I'm ca- Sander.

Ca- Sander Don Glass Harvard Indiana University Twenty Minutes Forty Percent
Lyra McKee: 'New IRA' admits killing of journalist

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:15 min | 2 years ago

Lyra McKee: 'New IRA' admits killing of journalist

"Last thursday. Twenty nine year old journalist Lyra Mckee was shot dead in Londonderry twenty one years after the Good Friday agreement was signed to bring peace to Northern Ireland yesterday. A group called the new IRA released a statement taking responsibility for the killing and offering it sincere apologies to liars family who holding her funeral today to find out more about the situation on the protests that followed liars murder, I'm joined by Rebecca black who's a journalist with the Press Association based in Belfast, Rebecca who are the new IRA and holiday different from other branches of the group. Morning there and the IRA they're a dissident Republican dissident Irish Republican terrorist group, but they Kim together to eleven grew together. A lot of these smaller groups that were sort of sloughs ING steam and the come together though, they're small numbers. They have being described as the threats by the police service of Northern Ireland's some of their members were involved with real array, which listeners will probably remember, and they responsible for the ball in nineteen ninety which which killed a lot of people. What has the public's response being to the group's admission of guilt? Well, just order discuss. I think the statement yesterday came quite a few days after it was very much enough to fold on an even though it shouldn't apology still seeking to justify what it has done. So buro- responses being. It's not enough. If you're issue any sort of statement, it should be that you're going to spy on the late stage. What would what possible justification can there be? What do they say? Well in their Russian they're blaming the police service and on the on the night. It's all on the night. That killed 'em was a police operation going on. There were searching Heis and based on intelligence and Abida terrorist suspects. The police have combined actually since then and said the review intelligence before the search and they're perfectly happy. It was the jet on should have gone ahead. But these dissident Republicans they say the by the peace coming into an area such as Creggan, and it some way provocative that they're suppressing them. They're perfectly entitled to riots Super Four lire Schultz and was ride in helping that was that was quite a number of petrol bombs thrown up police, and then in the battle this Amana merged, but yet in their Russia there, they think it's acceptable to close riots on to ultimately their Jackson to any sort of any sort of doctors objecting to out of being part of the United Kingdom and there. Of the mindset that learned Heil do Coyote violence until Northern Ireland's part of the United Ireland and their their philosophy. And is there any sense that this sympathy for that point of view, and that people aren't supporting extremists on either side? Well, very very little sympathy far. I mean, it was very different buck in the nineteen seventies. When the provisional IRA were going because they did have somewhat support. This group has very little support. I think after the carrying of killing of narrow in particular, a young female journalist who was competing political opinion chill. All she was doing was just watching that night. That's close to even more discussed. A main there seems to be even a split within the discipline grip themselves because ever since Thursday there have been a number of incidents where Petra ball miss that side, a dissident members Heiss the shots fired another person's heist in Lurgan county, my yesterday, do they seem to be disagreement even within themselves as you said, we know that Staunton the power-sharing agreement broke down of two years ago. I wonder how far the up since of a working assembly stoking, more extreme fringe groups.

Northern Ireland Rebecca Black Lyra Mckee Londonderry KIM Belfast Murder Press Association Creggan Lurgan County United Ireland Petra Heil United Kingdom Staunton Amana Schultz Russia Jackson Twenty Nine Year
Florida man executed for 1992 murder of 63-year-old court clerk

The South Florida Morning Show

00:35 sec | 2 years ago

Florida man executed for 1992 murder of 63-year-old court clerk

"And Florida executed Amana last night via lethal injection is convicted of killing a Miami-Dade court clerk in a robbery attempt. Twenty six years ago. Fifty five year old Jose Antonio humans became the second person this year to be put to death at Florida state prison with the state's new controversial three drug lethal injection Jimenez was sentenced to death for the nineteen ninety two fatal beating and stabbing of sixty three year olds Phyllis menas in her Miami apartment. The US supreme court rejected his last-minute appeal, and it was pronounced dead at nine forty eight Thursday night, his last meal was a Cuban

Florida Phyllis Menas Miami-Dade Robbery Jose Antonio Jimenez United States Miami Twenty Six Years Sixty Three Year Fifty Five Year
Princess Who Dat??

Anchor Entertainment Rundown

03:49 min | 2 years ago

Princess Who Dat??

"It's a recess, and I saw stars born and now I spend most of my time thinking about how I can meet and befriend Bradley Cooper's dog. That was his real dog that dog is so cute and such a good actor. Where's that? Dogs? Vanity Fair cover. Speaking of Doug famous, it's time for the news or as I like to call it your recess from the real news. Here we go. This is an early TMZ report and I won't lie. I am resisting it based purely on my emotions, but it has been reported that Pete Davidson and Arianna 'Grande have called off their engagement. The sentimental part of me hopes that they somehow make it through this. But the part of me that retains information is remembering the joke p Davidson made on SNL about tampering with Ariana GRANDE as birth control in order to get her pregnant and trapper at which point I thought girl. You need to get in control of this situation. Take that bony tail and gently shoe this man away. Adele posted a rave review to her social media of the Drake concert. She attended this week to which Drake replied, quote, I love this woman and she came to the show. Thank God. Nobody told me or I would have been shook and quote, which made me think about whether or not I could do various tasks. While Adele watched me. I think I could talk. I could maybe tell jokes, but I couldn't do anything requiring basic motor functions like I could offer Adele some tea, but I couldn't realistically make it. I would just pour hot water and sugar cubes everywhere, and then smile at her until she left Stacey dash who was once Dion from clueless, but is now a meaner more conservative version of Dion from clueless. Got married recently to a man named Jeffrey Marty who looks like a knockoff version of Sean Hannity and promises to drag her even further into the sunken place. Good luck with everything stays speaking of which on rose. Amana, Galt new men. The mayor of the sunken place is back on the press junket with news stories about the White House and particularly unpleasant details about the president's relationship to his daughter. But I feel like if we accept this gossip, I'm Arosa will take it. As a tacit acceptance of her re entrance into mainstream America and as almost every bachelor contestant ever has at some point said, I see that you're ready to move forward, but I'm just not there yet. Meanwhile, across the pond, there was another Royal wedding starring someone named Princess Eugenie, but I'm gonna treat it like the most recent Star Wars film and just ignore it. Learn from Star Wars, Royal family. You gotta space these things out more. Now, in theory, if Drake had known that Adele was at his concert and he was able to shake off his shook nece. He could have invited her onstage for a duet. I would love a version of take care with Adele instead of riana mainly because Riyan is just lying. She will not take care of Drake, she will toy with his affections and then leave on a party boat in the dead of night. Take care guys either Livia Harewood and I will catch you next time until. Then recess adjourned. Cast you just heard was published with anchor. Got something you want to say to the creator of this show, send them a voice message using the anchor app free for IOS an Android.

Adele Drake Arianna 'Grande Bradley Cooper Ariana Grande TMZ Livia Harewood Pete Davidson Sean Hannity Doug Dion Riyan Princess Eugenie Jeffrey Marty Amana P Davidson White House
Hokkaido Earthquake: Rescue Operations Start Amid Threats of Aftershocks, Landslides

English News - NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

Hokkaido Earthquake: Rescue Operations Start Amid Threats of Aftershocks, Landslides

"Japanese seismological authorities say the northern perfect. Your kite o. has been jolted by more quakes since the major quake struck three days ago. Amana chewed six point, seven earthquake hit the region on Thursday. The epicenter was located in either the highest level of says, making city on the country scale Ozzy or to set was recorded in the town of Ousama. The Japan meteorological agency says that more than one hundred forty tremors were failed in areas close to the epicentre before six AM on Sunday. It says the jokes are obliged to be

Japan Hokkaido North Korea United States Akhter Of Hokkaido Williams Tennis Hokkaido Electric Kim Jon Japan Railway NHK South Korea NFL Amana Hukou Abbas Self Defense Forces Ozzy
"amana" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Amana was spouse these stupid ideas would have been laughed off the stage in this country just a few years ago but after a generation raised on drugs and propaganda after eight years of the pied piper of marxism barack obama and his fellow travelers in the media these fringe ideas these radical ideas these extremist ideas that bernie is crowing about our in fact now in checked into the american way of life bernie says we're at a pivotal moment in history and he wants to run for the presidency by a spouse seeing these vile ideas that lead to three million human skulls in cambodia then led to sixty million deaths in the soviet union that lead to death of destruction across the planet whenever these ideas of equality equality are sold to the masses and just remember what i told you at the beginning of the show the very same people who now you hate because they have all the money and the better women and the nicer shoes in the better cars they will be running the system no matter who wins and no matter what the system is those at the top and that type will wind up at the top again and those of you on the bottom will still be on the bottom that's why you're on the bottom now and that's why you'll be on the bottom forever and you want to count your lucky stars that you have the largess of we the taxpayer today to pay for everything that you would joy in this nation all right people listen to what i have to say there is a dance of death in the west and actual death in the middle east courtesy of the islamic fascists meanwhile obama who i called the caesar in the white house this was written in government zero meanwhile the caesar in the white house entertains himself with a thousand sycophants partying on behind closed doors as if the islamic fascist hand will not touch him he thinks he's protected from this new plague the black death of radical islam we're facing something the west hasn't had to deal with since the wars of religion in the.

Amana barack obama bernie cambodia soviet union white house eight years
"amana" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

Rantin' and Ravin'

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Rantin' and Ravin'

"Amana china into this nigger and the reality is i'm not i he can be all his shit if if i'm not attracted i'm not attracted to spark show and over time even if women get with men that they may not necessarily be attracted to front over time you can develop an attraction for somebody that you were not necessarily attracted to but attraction is not to be dismissed because you don't wanna put it up on the same level as a motion connection with somebody because attraction is a form of a motion it's a feeling i will see this year i don't think it's necessarily the same thing but you basically you said a great point about that i get is a feeling i have to have something for you to be attracted to want to mess with you but i don't know i mean i've slept with strangers of head of actions strangers don't know anything about them and probably don't know anything about them now to be honest okay so let me say this woman slain me yom please and i'm gonna everybody i'd like that it's the yam em's blaming one of the one of the biggest since we are talking about past situations and shit like that and unfortunately or maybe fortunately i have not had a lot of partners so for me when you go well this person keeps coming back up because i don't have i have not had a lot of sexual partners and listen i i don't poohpoohed that i don't wanna bunch of men saying they put the dick inside me now i've sucked my share of the but i will to everybody.

Amana
"amana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A country that is supposed to be progressive how we tell women at forty that they are no longer useful and film and you have to stop and say why why is it okay why has it always been okay for people to say so how does it feel to turn forty and know that you're not gonna work anymore but they would never do that to a man men their careers start become really juicy like my character at at forty and you know i've spent all this time having to fight and buck the system to just get a role like this data's wrong we just have a lot of work socially to be seen as equal at even to allow allow women to get older we don't we do not allow women to be seen as beautiful as they get older i have really smart female friends that have said men age better but they don't h better this is what we have been taught and i even said to my friend you know you and your husband or the same age and i have to tell you you look a lot better than but she takes great win women have to work we work so hard we work so hard because if we don't if we don't we'll we'll be demeaned on amana even allowed you know they can get older they can get a little panch they can get gray hair they can lose their hair they can get crackly looking wrinkles on their face and we say they're handsome and wise handsome and wise and sexy and rugged and powerful but we don't even allow women to be powerful we don't even like women that are powerful i don't even know that that's positive connotation for a woman you know what that's just insanity it is it's crazy if it's a powerful character the characters obviously going to be unlikable it's not it there's a very strange concept and psychological way of demeaning women and bad that is what i would hope would would be included in the times up as well you you've played so many different parts in so many different films as i know it's hard to say what is your favorite of all the roles you've played what do you find which ones do you find the most challenging and the ones that meant the most to you.

amana
"amana" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Woman in a marriage that amana that a husband and a husband is the same as a man in a wife in a marriage to the kids there is no moral difference whatsoever now there's was a little bit of debate over there over the last couple of thousand years here in our society about that okay but here's here's what's interesting so they argue the morals on that that there is no difference an it can vary from case to case by the way of course yes what what they say two then they argue in the same argument in the same fight benefits well those benefits are based on what the morals of it think about social security social security being able to to inherit the benefits of the high your social security uh benefits in other words if your sponsor or if your spouse rather passes away you inherit those higher benefits oh wait that's morality so you get to assign morality to part of your argument and then totally dismiss it in the other part of your argument because that's what it became a bow will spouses gatt certain consideration and certain benefits and because we can't legally mary we don't get those same benefits well those benefits in some cases are based in morals there is some kind of moral values examined roku that entire equation so you argue for the moral values of one side of it and against it in the same argument and the same fight in another and that that's just it it it it comes down to it i think when you look at the fundamentals of of assigning all of this we're now the fourteenth amendment is the government treatment not the protection i i honestly wonder if we are getting to that point it does this get us closer to the fights along the way get us closer to something like a national sales tax of basically getting the government out of all of it not no not as fewer people pay taxes there's and there's the bigger problem with the gop plan fewer people will be paying into it it's not going to hit them as heart eight six six nine zero.

social security sales tax amana gop thousand years
"amana" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on KGO 810

"Strange man knowing statistically men kill are the killers of most women i mean obviously not all men till all women but it is this this this threat i mean i'm i'm not worried walking on the street if i see another woman i'm worried walking down the street possibly if i see another man and it's were it's an insane kind of a world we live in where we both need to attract amana and at the same time one of those is the biggest threat to the other gender uh but an out of my question what are called a lot of the guys i work lurks block aligned your chance group then why do we tolerate this behavior from other met why do we let other does get away with it and again if you go back to life 1960 eric television they're guy who were a brace show the guys who worked for michigan us guy violence they were never the start they were never the central character um but again we each shifted and what we promote what we condition you dire bowl are ideal did not setting well we now seen him we need to start promoting the good guys once again you know the good guys do that the girl sounds and help that if you think about what they're going to sherry one may uh uh turkey absolutely andreas moller therapist author on books about men and masculinity i'll be tweeting out your article as well thank you so much for your time good are you proud of our i will coming out the wells fargo scandal continues there is even more allegations about retaliation against whistle blowers joined in denial by one of those whistle blowers and why i wanna ask him he's giving of traditional currencies going to bitcoin all bitcoin i don't buy bitcoin but we're gonna find all all about that next.

amana eric television bitcoin michigan andreas moller
"amana" Discussed on REAL 92.3

REAL 92.3

03:26 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on REAL 92.3

"Alessia there's no emme spent given gene bailey when a daily pay i wanna be moved iran on tuesday even amana wherever tuesday ready has me keep it up david pogue guido i said when he ties my conley king county fun biondi plan lays guinea he showed and the manila government hominid pastukhov oversee i know ginnie radio now when he come man often ago this philadelphia's found his body won't hand iran on heroin use them an amana wherever tuesday she didn't ready you chas me keep it up on there is no mm spin it will be one melee daily pay and a move on dino as a yoko ono linux away i don't want you want your it oh by the way not one away mention is made in midoctober me candy management unanimous you'll pay for you remember nineteen and i did this you'll cameron i know debbie maddening technique jim visit did when upholding the what you may you there let the exit only lane on heroin used given amana wherever tuesday he did ready which has made keep it up there's no the spent eamon bailey when mean we are ninety two three la's on for hip.

david pogue guido philadelphia linux heroin eamon bailey gene bailey iran amana manila debbie jim
"amana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Then this this second thing relate to it i guess too big to fail regulations but we like to call it but you know basically a regulation wants banks to have a certain amana dact that is not deposit related and because wells fargo is such a strong deposittaking had sort of that in a it's it's it's actually a stronger profile but because they had to sort of go this other way an issue higherclass stat those are that those are sort of two issues that have impacted they're marching at the other banks have not had to deal with as much how much is wells fargo also suffering from increased competition for lending sense of a second even have the classic investment banks the world goldman sachs saying we want to get more into lending and that's the bread and butter of laws fargo so the other big issue said this is sort of an issue across the industry but we also cited whilst bargain quarter in terms of overall slowing loan growth and one of the areas that hit is commercial an industrial on growth and uh part of that is a higher pay damnedest banks are tapping the capital market says some of that is competition but some of that is also just the fact that we have credit spreads which are so tight i got yields that are very low and south banks tapping the capital markets paying off learned and then keep in mind minute bring backed that net interest margin issue that a lot of the sensitivity with interest margins is there are has been those commercial and industrial lawns because they price right away a lot of them are tied to short raves and so those are they area that are getting paid down then do you have less senstitivity to i'm the short rate side in on the other side of things investors are increasingly looking at longterm interest rates in our we had a big jump after the election people are very excited um but because there's been a sort.

capital markets interest rates amana wells fargo goldman sachs
"amana" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Short Story Long

"And years later now when i get an angel investment opportunity i think i'll double the scrutinize it oh yeah i can only amana a level more sophisticated than average rich guy the ahha like i've done they've utilizes the riot i've made a lot of reference calls i know how to make a reference go have built a lot of financial models yeah i've seen a lot of financial statements and so all that experience ended up being something that at the time i was like all their work in me to heart they're not bamyan ah alec back on how much harder was so misguided it's that perspective you know but it's i will say once again like in the study of success in what makes people successful it's like one of the biggest poisons is that like over uh it's expectations but it's also like its overvaluing yourself yes and that's where a lot of people just kill them it's like it almost seems like you kind of dodged these poisons along the path right and there's these poisonous leg mindsets that can get you at any one can crushed your entire career like a failure like yours big enough can crush somebody derailed their entire thing the other dad not believing in them could derail their whole thing uh even that thought of that bitterness that starts the build with some people of i'm not making enough and you'll what fuck this i'm going to quit yeah and it's like little do you know in the grand scheme of things now you're a happy father very successful this of you look back at that and say i should have been paying them it's like the difference of.

amana
"amana" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"amana" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Amana won a nobel prize for something he was nobody zero and invention a creation of the radical left that cultivated him for years and years and years in hawaii and then of columbia they picked them they handpicked them he was the perfect man for the time to push the antiamerican agenda and he he spent eight straight years doing what got him where he was which was dividing people turning first against the police in boston if you remember you remember that obama sowed the seeds of racial enmity in this country for eight straight years with his henchman eric holder one after the other they turned race against race sex against sex old against young all right let's hear what the people out there i've had to say about my headline on my website michael savage dot com when i wrote over the weekend actually was yesterday national felons league nfl overpaid and great spit on u s we got all sorts of replies on the on the your twitter feed one of the most profound is the picture of a us marine holding himself up during a national anthem by his arms holding onto the arms of his wheelchair because he has no legs unlike these overpaid thugs he lost his legs in iraq and he came to a game and while the national anthem was being played this man brought tears for the eyes of the world as he held himself up with his hands not his legs because he understands the anthem is about the nation these antiamerican thugs are the lowest form of humanity as far as i am concerned they're not heroes their spoiled ingrates that's all they are it's as simple as that there's another picture i want you to try to fight its on michael savage dot com as well as on my twitter feed that someone put together real break your heart it'll rip your heart out it's of a woman lying in.

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"amana" Discussed on Capital Allocators

Capital Allocators

01:32 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Capital Allocators

"And so we we have that discipline also which is forcing us to cross tease dot eyes and a lot of times you get halfway through a spreadsheet check it out amana i've seen enough i think all of those disciplines help and what does it take for one of those four name c meet the 400 do the work on thirty forty therefore you're going to buy what it what are the winner those special characteristics thing at the confluence of everything i i get kind of in in one sense i'm not a greedy individual for money but i'm greedy for superior businesses management valuation longterm run a longterm runway i i've won all that so i you know that's the way at the end of the day when we summarise doesn't have the superior business doesn't have the management that can get an eccentric cetera so the of the successful investments you made what have been the most important characteristics of a superior business well we talk about you know it's reflected in high profitability right whether we look at operating return which is even over operating net assets of the business to see what is the real driver of that of that fact what's the profitably of the factory of the retail and whatever right but they the key criteria in that whole thing the way you get high profitability was with pricing power and pricing power is phrase that's kind of loosely used on wall street.

amana
"amana" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

01:59 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"The sixth the is the put up with amana my education amount on my learning deadly rko the voice of boston fugitive found buried in backyard i'm denise alan membrane yo w rko news court documents show a man wanted in the 1980s killing of a pennsylvania police chief lived in a secret room and his exwife's home and told her to bury him in the backyard when he died in 1997 the remains of donald oh eugene web were found buried in a yard in dartmouth massachusetts authorities say web fatally shot saxon burke police chief gregory adams in december 1980 the state legislature today is expected to pass a rewrite of the massachusetts marijuana law the house and senate yesterday approved at committee's report that sets a tax rate on recreational pot from twelve to twenty percent warm and humid mike ellis has your forecast for this afternoon sunshine will mix with developing clouds it's going to be a very warm humid day is near eighty eight partly to mostly cloudy tonight perhaps a shower or thunderstorm mainly late lows near seventy two four tomorrow a mixture of sun and cloud house slight risk of the thunderstorm the high near ninety one jackie murphy takes a look at your traffic route twenty 24 south is where we begin with a rollover in the woods the right lane is closed before route fortyfour anton and we've got a more than to buy back out beyond 495 roux one 28 norther slow 135 in debt 'em up to the route nine works out expressway south is slow sabah and help pass freeport northbound side is still a tough crawl from east melton most of the weight of the tip tunnel get traffic and weather whenever with the w rko app denise alan membrane yo w rko news mary my friends one is the best time to plant a tree well twenty years ago javed javed javate i i didn't plant patrice was the second best time now today let bill kelley yelp you plant a tree for your retirement he'll put you on the right path to grow port that and shield your retirement nest egg he's.

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"amana" Discussed on Twinovation

Twinovation

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Twinovation

"Like us 2999 it's called the gauntlet we're trying to get into targets always loyal to hager threads with water blitz gauntlett all right right right i'll i nailed i nailed a new right in the side she had one more to go and i was hiding behind when it had by my back thought was done i just fucking nailed or i that's that idea was s someone posted the video and audio a lot of he where posts and was like also it's easier it's harder to throw an easier to duck while showed dozen do the people on top of the hill get unlimited balloons yahya while we i started in negative with we limited and because we run out of blends we did for per person yeah sounds that sounds about right it's ounce fair kazan you know you got but then you have people hoarding it in slovenia i'm a little worried people that a succeed while you know nixon immediately i got to maybe amana succeeded and might have been it may just been what's the trick the old the the exact skinny keep your eyes on the ball a lotta a lotta shutter step of a lotta shudder stepping a lotta faking like you're going for the thing making everyone throw akunov than gone when they're not ready near airline like fall and got odd yeah yeah i was rolling ivan i mean if it actually is also like it could also be corporate into a workout because you're doing a lot of lang lateral quickening so it's all slick a game for moms vehicle my kids are exercising here this is yoked the came afecei should've the health and fitness industry is something that i paid very close to touch and that's what i'm tapping into so again 2999 from phnom letting who ran through the rules ya i open the florida questions.

kazan slovenia nixon afecei hager amana florida
"amana" Discussed on Twinovation

Twinovation

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Twinovation

"Like us 2999 it's called the gauntlet we're trying to get into targets always loyal to hager threads with water blitz gauntlett all right right right i'll i nailed i nailed a new right in the side she had one more to go and i was hiding behind when it had by my back thought was done i just fucking nailed or i that's that idea was s someone posted the video and audio a lot of he where posts and was like also it's easier it's harder to throw an easier to duck while showed dozen do the people on top of the hill get unlimited balloons yahya while we i started in negative with we limited and because we run out of blends we did for per person yeah sounds that sounds about right it's ounce fair kazan you know you got but then you have people hoarding it in slovenia i'm a little worried people that a succeed while you know nixon immediately i got to maybe amana succeeded and might have been it may just been what's the trick the old the the exact skinny keep your eyes on the ball a lotta a lotta shutter step of a lotta shudder stepping a lotta faking like you're going for the thing making everyone throw akunov than gone when they're not ready near airline like fall and got odd yeah yeah i was rolling ivan i mean if it actually is also like it could also be corporate into a workout because you're doing a lot of lang lateral quickening so it's all slick a game for moms vehicle my kids are exercising here this is yoked the came afecei should've the health and fitness industry is something that i paid very close to touch and that's what i'm tapping into so again 2999 from phnom letting who ran through the rules ya i open the florida questions.

kazan slovenia nixon afecei hager amana florida
"amana" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

Maltin On Movies

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Maltin On Movies

"Before we started shooting to spend a lot of time together and talk everything through so that by the time we got there it just was like we're just living this now this is just the cameras on and were just living um so that was really the experience of it we shot so much in then often what he would do as he would leave the camera rolling so we would do a lot of improv before and after the scene so it never felt like we weren't shooting it always followed after and it was just always flowing and always going and it wasn't there wasn't a lot of stopping end reflecting it was just sort of in it and then the the first showing a to the festival i gotta bald my eyes so wonderful my mom was there and my sister was there and they were all crying it was like it was amazing really was well you but it's there's a film that's worthy of that um it was for me i mean it was totally lifechanging experience for me so i will always be so eternally grateful for the experience of doing that movie the did you feel the difference in terms of how you were perceived your how what doors were open to you and your making that fill i certainly felt the difference in how i was perceived i think it was like come it took a couple of years for to actually start showing itself in my career though sorry my dog is no i'm of says i i leading to what you're saying is serious staring at your dog ambrose shas who is the cutest thing in the world right now she is pretty cute but yeah it was funny it was funny i think there was a little if i i was like a little bit like oh no is this actually going to make any difference or amana started getting more of these kind of rules because they didn't really come right away because it was such a small movie and people in the industry saw but people out in the world didn't really see it runs so the challenge always fill yeah.

amana
"amana" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"amana" Discussed on Did She Say That with Sonnie Johnson

"Okay your pomeranian as who pomeranian his neck oh come come check on you when you an old folk's home you feel me your pomeranian is not gonna pick you up on sunday and take you to charge today i want you to the store after word your pomeranian is not going to do that for you you're selfish were to reap what you so because in the end with all your success when you turn around and look and realize you don't get amana shared with you don't have no kids know seats the passing also you just said now by yourself in all your success like what do you movies keep you want there's a paycheck somehow make the other side of the pillow a little warmer for you so i told my daughter don't be like these benches had had ended up with a little bit i said listen to me the greatest thing i did in my life was to have you okay and this is coming from minds you doctors told me i would never have occurred doctors say you never have one is no way you make it fourterm pregnancy so every time i look at my daughter what i see is what the doctors told me could happy what the world say could be done that's what i look at when i see my daughter and i told my daughter i want you to see to see if if i leave it up to these bitches you'll be implant parenthood.

amana